Brenton Holt ERKENS-GOSS

Brenton Holt ERKENS-GOSS

AKA  GOSSY

Late of  ?

Victoria Police Academy Squad Class #  15/2016-17

Victoria Police Force

Regd. #  42447

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 12 May 2017

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Senior Constable

StationsWilliamstown, Hamilton, Portland Police Station – Drug Investigation – Death

Service:  From 12 May 2017?  to 28 June 2019 =  2+ years Service

Awards: No find on It’s An Honour

Born: Sunday  12 April 1992 in Alice Springs, N.T.

Died on: Friday  28 June 2019 during the afternoon

Age: 27

Cause: Depression – Suicide – (method ?)

Event location: ?, Victoria

Event date: Friday  28 June 2019

Funeral date: Monday  8 July 2019 @ 1pm

Funeral location: Hamilton Performing Arts Centre, Victoria

Wake location: Hamilton Performing Arts Centre, Victoria

Funeral Parlour:

Buried at: Cremated

Memorial located at:

Brenton ERKENS-GOSS

Brenton ERKENS-GOSS

Brenton ERKENS-GOSS
2009

 

Pete Erkens-Goss & Brenton ERKENS-GOSS
Pete Erkens-Goss & Brenton ERKENS-GOSS

 

renton ERKENS-GOSS
RIP Brenton Erkens-Goss, park runner A5840248, we will miss you 💙💔
Brenton ERKENS-GOSSA
15 February 2019

Brenton Holt ERKENS-GOSS

Brenton Holt ERKENS-GOSS

Brenton Holt ERKENS-GOSS

BRENTON is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

 

Yesterday the #fightingptsdvicpol campaign was informed that one of our VicPol members had taken his own life in the afternoon.

Senior Constable Brenton Erkens-Goss, # 42447, of Hamilton Police Station ( Victoria ) hopefully you can now rest in peace.

Brenton represented Victoria Police and attended the inaugural World LGBT Conference for Criminal Justice Professionals in Amsterdam in 2017 .

Constable Brenton Erkens-Goss was one of more than 100 Victoria Police LGBTI Liaison Officers working to build rapport and trust with the LGBTI community and help tackle prejudice-motivated crimes and family violence.

Brenton was supportive in raising awareness for mental health issues, and he recently represented the Fighting PTSD VicPol campaign during the surf to surf running event in Warrnambool with his colleagues.

To his family and work mates, my sincere condolences. Please look after each other during this sad time.

I urge all members and retired veterans to please reach out to family, friends or any of your work colleagues before making that final decision.

Please everyone check in on each other and if anyone needs assistance please utilise the contact number on our website www.protectingtheprotectors.com

Police Welfare 92473344
TPAV 1800 800537
Lifeline 13 11 14
Beyond Blue 1300 224 636

https://www.facebook.com/pg/MandatorysentenceforpeoplewhokillPoliceOfficers/posts/


 

Brenton was born in Alice Springs 12 April 1992.
He always had a passion to join the police force after high school but was told he was to young and needed more experiences.

Soon, in 2009, he joined the SES in Rockhampton, Qld, before the family moved down south in 2010 and, there Brenton started with the SES in Mount Gambier, South Australia.
In 2013 while he was still waiting to join the Victoria Police Force, he applied for Protective Services Officer and graduated in squad 15 on September 2013 .

As a PSO, he worked in a few different places – such as Milton, Sunshine and out of the Victoria Police Centre training new PSO‘s.

Finally he joined VicPol and enlisted at the Victoria Police Academy in Squad 15 2016/17 of which he was a Deputy Guard Leader for the Squad’s Graduation day – that being on Friday 12 May 2017.

Brenton worked in Williamstown and then Hamilton before finally going to the drug investigation unit in Portland, Victoria until his death.

Brenton remained with the SES right up until he died, aged 27.

Brenton will be sorely missed by his family and many, many friends.

 

 

 


 

Police praise officer’s work in forging relationships with LGBTIQ community

 

Senior Victorian police have praised the work local officer Brenton Erkens-Goss made to forging relationships between the police and the LGBTIQ+ communities following the officer’s unexpected death.

Constable Erkens-Goss passed away on Friday, he took his own life. Prior to joining the Victorian Police, Erkens-Goss had worked as a Protective Service Officer.

Assistant Commissioner Neil Paterson, who is also the executive champion of Victorian Police Pride, praised the contribution First Constable Erkens-Goss made to building relationships between the police and LGBTIQ+ community.

“Brenton was a member of VP Pride and was a proud and out gay man who was truly valued by his work colleagues and the community he served.

“Prior to graduating as a sworn member on 12 May 2017, Brenton spent a number of years as a PSO where his enthusiasm for policing shone through. Brenton was part of the Victoria Police contingent that attended the first World LGBT+ Criminal Justice Professionals Conference in Amsterdam in August 2016.” Assistant Commissioner Neil Paterson said.

“As a member of the local Hamilton community, Brenton made many friends both at the station and in the community.”

Western Region Superintendent Glenn Owen echoed the praise for the officer.

“Brenton worked at Hamilton uniform and was recognised for his investigative talents, recently being selected to work at the Portland Tasking Team. His supervisors and work friends describe him as a highly competent, intelligent and enthusiastic member who was destined to become a detective. Brenton was also well respected in the local community and volunteered as a member of the SES.” Superintendent Owen said.

As one of 100 officers in the Victorian Police trained as a Gay and Lesbian Liaison Officer Constable Erkens-Goss had previously shared his thoughts on the program with east-coast LGBTIQ publication Star Observer.

 


 

It has been stated, by family, that Brenton was at his grandmothers 90th birthday party on the previous Sunday and there was simply “no hint” of what was to happen on the proceeding Friday.

It simply leaves you wondering, for the rest of your life, what you could have possibly done to prevent this suicide if there were no, apparent, obvious signs.

Suicidal thoughts are very silent so if you know someone who suffers with depression, tread carefully with how you treat them.

 

 

Andrew Goss

20 hrs

Over recent times, I didn’t see much of my nephew, Brenton Holt… life gets away from us all.
The older we get – the busier we are.
Life changes and there are more things that take up our time, more layers to our lives.
Just because you don’t see each other as often as you’d like, doesn’t mean you love them any less.
The last time I saw Brenton was last weekend for his Grandma’s 90th Birthday lunch and I am most grateful for that.
He was happy.
Talkative.
He looked well.
We spoke a lot of our roles in the operational field and ‘compared notes’ on “cells procedures” and the strange things we’d both seen.
We laughed😊
A lot!!
He told me how much he was enjoying the job and the people he worked with.
I’d never seen Brenton so settled.
I simply did not realise, mate.
I just didn’t see it – at all.
However, I am now reminded again that every day is not a given.
It’s not guaranteed.
If anything, we all need to learn from this.
Check in on your loved ones.
Often.
Then…. they know.
They’re not alone.

To Jessy, Tony, Monica, Steve, Mel, Cathy , Wayne & Daniel, Michael & Pete…. my love and thoughts. No one is ever prepared for this so, look out for each other always.

R.I.P. Brenton 💐
You will be missed by so many.😞

#fightingptsdvicpol
#rememberingbrentonalways
#ThinBlueLine

 

 


 

Much loved Liaison officer takes own life

Victoria Police LGBTI Liaison Officer Senior Constable Brenton Erkens-Goss took his own life on Friday.

One of over 100 Victoria Police LGBTI Liaison Officers, Brenton worked diligently to tackle prejudice-motivated crimes and family violence.

Further, he worked to build rapport and trust with the LGBTI community.

The loss of the officer came about because he ‘tragically succumbed to his inner demons,’ according to a Facebook post.

Last night, Senior Constable Ben Bjarnesen posted on Facebook about the loss.

Ben is Coordinator of the Queensland Police Service LGBTI Support Network.

Absolutely devastated to learn tonight that one of our friends and colleagues from Victoria Police, Brenton Erkens-Goss took his own life yesterday.

He was such a great guy and will be dearly missed by many. Rest In Peace brother.

Fellow Police pay tribute to Senior Constable Brenton Erkens-Goss

Also, in a touching tribute to their colleague, Cop Humour Australia spoke on the loss of Brenton.

“We have received heartbreaking news that Senior Constable Brenton Erkens-Goss of Hamilton Police Station in Victoria tragically succumbed to his inner demons and took his own life yesterday afternoon.

“Brenton was a long time follower and supporter of Cop Humour Australia, which makes this even harder for us. We wish we could have done more for him, or done more to raise mental health awareness and encourage Brenton to seek help.

“Nevertheless, we hope that Brenton is now at peace.”

The page also praised Brenton’s support in raising awareness for mental health issues.

“He recently represented the Fighting PTSD Vicpol campaign during a surf to surf running event in Warrnambool with his colleagues.

“As one of the Victoria Police LGBTI Liaison Officers, Brenton worked hard to build rapport and trust with the LGBTI community, and helped tackle prejudice-motivated crimes.

“Brenton also represented Victoria Police and attended the inaugural World LGBT Conference for Criminal Justice Professionals in Amsterdam in 2017.

“From what we’ve heard and been told — Brenton was a great copper and an even greater friend, and will be missed terribly by many.

“Our sincere condolences go out to Brenton’s family, colleagues, and friends.”

The post then spoke of the importance of seeking assistance.

“Please look after one another during this devastating time.

“If you’re feeling down, please speak to someone — reach out to family, a friend, a colleague, anyone.

“When it comes to the #ThinBlueLine you never fight any fight alone, your blue family will always be there to support you.

“Rest In Peace friend and colleague, for the sun has now set. We will remember.”

Police Liaison Officers

Despite continual progress the relationship between our communities and the police is at times difficult.

However, we must remain mindful of the valuable service provided by LGBTIQ Liaison officers across the country.

If you need someone to talk to, help is available from QLife on 1800 184 527 or online at QLife.org.au, Lifeline on 13 11 14, or beyondblue on 1300 22 4636.

QN Magazine | For the latest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) news in Australia, visit qnews.com.au. Check out our latest magazines or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

https://qnews.com.au/much-loved-liaison-officer-takes-own-life-senior-constable-brenton-erkens-goss-qn-magazine/


 

 

Victoria Police and the LGBTI community

“Everyone deserves to be treated equally and be able to live in their own skin without having to hide who they truly are”

CONSTABLE Brenton Erkens-Goss is hoping to do himself out of a job.

As one of more than 100 Victoria Police LGBTI Liaison Officers (GLLOs), Const Erkens-Goss imagines a future without the need for specialised support – where there is no difference and everyone is treated equally “as a person”.

“We’re not quite there yet but we’re definitely gaining ground,” he says.

After dreaming of becoming a police officer from a young age, Const Erkens-Goss now works to ensure LGBTI interactions with Victoria Police are always fair and respectful.

“Everyone deserves to be treated equally and be able to live in their own skin without having to hide who they truly are,” he says.

The force’s relationship with LGBTI communities hit rock bottom in the Tasty nightclub in 1994. Officers detained 463 patrons for seven hours, subjecting them to strip and cavity searches.

In 2014 then-Acting Chief Commissioner Lucinda Nolan formally apologised; ushering in a new era of policing to rebuild and regain trust.

Const Erkens-Goss says it was hard to hear about the disturbing raid as part of the Academy’s training, but ultimately it was indicative of a different time and a different Victoria Police.

“Originally when I was training as a Protective Services Officer, I hid it (being gay) but now the Academy is very, very supportive,” he says.

The Academy has an LGBTI Student Network and Const Erkens-Goss’ endeavours to implement his learnings from the inaugural World LGBT Conference for Criminal Justice Professionals in Amsterdam to increase inclusiveness among members.

“Victoria Police has definitely changed in the past two years,” he says, ahead of his graduation from the Constable Qualifying Program.

“Some people have never been friends with someone who is LGBTI and (they can have an attitude that comes from) ignorance or fear. It’s hard but if you have a conversation with them they become much more understanding.”

Out in the community, that understanding is also making a real difference to people’s lives.

“In one case recently I helped a trans teenager who was experiencing family violence from her father who was withholding her medication,” Const Erkens-Goss explains.

“I mediated with her dad and helped them get counselling. Her father simply misunderstood how his daughter was feeling and didn’t understand what she was experiencing, through specialised counselling this has educated him.”

But under-reporting of prejudice-motivated crimes and family violence, especially from older LGBTI victims, still concerns Const Erkens-Goss and the LGBTI liaison officers, who can informally discuss concerns, assist through the reporting process or help advise other police colleagues.

Const Erkens-Goss says Victoria Police’s involvement in events like Pride and Midsumma is far from tokenism, and shows the organisation celebrates diversity and is respectful and there to help.

“If someone asked me about joining Victoria Police I’d say ‘go for it!’ Victoria Police is an inclusive organisation with a lot of career progression.”

Hopefully, for Const Erkens-Goss that progression includes a spot in the ranks of the sought-after Dog Squad and the eventual retirement of his LGBTI liaison badge as the blue line becomes just another part of the rainbow.

Reach out to your local LGBTI Liaison Officer (or GLLO) on 9247 6944 or melbourne.gllo@police.vic.gov.au.

Be a force for good and join Victoria Police. For more information or to apply visit https://www.policecareer.vic.gov.au/.

 


 

Portland pair remanded in custody charged with drug trafficking

Portland police Sergeant Martin Flannery said specialist units and uniform members executed search warrants at properties in Portland’s Wellington Road and Patrick Street in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

Police allegedly forced their way into the Wellington Road house after the occupants failed to open the door.

A search of the premises revealed three syringes loaded with methylamphetamine and blood, three green lasers, quantities of a white crystal substance believed to be ice and two white iPhones containing significant drug trafficking conversations.

Police also located inside a vehicle several ziplock bags containing ice, 16 grams of cannabis on top of a child’s baby seat, three digital scales, 6.5 grams of heroin, used needles and $350 cash believed to be the proceeds of crime.

A total of 6.96 grams of ice was found inside the house and vehicle.

Sergeant Flannery said a young child was present at the time of the raid. He said the child’s mother and a man were arrested at the scene.

“This is a real concern for us, the exposure of young children to that sort of lifestyle is very alarming,” he said.

Andrew Ryan, 31, and Bronwyn Noku, 35, of Wellington Road, appeared in Warrnambool Magistrates Court on Thursday.

Mr Ryan made no application for bail and was remanded in custody until June 17.

Court documents obtained by The Standard revealed Ms Noku had admitted to buying 3.5 grams of ice to sell weekly. She told police she sold one point of ice for $50.

Magistrate Franz Holzer said Ms Noku had failed to show compelling reasons why she should be released and remanded her in custody. She will appear in court the same day as Mr Ryan.

Sergeant Flannery said the Wellington Street property had been an address of interest for some time.

“Action was taken on Wednesday as a result of information received from the community, which added to our significant amount of intelligence suggesting there was a high level of drug trafficking occurring at that house,” he said.

“This is an example of the public’s good work in assisting us to remove this sort of offending from our town. Getting these drugs off the streets reduced the harm on the community.

“This has been an ongoing investigation conducted by the Southern Grampians divisional tasking team, with the warrants executed with the assistance of Portland and Hamilton crime investigation units and Portland uniform members. It has been a really positive, team effort.

“The Southern Grampians divisional tasking team has a strong focus on minimising the harm of drugs in the community. We will act on any information and use the full extent of the law deal with it.

“Anyone with information should contact Crime Stoppers or myself, Brenton Erkens-Goss and Victoria Hudson at Portland police station.”

www.standard.net.au/story/6115645/heroin-cannabis-and-ice-found-in-house-with-half-filled-syringes-and-child-present/


 

Many Shades Of Policing

Wednesday, 23 August 2017 21:35

Twenty-three years after the Tasty nightclub storm, the rainbow which emerged is only getting more vivid at Victoria Police.

On paper, Constable Brenton Erkens-Goss has the perfect background to serve the community. He’s volunteered with the State Emergency Service as a road crash rescuer and has spent countless hours talking to and helping commuters as a Protective Services Officer (PSO).

But policing is about more than just what appears on paper.

“I came out to my family when I was 21 when I had my first relationship,” he said.

“They’ve always been supportive and there was a bit of ‘yeah, we know’ when I told people.”

As one of more than 100 Victoria Police Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and gender diverse and Intersex (LGBTI) Liaison Officers (also known as GLLOs), Const Erkens-Goss uses his personal experience to provide specialised support to a community which still struggles with a high level of under-reporting crime.

“In one case recently I helped a transgender teenager who was experiencing family violence from her father who was withholding her medication,” he explained.

“I mediated with her dad and helped them get counselling.

“Her father simply misunderstood how his daughter was feeling and didn’t understand what she was experiencing, through specialised counselling this has educated him.

“I strongly believe that everyone deserves to be treated equally and be able to live in their own skin without having to hide who they are.”

Victoria Police’s relationship with LGBTI communities hit rock bottom at the Tasty nightclub in 1994, when officers detained 463 patrons for seven hours and subjected them to strip and cavity searches.

In 2014, then-Acting Chief Commissioner Lucinda Nolan formally apologised; ushering in a new era of policing to rebuild and regain trust.

Const Erkens-Goss said it was hard to hear about the disturbing raid as part of the Victoria Police Academy’s training, but ultimately it was indicative of a different time and a different Victoria Police.

“Victoria Police has definitely changed,” he said.

“After the Tasty nightclub, the LGBTI Liaison Officer program was implemented to help build rapport and also to have trained and experienced liaison officers to be there to support victims of crime who may identify as LGBTI (to either sit in an interview, take
a statement or investigate hate crime) but also as a knowledge bank to other members who may need some assistance.”

Const Erkens-Goss said Victoria Police’s involvement in events like Pride and Midsumma was far from tokenism, and shows the organisation celebrates diversity and is respectful and there to help.

The Academy also has an LGBTI Student Network and Const Erkens-Goss is working to implement his learnings from the inaugural World LGBT Conference for Criminal Justice Professionals in Amsterdam to increase inclusiveness among members.

“I always wanted to be a police officer,” he said.

“To get some practical experience of the realities of the job I worked as a road crash rescuer, which was very challenging but rewarding.”

Const Erkens-Goss also paced the train platforms as a PSO, which he said was great for gathering intel and helping people, before graduating from the Constable Qualifying Program.

And while it’s still early days, he hopes the next stage in his career is retirement – of his GLLO badge, when the need for specialised support is no longer required.

“We’re not quite there yet,” he said. “But we’re definitely gaining ground.”

Image: Const Erkens-Goss at the Police Academy.

Editorial: Anthea Cannon
Photography: John Pallot

 

GLLO/LGBTI Liaison Officers

Victoria Police has a network of liaison officers (GLLOs) who provide advice to other police and the community.

The group has more than 100 GLLOs who also attend community events and build relationships with youth and LGBTI networks.

Reach out to your local
 GLLO on 9247 6944 or at melbourne.gllo@police.vic.gov.au via email.

 

Published in the Winter 2017 edition of Police Life

https://www.police.vic.gov.au/many-shades-policing


 

 

 

 

 

 

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