Glenn Edward McENALLAY

Glenn Edward McENALLAY

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  31940[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Constable

Stations:  Attached to City East Highway Patrol

Service:  From  14 November 1997 to 3 April 2002 = 4+ years Service

Awardsposthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Valour

Born:  10 March 1976

Incident Date:  27 March 2002

Incident locationGrace Campbell Crescent, Hillside, NSW

Died on:  3 April, 2002

CauseShot – Murdered

Age:  26

Funeral date:  9 April 2002

Funeral location:  St Johns Anglican Church, Taree

Buried at:  Tuncurry Cemetery

Approximate location of murder

Constable Glenn Edward McEnallay
Glenn Edward McENALLAY

"Photo

HWP vehicle 211 with the personalised memorial number plates for Glenn Edward McEnallay.

HWP vehicle 211 with the personalised memorial number plates for Glenn Edward McEnallay.  GEM211

About 5.30pm on 27 March, 2002 the constable was driving an unmarked Highway Patrol vehicle when he began to follow a stolen vehicle. In Denison Street, Hillsdale the vehicle sped off and Constable McEnalley informed VKG of the pursuit. The stolen vehicle turned into Grace Campbell Crescent and stopped. As the police vehicle came to a halt near the stolen vehicle four offenders alighted from it and fired a number of shots at the constable from a distance of about three metres. Constable McEnalley was hit in the right side of the head and right shoulder. Other police arrived at the scene and two offenders were arrested. Constable McEnalley died of his wounds on 3 April, 2002. He was posthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Valour Award.

NSW Police Commissioner's Valour Award

The constable was born in 1976 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 14 November, 1997.   At the time of his death was attached to the City East Highway Patrol.

Location of Grave:  Portion.  Garden He, Row 120

Tuncurry Cemetery, Manning St, Tuncurry

[caption id="attachment_15938" align="aligncenter" width="510"]In loving memory of Glenn Edward McEnallay. 10 March 1976 - 3 April 2002. Died in the execution of his duty. Much loved son, brother & fiance of Judy, Bob, Troy & Amanda. Forever in our hearts. Grave plate for Glenn Edward McENALLAY

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Daily Telegraph Online wrote:
Parole hearing for cop killer Motekiai Taufahema
A MAN involved in the murder of Sydney policeman Glenn McEnallay was today refused parole.

Motekiai Taufahema, 35, is serving 11 years jail after being found guilty of Senior Constable McKennally’s manslaughter.

His bid for freedom was today rejected by the State Parole Authority.

He was one of four men convicted for the shooting murder of Constable McEnallay ten years ago.

The State Parole Authority said today they believed Taufahema has not addressed his offending behaviour and his release is not supported by the Serious Offenders Review Council (SORC).

His seven year non-parole period ended last month.

“The offender needs to be reduced in classification before progress and judgment … It is not appropriate for SPA to consider the offender for release on parole.”

Commissioner Ron Woodham opposed Taufahema’s release, saying it was not in the public interest and he had not addressed his offending behaviour.

Taufahema, found not guilty of the murder of Senior Constable McEnallay but guilty of manslaughter, was sentenced to 11 years prison.

Motekiai’s brother, John, also found not guilty of the murder of Senior Constable McEnallay but guilty of manslaughter, was last month refused parole and will not be eligible again until 2014. His full sentence is also 11 years with a non-parole period of seven years.

The Authority last month also refused parole for co-offender Meli Lagi at a private meeting. He will not be eligible for parole again until next year.

Lagi, 32, who was found not guilty of the murder of Senior Constable McEnallay but guilty of firearms offences, was sentenced to almost 13 years prison with a non-parole period of almost nine years, which expired on 2 April 2011.

The fourth co-offender, 32-year-old Sione Penisini, is serving a total sentence of 36 years and won’t be eligible for parole until 2029.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/s … 6338503645

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Court allows police killer to stay for daughter’s sake

ONE of the men jailed for manslaughter over the death of Senior Constable Glenn McEnallay has escaped deportation to Tonga even though he has spent more than half of his 21 years in Australia in prison.

The best interests of Motekiai Taufahema’s seven-year-old daughter, born after he was jailed, tipped the balance in his favour when he appealed against the cancellation of his visa. But his childless brother, Sione, 31, also convicted of McEnallay‘s manslaughter, will be sent back to the country he left aged nine.

A victims’ group says the decisions perversely reward criminals who become parents, while refugee advocates say they show the unfairness of the Migration Act’s ”character test”.

Although Motekiai Taufahema, 33, had spent 12 of 21 years here behind bars, the deputy president of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, Robin Handley, found his daughter ”loves her father and misses him” and would be devastated if he were deported.

Combined with evidence of his rehabilitation, including a non-violent response to being stabbed 10 times by a fellow prisoner, it earned him ”one last chance”.

Mr Handley rejected Sione Taufahema’s appeal on the same day, saying the high risk of him re-offending outweighed other factors. Noting that he has spent almost 10 of his 21 years here in prison, Mr Handley accepted the Federal Government’s argument that the community would expect to be protected against his violent criminal behaviour.

Asked about Sione Taufahema’s imminent arrival, a Tongan Government spokesman said in an email, ”No comment.”

The Taufahema brothers were both on parole for a brutal bashing when stopped with four stolen guns in Hillsdale in 2002. Their accomplice, Sione Penisini, shot McEnallay four times.

Both brothers were sentenced to 11 years jail after pleading guilty to manslaughter – a result McEnallay‘s father, Bob, called a ”bloody disgrace”.

Sione Taufahema‘s deportation adds to a turbulent few years for the Taufahema family. Two of his siblings, Honora and Filisione, are also in jail. Another, 18-year-old Tavita, was shot dead by police in September during an armed hold-up at the Canley Heights Hotel. Last year 16-year-old Chris Emmerson was shot dead by a visitor at the family’s Yennora home.

The father, Maunaloa Taufahema, said he was happy for Motekiai’s daughter but disappointed for Sione, whom he considered Australian, not Tongan.

”He has spent a lot of his life in Australia, and to me his behaviour was based on the Australian environment,” he said.

Both brothers have spent only a week or two in Tonga since they left as children and their close families have since moved to Australia and New Zealand.

Robyn Cotterell-Jones, from the Victims of Crime Assistance League, said both brothers should be deported as a deterrent. ”I imagine victims would feel it’s wrong that if you’re arrested for murder but you get somebody pregnant you will be able to stay here rather than be deported.”

Dr Michael Grewcock, an expert on the character test from the University of NSW, said it seemed bizarre to deport one brother and not another: ”There’s just a general lack of consistency, which is built into the process.”

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Juan Carlos HERNANDEZ

Juan Carlos HERNANDEZ

AKA CARL, CARLOS, BOMBHEAD & ROCKY
Late of ?

NSW Goulburn Academy Class #  226

New South Wales Police Force

Probationary Constable # 98201

Regd. #  23642

Uniform #  1583

Rank:  Commenced Training at the Goulburn Police Academy on 18 February 1987

Probationary Constable – appointed 15 May 1987

Constable – appointed 15 May 1988

Constable 1st Class – appointed

Final Rank = Constable 1st Class

Stations: ?, Paddington ( 10 Division ), State Protection Group Sydney ( SPG ) – Death

Service: From 18 February 1987 to 1 December 1992 = 5+ years Service

Awards: No find on It’s An Honour

Born28 July 1959

Died on:  Tuesday  1 December 1992 @ St Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst

Age: 33 years,  4 months,  3 days

CauseAccidentally Shot at Redfern SPG

Event location:  Redfern Police Academy

Event date:  Tuesday  1 December 1992

Funeral date:  4 December 1992

Funeral location: ?

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at:  Cremated.  Ashes collected.  Eastern Suburbs Memorial Park, Matraville

Memorial located at: ?

 

Juan Carlos HERNANDEZ

CARL IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


 

Funeral location: TBA


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

In 1992 Constable Hernandez was a member of the State Protection Group and a qualified firearms instructor. He was accidentally shot in the chest while testing police in their annual firearms proficiency tests at the Redfern Police Complex. Following emergency surgery Constable Hernandez died at St Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst the same day as the accident.

 

The constable was born in 1959 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 18 February, 1987. At the time of his death he was attached to the State Protection Group.


 

Touch Plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra - HERNANDEZ
Touch Plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

Kelvin Harband‎NSW Fallen Police New Member · 13 hrs · Juan Hernandez was accidentally shot in the chest while doing firearms training as an Instructor at the Redfern Police Academy on 1 December 1992. Emergency surgery was unable to save his life and he passed on that same day. Juan and I went through the Academy together in 1987 and he will always be remembered and a great bloke whose life was cut way to short by the tragic accident. Juan is in the middle squatting down in this photo which was taken on the day of our attestation.
Photo credit: Kelvin Harband‎   NSW Fallen Police New Member ·    Juan Hernandez was accidentally shot in the chest while doing firearms training as an Instructor at the Redfern Police Academy on 1 December 1992. Emergency surgery was unable to save his life and he passed on that same day. Juan and I went through the Academy together in 1987 and he will always be remembered and a great bloke whose life was cut way to short by the tragic accident. Juan is in the middle squatting down in this photo which was taken on the day of our attestation ( 15 May 1987 ).

 

 

Carl is also credited with designing the TOU insignia – which was maintained in respect to his.

 

 


 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Tuesday 1 December 1992, page 4

IN BRIEF

Policeman shot dead

SYDNEY: A police weapons training instructor was fatally wounded by another officer during a gun training session yesterday.

Constable Juan Carlos Hernandez, 33, an instructor with the elite State Protection Group, died in hospital several hours after being shot in the chest at the old Police Academy at Redfern.

Constable Hernandez was supervising about 15 officers at a training session when a .38 calibre police-issue revolver discharged, wounding him in the chest.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/126959025


 

 

[blockquote]

Carl.

Juan Carlos Hernandez,
Carl was how I knew you,
I will never forget,
What you helped me through.

To walk into a room,
When I was very young,
My first days in the job,
To see death, just wrong.

I was only 19 years old,
In the job for a few weeks,
In morbid fascination,
What no one really seeks.

I stood in disbelief,
Waiting for him to breath,
But he did not move,
It was hard for me to believe.

As we left the room,
You stopped me for a while,
And asked if I was ok,
Then you gave me a smile.

A smile because you knew,
It was not one of joy,
To tell me it would be ok,
I was no longer just a boy.

Death I had just seen,
Even if for the first time,
With the strength you showed me,
I would be just fine.

In shock a few years later,
I heard you had been lost,
In a twisted circumstance,
Your family paid the cost.

You were loyal to the end,
That is what I heard,
You were the ultimate Man,
So to deny your last words, absurd.

You died loving what you did,
A Policeman you will always be,
Did not matter your end,
You are now free.

I can’t believe,
It’s over 20 years,
Since I sat with you,
Had a few beers.

For years you have rested,
In the ultimate peace,
Having died in the line of duty,
But your memory does not cease.

You will never be forgotten,
Not while I still stand,
I will never ever forget,
When as a 19 year old you held my hand.

Thank you
Brother in Blue.

Died in the line of duty
1st December 1992.

[/blockquote]

Penned by Brendo Greysie ( 2014 )

 


Police Attestation Ceremony

Speakers Cusack The Hon Catherine; Gallacher The Hon Michael
Business Questions Without Notice, QWN
POLICE ATTESTATION CEREMONY
Page: 22733

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: My question is addressed to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services. Will the Minister inform the House about the newest recruits to the New South Wales Police Force?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I thank the honourable member for her question. Last Friday, 23 August 2013, it was my great pleasure to attend the attestation ceremony for class 319 at the Goulburn Police Academy. I assure members that the calibre of probationary constables coming through the doors of the academy to pursue challenging and rewarding careers as police officers in this State remains very high indeed. They passed the stringent physical and academic tests, and have demonstrated the commitment and character befitting their new role. These qualities were no more visible than when the commissioner’s valour award was presented to Senior Constable Justin Knight on the parade ground last Friday. The award was conferred for conspicuous merit and exceptional bravery when an offender armed with a sawn-off rifle fired at Senior Constable Knight with intent to murder on 20 January 2007 at Eveleigh Street, Redfern—the Block.

In the course of pursuing a suspect, Constable Knight alighted from his vehicle and pursued an offender on foot, calling for him to stop. The offender produced a sawn-off rifle and, despite the risk, Constable Knight continued to follow him. The offender fired a number of shots at Constable Knight, narrowly missing him. The constable felt one of the projectiles go past his arm and thought that he had been shot. Being aware of the sensitivity of the local community towards police and despite the escalated danger, Constable Knight did not respond by firing his service firearm. The offender fled the scene, but was later identified and charged with attempted murder of a police officer. The offender was subsequently convicted.

I ask members to reflect on those circumstances and whether we would have acted with the same level of commitment, bravery and judgement as Constable Knight on that occasion. Too often the community reacts to instances where police officers have been accused of wrongdoing, but the events of that night in 2007 remind us of the challenges and risks faced by officers of the NSW Police Force, in this case potentially quite deadly. I am confident that Senior Constable Knight’s example will flow through to the 161 probationary constables who attested and have joined a force with record authorised strength in this State.

A number of the new police officers deserve special mention. The winner of the Robert Brotherson award for the highest level of academic achievement was Probationary Constable Natalie Martin. The winners of the Steven Roser memorial award for the highest male and female achievers in physical training were Probationary Constable Mitchell Thompson and Probationary Constable Guilhermina El-Mir. The Juan Carlos Hernandez award, given to the student with the highest marksmanship score, went to probationary constables David Edwards, Anton Sahyoun and Shanahan Toering—all three tied for that award. Probationary Constable Toering also received the award for the highest achiever in the Simulated Policing Acquiring Competence program.

One of the many proud parents at the attestation was Detective Superintendent Arthur Katsogiannis, whose son Daniel is now a probationary constable and commences his career at City Central Local Area Command. It was terrific to see 23 members of the attestation of class 319 identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, of which 16 were graduates of the Indigenous Police Recruiting Our Way [IPROWD] program that I have spoken about in this forum. Congratulations to them. I had the pleasure of witnessing the graduation of 13 dog teams from the State Protection Group Dog Unit. Some were general purpose dogs and others, obviously, were sniffer dogs. That is good news for Byron Bay and its former mayor, the Hon. Jan Barham. The attestation parades provide an opportunity— [Time expired.]

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: I ask a supplementary question. Will the Minister elucidate his answer?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I pay respect to the following five officers who retired from the NSW Police Force, taking with them collectively 190-plus years: Superintendent Ben Feszczuk, Detective Superintendent Col Dyson, APM, Superintendent Ray Filewood, Detective Inspector Dennis Clarke, APM, and Inspector Leslie Dickens. All five officers led the parade on Friday. It was an incredibly proud moment for them, their families and the communities they have represented in just short of 200 years of policing. As I said to the graduating class, “If you want to look for role models, look at these five as a classic example of what you can give back to a community that will give you so much more.”

 

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LC20130827015


NSW Police Force Newly Attested Officers

Speakers Cusack The Hon Catherine; Gallacher The Hon Michael
Business Questions Without Notice, QWN
NSW POLICE FORCE NEWLY ATTESTED OFFICERS
Page: 20006

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: My question is addressed to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services. Will the Minister inform the House about the newest recruits to the NSW Police Force? The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: On 3 May it was a great pleasure to attend the attestation ceremony for class 318 at the Goulburn Police Academy, and I can assure the House that the calibre of probationary constables coming through the academy to pursue a challenging and rewarding career as a New South Wales police officer remains high. All attesting officers have made it through physical and academic tests, and, most importantly, they have demonstrated the commitment and character of people prepared to ensure the safety and security of the community they will serve. The 202 probationary constables who attested have joined a police force now boasting a record authorised strength of 16,176. As members opposite know full well, we have been increasing the authorised strength of the NSW Police Force since we took office. After the further increase this month of 80 positions from the May class, we have boosted the authorised strength by 370, and we are on our way to increasing the force by a total of 859 positions, to a record authorised strength of 16,665 officers in August 2015. This month 50 additional positions were added to the Police Transport Command, bringing its authorised strength to 401. We have also added 30 positions to the authorised strength of the Traffic and Highway Patrol Command, bringing it to 1,295. That makes an increase of 50 new authorised positions to this command, and that is halfway to our commitment to increase the strength of the command by 100. While another 202 probationary constables have been drawn to this career, I am equally pleased with how many officers stay in this exciting and rewarding profession. Indeed, there is such demand for a career in policing that the NSW Police Force has implemented a freeze on new applications. Members opposite have mischievously tried to claim that this is a sign of cuts to the Police Force. That is as far from the truth as members opposite could possibly get. Thanks to the Government making the necessary reforms to the Death and Disability Scheme set up by members opposite and restoring the confidence of serving police officers by ensuring that they will have the back-up they need, I am advised that attrition within the Police Force is currently averaging about 40 officers a month, down from the average of 70 under the previous administration. Therefore, it stands to reason that if fewer officers are leaving the force, fewer replacements are needed. Under Labor, the NSW Police Force was faced with more than 800 officers on long-term sick leave and officers leaving the force at such a rate that police could not recruit fast enough to plug the holes. Placing a temporary freeze on new applications will ensure that potential applicants do not need to spend application fees, which easily total $500, including on such items as medical certificates, when there is a substantial wait before their application can be considered. We are getting on with the job of ensuring that the NSW Police Force is better resourced, better equipped and better supported than ever before. Members opposite are peddling misinformation and seeking to undermine the community’s confidence in a police force experiencing record numbers. A number of the new police officers deserve special mention. The winner of the Robert Brotherson Award for the highest level of academic achievement was Probationary Constable Thomas Stillwell. The winners of the Steven Roser Memorial Award for the highest male and female achievers in physical training were Probationary Constable Adam Splithof and Probationary Constable Caitlin Billingham. The Juan Carlos Hernandez Award, given to the student with the highest marksmanship score, went to Probationary Constable Matthew Skellern. [Time expired.]

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: I ask a supplementary question. Will the Minister elucidate his answer?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I am sure that all members would like to hear about these outstanding young probationary constables, including Probationary Constable Nathan Dechaufepie, who was the recipient of the Simulated Policing Acquiring Confidence Award. These officers can be proud of their achievements. Their families can be proud of them and, most importantly, their communities are proud of them. I am sure that the House will join me in wishing our newest police officers all the very best for their careers in the NSW Police Force.

 


 

 

Speakers MacDonald Mr Scot; Gallacher The Hon Michael
Business Questions Without Notice, QWN
POLICE GRADUATIONS
Page: 416

The Hon. SCOT MacDONALD: My question is addressed to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services. Will the Minister inform the House of the results of the latest police attestation?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I apologise to the House for my inability to be here last Friday. I had a very important role to fulfil as the Minister for Police and Emergency Services at the graduation of class 312 at the Police Academy in Goulburn. It was my first in my new role as Minister for Police and Emergency Services. One of the first things I had an opportunity to announce down there was clarification of the uncertainty that exists around the name of the organisation.

The Hon. Duncan Gay: It was well received.

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: It was well received. It will now return to its former name of the New South Wales Police Academy, not the police college. That announcement was very well received by the sworn officers. The attestation certainly brought back memories of when I was in a similar position, standing on the parade ground at Redfern more than 30 years ago. Whilst a lot of things have changed in policing, a lot of things have not. Obviously the equipment, the cars and the uniform have changed, but certainly one thing that has not changed is the high calibre of probationary constables coming through the academy. They are required to pass through a tough course, both physically and academically, to prove they can cut the mustard as officers in the New South Wales Police Force. Who knows, even Eric Roozendaal might apply to join the New South Wales Police Force—although he may not pass the integrity test.

They are men and women who are prepared to do their best for the people of this State and who will undertake this job on a daily basis, often in the most difficult of circumstances. The 111 probationary constables who attested at the ceremony have joined more than 15,000 officers in the Police Force. They come from all walks of life. Over 22 per cent of those who attested are women. Forty per cent come from outside metropolitan Sydney. Sixteen were born overseas, in countries such as Russia, Germany, Malaysia, China and even Botswana. They speak Arabic, Greek, Cantonese, Armenian, Dari, and Khmer. They will be posted to 59 local area commands across the State, from Albury in the south, to Richmond in the north, from Barrier in the west to the heart of Sydney. Forty-four of the officers have been assigned to non-metropolitan or rural regions.

Irrespective of where they have been posted they are on the front line. They stand between the community and the dangers of crime and other antisocial behaviour. A number of these new police officers deserve special mention. Firstly, the winner of the Robert Brotherson Award for the highest level of academic achievement was Probationary Constable Stephanie Hill. The winners of the Steven Roser Memorial Award for the highest male and female achievers in physical training were Probationary Constable John Feuerstein and Probationary Constable Sandra Chaban. The Juan Carlos Hernandez Award, given to the student with the highest marksmanship score, was Probationary Constable James Patrick. Probationary Constable Jessica Agland was the recipient of the Simulated Policing Acquiring Confidence Award.

I met some of the officers on Friday and I can confidently say that the New South Wales Police Force has a strong future. These officers can be proud of their achievements. Their family and friends can be proud of them for all the hard work they have put in to get there. The people of New South Wales can be proud of these people for choosing a selfless profession, dedicating their working lives to ensuring the safety and protection of the community. I am sure all members of the House will join me in wishing our newest police officers all the very best for their careers in the New South Wales Police Force.

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LC20110509023?open&refNavID=HA8_1




Allan Wayne McQUEEN

Allan Wayne McQUEEN SC, VA

New South Wales Police

Goulburn Police Academy Class 227

Probationary # 98444

Regd. #  23???

Rank:   Constable

Stations:  Sydney District Anti Theft Squad

Service:   From pre 26 June 1987  to  5 May 1989 = 1+ years Service

Awards:  Star of Courage ( SC ) ( Posthumously )

Commissioners Valour Award ( VA ) ( Posthumously )

Born: Friday  1 June 1962

Died On:  Friday  5 May 1989

Event:  Shot – wounded – Murdered

Event location:  Woolloomooloo

Event Date:  24 April 1989

Died:  5 May 1989 ( 9 days after event )

Cause:  Murdered – shot twice

Age:  26 yrs  11 mths  4 days

Funeral date:  9 May 1989

Funeral locationSt Mary’s Anglican Church

Buried at:  Cremated.  East Ballina Cemetery, McQueen Family Wall, Sec: Niche, Lot # 2

GPS: 28*51’47″S / 153*35’26″E

Memorial: 1/ Yurong Parkway, Phillip Park , Sydney, 2000

GPS:  Lat: -33.872583 / Long: 151.213778

2/ Sydney Police Centre, McQueen Room, 151 – 241 Goulburn Street, Surry Hills.

3/  Police Launch McQueen???.

Allan McQUEEN

Allan McQueen

Allan's touch plate was polished today, this 27th anniversary, 5 May 2016, by a mate, Craig Coleman, at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.
Allan’s touch plate was polished today, this 27th anniversary, 5 May 2016, by a mate, Craig Coleman, at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

 

ALLAN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

On the morning of 24 April, 1989 Constable McQueen, Constable 1st Class Ross Judd and Probationary Constable Jason Donnelly were patrolling the Woolloomooloo area. All were members of the District Anti-Theft Squad. About 11.35am they saw the offender Porter, apparently attempting to break into a motor vehicle. While Constable Judd parked the police vehicle, Constables McQueen and Donnelly went to speak to the offender. As he was being detained, the offender produced a concealed weapon and shot Constable McQueen twice in the chest and Constable Donnelly in the abdomen. Both constables then chased the offender, who continued firing at them, until both collapsed from their wounds. Constable Ross Judd also pursued and fired at the offender before returning to assist his colleagues. He then carried both wounded constables to the police car and drove them to the Sydney Hospital.

Constable Donnelly was to recover from his wounds however Constable McQueen had sustained extensive internal injuries and died on 5 May, 1989. The offender was later arrested by Queensland Police.

The Canberra Times of 12 July, 1990 reported on the result of the trial of the offender.

CONVICTION IN POLICE DEATH
SYDNEY:John Albert Edward Porter has been found guilty of the murder last year of Sydney police constable Allan McQueen. A Supreme Court jury deliberated for nearly 10 hours before finding Porter, 28, guilty of shooting the policeman on April 24 last year. Porter was remanded in custody for sentencing on August 3. The jury also found Porter guilty on one count of shooting with intent to cause grievous bodily harm and three counts of shooting to avoid arrest. He was found not guilty on a sixth charge of attempting to murder Constable Jason Donnelly.

Justice Badgery-Parker had directed the jury to find Porter not guilty on the charge of attempting to murder Constable Donnelly. Porter had pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Friends and relatives of Constable McQueen sat comforting each other in the public gallery as the verdict was returned. Constable McQueen, 26, died in St Vincent’s Hospital nine days after the April 24 shooting.

The constable was born in 1962 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 27 June, 1987. At the time of his death he was attached to the Sydney District Anti-Theft Squad. He was posthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Medal for Valour and the Star of Courage.

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Allan McQUEEN


 

 

The Age 25 April 1989 p1 of 42
The Age      25 April 1989      p1 of 42


 

The Sydney Morning Herald 25 April 1989 p1 of 54
The Sydney Morning Herald      25 April 1989      p1 of 54


 

 The Sydney Morning Herald 26 April 1989 p5 of 62
The Sydney Morning Herald       26 April 1989      p5 of 62


 

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 April 1989 p2 of 119
The Sydney Morning Herald   27 April 1989   p2 of 119


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 30 April 1989 p2 of 109
The Sydney Morning Herald           30 April 1989       p2 of 109

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19890430&id=4DRWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0ecDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4933,9248506&hl=en


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 1 May 1989 p6 of 76
The Sydney Morning Herald      1 May 1989       p6 of 76


 

 

The Age 1 May 1989 p5 of 36
The Age      1 May 1989      p5 of 36


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 1 May 1989 p3 of 76
The Sydney Morning Herald     1 May 1989    p3 of 76


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 4 May 1989 p1 of 118

 

 

The Age 4 May 1989 p1 of 61
The Age       4 May 1989          p1 of 61


 

The Sydney Morning Herald 5 May 1989 p1 of 76
The Sydney Morning Herald     5 May 1989     p1 of 76


 

The Sydney Morning Herald 5 May 1989 p4 of 76
The Sydney Morning Herald      5 May 1989      p4 of 76


 

The Sydney Morning Herald 7 May 1989 p25 of 99
The Sydney Morning Herald     7 May 1989     p25 of 99


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 12 May 1989 p2 of 74                        The Sydney Morning Herald        12 May 1989     p2 of 74

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19890512&id=rDJWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=nOcDAAAAIBAJ&pg=2205,1063653&hl=en


The Age 12 May 1989 p10 of 52
The Age            12 May 1989       p10 of 52


The Age 27 June 1989 P15 of 54
The Age               27 June 1989              P15 of 54


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 June 1989 p2 of 54
The Sydney Morning Herald 27 June 1989 p2 of 54


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 June 1989 p3 of 54
The Sydney Morning Herald                 27 June 1989                p3 of 54


 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 19 July 1989 p6 of 72
The Sydney Morning Herald    19 July 1989    p6 of 72

 


NSW Police Academy, Goulburn HERO'S WALK
NSW Police Academy, Goulburn HERO’S WALK


Date: 24 August 1989. Memorial unveiled on corner of Haig Ave & Boomerang St, sydney.
Date: 24 August 1989. Memorial unveiled on corner of Haig Ave & Boomerang St, sydney.

 

November 2013

Constable Allan Wayne McQueen

Constable Allan Wayne McQueen : November 2013
Photographs supplied by Peter F Williams

Memorial erected in memory of Constable Allan James McQueen who was shot in the line of duty and died from his injuries on the 5th May 1989.

On the morning of 24 April 1989, Constable McQueen, Constable 1st Class Ross Judd (MV, BM ), and Probationary Constable Jason Donnelly (MV, BM ) were patrolling the Woolloomooloo area. All were members of the District Anti-Theft Squad. About 11.35am they saw the offender Porter apparently attempting to break into a motor vehicle. While Constable Judd parked the Police vehicle Constables McQueen and Donnelly went to speak to the offender. As he was being detained the offender produced a concealed weapon and shot Constable McQueen twice in the chest and Constable Donnelly in the abdomen. Both Constables then chased the offender who continued firing at them until both collapsed from their wounds. Constable Ross Judd also pursued and fired at the offender before returning to assist his colleagues. He then carried both wounded Constables to the Police car and drove them to the Sydney Hospital. Constable Donnelly was to recover from his wounds however Constable McQueen had sustained extensive internal injuries and died on 5 May 1989. The offender was later arrested by Queensland Police.

Front Inscription

IN MEMORY OF
CONSTABLE
ALLAN WAYNE McQUEEN S.C.,V.A.
AGED 26 YEARS

DIED 5TH MAY 1989 FROM
GUNSHOT WOUNDS RECEIVED
IN THE EXECUTION OF HIS
DUTY AT THIS LOCATION
ON THE 24TH APRIL 1989

Location

Address: Yurong Parkway, Phillip Park , Sydney, 2000
State: NSW
Area: AUS
GPS Coordinates: Lat: -33.872583
Long: 151.213778
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.

http://monumentaustralia.org.au/themes/people/crime/display/100949-constable-allan-wayne-mcqueen

 


 

 


 

The Sydney Morning Herald Wednesday, May 10, 1989

Moving tributes for police nice guy ‘Big Al”

By LINDSAY SIMPSON ” Chief Police Reporter As one of “Big Al’s” best mates read a moving eulogy, burly police officers, hats in hands, bowed their heads and cried. Big Al was Constable Allan Wayne McQueen, the well-mannered policeman from Kyogle who died in the line of duty, shot trying to apprehend a suspected car thief in Sydney.

Constable McQueen, who had been in the force two years, had been picked to work with the Anti-theft Squad a training ground for young officers on their way to becoming detectives. Big Al, who spent three years trying to become a police officer, was known by that name “not so much because of his height but because of his heart”, said Cheryl Coleman, whose husband had shared a house with Constable McQueen in Coffs Harbour.

As Senior Constable Steve Tedder, who gave one of the eulogies said, “Big Al had the basic love and desire to become a police officer”. In 1986, while running his own cleaning business in Coffs Harbour, he built his own house and several local police officers became his flatmates. At that stage he had five jobs and was studying at night for his HSC English in an attempt to become a police officer. About this time, before he was even in the force, he saved a man’s life. The man had quarrelled with his girlfriend outside a local night club and had head-butted a pane of glass. The glass had cut his throat and Al tore his shirt off and stemmed the flow of blood while waiting for the ambulance.

Big Al. who trained as a boxer and played Rugby League, was not always the muscle builder he was at the time he joined the force. His former Rugby League coach at Kyogle High School, Mr Stan McBride, said that in the 14-year-old competition he had been the second smallest kid in the group.

Ballina townspeople also came to the funeral service. One local, Mrs Val Studdert, said she had never met Allan McQueen but had come out of respect for what he had done. “If we don’t have law and order, we have nothing,” she said.

The pallbearers wore pistols. Perhaps that’s the way it has to be these days, but they touched the pretty white wooden church in the green countryside with vulgarity. They were big, strong young men and their bulky police uniforms made them bigger, so that when they came to the narrow church door carrying their mate’s coffin, they could barely squeeze through. In any case, the coffin seemed too narrow for a young man as big as Allan McQueen.

Nearly 300 police went to his funeral in Ballina yesterday along with his mother and father, Mr John and Mrs Shirley McQueen, and 300 family and friends. They spilled out of St Mary’s Anglican Church into a church hall, where the service was shown on video, and out of the hall on to the grass, where they listened through loudspeakers.

If we are to still violence, we must cherish life. Yesterday, 26-year-old Allan McQueen’s life was cherished. Today, others will cherish the life of 32-year-old David Gundy, the unarmed man killed in a police raid following Constable McQueen’s mortal wounding. Spring had sung in both men for only a while before life escaped them in violence. Senior Constable Graham White told the mourners that Allan McQueen had been a man of honour, love and integrity and a man whose word could be relied upon. He did not search for riches but for life itself, said Constable White. “Today he would be saying, ‘Let’s get on with it. Let’s not have all this fuss and bother’.”

Detective Senior Constable Steve Tedder said that the day McQueen received the letter of his acceptance into the force, “his face lit up as if Manhattan had lit up”.’ Constable Tedder lived with Constable McQueen in Manly and called his mate “Big Al”. “What a joy he was to live with,” he said. Constable McQueen had made more friends in 18 months in Manly than Constable Tedder had in 28 years.

Colleagues of slain policeman Allan McQueen weep as he is laid to rest in Ballina yesterday. One of his favourite expressions was: “Not a problem“. Another was: “I’m here for a good time, not a long time.” Constable Tedder said it was somehow appropriate that Allan McQueen began his long battle for life on April 24, the day before Anzac Day. That was the day Allan McQueen became a hero. Police Commissioner John Avery said Constable McQueen had exhibited the qualities of a police leader of the future. “His father said it was a waste of a fine young life, and I agree,” said the Commissioner. “His was an unforgettable example of courageous service that will enshrine his name in the annals of the history of NSW.” Mr Avery quoted Virgil: “Blessings on your young courage, boy, for that is the way to the stars.”

Outside the church, a senior policeman said: “There’s a finality to heroism.” Mr Athol McQueen, a cousin and the boxer who knocked down champion Joe Frazier in the 1964 Olympic Games, said: “I hope there are more young blokes around like him.”

” The police band played a funeral march for their colleague, past Sunnyhaven Flats. The open-faced country folk let the tears run down their cheeks. As the cortege passed a place called Camelot, on the way to the Lismore Crematorium and another place called Goonellabah, an old woman stood at the roadside and said : “Poor little fellow.” At the crematorium flowers spelled out the letters NSWP -New South Wales Police on the hillside.

A young policeman picked up a rose and handed it to a young woman. , ‘ Mr John McQueen wipes away a tear as he stands with his wife Shirley at their son’s funeral.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/123586879/


 

NSW Police Service Annual report 1989 / 1990
NSW Police Service Annual report 1989 / 1990

https://www.opengov.nsw.gov.au/viewer/e97f9949de7fce571e09f3baa392f1a4.pdf


 

 

 

 

 

 




Sharon Louise WILSON

Sharon Louise WILSON

( late of Uralla )

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # ?????

RankProbationary Constable

Academy Class 215 & Sub Class 236

Stations:  Leeton

Awards? Nil

Born:  1968

Age:  20

Service:  9 May 1988 to 30 November 1988 = 6+ months Service

Cause of death:  Accidentally Shot – by collegue – Service weapon

Location of incident:  inside Leeton Police Station

Location of Death:  Wagga Wagga Base Hospital

Died:  Wednesday  30 November 1988

Funeral:  Monday  5 December 1988 @ 1pm

Funeral location?, Uralla

Buried Uralla

Memorial:  Memorial Tree planted at NSW Police Academy, Goulburn

Sharon Louise WILSON 1 - NSWPF - Killed 30 November 1988

Sharon Louise WILSON - centre, front row. Class 215
Sharon Louise WILSON – centre, front row. Class 215

About 2.15pm on 30 November, 1988 Constable Wilson was on duty at the Leeton Police Station when she suffered a severe gunshot wound to the head when another member’s service revolver discharged. Although treated at the scene by colleagues until the ambulance arrived, she passed away at the Wagga Base Hospital at 5.45pm the same day.

 

The constable was born in 1968 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 9 May, 1988. At the time of her death she was stationed at Leeton.

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Touch plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra
Touch plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

[alert_green]Sharon is mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

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“CHARGES POSSIBLE OVER SHOOTING
SYDNEY: The NSW Police Commissioner, John Avery, will decide whether charges should be laid against a constable allegedly involved in the shooting death of her 20 year-old colleague on Wednesday. A police spokesman said yesterday a team of detectives was waiting to interview the young officer over the death of policewoman Sharon Wilson at the Leeton Police Station, in the state’s Riverina district. He said results of the investigation would be forwarded to Mr Avery for consideration. A police spokesman said the detectives — including two from Sydney’s Internal Affairs department, two from homicide, a ballistics expert and a police psychologist — were waiting to talk to the 19-year-old constable. Probationary Constable Wilson was shot in the head by one bullet from a service revolver while on duty at Leeton Police Station, at 2.15pm on Wednesday. She was rushed to Wagga Base Hospital, but died 3 1/2 hours later. The policewoman awaiting questioning had been treated for shock and was being cared for by friends and welfare personnel, the spokesman said. Detectives hoped to talk with her last night. Miss Wilson, of Uralla, in the Northern Tablelands, was well known in the small community. She was regarded as a fine athlete and her 188cm frame was well known in the local basketball league. Miss Wilson was studying visual arts at the Riverina Murray Institute of Higher Education in Wagga. Her body will be transported to her home at Uralla, where a funeral will be held at I pm on Monday.”

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Wednesday 15 March 1989, page 22

 

Second death prompts gun rule review

SYDNEY: Junior police officers could be made to leave their guns at work after a young constable accidentally killed his best friend while cleaning his service revolver at home on Monday.

An internal police investigation into the shooting would look at the controls on probationary constables’ possession of weapons, the NSW Minister for Police, Ted Pickering, said yesterday.

Constable Andrew Pearce, 20, was cleaning his .38 service revolver in the bedroom of his Greystanes home in Sydney’s west at noon on Monday when the gun discharged and hit his friend Andrew James McDonald in the chest.

Mr McDonald, a 20-year-old bank teller from Greystanes, died an hour later in Westmead Hospital.

The incident was the second fatal shooting by a probationary constable in the past four months.

Last November Probationary Constable Sheree Schneider, 19, accidentally shot Constable Sharon Wilson in the head at Leeton police station in the Riverina region. The young constable now faces a manslaughter charge.

Acting Police Commissioner Angus Graham refused yesterday to comment on Monday’s shooting and was unable to say whether Constable Pearce, an officer with one year’s service, would be charged over the incident.

He said the fatal shooting was the subject of a full investigation by the police’s Internal Affairs Department.

“When we have these incidents we always review our arrangements,” he said.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/120916451

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The Sydney Morning Herald      28 July 1989      p 6 of 68

‘Empty’ gun killed officer

A policewoman fatally wounded a colleague with a shot from her service revolver which she believed was empty, the Leeton Local Court, in south-west NSW, heard yesterday.

Sheree Ann Schneider ( ProCst # 60370 ), 20, of Pine Avenue, Leeton was charged with the manslaughter of Constable Sharon Louise Wilson, 20, at Leeton Police Station on November 30 last year.

Constable Wilson died of head injuries at the Wagga Wagga Base Hospital as a result of the shooting.

Constable Harvey McRae told the court that he was sitting at a computer terminal when he heard the firing pin of a police revolver strike the empty chamber.  Constable Wilson had said, “Oh God, don’t do that.  You scared the living daylights out of me”.

He said Schneider pointed the revolver toward Constable Wilson and said:  “No, it’s empty, see?”  The gun then discharged.

Schneider said she went into the sergeant’s office and re-loaded her gun.  The court heard that four live bullets and one spent one were later removed from the revolver.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19890728

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R_27_EPILOGUE_Police

http://nswjudicialinjustice.com/Contentsfiles/R_27_EPILOGUE_Police.pdf

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The Law—From Protector To Persecutor
From ‘Signs Of Senility‘ a chapter of ‘A Study Of Our Decline‘ by P Atkinson (7/9/2013)

Schneider Case
In New South Wales, at Leeton police station on 30-Nov-1988, a junior policewoman produced a pistol and shot dead another officer. Sheree Ann Schneider claimed it was an accident. Satisfied the pistol was unloaded, she pulled the trigger without looking where the gun was pointed. The charge of Felonious Assault was dismissed in the lower court on 28th July 1989 under section 41 (vi) – the presiding officer ruled that no jury would convict. Use Of A Firearm In Disregard For Another Persons Safety was dismissed on 27th April 1990. The female did not even lose her job, presumably her fellow officers hope she will be more careful in future.

Court Ignores Duty
It is axiomatic with all weapons training that they never be pointed at anyone unless they are intended to be used —even in jest. Deliberately pulling the trigger without looking where the .38 pistol was pointed was criminal irresponsibility. Sharon Wilson was killed as the result of criminal negligence; a failure that should not be tolerated from any citizen, much less a police officer. Not knowing the gun was loaded is no excuse for anyone, least of all a trained professional. For the courts to fail to penalise this action is to commit more crimes; the denial of the importance of duty and the magnitude of taking a life.

The Law Repeats The Role Of Indulgent Parents
Schneider escaped penalty by adopting the infantile excuse that she was merely the hapless victim of the inadequate police weapons training program; that this was accepted by the authorities is not an aberration. Trial for murder is no longer a matter of resolving fact; it has become a re-enactment of the spoilt child caught by their indulgent parents; if the miscreant can deflect blame while generating sympathy then all is forgiven.

http://www.ourcivilisation.com/signs/chap8.htm

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Jillian Cupit HAWKES (FRAZER)

Jillian Cupit HAWKES ( FRAZER )

( late of Kirrawee )

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  PW73

Detective Sergeant 3rd Class – retired

Retired Hurt On Duty on 17 December 1982

Arrest Injuries – Assault on 30 July 1977

Milsons Point, North Sydney

Died  22 April, 1986

Age:  46

Buried:  Woronora cemetery

 

Det Sgt 3Class Jillian Cupit HAWKES nee FRAZER died 220486

On 30 July, 1977 Detective Senior Constable Hawkes and another detective attended Sydney’s Luna Park in relation to a complaint. While the offender was being escorted from the park he began to struggle violently and kicked Detective Hawkes’ legs out from under her. When she fell to the ground the offender continued kicking and stamping on her.

As a result she suffered an injury to her right leg which later developed a malignant bone tumour. The leg was amputated and after being fitted with an artificial leg Detective Hawkes returned to work.

On 17 December, 1982 she was discharged medically unfit.

On 19 April, 1986 the former Detective Sergeant Hawkes lapsed into a coma. She died three days later on the 22 April 1986.

 

The detective sergeant was born in 1939 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 16 August, 1965.

 

 Grave location:
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Pashalis (Paul) KATSIVELAS

Pashalis (Paul) KATSIVELAS

New South Wales Police Force

Constable

Shot – Murdered

Concord

Stationed at Newtown

Joined NSW Police Force on 13 December 1982 via Class 192

Born  1964

Died  4 April, 1984

Buried  Rookwood Cemetery

 Constable Pashalis Paul Katsivelas - shot - 040484

About 11.30am on 4 April, 1984 Constable Katsivelas was on duty at the Concord Repatriation Hospital where he was guarding a prisoner who was suffering from heroin withdrawal. The prisoner asked to be allowed to visit the toilet so the constable unlocked one handcuff and, with the assistance of a nurse’s aide, escorted the prisoner to the toilet area. As the prisoner left the toilet cubicle he suddenly leapt at the constable, knocking him to the ground. A violent struggle ensued during which the prisoner seized the constable’s service revolver and shot him twice in the chest before escaping. Constable Katsivelas died a short time later from his wounds. The offender was later located by other police and when warned to surrender he shot himself in the head.

 

The constable was born in 1964 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 13 December, 1982. At the time of his death he was stationed at Newtown.

 

This photo was taken of Paul, at the Hospital, on the same day, shortly before his death. The head Matron, Norma Spark, took the photo of Paul and a Nurse before Norma finished her shift. This is the last, know, photo of Paul alive.
This photo was taken of Paul, at the Hospital, on the same day, shortly before his death.
The head Matron, Norma Spark, took the photo of Paul and a Nurse before Norma finished her shift. This is the last, know, photo of Paul alive.

 

This memorial photo is hanging up at Newtown Police Station as a stark reminder to all Police that bad things can happen to good people. As seen in 2014.
This memorial photo is hanging up at Newtown Police Station as a stark reminder to all Police that bad things can happen to good people.
As seen in 2014.

 

Pashalis (Paul) KATSIVELAS
Pashalis (Paul) KATSIVELAS  Touch pad at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra – 2014

 

 

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NEWTOWN LOCAL AREA COMMAND POLICE COMMEMORATION SERVICE

http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LA20130508056

Page: 20259

Ms CARMEL TEBBUTT (Marrickville) [7.07 p.m.  8 May 2013]: Recently at Rookwood Cemetery I attended a memorial service to commemorate police officers from the Newtown local area command killed in the line of duty. The moving service was attended by Deputy Police Commissioner Nick Kaldis, Superintendent Simon Hardman, the commander of the Newtown Area Local Command, many other police representatives, and relatives and descendants of the police officers. Those attendees included Ms Avona Wallace, Mr and Mrs Norman Stephenson, Mrs Lynette Everton and Ms Edna Stevenson. Representatives from the emergency services and community members were also in attendance. The member for Campbelltown, Bryan Doyle, attended representing the Premier.

The five officers being remembered at the ceremony gave their lives to protect the community. They were Constable First Class John Wallace, Constable First Class Ruston Stephenson, Constable Lionel Guise, Detective Inspector Reginald Stevenson and Constable Pashalis Katsivelas. The ceremony to mark the sacrifice of these officers reflected on the enormity of their contribution to the community, as well as the impact of their death on their families. It is often said, and it is true, that police officers leave their homes for each shift uncertain of what any day may bring and whether they will return at the end of the day. We owe these men and women our deepest gratitude for the risks they face and take every day in their job. At Rookwood Cemetery we visited each of the graves of those officers who lost their lives in the line of duty and behind each individual was an illuminating life story.

We began at the grave of Constable First Class Ruston Stephenson, who died 80 years almost to the day of the commemoration. Constable Stephenson joined the Police Force in 1912, and four years later enlisted in the army, later joining the fight in France during the First World War. He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for conspicuous gallantry in rescuing injured soldiers while under fire. Remarkably, when he returned he rejoined the Police Force and continued to serve until his death on 9 April 1933 after a tragic accident involving a motorcycle at the then Newtown Stadium while performing general duties policing.

We were also told the story of Detective Inspector Reginald Hugh Stevenson—I was honoured on the day to meet his widow, Ms Edna Stevenson, who still had strong memories of the incident that led to Inspector Stevenson’s death. Detective Inspector Stevenson joined the NSW Police Force as a cadet in 1943 at the age of 17. In an act of extraordinary selflessness, Detective Inspector Stevenson was on annual leave on 9 December 1974 when he decided to go to work to assist in the planned arrest of a dangerous offender in Newtown, at the time telling his wife, “I don’t want my boys doing this on their own.” During the operation he was shot in the chest after leading his team in pursuit of the offender.

Detective Inspector Stevenson partially recovered and was awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct and the Queen’s Police Medal for Distinguished Service. However, he died in 1980 of a heart attack, deemed to be the result of the injuries he sustained on duty in 1974. These officers are just a few of many across New South Wales whose lives have been cut short as they have gone about performing their duty. I pay tribute to them all. They will not be forgotten and local events such as this are a powerful reminder of their sacrifice.

I also take this opportunity to acknowledge two Marrickville police officers, Sergeant Stewart and Constable Steele, who on Monday of this week rescued an intellectually disabled person from a house fire in Marrickville. Thankfully, those two officers who took huge risks survived and are quite rightly being hailed as heroes by their colleagues and the community. It is yet another example of the risk our police men and women take every day in order to keep the community safe. I take this opportunity to pay tribute to them.

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Eric George BAILEY GC

Eric George BAILEY GC

Father to John ‘Jack’ George BAILEY – NSWPF # 6293

New South Wales Police Force

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class # ???

( Class # 001 was in March 1947 – so Eric pre dates that. )

Regd. # 2382

Rank: Commenced Training on ? ? ?

Probationary Constable – appointed Wednesday 16 March 1927

Constable 1st Class – appointed 23 April 1938

Constable 1st Class – posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class

Stations: No. 4 Division from 14 June 1927,

The Rocks in 1928, then Gundagai, Narrandera & other rural stations.

Moruya 1938 then Blayney from 4 January 1945

ServiceFrom 16 March 1927 to 12 January 1945 = 18 years Service

Awards:  * George Cross  ( GC ) awarded, Granted 20 October 1946 – posthumously

also the George Lewis Trophy.

Bravery Commendation re arrest at Batemans Bay in 1940.

Highly Commended and awarded six months seniority for Conspicuous Bravery for the rescue of survivors, at sea, off Moruya on the 3 August 1942, after a fishing trawler had been attacked by a Japanese submarine.  Also received a Certificate of Merit from Royal Shipwreck Relief and Humane Society of NSW.

Born:  Sunday  14 October 1906 at Tenterfield

Died:  Friday  12 January 1945

Age:  38 years, 2 months, 29 days old

Cause:  Shot – Murdered

Event location:  Outside of Exchange Hotel, Adelaide St, Blayney

Funeral date:  Monday  15 January 1945

Funeral location:  Buried in Rookwood Cemetery

Grave location:  Anglican Section, Rookwood Cemetery.  Zone C, Section 08, Grave 1959

GPS:  -33.87119050511541,  151.05958014008522

Grave

Inscription:<br /> In Loving Memory of<br /> My Dear Husband and our Dear Father<br /> Eric George BAILEY<br /> Died 12th January 1945<br /> Aged 38 years<br /> Our Dear Mother<br /> Florence May BAILEY<br /> Died 1st December 1985<br /> Aged 78 years.<br /> Erected by New South Wales Government in Memory of Sergeant 2nd Class Eric George BAILEY G.C. who was shot in the Execution of his Duty at Blayney<br /> 12th January 1945.<br />

Sergeant Eric George Bailey ( 1945 )

 

Eric George BAILEY and his son - John
Eric George BAILEY and his son – John “Jack” BAILEY ( NSWPF # 6293 )

 

ERIC IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Eric George BAILEY GC. Touch plate at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra
Touch plate at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

Memorial location:  Below plaque is located at the location of the murder.

This plaque commemorates and honours the bravery and dedication of Sergeant Eric Bailey of the N.S.W. Police Force who was shot and killed when arresting a criminal at this place on the 12th January 1945. Placed on behlaf of the community by the Blayney Shire Council by Barry Colburt, Shire President, 11 December 1989.

On 4 January 1945, Constable 1st Class Bailey commenced duty at Blayney Police Station.  On his 8th day at that station, he was dead.

On a hot summer evening, eight days later, while on duty in Adelaide Street, he was informed that a drinker at the Exchange Hotel was displaying a revolver.

Shortly after 8pm on 12 January 1945, Constable 1st Class Bailey spoke to a man, Cyril Norman, who was dressed in an American Naval Uniform outside the Exchange Hotel, Blayney. The constable told the man that he intended to search him and his belongings regarding his alleged possession of a revolver. The man suddenly produced the revolver and shot Constable Bailey in the stomach. The constable then took hold of the offender and during the ensuing struggle two more shots were fired and the offender was wounded in the wrist. Three railway employees quickly came to the constable’s aid and the offender was handcuffed and detained until the arrival of Constable GradyBailey told Grady: ” He shot me through the back.  Don’t let him get away …I had a go.  I didn’t squib it “.

The wound suffered by Constable Bailey proved to be severe and he died on admission to the Orange Base Hospital with his wife by his side. He had in fact arrested his own murderer.

 

Allegations were later made suggesting that the offender was a contract killer sent to murder another local policeman, Constable Stan Grady, who had been enthusiastically investigating sly grog sellers and SP bookies in the area. The offender was said to have inadvertently shot Constable Bailey, whom he mistook for Grady, who was off duty at the time. When shot, Constable Bailey was in mounted police uniform, and until that day Stan Grady had been the only mounted constable in Blayney, thus the offender’s error. The offender, well-known Sydney criminal Cyril Normanalias Thomas Couldrey – was convicted and sentenced to death.

Norman was charged with the murder of Bailey and that of Maurice Hannigan, a Sydney shopkeeper from whom he had stolen guns and ammunition. Although he was convicted, the death sentence was later commuted to life imprisonment.


 

Bailey was posthumously awarded the George Cross, instituted in 1940 by King George VI and intended primarily for civilians, which recognized ‘acts of the greatest heroism or of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme danger’.

The first Australian policeman to be so honoured, he was also posthumously promoted sergeant 3rd class and awarded the George Lewis trophy in 1945 for the most courageous act by a policeman.

Bailey was accorded an official police funeral in Sydney and was buried in the Anglican section of Rookwood cemetery. His daughter and son John, who was to join the New South Wales police at the age of 16, also survived him.

( John ‘Jack’ George BAILEY, NSW Police Cadet # 0613, Regd. # 6293 )


 

28 May 2020

Maz Herrmann His son John “Jack” Bailey an ex cadet was our boss at Albury during the 80s and the day he retired I spoke to him that evening and said “Jack what are you fkn doing at work; today is your last day”? He said “I’m just tidying up some things before I go.
I knew Jack when he was a Snr Sgt at Wollongong and I was the Inspectors Clerk in 1977-1980.
I joined the cops the following year 1981 – then I had to call him Sir!
He was definitely an old school copper – enough said.
May he R.I.P.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1087842541279097/

 

 


 

The Sydney Morning Herald of 11 September, 1947

announced the presentation of Sergeant Bailey’s George Cross by Sir William McKell.

 

GEORGE CROSS AWARD – INVESTITURE BY MR. McKELL.

Mrs. F. M. Bailey, of Cleveland Street, Moore Park, widow of Police Sgt. Eric G. Bailey, yesterday received the George Cross awarded to her husband for holding a man who had fatally wounded him until assistance arrived, at Blayney in January, 1945. The decoration was made at an investiture held by the Governor General, Mr. McKell, at Government House.


 

Sergeant Bailey was born in 1906 and joined the New South Wales Police Force in 1927. At the time of his death he was stationed at Blayney. He was posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class ( Although his grave states Sgt 2/c ) and awarded the George Cross and the George Lewis Trophy.

* Eric BAILEY is the ONLY Australian Police Officer to be awarded the Imperial Honour, namely the George Cross Medal.


Bailey, Eric George (1906–1945)

by Christa Ludlow

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 13, (MUP), 1993

Eric George Bailey (1906-1945), policeman, was born on 14 October 1906 at Tenterfield, New South Wales, ninth child of Arthur Peter Bailey, compositor, and his wife Jane, née Bush, both native-born. Eric worked as a postal assistant before joining the New South Wales Police Force on 16 March 1927. After training, he was transferred to Sydney’s No.4 Division on 14 June, and sent to The Rock in 1928; he then served at Gundagai, Narrandera and other rural stations. Bailey was confirmed an ordinary constable on 16 March 1928. He married Florence May O’Connor at Mount Carmel Catholic Church, Waterloo, on 24 November that year.

Promoted constable 1st class on 23 April 1938, Bailey was next stationed at Moruya on the south coast. In 1940 he arrested a criminal at Batemans Bay and was commended for bravery, cool-headedness and devotion to duty. Learning that a fishing trawler had been attacked by a Japanese submarine off Moruya on 3 August 1942, he and Sergeant Horace Miller set out at night in a pleasure launch in heavy seas to assist with the rescue of the survivors. Bailey was highly commended and awarded six months seniority for conspicuous bravery; he also received a certificate of merit from the Royal Shipwreck Relief and Humane Society of New South Wales.

On 4 January 1945 Bailey was transferred to Blayney, south-west of Bathurst. On a hot summer evening eight days later, while on duty in Adelaide Street, he was informed that a drinker at the Exchange Hotel was displaying a revolver. When Bailey questioned the offender, Cyril Norman, and declared that he would search his room, Norman drew a revolver and shot him. In the ensuing struggle two more shots were fired, but Bailey managed to handcuff Norman and restrain him until Constable Grady arrived. Bailey told Grady: ‘He shot me through the back. Don’t let him get away . . . I had a go. I didn’t squib it’. Fatally wounded by the first shot, Bailey died hours later on 12 January 1945 in Orange Base Hospital, his wife at his side.

Norman was charged with the murder and that of Maurice Hannigan, a Sydney shopkeeper from whom he had stolen guns and ammunition. Although he was convicted, the death sentence was later commuted to life imprisonment.

Bailey was posthumously awarded the George Cross, instituted in 1940 by King George VI and intended primarily for civilians, which recognized ‘acts of the greatest heroism or of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme danger’. The first Australian policeman to be so honoured, he was also posthumously promoted sergeant 3rd class and awarded the George Lewis trophy in 1945 for the most courageous act by a policeman. Bailey was accorded an official police funeral in Sydney and was buried in the Anglican section of Rookwood cemetery. His daughter and son John, who was to join the New South Wales police at the age of 16, also survived him.

Select Bibliography

  • I. Bisset, The George Cross (Lond, 1961)
  • L. Wigmore (ed), They Dared Mightily (Canb, 1963)
  • Police News (Sydney), Feb 1945, p 7, Sept 1945, p 9, Oct 1947, p 44
  • Sydney Morning Herald, 14, 20 Jan, 8, 22 Feb, 5 Aug 1945, 30 Oct 1946, 11 Sept 1947
  • Sun (Sydney), 17 Jan 1979
  • service records of E. G. Bailey (police registry, New South Wales Police Dept, Sydney).

Citation details

Christa Ludlow, ‘Bailey, Eric George (1906–1945)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bailey-eric-george-9403/text16527, published first in hardcopy 1993, accessed online 6 January 2015.

Life Summary [details]

Birth

14 October 1906
Tenterfield, New South Wales, Australia

Death

12 January 1945

Orange, New South Wales, Australia

Religious Influence
Occupation
Workplaces

 

This article was first published in hardcopy in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 13, (MUP), 1993

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bailey-eric-george-9403


 

 




Thomas MADDEN

Thomas MADDEN

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Constable

Stations? , Bathurst

ServiceFrom  20 January 1864  to  30 April 1867 = 3+ years Service

Awards?

Born: ? ? 1836 – 1837, County Mayo, Ireland

Died on:  30 April 1867

Cause:  Accidentally Shot – ” Friendly fire ”

Event location:  Pulpit Hill ( near Katoomba )

Age: 30

Funeral date

Funeral location:

Buried at:  Hartley Cemetery, Great Western Hwy, Hartley, NSW

Location of Grave:  a/a

Memorial location:

 Thomas Madden

Cst Thomas MADDEN - Shot - 30 April 1867 - Grave stone

photo courtesy of:  http://livonne.com.au/2013/03/02/in-the-line-of-duty/

 

Sacred to the memory of Thomas Madden Constable. Who was accidentally shot 13th April 1867 while in the discharge of his duty at Pulpit Hill. A native of County Mayo Ireland. Aged 30 years. May his soul rest in peace. Erected by the members of the Police force in the Western District.
Sacred to the memory of Thomas Madden Constable. Who was accidentally shot 13th April 1867 while in the discharge of his duty at Pulpit Hill. A native of County Mayo Ireland. Aged 30 years. May his soul rest in peace. Erected by the members of the Police force in the Western District.

[alert_green]THOMAS IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

On the 29 April, 1867 a party of eight police led by Sergeant Walter Casey camped at Pulpit Hill (near present day Katoomba) with fifteen or sixteen ‘heavily ironed’ prisoners they were escorting from Bathurst Court to Darlinghurst Gaol.

At midnight Constable Madden took his turn to watch over the lockup in which the prisoners were housed. When he was relieved at 2am by Constable Hitchcox, Constable Madden went to check the prisoners. When he opened the door of the lockup, the prisoners, who had apparently been waiting for their chance to escape, rushed the constable. Sergeant Casey, who realised what was occurring, began firing at the prisoners. Unfortunately, of the five shots fired by the sergeant, three accidentally struck Constable Madden, inflicting fatal wounds. Two prisoners were also wounded.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald of 14 May, 1867, page 3  gave news of the inquest into the death of Constable Madden.

 

INQUEST ON THE BODY OF CONSTABLE MADDEN.

At the inquest held by the District Coroner, at Hartley, on view of the body of the unfortunate deceased Constable Thomas Madden, who was accidentally shot by Sergeant Casey while resisting the attempt of prisoners to escape from the lockup at Pulpit Hill, depositions were taken.

Walter Cassels Casey, sergeant of police, stationed at Sofala, on oath saith

On the 29th April I was in charge of an escort of fifteen prisoners en route from Bathurst to Sydney ; that night the escort stopped at Pulpit Hill lock-up, I was on guard over the prisoners from 7 to 10 p m ; and was relieved by constable Duggan, who was on guard from 10 to 12, when he was relieved by the deceased, who remained on guard from 12 to 2a.m. of the 30th instant, Constable Hitchcox had to relieve him then.

After I was relieved from guard by constable Duggan, I laid down on the sofa (marked A in the plan), and had my revolver loaded on the window sill at hand ; anxiety kept me from sleeping, and I conversed with every sentry ; at twelve minutes past 2 a.m, deceased called Constable Hitchcox from an adjoining room ; deceased then said, ” I will look to see that they are all right,” immediately after this, the prisoners, led by Rutherford, Holmes, Moran, Smith, Southgate, and Kerr burst into the front room, out of the cell (C), and through the door (B), I jumped up, seized my revolver, and fired at the prisoner Moran ; he appeared to fall, I then fired at Kerr, who sang out, I fired at Kerr, who was rushing at deceased ; Kerr fell, I then fired at Southgate, who had hold of deceased ; the pistol hung fire , Southgate was not hit ; I fired again at one I supposed to be prisoner Holmes, I believe that something was put over the lamps very soon after the rush ; I found a blanket and a prisoner’s jacket on the table after all was over ; as the room seemed to get very dark after the two first shots ; it may have been caused by the smoke ; after I had fired five shots, the prisoners all but two ran into the cell, these two, who were Holmes and Rutherford, ran out of the front door (D), taking the direction of G and F ; I followed Holmes, and snapped the pistol at him ; it did not go off ; I then ran in and shut the door on the prisoners, who were in the cell at the time senior-constables McArthur and McNanamy and other police ran up from the barracks ; McArthur told me that Madden was shot in three places, and that the prisoners must have a revolver, I said, ” Than they got Madden‘s,” I said three or four of the prisoners are shot. I then looked at Hitchcox‘s revolver, it was not discharged, nor was any other of the police revolvers but my own, which had been fired five times, I then said, “Oh, my God! I must have shot poor Madden,”

I went up to the barracks, and saw deceased ; he complained of pain in his bowels ; I said, ” Oh, Madden it was I shot you,” he said, ” No, it was the prisoners,” I said, ‘ No, it was me, as no other revolver was discharged,” he said then, “If it was, I forgive you ; I know you did not do it on purpose,” and shook hands with me. I was so overcome at the thought of shooting my comrade, I do not know what I did, I believe I fainted.

I saw in the afternoon that prisoner Moran and Kerr were each wounded in two places – Moran on the breast and in the thigh, and Kerr having a graze on his head and a severe wound through his right arm.

When I went in, Moran said:, “You b—— butcher, if I had a revolver I would have got away ; I would as it was but for the sergeant.”

I was standing on the sofa when I fired, and the deceased was struggling with the prisoners ; my revolver has six chambers ; one chamber had two round bullets in it, one of which struck Moran on the left breast ; it is usual to see if the prisoners are all safe when changing guard ; the whole affair did not last more than five minutes ; I have been about eleven years in the police, I think Kerr had hold of deceased by the throat ; Kerr was shot through the right arm, and deceased on the left side ; I believe deceased was trying to keep prisoner from me and the door ; the property found on deceased consisted of £7 16s 3d and a silver watch and chain.

Thomas Hitchcox sworn: ” I am a constable stationed at Pulpit Hill, on the morning of the 30th April I was called shortly after 2 a m to relieve the deceased constable Madden, who was on duty guarding fifteen prisoners in the Pulpit Hill watch-house. When I came out of my own room sergeant Casey was lying on a sofa, after I had been out of my room a few moments, constable Madden said, “I’ll see if the prisoners are all right ”

He took the padlock off and drew the bolt, immediately, the prisoners rushed the door open and I believe knocked deceased down ; at least l lost sight of him ; prisoner Rutherford sprang at my throat, with, I believe the intention to get at Sergeant Casey‘s revolver, which was lying on the window ; I got away from him ; he followed me, and got hold of me a second time ; I then got away ; sergeant Casey jumped up and commenced to fire his revolver at the prisoners. Rutherford again caught me by the throat ; I had great difficulty in getting away from him ; I rushed into my bedroom ; got out of the window ; and went to the barracks to call the escort, who were sleeping in the barrack room, and to get arms, as the prisoners were between myself and my own ; I believe had not sergeant Casey fired as promptly as he did we should have been disarmed ; and the prisoners would have escaped ; my revolver was hanging behind the cell door ; the place where I generally keep it,

Sergeant Casey was standing on the sofa when he fired.

Daniel Murray O’Hara being duly sworn said I am a duly qualified medical practitioner residing at Hassan’s Walls, I have this day made a post mortem examination on the body of Thomas Madden ; there were no external marks of violence on the body, except three punctured wounds ; one on the left jaw in front of the ear, one on the left shoulder blade, and one on the left side, between the ninth and tenth ribs ; these three wounds are gunshot ; where the ball entered I found the ball that caused the wound on the jaw had passed through the lower jaw blade fracturing it and wounding parts inside the jaw, viz muscles etc, and passing through the roof of the tongue in which I found the ball lodged in its substance ; on the right side the bone had split the ball, and one small portion was found immediately inside the left jaw bone, and the principal portion on the place stated, with a small portion of bone adhering to it ; this wound would not necessarily have proved fatal ; I found that the wound on the left side was more serious ; and on opening the chest and abdomen, I found that the ball had passed through the chest and abdomen, from the left to the right side, wounding in its course the pleura, peritoneum, and spleen, liver, and stomach, I found the ball under the skin on the right side ; there had been a great deal of internal haemorrhage along the course of this ball ; I believe it was from the causes of this wound that death took place ; I was not able to discover the ball that had entered the shoulder blade but as it had not entered the chest I did not consider it necessary to make any further search for it. The round hallmarked “X” is the one which had entered the side, and was the cause of death ; the ball marked “T” I found in the substance of the tongue.

The jury returned the following verdict – “That on the 30th day of April last, at Pulpit Hill, the said Thomas Madden died from pistol shot wounds, fired by Sergeant Casey while in the execution of his duty, and not by any other violent means whatever to the knowledge of the said jurors, did die.” The jury also added that they consider no blame attached to Sergeant Casey.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13138796

The constable was born in Ireland and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 20 January, 1864 at the age of 28 years. He had previously served in the Royal Irish Constabulary. At the time of his death he was a mounted trooper in the New South Wales Police Force and was stationed at Bathurst.

 

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NSW BDM – Death  5356/1867

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I visited this grave today, Saturday 29 October 2016 and it is still in great shape.

Cal

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Senior Constable John R HERBERT

Senior Constable John R HERBERT

Accidentally Shot

Molong

13 April, 1865

 

In April 1865 Senior Constable Herbert, along with Constables Cook and Ambrose and Tracker Peter, were searching for the Hall Gang of bushrangers in the bush between Forbes and Canowindra. The bushrangers had earlier robbed a store at Forbes and information had been obtained indicating that they were headed for Canowindra. The police party made camp in the bush near Molong, and Senior Constable Herbert announced that he and Constable Ambrose would be leaving the camp to keep watch on a hut where they suspected the gang might be hiding. It was arranged that should either he or Ambrose return during the night they would whistle to alert the camp of their approach.

 

Unfortunately, Herbert and Ambrose did return during the night but, after losing their way in the darkness, they approached the police camp from a different direction than expected. Being closer than they believed to the camp, they also did not whistle to signal their arrival. Believing the approaching riders to be the bushrangers Constable Cook issued a challenge on two occasions without receiving a reply, so on the second occasion both he and Peter fired into the darkness, unfortunately  hitting Constable Herbert in the groin, neck and shoulder. He died about a week later.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald dated 29 May, 1865 indicates that Constable Cook was charged with a criminal offence following the shooting, reporting that ” Constable Cook was placed on his trial to-day, at the Quarter Sessions, for shooting Constable Herbert, and was acquitted… The Court has concluded its sittings. ”

 

The senior constable was born in 1837 and joined the police force on 1 September, 1859. In 1862 he became a member of the newly-formed New South Wales Police Force. At the time of his death he was probably stationed at Canowindra.