Andrew James MURRAY

Andrew James MURRAY 

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   ?

Rank:  Constable 1st Class

Stations?, Tabulam – Death

ServiceFrom  20 July 1981  to  23 March 1989 = 7+ years Service

Awards: Commissioners Valour Award ( posthumously )

No find on It’s An Honour

Born? ? 1962

Died on:  Thursday  23 March 1989

Age:  26

Cause:  Drowned during an Off Duty rescue attempt

Event location:  Tallows Beach, Byron Bay, NSW

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at:  St Finbarr’s Catholic Church, Byron Bay, NSW

 Memorial at?

[alert_green]ANDREW IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]


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 Funeral location ?

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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On 23 March, 1989 Constable Murray and his family were holidaying at Byron Bay. About 3.05pm on that day they were at Tallows Beach when the constable saw a young woman in distress in the water. He then took his surf ski and paddled out through a rough, two metre swell to assist. The girl’s boyfriend at this time also entered the water and managed to help her to safety. Constable Murray had at this time unfortunately been tipped off his surf ski and was seen with an arm raised, indicating that he was having difficulties. He was again spotted a short time later floating about fifty metres out, on the surface. Despite an extensive search the constable was not seen again. It is thought that he may have been struck on the head by the ski when tipped off it, or perhaps injured when dumped in the heavy seas.

 

The constable was born in 1962 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 20 July, 1981. At the time of his death he was stationed at Tabulam.

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Sunday 26 March 1989, page 2


Police scale down sea search

SYDNEY: Police and rescue workers scaled down the search yesterday for Andrew James Murray, 26, a young police man who disappeared in rough surf on Thursday at Byron Bay, on the Far North Coast.

Off-duty Constable Murray, of Tabulam police station, was swept out to sea after going to the rescue of a swimmer in trouble about 3pm.

Constable Murray paddled over to the distressed swimmer but was knocked off his surf ski by a wave.

He was caught in a strong rip and dragged out to sea.

The swimmer managed to struggle back to shore and alerted emergency services.

A police spokeswoman said today that there was little hope of finding the constable alive and the search was being scaled down.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article120918741.txt

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Sergeant 1st Class Rhoderic Francis LINDSAY

Sergeant 1st Class Rhoderic Francis LINDSAY

New South Wales Police Force

Boating Accident

Swansea

20 February, 1984

On the afternoon of 20 February, 1984 Sergeant Lindsay and Senior Constable Calman were both off duty and fishing in the sergeant’s boat off Swansea. About 6.10pm the yacht Melody radioed for assistance after running aground on the bar at Swansea Channel. Sergeant Lindsay and Senior Constable Calman then set out to assist the stricken vessel. Securing a line to the Melody they attempted to tow the vessel to safety, but as their efforts were hampered by heavy seas the sergeant released the line from the yacht. Constable Calman then noticed that Sergeant Lindsay was missing from his boat and seeing blood in the water, dived into the sea to rescue his friend. Constable Calman, assisted by surf club members, then conveyed the injured sergeant to shore however it was found then that he had died of his injuries.

 

It appears that Sergeant Lindsay was either knocked or was washed overboard where he suffered extensive head injuries when struck by his boat’s propeller.

 

He was posthumously awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal and the Police Commissioner’s Commendation for Outstanding Courage and Devotion to Duty.

 

The sergeant was born in 1935 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 12 April, 1955. At the time of his death he was stationed at Newcastle.


 

National Police Remembrance Day ceremony in Lake Macquarie

Rhoderic Francis LINDSAY

 


 




Francis Laurel BURKE

Francis Laurel BURKE

Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Constable

Stations: ?, Redfern – Death

ServiceFrom  20 June 1955  to  20 January 1961 = 5+ years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born? ? 1927

Died on:  20 January 1961

Age:  33 – 34

Cause:  Drowned during a “Off Duty” surf rescue

Event location:   Kiama Beach

Event date:   20 January 1961

Funeral datepossibly  23 January 1961

Funeral location?

Buried at:  possibly Rookwood Catholic – Portion Lawn 1, Plot 59

 Memorial located at:  ?

“There are a number of photos of this man on Ancestry.co.au which I can’t access”  26 July 2017

[alert_green]FRANCIS IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]


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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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 On 20 January, 1961 Constable Burke was holidaying on the South Coast with his family. In the afternoon of that day the family were at Kiama Beach when the constable was informed by his son that two boys were in difficulties in an undertow. Constable Burke entered the water and swam out through the heavy surf to assist. Unfortunately he collapsed during his efforts and after being seen floating face downwards in the water, was carried onto the beach. He failed to respond to resuscitation and was conveyed to the Kiama District Hospital where life was pronounced extinct.

 

The constable was born in 1927 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 20 June, 1955. At the time of his death he was stationed at Redfern.

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There is a Francis L BURKE buried at Rookwood ( as detailed above ) but no other verifying details via internet search.

There is also a Francis Neil BURKE mentioned in the Kiama Independent on 25 January 1961 having died at Kiama, late of Sydney.

Nothing found on Trove.

 

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Police Remembrance Day:

A family member of Constable Francis Laurel Burke, who died in 1961, laid a wreath at the Police Remembrance Day commemorations on Monday. Picture: ANDY ZAKELI<br />
A family member of Constable Francis Laurel Burke, who died in 1961, laid a wreath at the Police Remembrance Day commemorations on Monday. Picture: ANDY ZAKELI

Almost 60 years on, Kenneth Nash still misses his uncle Allen.

Sergeant Allen William Nash, aged 40, was killed in the line of duty by a gun-wielding offender at Primbee in 1956.

Sgt Nash was one of eight officers stationed in the Lake Illawarra local area command who were recognised with memorial plaques on a wall of honour outside Lake Illawarra police station on Monday, as part of Police Remembrance Day commemorations.

Dozens of current and retired officers, families, friends, politicians, councillors and members of the public gathered at Oak Flats for a ceremony to unveil the memorial wall, and honour past and present officers.

 

Since 1862, more than 250 NSW Police officers have died in the line of duty.

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/2591540/lake-illawarra-officers-honoured-on-police-remembrance-day-photos/

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Trevelyn Cuthbert NOWLAND

Trevelyn Cuthbert NOWLAND

New South Wales Police Force

Constable

Drowned

31 years

Bendemeer

6 October, 1931

Trevelyn Cuthbert NOWLAND

 

In 1931 Constable Nowland was the lone policeman attached to the Bendemeer Police Station. On the night of Sunday 4 October, 1931 a man came to the station to complain that he had been camped under the bridge at the river and had been accosted by a “madman” who had threatened to kill him. He requested that the constable come down to the bridge, which was at the McDonald River, a distance of less than 300 metres to look for the madman. The constable obliged, however after a brief search under and around the bridge, the alleged “madman” could not be found. The following night the man again came to the police station with the same complaint. (It was believed to have been the same man both nights as Mrs Nowland heard his voice on both visits, although she never actually saw him). The constable took his revolver and set out to search the bridge area again. When he failed to return home by the morning Mrs Nowland telephoned the police at Tamworth.

 

Police from Tamworth quickly travelled to Bendemeer and, with the assistance of an Aboriginal tracker, began to search for the missing man. Later that afternoon Constable Nowland’s body was found and recovered from the McDonald River. He was still fully clothed, except for his cap, and the body had no apparent signs of violence, although apparently the constable’s nose had been bleeding before he fell or was thrown into the water. At the spot where the body was found the water was only three to four feet (about 1 metre) deep.

 

The Brisbane Courier dated 7 October, 1931 reported that “The police believe that Nowland was insensible or dead before he entered the water. It is thought that Constable Nowland did not reach the bridge last night. His way would have taken him past a hotel, and beneath brilliant lights, and it is considered that he would certainly have been seen had he gone direct to the bridge from the police station. It is thought probable that he was attacked almost as soon as he left the police station, and was then taken to the river and thrown into the water insensible. The police are handicapped by the absence of any description of the man who twice called at the police station and spoke of the lunatic. Constable Nowland was the only one who saw him.”

 

The Sydney Morning Herald of 10 November, 1931 reported the open finding of the inquest into the constable’s death, as follows.

“BENDEMEER MYSTERY – CORONER’S OPEN VERDICT.
TAMWORTH. Monday.
The inquest into the death of Constable Nowland, whose body was found in the McDonald River on October 5, came to an end to-day, when the coroner (Mr. Geikie, P.M.) returned an open verdict. Six sessions of the inquest have been held, and 24 witnesses have been examined. In delivering his finding, Mr. Glekie said that the case was marked by many conflicting and mysterious statements. If it was suicide, then the deceased must either have been sane or insane. If he was sane, the first thing was to look for the motive, and the evidence adduced no such motive. If he was insane, no motive need be looked for. There was not a tittle of direct evidence of mental derangement in the constable up to the time of his death. His finding would be that Nowland was found dead in the McDonald River without any marks on the body; further, that death was due to drowning, but how or by what means drowning came about the evidence did not say.”

The mystery of what exactly happened to the unfortunate Constable Nowland has apparently never been solved, although theories ranging from suicide to poisoning to murder have long been put forward. A coroner’s inquest into the death gave the cause of death as drowning, however the surrounding circumstances remain unknown.

 

The constable was born in 1901 and was aged 31 years when he died.  He joined the New South Wales Police Force on 25 August, 1922. At the time of his death he was stationed at Bendemeer. He is not listed in the official New South Wales Police Honour Roll.

 

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Trooper Joseph LEES

Trooper Joseph LEES

New South Wales Police Force

Drowned

Grafton

7 January, 1867

On 7 January, 1867 the trooper was on duty collecting the electoral roll and agricultural returns near Grafton. Shortly after 1pm on that day he was attempting to cross First Falls on the Upper Clarence River when his horse reared, throwing him into the water, where he drowned. Trooper Lees was a married man with two children and a wife then expecting their third child.

 

The Maitland Mercury dated 15 January, 1867 contained the following brief notice, indicating that “We regret to learn that Trooper Leece [sic] of the Grafton Police Force, in attempting to cross the First Falls, at the Upper Clarence, yesterday, shortly after noon, in the execution of his duty, was carried down by the current and drowned. Information of the sad event reached Grafton last evening when the police boat was immediately dispatched with grapnels to drag for the body, which had not been recovered up to the time our informant left.”

 

At the time of his death the trooper was stationed at Grafton.




Constable Jeremiah O’HORRIGAN

Constable Jeremiah O’HORRIGAN

Drowned

Forbes

25 February, 1863

 

On Wednesday 25 February, 1863 the constable was away from his station patrolling the Weddin Mountains. On his return journey to Forbes he was required to cross the flooded Lachlan River. As he did so the strong current began to carry his horse along. Constable O’Horrigan attempted to check the horse however it rolled over, throwing him into the water. As he was unable to swim, the constable was drowned. His body was recovered downstream some hours later.

 

The constable was born in 1831 and joined the police force on 1 May, 1860. In 1862 he became a member of the newly-formed New South Wales Police Force. At the time of his death he was stationed at Forbes.




Constable Christian SEIDTZ

Constable Christian SEIDTZ

Drowned

Grafton

29 April, 1861

 

The constable is believed to have drowned in the Clarence River at Grafton while trying to save the life of a young boy (eleven-year-old Daniel Forde) who had fallen into the water at a spot nearly opposite the constable’s house. The Sydney Morning Herald dated 15 May, 1861 printed the following article in relation to the inquiry into the deaths of the constable and young Daniel Forde.

 

MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY – Upon the bodies of Daniel Forde and Christian Seidtz.

James Hovenden, Chief Constable, stated: About noon I met the deceased boy (Forde) near Pound Street; carrying meat on horseback; shortly after, one of his brothers informed me that he had been thrown from his horse into the water in Pound Street; I procured the drags and went to the spot to endeavour to recover the body; medical aid was in attendance when the body was found, about three quarters of an hour afterwards.

 

Solomon Cooper sworn : I knew the deceased Christian Seidtz; about noon on Monday my wife called my attention to someone crossing a flooded part of Pound Street, near my residence; I ran out and saw a boy struggling in the water; Seidtz, who lived opposite, came out of his house and plunged in to assist the lad, and sunk immediately; I never saw him rise after he went into the water; I gave an alarm and Richard Barrett immediately swam out; Mr. Sanders and myself did all we could, but not being able to swim could not go out of our depth; the water was about ten feet deep; the body was not recovered for about three-quarters of an hour; Dr. Little saw the body but could not restore animation.

 

Carl Meyer, sworn, stated: I live in Pound Street, near the deceased’s place; I heard Mrs. Seidtz call out that her husband was drowning; I ran up and saw a lad struggling in the water, and his horse by the side; I could not see Seidtz for some time then his face showed for a moment and disappeared; I could not swim; I gave information to the chief constable; every effort was made to rescue the deceased.

 

The deceased, Seidtz, was a man much respected; a native of Germany; and had been three years in the Grafton police force, during which time there was no complaint against him. He was a remarkably fine-made man, thirty-five years of age; and a very sober industrious person. This sudden event has left his unfortunate wife and four young children totally unprovided for.”

 

At the time of his death the constable was 35 years old and was stationed at Grafton. He is sometimes recorded as ‘Seitz’ or ‘Leitz’




John SMITH

John SMITH

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Trooper

Stations? , Araluen

ServiceFrom  ?  to  10 February 1860

Awards?

Born? ? ?

Died on:  10 February 1860

Cause:  Drowned

Event location:  Crown Flat, Araluen

Age:  ?

Funeral date ?

Funeral location ?

Buried at: Unmarked grave at Araluen Catholic Cemetery

Trooper SMITH lies in an unmarked grave at Araluen Catholic Cemetery.
Trooper SMITH lies in an unmarked grave at Araluen Catholic Cemetery.

[alert_yellow]JOHN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]

 

The trooper was drowned in severe floods at Araluen in February, 1860. The Sydney Morning Herald of Monday 20 February, 1860 graphically reported the floods, advising of “Losses to life and property, the extent of which are yet not known, from a subject of a dark page in the annals of Braidwood and surrounding districts.” It went on to describe the sad death of Trooper Smith.

 

….The next calamity to human life occurred at the police camp. Trooper Smith, who had lately joined the force, was endeavouring to escape to Mr. Sweeney’s house, when the current carried him off, and his corpse was discovered when the water subsided; it was entirely buried in the sand, part of the arm projecting.  Several bodies not known have been recovered, and it is anticipated that at least seventeen human beings have lost their lives in the Araluen flood. ……..

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13036792?searchTerm=trooper%20john%20smith&searchLimits=l-decade=186|||l-year=1860

At the time of his death the trooper was stationed at Araluen. No further details are known as yet.

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The Goulburn Herald ( NSW )  Saturday  18 February 1860  p 2 of 4

…….

One of the Troopers of the Southern Patrol, a fine young man named John Smith, was drowned while endeavouring to cross from the police camp to the Cornstalk Inn.  In fact the destruction is general and conceivably great. …..

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/103400139?searchTerm=trooper%20john%20smith&searchLimits=l-decade=186|||l-year=1860|||l-month=2#reloadOnBack

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The Empire ( Sydney )  Monday  20 February 1860  p 3 of 8

……. At the Police Camp the water rushed in, and one of the troopers named Smith, whilst making his way from there to Sweeney’s public house, was carried away by the rushing torrent and met with a watery grave : his body, together with the bodies of two Chinamen, have been recovered. ……

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/64097583?searchTerm=trooper%20john%20smith&searchLimits=l-decade=186|||l-year=1860|||l-month=2

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Matthew James EVERINGHAM

Matthew James EVERINGHAM

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 

Rank:  District Constable

Stations: ?, Portland Head ( Hawkesbury area )

Service:   From  ?  ?  ?    to  25 December 1817 = ? years Service

Awards

Born: ? ? 1769

Died on:  25 December 1817

Cause:  Drowned

Event location:  Hawkesbury River

Age:  48

Funeral date

Funeral location

Buried at:  Wilberforce Cemetery

Sacred to the memory of Matthew James Everingham who departed this life 25th of Dec. 1817 aged 48 years.<br /> Farewell vain world I have had anough of thee and am carless what thou canst say of me. they smiles i curt not non thy frowns i fear beneath this and my head Liesquit heal.

 

[alert_red]MATTHEW is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]

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The Sydney Gazette dated 3 January, 1818 reported that “On Friday last Mr. Matthew Everingham, settler and district constable at Portland Head, fell overboard from a Hawkesbury boat, and was unfortunately drowned. On the finding of the body an Inquest was convened, who returned a Verdict Accidental Death. He leaves a large family to deplore his premature destiny.”

 

Constable Everingham was still news well over a century after his death. The Barrier Miner of 4 June, 1929 reported the following story.

 

Matthew James Everingham arrived in Sydney on the ship Scarborough in 1788. In 1791 he was married at Parramatta to Elizabeth Rhymes by the Rev. Samuel Marsden. In the same year he was granted 50 acres of land, then described as “at the Ponds two miles N.E. of Parramatta“.  Later he settled on the Hawkesbury River, on the farm afterwards known as Andrew Everingham’s Farm. He also became the owner of land at “Richmond Hills“, believed to be now in the Kurrajong district. He was appointed and remained district constable till his death in 1817. In that year he was drowned in the Hawkesbury River and was buried at Wilberforce, where his grave can still be seen.

 

At the time of his death the constable was stationed at Portland Head (Hawkesbury).

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NSW BDM = Marriage:  125/1791 V1791125 3A &  125/1791 V1791125 147A

NSW BDM = Death:         3920/1817 V18173920

 

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EVERINGHAM, MATTHEW JAMES (1769-1817), settler, was convicted in London on 7 July 1784 and sentenced to transportation for seven years. Shortly before his conviction he was employed as a ‘servant‘ by an attorney of the Middle Temple, hence the subsequent references to him as ‘attorney’s clerk‘. Allegedly ‘in great distress’ he had obtained two books by false pretences from the servant of another attorney, and these he had offered for sale.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/people/1465540?q=Matthew+James+EVERINGHAM&c=people

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Windsor and Richmond Gazette, NSW. Friday 5 February 1932 page 6 of 12 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/8914125?zoomLevel=3&searchTerm=Matthew%20James%20EVERINGHAM&searchLimits=
Windsor and Richmond Gazette, NSW. Friday 5 February 1932 page 6 of 12
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/8914125?zoomLevel=3&searchTerm=Matthew%20James%20EVERINGHAM&searchLimits=

 

Matthew James Everingham - 2512-1817 - News article 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Windsor and Richmond Gazette NSW Friday 21 June 1929 Page 11 of 16
Windsor and Richmond Gazette NSW
Friday 21 June 1929
Page 11 of 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 – 1954), Friday 23 August 1929, page 7


THE EVERINGHAM FORTUNE?.

NEWCASTLE CLAIMANT

NEWCASTLE has produced a claimant for the Everingham millions in Mr. Ernest Edward Chaseling, who declares that he is a direct descendant of Matthew James Everingham.

He says that his grandmother, Ann Everingham, was a daughter of Matthew. She married John Chaseling in 1818, and his father, Joshua Watford Chaseling, was a son of that union. Mr. Chaseling has two brothers and two sisters.

Matthew Everingham, history tells, was drowned in the Hawkesbury River before he could leave for England to claim £200,000. That was in the early part of last century. Interest on the money has accumulated until the sum of eleven million pounds is said to be now awaiting its rightful claimant.

Mr. John Chaseling, son of Thomas Chaseling I., who married Miss Ann Everingham, one of the three daughters of pioneer Matthew J. Everingham (obit. 1817), is interred, as also is his wife, Mrs. Ann Everingham Chaseling, in the private vault of Matthew James Everingham II., which is situated at ‘Knight’s Retreat Farm,’ near Sackville, on land specially set aside by the will of second Matthew James Everingham as a burial place for any of the Everinghams in descent, or kindred. — “MARMINGA.”

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article85927804.txt

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Everingham, Matthew James (1769–1817)

by A. J. Gray

Matthew James Everingham (1769-1817), settler, was convicted in London on 7 July 1784 and sentenced to transportation for seven years. Shortly before his conviction he was employed as a ‘servant’ by an attorney of the Middle Temple, hence the subsequent references to him as ‘attorney’s clerk’. Allegedly ‘in great distress’ he had obtained two books by false pretences from the servant of another attorney, and these he had offered for sale.

He arrived in the First Fleet transport Scarborough and was employed by Assistant Commissary Zachariah Clark. On 13 March 1791 Everingham married Elizabeth Rymes of London, who had arrived in the Neptune on 28 June 1790 and in July he settled on a 50-acre (20 ha) grant near Parramatta. In December Watkin Tench noted that ‘the Attorney’s Clerk’ appeared to find the cultivation of his own land ‘not half so easy a task as he formerly found that of stringing together volumes of tautology to encumber or convey that of his neighbours’; but for once Tench was unjust. Far from being ‘out of his province’ Everingham succeeded as a settler. In 1800 he signed the address to Governor John Hunter setting out ‘the grievous and intolerable burdens’ under which the settlers at the Field of Mars had long laboured; soon afterwards he disposed of his grant to Andrew Hume and like many of the early grantees moved to the Hawkesbury where farming prospects were better. By 1803 he was well established at Portland Head, but in 1804 his home and farm buildings were burned by natives and he, his wife and servant were speared, though happily their wounds were not fatal. In 1816 he acquired 130 acres (53 ha) at Richmond Hill, and became a district constable. A year later, on 25 December 1817, he was accidentally drowned in the Hawkesbury. In a memorial to the colonial secretary in 1825 his widow claimed, apparently without financial result, that he had died while in the execution of his constabulary duties.

Everingham was survived by five sons and four daughters, and was buried in St John’s cemetery, Wilberforce. His career was not spectacular, but over a long period he discharged his duties faithfully and worked steadily as a pioneering settler.

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/everingham-matthew-james-2030

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