1

Kenneth Roy CURRAN OAM

Kenneth Roy CURRAN  OAM

AKA Bluey

Late of Frenchs Forest, NSW

NSW Redfern or Penrith Police Academy Class #  ? ? ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # ????

Rank?

Final Rank = ?

Stations?

Service:  From ? ? 1950  to ? ? 19566 years Service

Awards: Medal of the Order of Australia ( OAM ) granted 12 June 2006

For service to the community, particularly through pipe bands & aged care organisations, & to a range of military and law enforcement authorities as an instructor.

Born: Wednesday  9 September 1925

Died on: Thursday  27 June 2019

Age: 93yrs  9mths  18days

Cause: On 24 May 2019 – Ken was in Arcardia, Pittwater Private Hospital after a heart attack

Event location: ?

Event date: ?

Funeral date: Thursday 4 July 2019 @ 10.30am

Funeral location: St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church, Prahran Avenue, Davidson, NSW

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: Ann Wilson Funerals – 02 9971 4224

Buried at: ?

Memorial located at: ?

In the 1954 Electoral rolls, Ken is living at 91 Connaught St, Dee Why – along with Dory Mary, who was possibly his wife – and his occupation is recorded as ‘Policeman’.

Norma ( dec ), mentioned in his obituary “may have been” his second wife.

 

Cal via Kevin Banister.

Kenneth Roy CURRAN OAM

BLUEY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


Date listed: 29/6/2019CURRAN,  Kenneth Roy OAM
NX202327
1st Commando Company

“BLUEY”

Aged 93

Late of Frenchs Forest Passed away peacefully 27 June 2019

Dearly loved husband of Norma (dec).

Adored father of Neville, Graeme, Jenny and their partners.

Devoted Pop of seven grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren.

Loved by all his family.

In God’s Care

A Requiem Mass for the repose of the soul of Ken will be held at St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church, Prahran Avenue, Davidson on Thursday, 4 July, 2019 at 10.30am.

By request no flowers please

Publication: Manly Daily

https://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/tributes/notice/3274730/?fbclid=IwAR2Pbi3tMHQHa8L3niafIQt1QjV68zjs3MvNTmdsPyyWX30p6yDwbwN9f9g

 


IF, you’ve ever published a death notice of some significance, this is it.

Ken Curran was a Commando during his military service.  I am not sure whether he served in WW2, Korea, Vietnam….?  But, I can gain more for you later.

Ken Curran was in my Unit, 1/19 Bn RNSWR and he was a fine man.  He gave his all to those about him.

A true ‘Serviceman’. One, that I respected and admired.

 

Sadly,  I am in Tasmania for the moment, and thus won’t be in a position to be at his funeral………. bugger.

 

Bob Burrage.

 

 

 

 


 

Kenneth Roy CURRAN OAM
Kenneth Roy CURRAN OAM


 

 

FRONT COVER: VALE WO2 Ken “Bluey” Curran, OAM. JP. 2nd/11th Commando Squadron WW2 & 1 Commando Company 9th of September 1925 - 26th of June 2019
FRONT COVER: VALE WO2 Ken “Bluey” Curran, OAM. JP. 2nd/11th Commando Squadron WW2 & 1 Commando Company 9th of September 1925 – 26th of June 2019

 


Kenneth Roy CURRAN OAM

Kenneth Roy CURRAN OAM

MEDAL (OAM) OF THE ORDER OF AUSTRALIA IN THE GENERAL DIVISION
Mr Kenneth Roy CURRAN,
32 Mimosa Street, Frenchs Forest NSW 2086
For service to the community, particularly through pipe bands and aged care
organisations, and to a range of military and law enforcement authorities as an
instructor.
Current Drum Major, Northern Suburbs Pipes and Drums.
Current Honorary Drum Major and Dress and Drill Tutor, East Hills Scouts Pipes and Drums, for 30 years.
Current Dress and Drill Judge, Australian Pipe Band Association.
Current volunteer driver and carer, KADDY (Keen Abled and Disabled of Dee Why), for over 19 years; Board Member, for several years.
Current bus driver, Justinian House, Mater Hospital, for about 18 years.
Bus driver, Manly-Warringah-Pittwater Community Transport.
Justice of the Peace, since 1958.
Unarmed Combat Instructor, Australian Special Forces, Naval Police, Australian Army, NSW Police, NSW Prison Service, since 1950s.
Awards include:
Seniors Week Achievement Award, 2004.
Frank McAskill Trophy, for the improvement of the quality of life for Senior Citizens in the Manly Warringah-Pittwater areas, 2000.
Sister of Mercy Award, for his service to Justinian House.

https://webarchive.nla.gov.au/awa/20070829035401/http://www.gg.gov.au/res/File/PDFs/honours/qb06/Media%20Notes%20OAM(A-E).pdf


 

Ken Blue Curran (2012)

 

Inducted into the A.M.A.H.O.F.(Inc) for 2012
Lifetime Achievement – Army Unarmed Combat

 Inducted into the W.K.U.H.O.F. for 2012

Lifetime Achievement – Army Unarmed Combat

Blue Curran on an unarmed combat course in the early 1960’s
Blue Curran on an unarmed combat course in the early 1960’s

Kenneth Roy “Blue” Curran was born on 9th September 1925 in Waverly NSW.  He first joined the army during WW II in 1943 at 18 years of age. His service number was NX 202327 he served in Australia and after reaching 19 years of age and therefore being eligible for overseas operational deployment transferred from Infantry to Commandos.  He saw service in 2/11 Cavalry Regiment Commando Squadron, he completed his commando training in far North Queensland and later saw service in Moratai, Labuan, British Borneo and Rabaul before the end of the war.

At wars end he returned to civilian life but reenlisted in the military as a Citizen Military Force (CMF) member of the newly raised 1 Commando Company (1 Cmdo Coy) in 1955 at the age of 30.  His CMF service number was 2242907.

Blue was an active member of 1 Cmdo for twenty years up until 1975 when he officially retired from military service.  However, as a result of Blue’s experience and skills relating to Military Unarmed Combat (MUC) training over the years he has been retained as a consultant from time to time to the military to assist in MUC training well into the new millennia.

As a consultant to the military he had conducted training for commandos, infantry battalions and other unit’s right through to 2000.  From 2004 to 2007 he was requested by the Infantry Training Center at Ingleburn to conduct training in bayonet fighting.  In addition to his service to the military Blue has also trained the first members of the then newly raised NSW Police Tactical Response Group (TRG) and continued to provide training support as requested.  He has trained numerous other law enforcement groups, prison services and members of the Sheriff’s Department. He has also conducted security training for security firms, and personal self defence training for members of the community.  He continues to train security officers in self defence and the use of batons and handcuffing techniques.

Physical fitness in MUC training is heavily emphasized by Blue
Physical fitness in MUC training is heavily emphasized by Blue

During his time in the Australian Military Blue was responsible for keeping alive MUC from his initial training in WW II to its resurgence in the mid 1950’s with the raising of 1 Cmdo Coy.  He was also instrumental in the continual review and development of the MUC training program ensuring that outdated techniques were dropped from the syllabus and new information added to keep the MUC syllabus relevant to the changing needs of the military.  This also comprised the inclusion of skills from civilian martial arts either through serving soldiers with previous experience or through association with martial arts instructors.  However, it was always advocated that any changes to the syllabus was relevant to the operational requirements of the military and were not a stylised application of complicated techniques that did not fit military needs or application.

Blue over time would later become the Army’s senior MUC instructor and the person primarily responsible for its propagation to the next generation of MUC instructors in the early to mid 1960’s who in later years would guide MUC within the military.  In this role Blue was the last then serving WWII Commando with MUC training and operational experience remaining from the WW II era.  Those instructors who later would have their own significant contributions to MUC that would benefit from this knowledge and experience included Major Greg Mawkes, Major John Whipp, and WO1 Denis Gaskell to name a few.

In 1980 Blue was officially acknowledged for his services related to MUC training within the military and was awarded the Order of Australia Medal.  In later years he was recognized further by membership to the International Close Quarter Fighting Instructors Association.  Ken currently lives with his wife in French’s Forrest Sydney.

Blue supervising training on a MUC course in the 1950’s
Blue supervising training on a MUC course in the 1950’s

Dialogue and Interview with Ken “Blue” Curran OAM, JP

Recorded by Glen Gardiner 1st April 2010, Sydney

I first joined the army in 1943 when I was 18 years old. I went to recruit training in Warwick in Queensland and returned to Sydney where I was posted to a young soldier infantry battalion.

At that time you could not be deployed overseas on operations until you were 19 years of age.  So those of us who were under 19 years of age would end up in these young soldier battalions.  There were three of these battalions located in Sydney at the time.

Bayonet training is integral to MUC
Bayonet training is integral to MUC

While posted to Sydney I was involved in the development of beach defences in and around Sydney.  I attended my first Military Unarmed Combat (MUC) course in Sydney which was run by an ex professional wrestler named Alf Vockler.  He was a Warrant Officer 2nd Class (WO 2) and the only instructor on the course.  In those days MUC was virtually unheard of.  To the best of my memory he was posted to the military as a Sgt because of his wrestling experience.  He may have come from a corps of instructors but I am not certain.

The MUC course was conducted in the French’s Forrest area at Terry hills around the Xmas period of 1943/1944.  The course duration was for a period of 2 weeks, the courses official title was Physical Training and Unarmed Combat Course.     There were approximately 20 participants on the course from the infantry corps.  To my knowledge all passed the training and qualified as an exponent.  In those days the army did not run instructors courses that I am aware of and relied on military personnel with previous experience recruited specifically to instruct.

The training consisted mostly of holds and restraints with a heavy focus on wrestling.  There was a little bit of disarm techniques related to pistols.  Not much was done with rifles or knives even.  Counters to open handed attack with the counters mainly being throw downs was also conducted.  There was a very heavy amount of work related to physical fitness training.

Later that year after completing the MUC course I was sent to Cowra as a reinforcement when Japanese POW’s made an attempt to escape.  After that I returned to Sydney where I turned 19 and was then sent to Canungra.  The course at Canungra was jungle training before we were deployment north on operations.  After completing training at Canungra I and 3 others volunteered to be transferred from infantry to Commandos.  3 of us were accepted into 2/11 Commando Cavalry Squadron.  This unit had formally been a cavalry unit in the Middle East with the 9th Division prior to their return to Australia.  From Canungra I was posted to the Atherton Tablelands with 2/11 Commando Sqn (Divisional Commando with 3 Commando units attached to each Division) at Raven hoe where we conducted pre deployment training. We concluded commando training here in 1944.  It included infantry training, MUC, explosives training, etc.

I was used to conduct the MUC training as an instructor for the unit as I was the only one in the unit who had done an MUC course that I was aware of.   During this period at Raven hoe which was only several months.  During this time I trained the personnel in platoon sized groups.  I think would have trained 2 platoons in this period.  It was difficult to train more or formalize the training as in those days the members of the unit were scattered all over the place conducting various forms of training before deployment.  This was all prepatory to us doing invasion training which was later conducted near Cairns if my memory is correct.  Members of the unit would conduct training at the Atherton Tableland and then go to Cairns to do training changing from ships to landing craft, cargo nets and practicing beach landings.  The troops would then return to the tableland and do other forms of training some of which included MUC depending on availability.  We then were deployed in the invasion of Moratai in 1944 (2/11 Cmdo Cav Regt, 24 Bde, 9 Div).  After Moratai we boarded steamers and conducted the invasion of Labuan (1944).  After the capture of Labuan we were deployed to British Borneo, Papar on the Padus River pushing up the rail link to Jesselton.  While we were in Jesselton we received news that the war was over.

Blue and Lionel “Pup” Currell both WWII Cmdo and MUC Instructors
Blue and Lionel “Pup” Currell both WWII Cmdo and MUC Instructors

The 2/11 Cmdo Cav Regt was disbanded and I was sent to Rabaul for several months guarding prisoners as well as being involved in infrastructure rebuilding.  I then returned to Australia and after a period when I was hospitalised with malaria I was demobed at the School of Artillery at North Head after I had recovered from my bout of malaria.

After the war I completed my apprenticeship as a photo engraver and joined the NSW police force from 1950 to 1956.  I then worked for the NSW railway as a fireman on the steam engines for a year. I then returned to my trade. During my working life I did a lot of different jobs.

In 1955 I joined the Citizen Military Forces (CMF) the pre cursor to the Reserves.  I did my CMF recruit course at 1 Commando Company at Georges Heights, Mossman.  I remained in that unit until 1975.  During this period I instructed MUC courses for the unit and other members of the Army.  The chief instructor for MUC training at 1 CMDO at this time was WO 2 Lionel Currell (“PUP” Currell).

Standing Blue last right with John Whipp second from left 1970’s
Standing Blue last right with John Whipp second from left 1970’s

It was during this period that I requalified as a MUC exponent and later qualified as an Instructor.  During my time with Commandos I later assumed the position of chief instructor teaching MUC at 1 Commando.  WO 2 Lionel Currell was a regular army soldier and a WW II commando veteran.  When I joined 1 Cmdo, he was the 1 Cmdo Coy, Company Sergeant Major (CSM).  He was posted to the unit from Western Australia where he was involved in a parachute unit.  I have no idea where he learnt MUC but he was very proficient, a disciplinarian and I was his assistant instructor.  After his 4 year posting to the unit he was reposted and I became the senior instructor for 1 Cmdo Coy.  Prior to his leaving I had risen through the ranks and I was promoted to the position of CSM 1 Cmdo Coy, the first CMF member to reach this position.  The Officer Commanding (OC) of 1 Cmdo Coy during this time was a regular army officer,  Major Grant, a veteran of  WWII and Korea who was later promoted to Brigadier and an ex WWII Commando.  He is now living in Melbourne I believe.

Blue teaching counters to Bayonet attacks at 1 Cmdo in 2007
Blue teaching counters to Bayonet attacks at 1 Cmdo in 2007

During my time with 1 Cmdo I trained many units over the years in MUC.  I trained the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) on 4 occasions in Perth as well as their members at 1 Cmdo Coy.  The majority of SAS instructors came from 1 and 2 Cmdo with a lot of their first members coming from these units as well.  I also gave training to 3rd battalion Royal Australian Regiment (3 RAR) and the 1/19 battalion CMF Bushman’s Rifles at Ingleburn.

It is hard to remember all the courses I instructed on.  A lot of the courses would be conducted at 1 Cmdo Coy.  After I retired from the CMF in 1975 I would still be asked to conduct MUC courses for my old unit and others.  In 2004 I was called by Major Davis at Singleton to teach bayonet work in trenches.  I did this as a volunteer for a period of 3 and half years.

I think while I was at 1 Cmdo I ran approximately 2 courses a year from 1955 to 1975.   In addition to this I was also involved in conducting training for police instructing the first course for the NSW police Tactical Response Group (TRG) at 1 Cmdo Coy.  In subsequent years I conducted follow up training with the police as well as the NSW prisons department and later the Corrective Services, Australian Protective Services, and Sheriff’s Department.  I have also conducted numerous self defence and training courses for commercial security personnel in the security industry.  I am currently 84 years young and still conducting self defence and security officer training teaching self defence, batons and handcuffing techniques.

“Blue”, who were the Instructors of MUC and what was their backgrounds when you first started training and then through your subsequent time teaching MUC?

The first MUC instructor I met was WO 2 Alf Vockler who was a professional wrestler.  As a young digger this man was god to us. I believe he had joined and was recruited by the military to teach MUC.  Later in the 1950’s while at 1 Cmdo Coy I met WO 2 Lionel Currell who was the senior instructor for MUC at 1 Cmdo Coy before being posted from the unit.  I am not sure where he learnt MUC but he was quite good at it.  I believe Lionel was initially trained possibly by British instructors.  I am not aware if he had previous training in martial arts other than MUC.  I remember that he was a strong disciplinarian.

Blue taking PT on a MUC course in 1980 when he was 55 years old
Blue taking PT on a MUC course in 1980 when he was 55 years old

To your knowledge “Blue” was MUC also being trained in other non commando units and was it widespread in the Army as well as other services during WWII?

I am not certain about that because during this time you only new about what your particular mob was doing.  But thinking about it, it is quite possible that this was the case.

After World War II can you describe the attitude toward MUC training by the military command in commandos and the wider military?

After WWII MUC training disappeared within the Australian military.  It did not gain resurgence until the formation of the CMF commandos in 1955.

Senior military commanders had lost touch with MUC and felt that it was a specialist skill and not something that was regularly conducted within the wider Army.  It was thought of as being more relevant for Special Forces (SF).  However, non SF units would contact 1 Cmdo Coy requesting this form of training.

“Blue”, was there a resurgence of MUC training with the onset of the Korean War and if so who were the instructors and where were the courses conducted and what did the syllabus contain?

I am not sure if MUC was taught for the Korean War but it was 1 and 2 Cmdo Coy which revitalized MUC in the Australian army from the mid 1950’s.  In 2 Cmdo Coy the main Instructor was Ted Malone.  I also qualified Major Greg Mawkes from the SASR in Swanbourne in the 1960’s.  He later became OC of 2 Cmdo Coy and then was responsible for MUC training in the SASR.

John Whipp was another instructor qualified by me in 1962 prior to going to Vietnam.  He was in an infantry battalion at the time and did the course at 1 Cmdo here in Sydney.  John and Greg would both later play important roles in MUC training within the Australian military.

During this period the syllabus for MUC had changed dramatically to that of WWII.  The main emphasis now was on killing techniques.  This was developed through seeing what was being done in military circles as well as civilian martial arts and then adapting that information for the various roles required in the military.  The courses were continually updated for current techniques of the day with the syllabus  still displaying a strong emphasis on physical training, rolls and break falls, pressure points, throws, striking techniques, defence against weapons including firearms, knives, machetes, bayonet fighting, elimination techniques and prisoner control.

Blue instructing on a MUC course at 1 Cmdo Coy in 1980
Blue instructing on a MUC course at 1 Cmdo Coy in 1980

“Blue”, did you feel that the support for MUC by the military command was cyclic and stop and go during your years of association with MUC training?

Yes support for MUC in the Australian military was very up and down dependent on the individual interest of senior commanders within the army.  Some military commanders understood the value others did not and MUC either benefited or not from this situation.

The problem was however, that after a period of non support the Army would need to re-invent the wheel again and had to either find remaining qualified personnel or start again.  I think the cycle now is going downhill once again after some support in recent years.

“Blue”, was there a renewal and subsequent wane of interest in MUC in the Vietnam War era?

Prior to going to Vietnam there was interest by personnel to conduct training however, this conflicted with the need for unit commanders to train troops prior to deployment in normal infantry soldier skills and not ones seen as value added such as MUC.

 

“Blue”, do you feel that MUC in the Australian military developed in different directions as members of the defence force promoted MUC in the Army as well as the other services for different needs, what can you tell us about this?

Yes I did see MUC go in different directions, but I still think that MUC should be under one banner with different corps requirements being managed under one guiding direction.  Each one has its own core requirement but needs to be managed so that MUC heads in one direction; to make my point Military Police don’t need to be taught how to kill for example.  But they also need to know techniques for an operational focus.

 

“Blue”, during the period that you have been involved with MUC training in the military have you seen it evolve and if so what are your thoughts about that evolution?

Yes, MUC has evolved and I think for the best as new techniques are added that support the soldiers role for today.

 

“Blue”, in your opinion do you feel that there is still a place for MUC training in the military in the 21st century and if so what it is?

Yes, without a doubt.   MUC is required to enable our Army to stay relevant with other nations and to develop soldierly skills and techniques that are required on operations.

Blue in his mid 80’s still teaching Bayonet fighting skills
Blue in his mid 80’s still teaching Bayonet fighting skills

“Blue”, what is your opinion concerning the military sourcing civilian martial artists to teach soldiers, do you think it relevant and are these instructors suitable to teach for various operational roles?

I maintain that an instructor needs to have a military background but it is commonsense to take knowledge from wherever we can find it and adapt it for the military role.  You must update to stay current.  I don’t think civilian instructors though are the complete answer.  But certainly take the knowledge and adapt it for the military using military instructors or previous civilian instructors who are in the military.

 

“Blue”, in your opinion what do you feel would be the way forward for MUC training today for today’s military?

Training needs to be relevant to the needs of the Army, it is unfortunate that currently MUC in today’s military is not as widespread throughout the military as it should be as in other nations.  I think that it is difficult for military commanders to recognize the value of MUC and to support MUC.  Until this happens MUC will remain as it always has and will be reliant on the support of individual commanders as they come and go.  In today’s Army MUC should be integral in training developing skills and confidence.

 

“Blue”, can you describe what the training was like? How hard? Injury rates etc

Injury rates in the WWII MUC courses were very low and the same applied during my time teaching MUC.  High injury rates are a sign of bad instruction.  Training was hard, we had to prove a point, and a lot of the techniques were designed for killing.  Physical fitness was a big part of training, it was important to teach soldiers to develop the will to still keep going.  It still is important.

 

“Blue” you have lived to a very fortunate age what pearls of wisdom can you impart to the younger generations on conducting self defence/defensive tactics training?

As is, Keep it up and keep it going, it is something that is needed.  Use commonsense, make sure there are no injuries and impart knowledge as best you can.

 

“Blue” what advice would you give people regarding avoiding fights and once in a fight what should they do?

Walk away from it if possible, if you cannot walk away you have to do the best you can.  If you are in it you are in it to win.  I don’t care if I have to use dirty tactics to win and survive.

 

“Blue”, what are your views of the Australian soldier from when you were serving and the current Aussie soldier today?

Blue and the Author, former MUC instructor Glen Gardiner
Blue and the Author, former MUC instructor Glen Gardiner

I think today they are far superior to the soldier of the past.  The soldier of the past came up through the depression days.  He had to learn the ropes the hard way.  Today’s young soldiers in my opinion are far better educated and sophisticated and willing to learn.  A far better type of lad mentally and physically to previous years.  As an example one participant as a private learning MUC was a qualified medical doctor and he had a genuine desire to learn.

Ken Blue Curran (2012)

https://www.amahof.asn.au/members/2012-2/ken-blue-curran/?fbclid=IwAR0rSj7irHTqF1C-_LdXOEqYgjHZkLm0CrlqQGmfcAk209qcvtfsIzysZHc


 

 

Australian Commando Association (NSW) Inc · June 27 · So passes a great Australian.
Australian Commando Association (NSW) Inc · June 27 · So passes a great Australian.


 

 

 

 




Gordon Lawrence CONNOLLY

Gordon Lawrence CONNOLLY

AKA  BEAR

Late of  ?

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  “possibly”  088 or 089

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  10152

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 30 October 1961

Constable 1st Class – appointed 1 April 1967 ( lost 6mths Seniority somewhere )

Detective – appointed ? ? ?

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed1 February 1978

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed 30 March 1986

 

Final Rank = Sergeant 1st Class

Stations?, Central ( 1 Division ), Parramatta ( 18 Division 1970s ), Cabramatta ( 34 Division ), ?

Service:  From ? Pre Oct 1961  to ? ? ?? years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 22 April 1983 ( Det Sgt 3/c )

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 20 November 1998 ( SenSgt )

2nd Clasp to National Medal – granted 20 November 1998 ( SenSgt )

Born: Tuesday 3 December 1940

Died on: Friday 11 October 2019 @ Blacktown Hospital, NSW

Age: 78 yrs 10 mths 8 days

Cause: Heart attack.  Suffered dementia.

Event location: ?, NSW

Event date: 4 October 2019 ( suffered heart attack )

Funeral date Wednesday  16 October 2019 @ 10am

Funeral location:  North Chapel, Pinegrove Memorial Park, Great Western Hwy, ?

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

Memorial located at: ?

 

Gordon Lawrence CONNOLLY AKA BEAR

BEAR is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Gordon Connolly, (Bear) was admitted to Blacktown Hospital on the morning of 4 October, 2019, after suffering a heart attack.

On arrival at emergency, his heart stopped & was resuscitated. His condition was serious.

Doctors indicated that he may have suffered some brain damage as a result, and as we know, he had been suffering Dementia for many years.

 

 

Condolences to his son Dave and families.


 

*It is ‘assumed’ that this article refers to Gordon Lawrence CONNOLLY # 10152

 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Saturday 20 November 1993, page 11

 

One arrest before stabbing

SYDNEY: A youth was arrested and charged with assault a few hours before 17-year-old Geoffrey Berrett died at the same under-18s dance at The Hills Centre in Sydney’s north west last weekend, police said yesterday.

The organisers of the Castle Hill dance said they would now require all youths to go through metal detectors to gain entry and video cameras would be installed.

Police and organisers have come under pressure over safety at the dances, with both denying there had been many major incidents at previous dances, held monthly.

But a senior sergeant at Castle Hill police admitted several youths had been charged with assault at the no-alcohol dances, with one charged in an unrelated incident on the night of Geoffrey Berrett‘s alleged murder.

Senior Sergeant Gordon Connolly said several youths had been charged with assault in the past three years, but there had been nothing worse “than a bloodied nose” until last weekend.

Two youths charged with the murder of Geoffrey Berrett will appear on Monday at Westmead Coroners court.

20 Nov 1993 – One arrest before stabbing – Trove


 

 

 




Warren Lynwood LORD

Warren Lynwood LORD

AKA Wazza

Late of  ?

NSW Redfern Police Training Centre –  Class #  ‘possibly’ 100

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  11171

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 17 August 1964

Constable – appointed  17 August 1965

Senior Constable – appointed  17 August 1973

Still appeared in the 1989 Stud Book as a Senior Constable

Final Rank = Senior Constable

Stations?, Western District ( 1965 ), North Sydney ( 1980s ),

Service:  From ? ? pre August 1964?  to ? ? ?? years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 2 March 1981 ( SenCon )

Born Monday  23 October 1944

Died on Sunday  11 August 2019

Age 74 yrs 9 mths 19 days

Cause: Heart attack on Saturday 10 August 2019

Event location:  Sutherland Hospital ICU, NSW

Event dateSaturday  10 August 2019

Funeral date Friday  16 August 2019 @ 3pm

Funeral location South Chapel, Woronora Cemetery, Linden St, Sutherland, NSW

Wake location: ?TBA

Funeral Parlour: Olsens Funerals, Sutherland

Buried at: ?TBA

Memorial located at: ?TBA

 

 

WARREN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Just to advise the friends and classmates of Warren Lynwood LORD, that Warren passed away yesterday 11/09/2019 at the Sutherland Hospital ICU.

Warren appears to have had a massive myocardial infarction the previous Saturday evening and never regained consciousness.

He is survived by his wife Denyse and his close family who were by his bedside.

Warren was 74 years of age.

Rest In Peace Warren, you will be sadly missed by all who knew you. ????????

Funeral information to follow.


 

 

 

 




Walter Cecil Bertie BYRNE

Walter Cecil Bertie BYRNE

AKA  ?

Late of 26 York Ave, Five Dock

NSW Redfern or Penrith Police Academy Class #  ? ? ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Detective – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Detective Sergeant

Stations?, Chief of CIB – Company Squad – Death

Service:  From ? ? 1921 – 22?  to 8 August 195028 years Service

Awards: No Find on Australian Honours

Born: ? ? 1899

Died on: Tuesday  8 August 1950

Age: 51

Cause: “possible” Heart attack

Event location: ? ( in a Police vehicle )

Event date:  Tuesday  8 August 1950

Funeral date: Thursday  10 August 1950 @ 2pm

Funeral location: St Alban’s Church, Fivedock, NSW

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: Charles Kinsela Pty Ltd, AFDA Est. 1830, Taylor Square, Darlinghurst

Buried at: Cremated – Rookwood Crematorium

Memorial located at: ?

 

Walter Cecil Bertie BYRNE. Photo source: Jason Osborne
Photo source: Jason Osborne

WALTER is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  * BUT SHOULD BE


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

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Married in 1942 to Margery Elizabeth ROBERTSON

( 1903 Eden NSW – 24 May 1997 – Five Dock, NSW – 94 old )

 


 

Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 – 1954),

Saturday 19 July 1947, page 7

EXTRADITION SOUGHT OF MAN

WANTED IN NS.W.

SINGAPORE, July 17.- In the first District Court today Detective Walter Cecil Byrne, of the Sydney C.I.B., applied for the extradition to N.S.W. of a man who he said was wanted for trial there on a conspiracy charge.

Byrne identified George Stamford as Stanley Hammond, who last month failed to appear in a Sydney court to answer a charge of conspiracy.

The judge remarking that the case had reached “a serious stage,” withdrew bail and remanded Stamford in custody until July 22.

The accused, who answered to the name Stamford, allegedly arrived in Singapore from Australia last month as a stowaway aboard an Avro Anson plane.

He was charged as alias Stanley Hammond, with having conspired with John Maxwell Gray and Gordon Leonard between January, 1944, and June, 1945, in New South Wales, to cheat certain persons of money and valuable securities by offering them shares in John Gray and Company.

19 Jul 1947 – EXTRADITION SOUGHT OF MAN WANTED IN N.S.W. – Trove

 

 


 

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 – 1954),

Saturday 18 February 1950, page 10

STEALS TO HELP SICK SON

Police said in Quarter Sessions yesterday that a man charged with the theft of £230 had stolen the money to try to save the life of his three-years-old son.

Doctors had said the boy, a cancer sufferer for 12 months, had only two more months to live.

The father, Leslie Galvin, 34, textile worker, of Salisbury Road, Camperdown, admitted having stolen the money from his employers, Bradford Cotton Mills, of Camperdown.

Detective – Sergeant Walter Byrne, CIB., said he believed Galvin had used all the stolen money to pay his son’s medical expenses. The child had developed cancer a year ago. Since then he had had a serious operation and needed regular deep-ray treatment.

Mr. Jack Thorn (for Galvin) said Galvin had now started a job that paid him between £9 and £11 a week. He wanted a chance to pay back the money he had stolen.

Judge Holden released Galvin on a £50 bond to be of good behavior for three years. He ordered Galvin to repay the money to the Bradford Cotton Mills at £8 a month.

18 Feb 1950 – STEALS TO HELP SICK SON – Trove

 


 

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 – 1954),

Sunday 16 April 1950, page 36

Bets

In a bare 14 months, if the truth was told, balding, thick-set Victor Claude Jupp, aged 39, gambled £4000 on trotting and dog races. Jupp is a married man with two small sons.

He lives in Campbell Street, Abbotsford. Since 1939 he was employed by Mort’s Dock, and Engineering Company at a weekly wage of £10/3/ as a paymaster of casual labor.

At the Quarter Sessions this week he pleaded guilty to having stolen £4000 from the company between November, 1948, and last January.

Detective – Sergeant Walter Byrne said Jupp confessed that he had consistently drawn from the cashier more money than was required to pay the casual laborers, and that he had gambled all the money he stole on the trots and the dogs. Jupp was not addicted to drink and had no previous convictions, the detective-sergeant added.

Solicitor Martin James Alexander Easton, who appeared in court on behalf of the company, said Jupp had signed a confession, in which he said he could make restitution of £1000 immediately. . But, Mr. Easton added, Jupp had said that the offer of restitution was not his wish – it was the wish of his mother and his wife, who would have to sell all their property to realise £1000.

The company, Mr. Easton said, would accept that offer of restitution.

Barrister Reynolds; for Jupp, said the prisoner felt it was unfair for his mother and his wife to bear so heavy a burden on his behalf.

Judge Holt remanded Jupp until Tuesday for sentence.

16 Apr 1950 – Bill Rodie PRESENTS REAL LIFE – Trove


 

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 – 1954),

Wednesday 9 August 1950, page 9

Police funeral for detective

Detective – Sergeant Walter Cecil Bertie Byrne, 51, chief of the C.I.B. Company Squad, who died yesterday, will be buried with full police ceremonial tomorrow.

Sergeant Byrne died in a police car while on his way to his home in York Road, Five Dock.

The Officer in Charge of the C.I.B. had ordered a car for him when he said he felt ill.

Sergeant Byrne gave evidence at Quarter Sessions ( Darlinghurst ) yesterday morning.

In a tribute at Quarter Sessions later Judge Holden said he had known Sergeant Byrne for many years as a fair, truthful, and honest officer.

09 Aug 1950 – Police funeral for detective – Trove


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Thursday 10 August 1950, page 22

BYRNE, Walter Cecil Bertie. – August 8, 1950, suddenly of 26 York Avenue Fivedock late Detective Sergeant of the C I B Sydney,

dearly beloved husband of Marjorie,

loving father of Joan, William, Josephine and Thomas and

loving father-in-law of Edna and Alexander

aged 51 years

At rest

10 Aug 1950 – Family Notices – Trove


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Wednesday 9 August 1950, page 4

DETECTIVE BYRNE

Detective – Sergeant Walter Byrne, chief of the Company Squad at the Criminal Investigation Branch, Sydney, died suddenly yesterday soon after giving evidence at the ( Darlinghurst ) Quarter Sessions.

He was 51.

He became ill after arriving at the C.I.B. from court, and died while being driven to Western Suburbs Hospital.

Detective-Sergeant Byrne had served 28 years in the police force in Sydney, and was an expert investigator in cases involving company law.

He was soon to have been made an inspector.

He is survived by Mrs. Byrne and four children.

09 Aug 1950 – DETECTIVE BYRNE – Trove


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Tuesday 29 August 1950, page 12

In the Will of WALTER CECIL BERTIE BYRNE late of Fivedock in the State of New South Wales.

Detective Sergeant of Police, deceased Application will be made after 14 days from the date of publication hereof that Probate of the last Will and Testament dated the 11th March 1947, of the above named deceased may be granted to Marjorie Elizabeth Byrne the Executrix named in the said Will and all notices may be served at the undermentioned address.

All creditors in the Estate of the deceased are hereby required to send in particulars of their claims to the undersigned JOHN W. BINNEY. Proctor for the Executrix. 79 Elizabeth Street Sydney.

29 Aug 1950 – Advertising – Trove


 

 

 

 

 




Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

AKA  YT

Late of Callala Beach – formerly of Hornsby, NSW

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  184B

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  20316

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 23 July 1982

Constable 1st Class – appointed 27 May 1988 ( Seniority date = 23 July 1987 )

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Detective Sergeant ?/C

Stations?, Darlinghurst ( 1980’s ), Hornsby, Liverpool ( CIU ), Drug & Vice, Newtown – Retirement

Service:  From ? ? pre July 1982?  to 8 May 2003 =  21 years Service

Awards: National Medal – granted 6 April 2001 ( Det SenCon )

Born: Wednesday  30 March 1960

Died on: Friday  21 June 2019

Age: 59

Cause: Natural causes – Heart attack

Event location: Home

Event date: ?

Funeral date: Wednesday  3 July 2019 @ 1pm

Funeral location: Magnolia Chapel, Macquarie Park Crematorium & Memorial Pk, cnr Delhi Rd & Plassy Rd, North Ryde, NSW

Wake location: ?TBA

Funeral Parlour: ?TBA

Buried at: Cremated

Memorial located at: ?

 

entertainer John ENGLISH & Alan James WHITE
entertainer John ENGLISH & Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

ALAN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


Grave location: TBA   

Alan James WHITE

 


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Exact date, and cause, of death is yet to be established as YT may have passed days before being found.

 

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

Alan James WHITE

 

 


 

 

 

 




Lyn TOWNSEND

Lynette Irene TOWNSEND

Wife of Retired NSWPF member Supt. Lloyd Townsend # 9234
AKA LYN
Late of Dubbo
New South Wales Police Force
Rank:  Police wife
Final Rank = ?
Stations?
 
Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour
Born:   ? ? 1945 – 1946
Died on:   Wednesday  5 June 2019
Age:  73
Cause:  Heart attack
Event location:   ?
Event date:   ?
Funeral date:   Tuesday  11 June 2019 @ 10.30am
Funeral location:   Chapel of the Western Districts Memorial Park, Boothenba Rd, Dubbo, NSW
Wake location:  ?
Funeral Parlour:  Abbey Funeral Home,  6881 8988
Buried at:   Buried
 Memorial located at:   ?

 

 [divider_dotted]

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

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May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

LYNETTE IRENE TOWNSEND
“LYN”
Passed away 5th June 2019
Aged 73 years.
Late of Dubbo.
Dearly loved wife of Lloyd.
Loving mother & mother-in-law of Gavin & Natalie, Aaron & Emma.
Adored grandmother of Isabella.
Lyn’s funeral service will be held in the Chapel of the Western Districts Memorial Park, Boothenba Road, Dubbo commencing at 10.30am Tuesday 11th June 2019 followed by a private burial.
Funeral arrangements are in the care of:
“Our family caring for your family”
02 6881 8988

Published in Narromine News on June 8, 2019

http://tributes.narrominenewsonline.com.au/obituaries/narrominenewsonline-au/obituary.aspx?n=lynette-irene-townsend-lyn&pid=193088730




Adam James HAHN

Adam James HAHN 

AKA  Hahny
Late of Garden Suburb

NSW Goulburn Police Academy Class #  ? ? ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  25809

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Sergeant

Stations?, Newcastle, Gosford ( 1990’s ), Police Prosecutions Command – Retirement

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?  to  21 January 2010 =  21 years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   Friday 5 September 1969

Died on:   Saturday  18 May 2019

Age:  49

Cause:   Heart attack

Event locationKurraka Reserve in Fletcher playing soccer

Event date:   Saturday  18 May 2019

Funeral date:   Friday  31 May 2019 @ 3pm

Funeral location:   Pettigrew Family Funerals, 444 Pacific Hwy, Belmont, NSW

Wake location:  ?

Funeral Parlour:  Pettigrew Family Funerals,  4951 1166

Buried at:   Cremated

 Memorial located at:   ?

Adam James HAHN

Adam James HAHN with friend John Marlow
CHARACTER’: Mr Hahn, left, was described as an intelligent man with a larger than life personality. Friend, John Marlow on right.

 

Adam James HAHN

Adam James HAHN
WORK: Mr Hahn outside Newcastle Courthouse in 2007, when he was working as a police prosecutor. Picture: David Wicks

 

Adam James HAHN
‘LARGER THAN LIFE’: South Cardiff footballer Adam Hahn during a recent match. He died during a game at Fletcher on Saturday.

 

 

[alert_yellow] ADAM is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

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[divider_dotted]

HAHN Adam James

Late of Garden Suburb

Passed unexpectedly

18th May 2019
Aged 49 years

Dearly loved husband of Rachel.

An adored father to Rylie, Elijah and Seth.
Cherished son of Lynette (dec’d) and Dennis.

A much loved brother, son-in-law, brother-in-law, uncle, nephew, cousin and great mate to many.

The family and friends of Adam are warmly invited to attend a celebration of his life, to be held in The Chapel, 444 Pacific Hwy Belmont (parking via Henry St), on Friday 31st May, 2019, service commencing at 3pm.

logo

Published in The Newcastle Herald from May 25 to May 29, 2019

http://tributes.theherald.com.au/obituaries/theherald-au/obituary.aspx?n=adam-james-hahn&pid=192971315&fhid=31483

May 31, 2019
From a Boy to a Man, from Windale to great heights, sadly missed by many. RIP Adam.
May 31, 2019
May Adam forever Rest In Peace.

https://www.australianpolice.com.au/adam-james-hahn/

May 27, 2019
Thanks for the laughs mate, for your honesty and integrity, for the gutsy determination that drove you. Always enjoyed being with you, work or sport. When I think of you / I smile RIP.
My thoughts and prayers to Rache and your beautiful children.
May 25, 2019
One of the funniest people I have ever met. And just a real great bloke.
RIP little fella
May 25, 2019
http://www.legacy.com/guestbooks/theherald-au/adam-james-hahn-condolences/192971315

South Cardiff footballer Adam Hahn has been remembered as a ‘likeable, genuine bloke’

Adam Hahn suffered what is believed to have been a heart attack about 10 minutes before the end of his South Cardiff team’s match at Kurraka Reserve in Fletcher on Saturday.

The 49-year-old collapsed without warning on the field and – despite the best efforts of those on the scene, including a nurse who used a defibrillator and later paramedics – could not be revived.

The incident has rocked South Cardiff Junior Football Club, which the over-35s side are a part of, and shattered players and those associated with the team.

“He was just a character,” team-mate Ian Nesbitt said.

“A very intelligent man, but just a character.

“A larger than life sort of fella – he was only a little bloke. He was just one of the boys, loved drinking VB like it was going out of fashion.”

Mr Hahn, a Garden Suburb resident who ran a handyman business, leaves behind a wife and three children.

He grew up Windale, and spent many years working as a police officer, and later, police prosecutor. He was also a regular writer to the Herald’s letters page.

Mr Nesbitt, who was on the bench at the time, said his team-mate had shown no signs of any medical problem before the tragic incident.

“I was actually discussing who to pick as man of the match, and Adam’s name came up so I was kind of focused on him,” he said.

“And he just simply fell to his knees and then fell flat on his face, and that was it. He wasn’t even running, he was standing still.

“There wasn’t too many people who saw it. I ran out onto the park, I kind of knew something was going on. We initially thought he was having some sort of seizure.”

Players commenced CPR, and an off-duty nurse who was at the fields assisted in administering Maryland Fletcher Football Club’s defibrillator before paramedics arrived, but it was to no avail.

Mr Hahn had been part of the South Cardiff over-35s team for the past 11 years.

Grieving team-mates gathered at the club’s training ground on Wednesday night to mourn his loss and offer support to each other.

Macquarie Football has arranged for a group counselling session to be held for affected players and officials this Saturday

“There are blokes struggling,” Mr Nesbitt said.

“It was pretty harrowing with that scene, and just wondering what the hell was going on, on Saturday.

“We thought it might benefit to get everybody together as a group … there were a few tears and a chance for everybody to talk about it.

“There were a lot of guys who weren’t saying anything on Saturday, so the idea was to try to get that out and encourage everybody to either talk to your wife, talk to your family, talk to us, talk to your mate.”

South Cardiff Juniors president Cindy Redpath said the club’s teams would wear black armbands during this weekend’s matches as a tribute. A minute’s silence will also be held before each game.

“There’s a lot of people that are quite affected, very upset,” she said.

“It’s been a tragic, tragic event.

“He was one of the most likeable, genuine blokes you would come across. It’s a big shock.”

Ms Redpath said a gala day was being planned for later this year as a fundraiser, but a 100-club raffle would be held during Saturday’s matches with all proceeds going to Mr Hahn’s family.

Argenton United Football Club have pledged to donate the proceeds of a club BBQ.

Other clubs have expressed their condolences.

Mr Nesbitt said the over-35s team had cancelled this weekend’s match but players had vowed to continue playing this season in honour of their mate.

“Hahny loved his football and he’d want us to play on,” he said. “But we’re going to have this weekend off.

“We will definitely resume the following week. I think we owe it to him to keep on playing. He was a champion, he will be sorely missed.”

It’s been a tragic, tragic event. He was one of the most likeable, genuine blokes you would come across. It’s a big shock

South Cardiff club president Cindy Redpath

https://www.theherald.com.au/story/6173835/one-of-the-most-likeable-blokes-you-would-come-across-tributes-to-dad-who-died-on-soccer-field/


 

Stuart Munro is feeling heartbroken.

Yesterday was a day full of highs and tragic lows.. 2 minutes before Mel came into check point 4, I received a call letting me know about the sudden tragic loss of a great mate and team mate Adam Hahn (Hahny) who died playing the game he loves during our soccer game.
Having to stay strong for Mel while trying to come to terms with the news was one of the hardest things I have ever had to do.
My thoughts and condolences go out to Rachel, Eli and Seth. Words can’t possibly express what you are going through at this sad and tragic time..
To my Southy O35 Brothers, knowing how I’m feeling not being there, would be nothing in comparison to the traumatic experience you guys dealt with at the game.
Hahny you were one of the good ones mate. Your quick Witt and stories were legendary mate. Our conversations and great laughs are going to be sorely missed.
The team has lost a larger than life character and will find it hard to go on without you mate. But we will. It’s what you would want.
Vale Hahny “you Goober”
Cheers mate. Green Dream


 

 

 

 




Mark Anthony GARNER

Mark Anthony GARNER 

AKA  BAM BAM
Late of  ?

NSW Goulburn Police Academy Class #  227

New South Wales Police Force

ProCst # 98395

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  23922[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Commenced Training at Goulburn Police Academy on Wednesday 1 April 1987

Probationary Constable – appointed 26 June 1987

( was still a ProCst in 1989 )

Final Rank = Detective Senior Sergeant

Stations?, Nyngan, Bourke ( SenCon – Sgt ), Castle Hill, Negotiators Course, State Protection Security Unit ( S.P.S.U. ),  Tweed Heads – Retirement

ServiceFrom  1 April 1987  to  21 November 2011 ( Suspended ) – 21 November 2013 ( Retired ) = 26+ years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   Tuesday  18 February 1964

Died on:  Sunday  19 May 2019

Age:  55

Cause:   Heart attack in his sleep

Event location:   ?

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:   Friday  31 May 2019 @ 11am

Funeral location:   Tweed Valley Cemetery, 813 Eviron Rd, Duranbah, NSW

Wake location:  Currumbin RSL, 165 Duringan St, Currumbin, Qld

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   ?

 Memorial located at:   ?

 

Mark Garner in 2004
Mark Garner in 2004

 

Mark Garner on 22 April 2015<br />
Mark Garner on 22 April 2015

 

[alert_yellow] BAM BAM is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 

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 Funeral location


[divider_dotted]

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

Bam Bam played NSW Police Football and was widely known and liked and was a great bloke.
He suffered a heart attack in his sleep.

 


 

Inquest into the death of Brenton Hasler at Tweed Heads on the 30 November 2006.

Finding handed down by Deputy State Coroner MacMahon on 30 January 2008.

 

On Thursday 30 November 2006 police were conducting an operation on the Pacific Highway at Sextons Hill near Banora Point in northern New South Wales. The operation was directed, in part, at detecting unregistered and wanted vehicles.

Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) equipment was being used to assist in this process. S/C Mahaffy was the ANPR operator and S/C Hamilton positioned himself some 225 meters further north along the Pacific Highway at a stopping site. The stopping site was just south of Terranora Road. The operation commenced at about 0830.

S/C Bowmer was also to assist in the operation.

The traffic was very heavy and on his arrival S/C Bowmer decided to facilitate traffic flow by arranging for the traffic lights at the intersection of Terranora Road and the Pacific Highway to be turned off and the traffic managed manually.

S/C Bowmer parked the police vehicle he was driving at the ANPR stopping site near that of S/C Hamilton. As this was occurring a rider was travelling on the Pacific Highway on a Honda VFR 750 motorcycle. He was negotiating through the traffic and was overtaking vehicles on the nearside on the incorrect side of the edge line. This was contrary to the motor traffic laws.

S/c Mahaffy, who advised S/C Hamilton, observed this.

As a result S/C Hamilton stopped what he was doing and walked onto the road and directed the rider to stop. The rider refused and accelerated away.

S/C Hamilton yelled to S/C Bowmer to stop the rider and S/C Bowmer having returned to his vehicle followed him. By this time the rider was out of sight.

S/C Bowmer proceeded along the Pacific Highway looking for the rider. After examining a number of side streets S/C Bowmer observed a bike on Darlington Drive, Banora Point, just off the Pacific Highway. He exited the Pacific Highway and followed it.

The bike rapidly increased speed and S/C Bowmer decided to commence a pursuit and did so with lights and sirens operating. Shortly before the intersection of Lochlomond Drive and Darlington Drive the bike left the road and collided with a tree.

S/C Bowmer came on the scene shortly thereafter and provided assistance to the rider. CPR was commenced and an ambulance was called.

On arrival the ambulance officers found the rider to be unconscious, without pulse and not breathing. CPR was continued and he was taken to Tweed Heads Hospital however the rider was declared to be life extinct shortly after his arrival at the hospital.

Elizabeth Alice Hasler subsequently identified the deceased as being her husband Brenton Craig Hasler.

On 2 December 2006 an autopsy was performed at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Newcastle, by Dr. K. Lee, a senior specialist forensic pathologist. Dr Lee found that the cause of Mr. Hasler’s death was multiple injuries.

Legislative Provisions.

The role and function of a Coroner is contained in section 22, Coroners Act, 1980 (the Act).

That section, in summary, provides that at the conclusion of an inquest the coroner is to establish, on the basis of the evidence available, the identity of a deceased person together with the date, place and the cause and manner of their death.

Life Extinct Certificate, Dr. B Beal, Tab 1. 5 Identification Statement, Tab 2. 6 Autopsy report, 2 April 2007, 10.at Tab 66.

Section 13 (1) (a) of the Act provides, in addition, that a coroner has jurisdiction to hold an inquest if it appears to the coroner that a person has died a violent or unnatural death.

Section 13A (1) (b) also provides that a coroner who is the State Coroner or a Deputy State Coroner has jurisdiction to conduct an inquest where it appears that deceased died, or there is reasonable cause to suspect that the person has died, as a result of or in the course of a police operation. Section 13A (2) provides that where the jurisdiction to hold an inquest arises under both section 13 and section 13A an inquest is not to be held except by the State Coroner or a Deputy State Coroner.

On the facts as set out above it is apparent that Mr. Hasler’s death was one that came within the meaning of section 13(1)(a) in that it occurred as a result of injuries he sustained in circumstances that appeared to come within the definition as a result of or in the course of a police operation, in this case a police pursuit.

As such either the State Coroner or a Deputy State Coroner is required to conduct the inquest into his death.

Issues for Inquest:

In this inquest the identity of Mr. Hasler together with the date, place and direct cause of his death are not in dispute.

On the evidence available I am comfortably satisfied that Brenton Craig Hasler died on 30 November 2006 at the Tweed Hospital and that the cause of his death was multiple injuries sustained by him when the motorcycle he was riding left the road and collided with a tree.

The manner, or circumstances, of Mr. Hasler’s death was, however, the subject of examination in the course of the Inquest.

The issues inquired into during the course of the inquest were as follows:

• Was Mr. Hasler the rider of the motorcycle that failed to stop when directed to do so by S/C Hamilton?

• Were the circumstances sufficient to justify the commencement of a pursuit?

• What was the applicable police policy?

• Did S/C Bowman comply with the policy, as he understood it, during the course of the pursuit and should he, at any time, have discontinued the pursuit?

• What caused Mr. Hasler to lose control of the motorcycle and did the manner in which S/C Bowman conducted the pursuit cause, or contribute to, that loss of control of the motorcycle?

• Following Mr. Hasler suffering his injuries was assistance provided to him in timely manner?

• Were the NSW Police critical incident guidelines complied with?

• Are there any recommendations that should be made in accordance with section 22A?

The Evidence:

During the course of the inquest evidence was taken from the following witnesses

• Senior Constable Brett Andrew Mahaffy (the officer operating the ANPR equipment on the Pacific Highway),

• Senior Constable Troy Anthony Hamilton, (the officer who directed the rider of the motorcycle to stop),

• Michael Francis Murphy (a truck driver in traffic near the ANPR site at the time that the motorcycle rider was directed to stop),

Sergeant Mark Anthony Garner (a police officer in traffic near the ANPR site at the time that the motorcycle rider was directed to stop),

• Bruce Roy Austen, (who was driving on Darlington Drive in the opposite direction to that of the Mr Hasler and Senior Constable Bowmer and saw the motorcycle lose control)

• Kellie John, (who saw the collision of the bike with the tree from her lounge window which overlooked the park in which it occurred),

• Mark Raymond Rabjones (who saw the incident from his driveway and provided assistance to Mr. Hasler following the collision)

• Senior Constable Paul Bowmer (the officer who conducted the pursuit of the motorcycle rider),

• Inspector David Richard Driver (the officer responsible for the investigation of the death of Mr. Hasler in accordance with the critical incident guidelines).

In addition statements from witnesses not called to give evidence, relevant police policy and guidelines, maps, vehicle inspection reports and diagrams were also made available.

Was Mr. Hasler the rider of the motorcycle that failed to stop when directed to do so by S/C Hamilton?

S/C Hamilton, after the rider of the bike failed to stop as directed, followed in the direction the rider had taken. He subsequently arrived at the site where Mr Hasler had been injured. During evidence he was asked whether Mr. Hasler’s bike was the bike ridden by the rider that had failed to stop as directed. He thought that it had been and explained why he had come to that conclusion.

Sergeant Garner, who had seen the bike on the Pacific Highway and had also seen S/C Hamilton direct it to stop. Sergeant Garner also attended the crash site and had the opportunity to observe Mr. Hasler’s bike. He also was of the view that the bike was the same as that he had observed on the Pacific Highway and gave his reasons during the course of giving evidence.

I accept the evidence of S/C Hamilton and Sergeant Garner on this point and am satisfied that Mr. Hasler was the rider who failed to stop when directed to do so by S/C Hamilton at the ANPR stopping site that morning.

Were the circumstances sufficient to justify the commencement of a pursuit?

Transcript 06/11/2007, 81-82. 8 Transcript 07/11/2007, 210.

Mr Hasler was directed to stop by S/C Hamilton and failed to do so. He then accelerated away. S/C Hamilton gave him the direction to stop as a result of information he had received from S/C Mahaffy. S/C Hamilton then yelled to S/C Bowmer stop the bike after which S/C Bowmer followed the bike. S/C Bowmer did not know why S/C Hamilton wanted the bike to be stopped and gave evidence that when he was able to stop the rider he intended to administer a random breath test while waiting for S/C Hamilton to attend.

There was some debate during the course of the inquest as to when the pursuit of Mr. Hasler commended and I will return to that debate later however on the evidence it is my view that Mr. Hasler’s failure to stop as directed by S/C Hamilton was sufficient to justify efforts to be taken to apprehend him notwithstanding the fact that the officer doing so might not initially know the reasons for S/C Hamilton’s request that they do so.

In any event I accept S/C Bowmer’s evidence that he observed Mr. Hasler accelerating his motorcycle in Darlington Drive to a speed that was well in excess of the speed limit applicable. I consider that at that point S/C Bowmer had sufficient cause based on his own observations, subject to the application of the relevant protocols, to seek to apprehend Mr. Hasler.

What was the applicable police policy?

The guidelines for police pursuits are contained in the NSW Police Safe Driving Policy (the Policy).

The policy deals with the qualifications and experience of police officers authorised to engage in a pursuit and the vehicles that may be used. The evidence, which I accept, is that S/C Bowmer was appropriately qualified and experienced and his vehicle was also appropriately classified to conduct a pursuit. The Policy, at Part 6, deals with Urgent Duty and Pursuits. An urgent duty is defined as being duty ‘which has become pressing or demanding prompt action’.

A pursuit is defined as commencing ‘at the time when you decide to pursue a vehicle that has ignored a direction to stop’

On the commencement of urgent duty or a pursuit the relevant officer is required to make certain notifications to senior officers at VKG and thereafter undertake those duties or the pursuit in accordance with any instructions given by the appropriate senior officer.

Evidence was given at the inquest that the Policy underwent and adjustment by the introduction of a Coded System of Safe Driving from 11 November 2005

That system made it permissible for an officer to perform urgent duty ‘without first informing police radio in the execution of a traffic stop.

Exhibit 3, Tab 69. 10 NSW Police Safe Driving Policy, 29. NSW Police Safe Driving Policy, 30. Exhibit 5.

However, should the driver of the other vehicle attempt to avoid apprehension or appears to be ignoring requests to stop, and a decision is made to pursue the vehicle – then a pursuit has commenced’.

At inquest there was a difference of opinion as to how the relevant policies were to be applied to the circumstances that occurred 30 November 2006.

One view, that held by Counsel assisting and Inspector Driver was that when S/C Bowmer left the ANPR site with the intention of stopping Mr. Hasler a pursuit had commenced and, as a consequence, the obligations provided for in the guidelines came into force. The other view, the one held by S/C Bowmer and apparently other officers, was that he (S/C Bowmer) was able to commence urgent duty until he approached the motorcycle for the purpose of a traffic stop. If, having indicated to the vehicle that it was to stop, he formed the view that other vehicle was attempting to avoid apprehension or appearing to ignore his request to stop, he would have to decide, as he did in this case, if he was going to commence a pursuit. He was of the view that it was only at that time that he would have had to advise VKG that he was in pursuit. In this case the motorcycle rider had refused to stop.

I accept that S/C Bowmer did not know this however it must have been implicit in the circumstances of the ANPR operation and in S/C Hamilton’s call to ‘stop the bike’. That was the basis of S/C Bowmer’s actions in following him.

It was clearly the intention of S/C Bowmer to stop the rider. To follow him to administer a random breath test whilst awaiting S/C Hamilton’s attendance seems to me to be somewhat artificial. I consider that on a reasonable interpretation of the policy the pursuit commenced at the time S/C Bowmer left the ANPR stopping site with the view of stopping the bike.

On that interpretation he was at that time obliged to inform VKG of the pursuit and to implement the other instructions contained in the policy.

As I indicated during the course of the inquest I am not, nor do I intend to be, critical of S/C Bowmer in respect of his interpretation of the policy. It is clear from the findings of other Coroners and the various interpretations placed on the policy during the course of this inquest that the issue of the interpretation of the policy has been a live one for some time.

The introduction of the Coded System of Safe Driving in November 2005 does not, in my view, clarify the obligations of officers that find themselves in such situations. Indeed it is my view that it probably makes it more confusing by adding another element to the equation. The policy needs to be clear and unambiguous so that officers responsible for its implementation are able to act with confidence in situations that they are required to face in their duties. I propose to make a recommendation pursuant to section 22A on this subject.

Coded System of Safe Driving ,2. See Decision of SDSC Magistrate Milledge in William Spence 1 July 2004 and DSC Magistrate Pinch in Colin John Holmes 29 November 2004.

Did S/C Bowman comply with the policy, as he understood it, during the course of the pursuit and should he, at any time, have discontinued the pursuit?

S/C Bowmer gave evidence that having entered Darlington Drive he observed the motorcycle ahead of him and formed the view that the rider was exceeding the speed limit. He also formed the view that the rider had probably seen him and was seeking to avoid apprehension.

At that time S/C Bowmer decided to commence a pursuit. He attempted to contact VKG to advice of the pursuit but was initially unsuccessful but was able to do so some 9 seconds later.

From the VKG records it would seem that there was a period of 21 seconds form the first attempt to advise of the pursuit to the time that S/C Bowmer advised VKG of Mr. Hasler’s collision and of the need for an ambulance.

The shortness of the pursuit is also emphasised by the recordings contained in the in-car video recordings from S/C Bowmer’s vehicle. The pictures in that recording commence at 9.15.37 with a view of Mr Hasler’s motorcycle 160-180 meters ahead of the police vehicle about to take a left hand bend. The motorcycle is then out of sight. At 9.15.51 a splash of water is observed (as Mr. Hasler’s motorcycle passes through a storm water drain).

The inquest has had the opportunity to traverse the route that was travelled and to observe that part of the pursuit that was recorded on the in-car video. We have also had to evidence of a number of witnesses who observed aspects of the pursuit. A police pursuit is, in its nature, dangerous. It is required to be conducted with skill by the officer involved in order to ensure the safety of the general public who might be in the area (particularly-as in this case where it is a residential area), the police involved in the pursuit and, of course, those that are being pursued.

As far as the manner in which S/C Bowmer conducted the pursuit is concerned the evidence establishes to my complete satisfaction that it was performed in a competent fashion and during its short duration no event occurred that would, in my view, have required it to be terminated. There was, as I have indicated above, some delay in S/C Bowmer accessing VKG to advise that a pursuit had commenced however this was minimal and had, as far as I can see, no bearing on the course of the pursuit.

Counsel assisting has suggested that whilst she does not criticise S/C Bowmer she suggests that looked at in hindsight and taking into account all the now known circumstances perhaps the commencement of the pursuit by S/C Bowmer was not appropriate. I feel however that I must try and put myself into the circumstances that existed on 30 November 2006. I cannot second-guess S/C Bowmer. It seems to me that S/C Bowmer’s do not warrant any criticism whatsoever.

Bowmer transcript 7/11/2007 168 Exhibit 3, Tab 19. Exhibit 3, Tab 17.

having regard to S/C Bowmer’s understanding of the policy, and having regard to the circumstances in which he found himself, I am satisfied that the NSW Police Safe Drive Policy was complied with.

Following Mr. Hasler suffering his injuries was assistance provided to him in timely manner?

What caused Mr. Hasler to lose control of the motorcycle and did the manner in which S/C Bowman conducted the pursuit cause, or contribute to, that loss of control of the motorcycle?

Mechanical defect did not contribute to the incident see evidence of Graeme Bruce Lawrie expert vehicle examiner ‘there was no mechanical defect or failure with the vehicle that may have been a contributing factor towards the collision.’

Mr Hasler lost control of the motorcycle when he was unable to negotiate the bend in Darlington Drive. (See evidence of Michio Justin McMillan).

‘It is obvious from the physical evidence available that the motorcycle rider, Hasler, has not anticipated or negotiated this bend. Hasler has braked hard and after skidding the motorcycle has left the road and mounted the raised concrete cutter onto the grass.

’ Mr Hasler was travelling at a great speed. I accept the calculations of S/C Craig Stewart Norton that the motorcycle was travelling at between 129km/h and 135km/h as being indicative of that speed.

Also: Bruce Roy Austin, ‘very, very fast’  Kellie John from her lounge-room: ‘I could hear the bike coming, I assumed it was a bike, it was very loud and so I turned around to look out my window because I was thinking – I could hear them coming very fast and I was thinking how are they going to slow down to go through the roundabout’

S/C Bowmer’s pursuit did not contribute to the loss of control.   Statement 21/03/2007 para 2319 Statement 28/12/2006 para 13 and 14.  McMillan statement 28/12/2006 para 12.  Norton statement 12/01/2007 para 8.  Austin 6/11/2007 89 23 John 6/11/2007 98 at 35

I have had the benefit of observing the in-car video and hearing the evidence of those who were present. It is undisputed that S/C Bowmer was travelling some distance behind Mr Hasler and at a slower speed.

It is not suggested, and I find that it was not the case, that S/C Bowmer’s driving or the manner in which he conducted the pursuit contributed to Mr Hasler losing control of the bike.

I am satisfied that the cause of the collision was due to the motorcycle being ridden at excessive speed for the conditions and that on reaching the bend in the road Mr. Hasler was unable to negotiate it thereby losing control, mounting the gutter and thereafter continuing for some time until colliding with a tree.

Were the NSW Police critical incident guidelines complied with?

The relevant policy is the Guidelines for the Management and Investigation of Critical Incidents. That policy was tendered in evidence.

In accordance with the policy Inspector David Richard Driver was appointed to investigate the circumstances of Mr Hasler’s death. That investigation was a detailed and thorough one and a number of recommendations were made that go to police procedures that should be given serious consideration. The investigation identified a number of non-compliances with the guidelines. These are identified in Inspector Drivers report. They did not, in my view, affect the integrity of the investigation of Mr. Hasler’s death. It is, however important that such guidelines be complied with strictly in all critical incident situations as compliance ensures that the best evidence is available for any review that subsequently takes place and, at a minimum will free officers involved from any unjustified criticism.

Formal Finding:

Brenton Craig Hasler died on 30 November 2006 at the Tweed Heads Hospital. Mr. Hasler’s death resulted from multiple injuries he received when the motorcycle he was riding left the road at speed and collided with a tree during the course of a police Section 22A Recommendation:

To the Commissioner of Police:

1. That the NSW Police Safe Driving Policy and the Coded System of Safe Driving be integrated and reviewed and clarified with a view to ensuring that ambiguity as to the obligations officers who are required to engage in traffic stops, urgent duties and pursuits are removed.

2. That consideration be given to the inclusion of a knife in the equipment carried by highway patrol vehicles to assist officers who find themselves needing to free persons who might be trapped in motor vehicle collisions or other such situations.

http://www.coroners.justice.nsw.gov.au/Documents/dic2008.pdf


Other data




David Valentine PAUL

David Valentine PAUL   DFC

AKA  BOYDEE
Late of Vaucluse

NSW Penrith Police Academy Class #  “possibly” Class 2 of 1946

David was of Aboriginal decent and one of the earliest to have joined the NSWPF

New South Wales Police Force

Uniform # 1241

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  4931[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 7 January 1946

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 20 February 1967

Does NOT appear in the 1979 Stud Book

Final Rank = Detective Sergeant 1st Class

Stations?, Clarence St Police Stn ( 1948 ), NSW Police Air Wing – Pilot of aircraft NEMESIS ( 1949 ),  Bondi Detectives ( 10 Division 1960’s – Det Sgt 2/C ), Central Detectives ( 1 Division about 1973 – Det Sgt 1/C ),

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre Jan 1946?  to  ? ? ?? years Service

 

[blockquote]

World War II

Australian Imperial Force

Regiment:                        454 Squadron RAAF

Enlisted:                           4 January 1941

Service #                           0210106   403215 ?

Rank:                                 Flight Lieutenant

Training:                          Empire Air Training Scheme ( EATS ) Trained in Rhodesia

Embarkation:                 ?

Next of kin:                     ?

Religion:                          ?

Single / Married:          ?

Returned to Australia:  ?

Military Awards:                  Distinguished Flying Cross ( Imperial )  DFC – granted 28 March 1944

Formal portrait of RAN and RAAF officers at the RAN/​RAAF Australian Joint Anti-Submarine School (AJASS) at HMAS Albatross at Nowra NSW. The only identified officer is O210106 Flight Lieutenant David Valentine Paul DFC RAAF at front row far left. Flt Lt Paul enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained as a pilot with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. He was posted to 454 Squadron RAAF. Flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean. Rescued from the sea he became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW Police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.

[/blockquote]

 

Awards:   No NSWPF Awards found

Born:   Thursday  10 June 1920

Died on:   ? ? pre 14 May 1973?

Age:  52

Cause:   Heart attack

Event location:  Richmond Air Base, Richmond, NSW

Event date:   ? ? pre 14 May 1973

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Wake location:  ?

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   ? – usual searches fail to locate a grave or mention of death

 Memorial located at:   ?

 Description Studio portrait of 403215 (O210106) Flight Lieutenant (Flt Lt) David Valentine Paul DFC RAAF. Flt Lt Paul enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained as a pilot with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. He was posted to 454 Squadron RAAF. Flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean. Rescued from the sea he became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW Police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.
Studio portrait of 403215 (O210106) Flight Lieutenant (Flt Lt) David Valentine Paul DFC RAAF.   Flt Lt Paul enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained as a pilot with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. He was posted to 454 Squadron RAAF.   Flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean.   Rescued from the sea he became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW Police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.

 

 

[alert_yellow] DAVID is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

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 Grave location TBA

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

David Valentine PAUL

David was an RAAF Pilot during WWI and, afterwards, joined the NSW Police.
He was also a member of 22 Squadron, Richmond, NSW and apparently died of a heart attack at the Squadron at Richmond in 1973.

The Sun   Friday  2 Sep 1949  page 1

"LEGACY" SMILE. Traffic Constable David Paul was " arrested " today by Mrs. Eric Bennett, president of the women's auxiliary of Associated Newspapers ( The Sun ) RSL sub-branch, but was " discharged " when he bought a button for Legacy War Oprphans' Day.Constable Paul is one of the pilots of the NSW Police aircraft Nemesis.A former RAAF Squadron-Leader bomber pilot and DFC winner, he was shot down over Greece and was a POW in Germany for several years.
“LEGACY” SMILE. Traffic Constable David Paul was ” arrested ” today by Mrs. Eric Bennett, president of the women’s auxiliary of Associated Newspapers ( The Sun ) RSL sub-branch, but was ” discharged ” when he bought a button for Legacy War Oprphans’ Day. Constable Paul is one of the pilots of the NSW Police aircraft Nemesis. A former RAAF Squadron-Leader bomber pilot and DFC winner, he was shot down over Greece and was a POW in Germany for several years.


c1942 Description Informal group portrait of four graduates of an Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) course in Rhodesia. Probably taken at the port of Mombassa, Kenya, several of these recent graduates were about to depart for service with 454 Squadron RAAF in the Eastern Mediterranean. Left to right: 406684 Sergeant (Sgt) Ralph Mervyn Simpson RAAF, killed in action on 4 December 1943, Charlie Mumford, 403215 (O210106) Sergeant David Valentine Paul and 400954 Sergeant George Townson Agg. Sgt Paul, later promoted to Flight Lieutenant (Flt Lt) enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained as a pilot with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. He was posted to 454 Squadron RAAF. Flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean, Sgt Simpson being killed after parachuting from the crashing aircraft. Rescued from the sea with surviving crew members Agg, now a Warrant Officer (WO) and WO 645357 Jim Rennie RAF, Paul became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW Police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.
c1942 Description   Informal group portrait of four graduates of an Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) course in Rhodesia. Probably taken at the port of Mombassa, Kenya, several of these recent graduates were about to depart for service with 454 Squadron RAAF in the Eastern Mediterranean. Left to right: 406684 Sergeant (Sgt) Ralph Mervyn Simpson RAAF, killed in action on 4 December 1943, Charlie Mumford, 403215 (O210106) Sergeant David Valentine Paul and 400954 Sergeant George Townson Agg.    Sgt Paul, later promoted to Flight Lieutenant (Flt Lt) enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained as a pilot with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. He was posted to 454 Squadron RAAF. Flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean, Sgt Simpson being killed after parachuting from the crashing aircraft. Rescued from the sea with surviving crew members Agg, now a Warrant Officer (WO) and WO 645357 Jim Rennie RAF, Paul became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW Police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.

 

c1942DescriptionFormal group portrait of recent graduates of an Empire Air training Scheme (EATS) pilot training course in held in Rhodesia. The only identified man is 403215 (O210106) Sergeant, later Flight Lieutenant (Flt Lt) David Valentine Paul DFC who like all the new pilots standing in the rear and middle rows is wearing his newly presented wings. Flt Lt Paul enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. Posted to 454 Squadron RAAF he was flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa when he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean. Rescued from the sea he became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader. The four men sitting are probably the course flying instructors.
c1942  Description   Formal group portrait of recent graduates of an Empire Air training Scheme (EATS) pilot training course in held in Rhodesia. The only identified man is 403215 (O210106) Sergeant, later Flight Lieutenant (Flt Lt) David Valentine Paul DFC who like all the new pilots standing in the rear and middle rows is wearing his newly presented wings.

 

 c1965DescriptionFormal portrait of RAN and RAAF officers at the RAN/RAAF Australian Joint Anti-Submarine School (AJASS) at HMAS Albatross at Nowra NSW. The only identified officer is O210106 Flight Lieutenant David Valentine Paul DFC RAAF at front row far left. Flt Lt Paul enlisted on 4 January 1941 and trained as a pilot with the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS) in Rhodesia. He was posted to 454 Squadron RAAF. Flying a Baltimore aircraft from a base in North Africa he was shot down on 4 December 1943 during a sortie over the Mediterranean. Rescued from the sea he became a prisoner of war (POW) of the Germans, finally being released in 1945 at Stalag IVb POW camp in 1945 at Muhlberg, Germany. He joined the NSW Police Force after the war and remained in the RAAF Reserve rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.
c1965    Description    Formal portrait of RAN and RAAF officers at the RAN/RAAF Australian Joint Anti-Submarine School (AJASS) at HMAS Albatross at Nowra NSW. The only identified officer is O210106 Flight Lieutenant David Valentine Paul DFC RAAF at front row far left.


Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), Thursday 9 September 1943 (No.200), page 2054

 

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE.

 

HIS Excellency the Governor-General in Council has approved of the following changes being made:—

CITIZEN AIR FORCE.

General Duties Branch.

The following non-commissioned officers (Pilots) are appointed to commissions on probation with the rank of ( Sergeants ) with effect from the dates indicated: –

No. 403215 David Valentine Paul (17th April, 1943)

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/232758844

Army News (Darwin, NT : 1941 – 1946), Friday 7 April 1944, page 1

 

More RAAF Decorations CANBERRA,

Thursday. –

The Air Minister, Mr. Drakeford, has announced that six officers of the RAAF serving overseas have been awarded the DFC.

They are:

Flight-Lieutenant Murray Charlton, of Killara, NSW;

Flight-Lieutenant David William Lewis, of Gundi, NSW;

Flying-Officer Ronald Albert Hoskings, of Dromana Victoria;

Flying-Officer Thomas Alexander Bunn, of Blackburn, Victoria;

Pilot-Officer David Valentine Paul, of Willoughby, NSW and

Warrant-Officer Keith George Campbell, of Willoughby, NSW.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/47691749

Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), Thursday 13 April 1944 (No.71), page 803

 

THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL HAS RECEIVED ADVICE THAT HIS MAJESTY THE KING HAS APPROVED OF THE FOLLOWING AWARDS- 28th March, 1944:—

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE.

For skill, courage and devotion to duty in flying operations against the enemy:

Distinguished Flying Cross.

….

(with effect from 4th June, 1943).

Pilot Officer David Valentine Paul, No. 403215.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/232778034

 

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 – 1954), Thursday 6 June 1946, page 1

TOWN TALK

 

Did you see see pleasant looking copper at Pitt and Market Streets yesterday sporting the D.F.C.?

He was Constable David Paul ;

flew Baltimores in 454 Squadron ; was taken prisoner east of Athens, and spent 17 months in the bag.

Joined police force this year. Likes it

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/248500543

 


* the only link is the name.  Not confirmed as the same person.

Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 – 1954), Sunday 11 May 1947, page 8

 

This Week’s Case-book

THE DOOR WAS MADE READY FOR A RAID HUSBAND,

suspicious of his wife, loosened screws in a bolt on the front door of his flat to gain easy entry for a raid he planned to catch her with the co-respondent.

The husband, pastry cook Reginald John Ginns, of Kirribilli, was 21 when he married Doreen Frances Ginns, formerly Angove, in February, 1940, she being 22.

Ginns said he became suspicious of his wife and engaged an inquiry agent.

On the night of December 1, 1946, a man was seen to enter the flat at 7.30. The lights went off at 8.30 and were put on again at 9.25 when tea was made, according to sounds from the flat.

On December 7, the raiders forced the door. Ginns said he switched on the light and found his wife and a man on the floor of the lounge room.

A lumber jacket belonging to the man yielded the name of David Valentine Paul, of Crow’s Nest, he added.

Ginns was given a decree nisi on the ground of his wife’s adultery with Paul; he also obtained custody of the only child of the marriage, a boy of six.


 

National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), Thursday 21 October 1948, page 5

STUNT PRECEDED CRASH

TENTERFIELD PLANT FATALITY TENTERFIELD,

Wednesday.

The Tenterfield Coroner found today that Richard Colin Perram and Eileen Emily Wratten had died from burns accidentally suffered when the aeroplane in which they were flying, crashed last Sunday.

Frank Lawrence Cornford said that he was at Tenterfield aerodrome and heard Mrs. Wratten say to Perram prior to taking off ” I want you to do some loops and turns.”

When the plane took the air the pilot started to loop the loop and do steep turns and rolls. The plane then started to Shoot up the ‘drome, he said. ”

The plane was flying excessively low and when about 150 feet up the plane made a stall turn. It then went into a spin and crashed to the ground.

Within a matter of seconds it burst into flames.”

Cornford said that with others he rushed to the plane, but by the time he got there it was impossible because of the heat and flames to get near enough to be of any assistance.

Constable David Paul, of Clarence Street Police Station, Sydney, said he saw the plane in the air over the aerodrome. It was stunting at a height of about 500 feet and stall turning. In a final dive the plane passed over the head of a person on the aerodrome at about 25 feet, pulled up to a height of about 150 feet and attempted another stall turn. At the top of the turn the aircraft stalled completely and crashed.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/161684116

 

 

 

 


 

 

Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), Thursday 16 December 1948 (No.165), page 4223

 

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE.

HIS Excellency the Governor-General in Council has approved of the following changes being made:—

…….

RESERVE.

General Duties Branch.

The following former officers are appointed to commissions with the ranks indicated:—
( Temporary Flight Lieutenant )
David Valentine Paul, D.F.C. (403215), 21et July, 1948,…..
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/232886093

 


 

 

 




Ian HOOPER

 Ian HOOPER

AKA   HOOPS
Late of Georgica, NSW

NSW Goulburn Police Academy Class #  234 or 235

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  24960

Rank:  Commenced Training at Goulburn Police Academy on 4 January 1988

Probationary Constable – appointed ? April 1988

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Senior Constable

Stations?, Mt Druitt ( 1990’s ), Penrith GD’s & Detectives, Detective,

ServiceFrom 4 January 1988  to 26 May 1999 =  11+ years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   Saturday  6 December 1958

Died on:   Saturday  27 April 2019

Age:  60

Cause:   Heart attack

Event location:  Lennox Head football club sport ground

Event date:   Saturday  27 April 2019

Funeral date:   Friday  3 May 2019 @ 11am

Funeral location:   Lismore Memorial Gardens, Skyline & Rouse Rds, Goonellabah, NSW

Wake location:  ?TBA

Funeral Parlour:  ?TBA

Buried at:   ?TBA

 Memorial located at:   ?

 Ian HOOPER

 

[alert_yellow] HOOPS is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 [divider_dotted]

 

 Funeral location TBA

[divider_dotted]

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

 Ian HOOPER
December 2015

Popular rugby referee dies after on-field heart attack

DEVOTED rugby referee Ian Hooper passed away on Saturday after suffering a fatal heart attack while refereeing a rugby union game at the Lennox Head football club.

Ambulance crews were called to the grounds after Mr Hooper, 58, collapsed seven minutes into the senior reserve grade game between Lennox Head and Ballina.

While waiting for the ambulance to arrive qualified off-duty professionals from both clubs assisted immediately with first aid protocol and united in a community effort to keep Mr Hooper alive.

Current president of the Far North Coast Rugby Referees Association, Allan Thomas, said Mr Hooper stepped in to referee the game at late notice after another referee was unable make the appointment.

“The incident occurred very early into the first half where Hoops suffered a significant heart attack, they tried to resuscitate him, which they did,” he said.

Mr Hooper later died in hospital.

 Ian HOOPER
Ian Hooper known as ‘Hoops’ in the middle of one of the many Rugby Referee Groups he coordinated at the Byron 7’s. (2017). Photo: William Palmer.

“That just goes to show his devotion to the game, which was his passion and something he loved doing,” Mr Thomas said.

Mr Hooper, a former NSW Police officer in Sydney for more than 20 years, relocated to Georgica before joining the FNCRRA and becoming a life time member.

He is recognised by FNCRRA as a past President, current Chairman of Coaching & Grading, current Referee Appointments Officer, Referee, and Referee Coach for this Zone & NSWCRRA who helped mentor and develop Junior and Senior Referees over many years.

“Last year he gave that up so he could focus on the development and mentoring of junior and senior referees on the Far North Coast,” Mr Thomas said.

Hooper has made an instrumental and massive contribution to the Far North Coast Referees Association and has left a big hole in our association.

“He was a very happy fellow and got on well with all his peers. He touched people’s lives and he will be sadly missed.

“He used to play rugby union in Sydney and I was told he was a very cheeky halfback. He was charismatic.

“From a zone’s perspective, he will be sorely missed as a friend, mentor, a coach, a referee and a devoted father and husband.

“We would like the community to acknowledge the feats this person has made to the community at large.”

Long-term friend and fellow life member of the Far North Coast Rugby Union Referee Association, Stephen Miller, said Mr Hooper was not only imperative to the development of a strong referee group, but a family man who acted with the utmost integrity throughout his career.

“The conviction and devotion that he had for the country referee development program was remarkable,” he said.

“He was absolutely devoted to his partner Julie and his two boys Tom and Max.

“His personality was something else – if there was something that needed to be said, he was the one who would say it how it was.

“He was never a plain critic, but when he saw that something was wrong, he saw the opportunity for someone to right it.

“So good to work with, so dependable, so reliable.”

Mr Miller said Mr Hooper was a man who had his priorities straight and was always open to a glass of red wine and a few jokes.

Fellow member of the FNCRRA, Will Palmer said he was also an integral part of the Byron 7’s Carnival for years and co-ordinated the appointment of Referees from across Australia & Overseas.

“Without which the event couldn’t happen,” Mr Palmer said.

“Apart from being a cheeky half back in his Rugby playing days, Hoops also was a Police Officer for many years and made a valued and significant contribution to the citizens of NSW. He touched many people’s lives and will be sadly missed. RIP Hoops.”

A spokesperson from NSW Ambulance media said Mr Hooper was revived on the field by an off-duty officer before crews arrived to take him to Ballina hospital.

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