1

Vira Helen JENKINS nee Vira DEW

Vira Helen JENKINS

nee Vira DEW

Wife to Retired Superintendent Eric DEW # ????

AKA 

Late of 

 

NSW Police Training Centre – Redfern  / Police Training College – Penrith  Class #  ? ? ? 

 

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  Police Woman 006

 

Service:  From ? ? 1946   to   ? ? ? ? years Service ? ? ?

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at ? Police Academy on ? ? ?

Probationary Constable- appointed ? ? ?

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ? 

Detective – appointed ? ? ? ( NO )

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? 

Leading Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? ( N/A )

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed ? ? ? 

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed ? ? ?

 

Final Rank =  Sergeant 

 

Stations?, School Lecturing Section – Sydney ( 4 Years ), School Lecturing Section – Newcastle ( 3 November 1952 – ? ), Newcastle – Retirement ( aged 56 )

 

Retirement / Leaving age: = 56

Time in Retirement from Police: 47 years

 

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours system

 

 Born? April 1918

Died on:  Saturday  15 May 2021 

Age:  103 years,

 Vira Helen JENKINS Vira Helen DEW Vira JENKINS Vira DEW. Vira Dew is pictured on the left with another officer in navy blue uniform circa 1940s.
Vira Dew is pictured on the left with another officer in navy blue uniform circa 1940s.

 

 

 Vira Helen JENKINS Vira Helen DEW Vira JENKINS Vira DEW. NSW Police Legacy<br /> 7 April 2021<br /> Congratulations to NSW Police Legatee Vira Dew, who last week turned 103! Vira was one of the first policewomen to work in the Newcastle area. After retiring at the age of 56, she lived on a farm in Maitland with her husband, retired Superintendent Eric Dew, for several years.<br /> Vira is pictured here with Chief Inspector Tony Townsend, Snr Sgt Alyssa Willetts, and Det Snr Sgt Maree Maynard, who all visited to wish her well. Happy birthday Vira!
NSW Police Legacy
7 April 2021
Congratulations to NSW Police Legatee Vira Dew, who last week turned 103! Vira was one of the first policewomen to work in the Newcastle area. After retiring at the age of 56, she lived on a farm in Maitland with her husband, retired Superintendent Eric Dew, for several years.
Vira is pictured here with Chief Inspector Tony Townsend, Snr Sgt Alyssa Willetts, and Det Snr Sgt Maree Maynard, who all visited to wish her well. Happy birthday Vira!

 

 Vira Helen JENKINS Vira Helen DEW Vira JENKINS Vira DEW
NSW Police Legacy
7 April 2021
Congratulations to NSW Police Legatee Vira Dew, who last week turned 103! Vira was one of the first policewomen to work in the Newcastle area. After retiring at the age of 56, she lived on a farm in Maitland with her husband, retired Superintendent Eric Dew, for several years.
Vira is pictured here with Chief Inspector Tony Townsend, Snr Sgt Alyssa Willetts, and Det Snr Sgt Maree Maynard, who all visited to wish her well. Happy birthday Vira!

Cause:  Natural – Old Age 

Event location:   ?

Event date ?

 

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral locationUniting Church,  347 Ken Tubman Dve, Maitland, NSW

( click here to see Cornona19 Virus Pandemic rules – this will be a limited numbers Funeral )

any Future Wake location??? TBA 

any Future Wake date??? TBA

( Due to current Govt. restrictions on ‘Gatherings’ due to Corona19 Virus Pandemic, some families may wish to have a Memorial Service / Wake with friends and family at a later date )

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: Nil – at this time ( May 2021 )

 

 VIRA is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/ 

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/ 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/ 

Australian Police YouTube Channel 


 

Vira Helen JENKINS Vira Helen DEW Vira JENKINS Vira DEW. Special Constables Sue<br /> Elliott and Vira Jenkins<br /> make the acquaintance of<br /> some of the 'props' they<br /> will use daring their lectures<br /> to school children.
Special Constables Sue Elliott and Vira Jenkins make the acquaintance of
some of the ‘props’ they will use daring their lectures to school children.

 

 

Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 – 1954),

Tuesday 4 November 1952, page 10

 

” Women In Blue ” to Lecture In Schools

Two young women who will soon be familiar figures to all school children in the district are Special Constables Vira Jenkins and Sue Elliott.

Special Constables Sue Elliott and Vira Jenkins make the acquaintance of some of the ‘props’ they will use daring their lectures to school children. The puppets include a policeman, a small girl and a villain. Posters, cut-out paper figures and miniature road signals are also part of their equipment.

They started work yesterday with the Newcastle school lecturing section of the police force and will assist Constables D. Pike and R. Mann in covering the 266 schools in the district.

While on duty the women wear the navy uniform and wide – brimmed hat designed for women police. They will travel to schools by bus or in the utility belonging to the section. Both are from Newcastle.

Miss Jenkins, who was a nurse before she joined the police force six years ago, will be living at home for the first time for years. She has been four years with the school lecturing section in Sydney.

Mrs. Elliott is a policeman’s widow. She joined up only two months ago and has been in Sydney to train for the work.

With her six-year-old son, she is now living at Lambton.

Traffic Duty

As well as lecturing at schools on road safety, snake bite, fire hazards ” and anything else affecting the safety of children, ” Miss Jenkins said, they will also do traffic duty at school crossings. ”

As soon as we have learnt our lines, we will ‘use puppets in our lectures, ” she said. ” We have to rig up a special stage and dress the puppets.

They have been used now in Sydney for some time and are immensely popular with the kiddies. ”

Miss Jenkins said there were now 36 women in the N.S.W. Police Force, 18 in uniform and 18 in plain clothes. This was the maximum number allowed and had been specified by an Act of Parliament.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/160403116


 

 

Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 – 1954),

Wednesday 12 November 1952, page 7

 

ON MONDAY Constables D. Pike and R. Mann, of the Road Safety Control branch, gave a demonstration at Mayfield West School and Special Constables Vira Jenkins and Sue Elliott, who accompanied them, concentrated on the infants’ department where the children were taught road safety by means of nursery rhymes and poems.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/160405828


 

Successful Students For Trades and Arts Courses

Newcastle and District.

– DRESSMAKING

Stage 1:

 

…….., Vira H. Jenkins,…….

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/17298668


 

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954),

Wednesday 29 January 1936, page 3

 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Further Examination Results SYDNEY, Tuesday.

The balance of the results of the 1935 final examinations of the Technical Education Branch were made available to-day.

The letters, “A,” “B,” and “C” indicate the grade of pass in each subject. Then each subject. The letter “P” indicates a pass in early stages of subjects where the results are not graded. The passes are not given in order of merit. In the trades courses the pass shown is the grade award for all subjects embraced in the course.

Enrolments for the 1936 session will be accepted as from February 17.

Classes will reassemble on February 24.

The list includes the following northern passes –

 

– DRESSMAKING

Stage 1.

…….., Vira H. Jenkins,…….

29 Jan 1936 – TECHNICAL EXAM. RESULTS – Trove

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142395992


 

 

Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 – 1954),

Tuesday 1 December 1931, page 8

Successful Newcastle District Pupils in Primary Final Examination

QUALIFIED FOR PROMOTION TO HIGHER SCHOOLS

OFFICIAL LISTS ISSUED HIGH PERCENTAGE OF PASSES

The result of the Primary Schools’ final examination issued to-day disclosed that the percentage of passes secured this year is very high.

DISAPPOINTMENT was expressed by some of the school teachers that children who passed very high in every subject but did not secure the necessary percentage of points in arithmetic failed to secure a pass.

The results of the bursary examination will not be made available for some time.

Results: —

Cook’s Hill Girls …………….., Vira Jenkins, ………

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/164244016


 

Nothing further, than what is recorded above, is known about this person at the time of publication and further information and photos would be appreciated.

 

Cal
250521


 

 

 




Raymond James SMITH

Raymond James SMITH

AKA 

Late of Camden South, NSW  

 

NSW Police Training College – Penrith  Class #  019

 

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  5632

 

Service:  From ? February 1947   to   27 May 1978   =  31 years Service ? ? ?

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at Penrith Police College on ? Feb 1947 ( aged 27 years )

Probationary Constable- appointed Monday  28 April 1947 ( aged 27 years, 7 months, 26 days )

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ? 

Detective – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? 

Leading Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? ( no such rank during this period )

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 15 February 1963

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 22 August 1969

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed 1 March 1974

 

Final Rank = Sergeant 1st Class 

 

Stations?, Lithgow ( 1953 ), ?, Deniliquin ( 1964 )( Sgt 3/c ), ?, Hurstville – Retirement

 

Retirement / Leaving age: = 58 years, 8 months, 25 days

Time in Retirement from Police: 42 years, 8 months, 12 days

 

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours system

 

 Born:  Tuesday  2 September 1919 

Died on:  Monday  8 February 2021 

Age:  101 years, 5 months, 6 days

 

Cause:  Old age

Event location:   ?

Event date ?

 

Funeral date? ? ?TBA

Funeral location? 

( click here to see Cornona19 Virus Pandemic rules – this will be a limited numbers Funeral )

any Future Wake location??? TBA 

any Future Wake date??? TBA

( Due to current Govt. restrictions on ‘Gatherings’ due to Corona19 Virus Pandemic, some families may wish to have a Memorial Service / Wake with friends and family at a later date )

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: Nil – at this time ( February 2021 )

 

 

 RAYMOND is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/ 

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/ 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/ 

Australian Police YouTube Channel 


 

Lithgow Mercury (NSW : 1898 – 1954),

Wednesday 22 July 1953, page 3

Bus Disturbance Case Part Heard

Circumstances surrounding a disturbance in a picture bus returning from Lithgow to Cullen Bullen on March 14 were outlined in yesterday’s court when a young Blackman’s Flat man faced four charges.

Before the court was Eric Lane, who, pleaded not guilty to charges of assault, malicious damage to two bus windows valued at £5, behaving in an offensive manner in a bus and maliciously injuring a sports coat valued at £7.

The case remained part heard after lengthy evidence for the prosecution had been given and was set down for resumption next Tuesday.

John Robert McGregor Collins, bus driver, of 45 Main-street West, an employee of Eric Newham Bus Service, told the court he was driving a crowded bus down Main-street at 11.20 p.m. on March 14 when a number of people called out to him to stop the bus and open the automatic doors. He did so and, amid considerable noise, a number of standing passengers surged out of the bus. ” They scrambled over one another to get out, ” Collins said. ” I did not see anything, but Marjoram came down to me and said he wanted to give Lane in charge.” Collins added he drove to Dunn’s corner, locked the bus door to prevent anyone getting out and asked his employer to ring for the police.

Walter Stanley Marjoram, of Marrangaroo, a shiftman employed at the State Mine, victim of the alleged assault, said in evidence he had been to the Trades Hall pictures and, with his wife and daughter, aged 13, he went to the back of the bus. His wife obtained a seat and his, daughter was being nursed while he stood. He noticed a second vacant seat and Marjoram said he told a girl who was also standing that there was a seat for her. ” There was a chap sitting there, occupying about two-thirds of the seat for two people and, after I stood for a while, I decided I might as well have a seat, Marjoram said. ” I went to where defendant was sitting and put my hand down to move his legs. He moved them a little and I sat down. ”

Wanted Seat, Not Fight

Marjoram detailed a conversation he then had in which he claimed Lane asked him if he thought he was smart but he said he did not want to fight, he merely wanted some of the seat. ” He kept arguing and got up and said ‘ come outside and I’ll fix you’, ” Marjoram added. ” He then sat down again and said ” if you don’t shut up I’ll job you. ” I said ‘good-oh’ and he jumped up, pushed me back into the seat and hit me about five or six times about the forehead. ” Marjoram said he was dazed by the punches and had to have two stitches in a wound above the right eye. Afterwards he noticed that the bus windows were broken, that his sports coat was torn an his other clothes covered with blood.

Marjoram said he had lost three days from work as a result of the incident and lost an additional two days while attending court. He had thus lost five days’ work at £3/6/-per day.

Evidence of having gone to Dunns Corner and arresting Lane was given by Constables Cliff Love ( Clifford Stanley LOVE # 4958 ) and Raymond James Smith ( # 5632 ).

They said Lane admitted punching Marjoram who, he claimed, was ” trying to stand over him. ”

Lane added Marjoram had grabbed his legs and attempted to pull them off the seat.

Both police witnesses said that Lane admitted breaking one window, but claimed the other was already cracked.

Mr. J. Le Fevre appeared for Lane.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/220821148


 

Lithgow Mercury (NSW : 1898 – 1954),

Wednesday 24 November 1954, page 4

Hammering On Cell Doors Not Unusual

It was the usual thing for prisoners under the influence of liquor to hammer on the cell doors, a police constable said during a traffic hearing in this week’s court.

The policeman, Const. Raymond James Smith, said that sometimes they “got sick of it” and sometimes they “kept it up.”

Const. Smith was giving evidence in a charge of driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor against Cecil John Green of South Bowenfels.

Defendant, who was at present on a bond in relation to a similar offence, was fined £20 by Mr. C. K. Ward, S.M., and was told by the magistrate that he was fortunate in not being gaoled.

Through Mr. I. Higgins defendant pleaded not guilty to having driven a car in Main-street whilst under the influence of liquor on August 30.

Principal witness was Sergt John Talbot Parkinson ( # ???? ), who told the court he was a passenger in the police truck, driven by Const. Peisley, ( # 6890 ) at 4.30 p.m. on August 30, when he saw defendant drive a vehicle from a parked position. ” We were travelling west along Main-street and defendant drove a motor car from the eastern side of the street near Lithgow street,” the police officer said.

Claimed Defendant Stumbled From Car

He alleged defendant did not give a hand signal and drove on approximately the centre of the roadway. At the intersection defendant made a wide left hand turn and entered Lithgow-street on the incorrect side, swerved suddenly back to the correct side and again back to the centre of the street, Sergt. Parkinson said.

Defendant was then halted and told to alight, which he did by stumbling out of the car. “I told him to stand away from the car and he released his grip of the door and stood swaying violently on his feet. ” Defendant, who said he had three beers, smelt strongly of intoxicating liquor, his speech was very thick and he could not articulate his words,” witness said.

Collided With Door Post

He added that defendant had to be assisted up the Police Station steps as his condition had deteriorated and he was in danger of falling. Going through the door defendant had collided with the door post. He had asked for Dr. Doutreband, but that doctor was not available.

Stating that he had 27 years experience as a police officer, Sergt. Parkinson said in his opinion, defendant was in an advanced state of being under the influence of intoxicating liquor.

Corroborative evidence was given by Const. W. R. Peisley ( William ‘Bill’ PEISLEY # 6890 ), who, in cross-examination, said he did not know defendant had subsequently seen Dr. Doutreband after his release.

When he received the charge against defendant Const. Smith, who was on duty as station constable, said he smelt a strong smell of intoxicating liquor about defendant.

“Defendant appeared to be considerably affected by intoxicating liquor,” Const. Smith added.

In lengthy cross-examination Const. Smith said he visited the cells after defendant had been lodged there.

Heard Him Fall To Ground

“When I was opening the door I heard defendant hammering on the other side and just as I opened the door I heard him fall to the ground ” Const. Smith said.

Mr. Ward over-ruled an objection by the prosecutor to this line of questioning. Mr. Higgins stating that his client had never been told that Dr. Doutreband would not be coming and that he was clamoring and asking for a doctor.

Const. Smith denied there had been an conversation in the cells about a doctor.

When bailed out at 8.15 pm defendant was not under the influence, Const Smith added.

Re-examined by the prosecutor, Const Smith said he heard defendant hammering on the cell doors ” a considerable time ” before he visited him at seven o’clock. Mr. Higgins said his client did not wish to give evidence.

Sgt. C. G. Bush ( # 3831 ), police prosecutor, said defendant was still serving a three years’ bond which had more than two years to run.

Mr. Higgins submitted that his client was a man who worked exceptionally hard in the bush and was a married man with a wife and three children to support.

Was Considering Gaol Sentence

” I realise there is a grave breach of the law here, but I ask Your Worship to make the penalty pecuniary, otherwise there will be great hardship to his wife and family.” the solicitor said. There was no evidence that anyone had been endangered by defendant’s driving, he added.

Mr. Ward said it appeared defendant was very much under the influence of liquor and probably had more liquor than he was prepared to admit to police. “I was considering sending him to gaol, but in view of your representations, I will make it a fine,” the magistrate told Mr. Higgins.

Defendant was given one month to pay the fine of £20.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/220821148


 

 

Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 – 2001),

Friday 13 November 1964 (No.128), page 3596

The 24th day of October, 1964 BY virtue of the authority vested in me by the District Courts Act, 1912 – 1961, I hereby appoint Sergeant 3rd Class Raymond James Smith as Bailiff of the District Court holden at Deniliquin.

J. E. H. PILCHER, Judge.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/220344766


 

 

 

Nothing further, than what is recorded above, is known about this person at the time of publication and further information and photos would be appreciated.

 

Cal
 

 

 

 




Marcel John BAILEY

Marcel John BAILEY

AKA  JACK 

Late of Quakers Hill Nursing Home, NSW

Jacks widow – Janet Bailey passed away, peacefully, in her sleep on Saturday 27 March 2021 and will be laid to rest with Jack at the Pinegrove Cemetery on Saturday 3 April 2021.  May they both, forever, Rest In Peace.

 

NSW Penrith Police College Class #  027

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 7224

Uniform #  3565 & 909

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at Penrith Police College on 11 February 1952 ( aged 22 years,  5 months,  2 days )

Probationary Constable- appointed 31 March 1952  ( aged 22 years, 6 months, 22 days )

Constable – appointed 31 March 1953

Constable 1st Class – appointed 1 July 1958 ( 4 months loss of Seniority somewhere )

Senior Constable – appointed 1 July 1963 

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 1 January 1968

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 11 June 1975

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed 1 December 1978

Final Rank =  Sergeant 1st Class 

 

Stations: Metropolitan District:  Police College, Penrith – Trainee

Liverpool GDs ( 22 Division )( ProCst )( 21 April 1952 – 9 June 1952 ),

was to be transferred to Moss Vale – but that was Cancelled,

Parramatta GDs ( 18 Division )( 10 June 1952 – 20 June 1954 ) – whilst at Parramatta, he assisted the Army at Windsor through the catastrophic floods,

Traffic Branch ( 21 June 1954 – PSB, later STP – Solo Cyclist – Probation ),

Traffic Branch ( 10 August 1954 – 30 June 1955, PSB, later STP – Solo Cyclist – Permanent ), 

Liverpool STP – Solo cyclist ( 1 July 1955 – 17 Jan. 1961 ),

Camden – STP ( Cst 1/c )( 18 Jan. 1961 – 13 Feb. 1966 )( 22 Division in those days but 35 Division now ),

Liverpool STP Solo Cyclist ( 14 Feb. 1966 – 16 June 1966 ),

Liverpool STP – STP – Car Crew ( 117 June 1966 – 23 June 1968 )

Liverpool STP – Assistant to Sgt In Charge, STP ( 24 June 1968 – 21 December 1969 )( Promoted to Sgt during this time and Assistant Sgt in Charge of STP, Liverpool,

Liverpool STP – Sgt In Charge, STP ( 22 December 1969 – 6 Sept. 1975 ),

Redfern GDs ( 7 Division )( 7 Sept. 1975 – 8 May 1976 ),

Liverpool HWP ( Sgt 2/c, OIC of Liverpool HWP )( 9 May 1976 – 4 December 1976 ),

On 8 January 1978 he was to go to Fairfield ( 34 Division GDs but that transfer was Cancelled,

Ryde HWP ( 17 Division )( Sgt 2/c – Sgt 1/c – OIC of HWP – 5 December 1976 – 25 March 1978 ),

 Liverpool Traffic Sgt ( 26 March 1978 – 23 December 1978 ),

Gosford GDs ( 32 Division – 24 December 1978 – 17 February 1979 ),

Liverpool GDs ( 18 February 1979 – 30 November 1980 ),

Wagga Wagga Police Stn – Traffic Supervisor ( 1 December 1980 – 9 September 1984  ),

Whilst the Traffic Supervisor at Wagga Wagga Police Station, Jack took optional retirement, at the age of 55 – 9 September 1984

Source – Stud Books and Liverpool ( NSW ) Police Time Line ( 1788 – 2016 ) & Police Service Card.

 

 

Service:  From 11 February 1952   to 9 September 1984  =  32 years, 6 months & 29 days Service

 

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours – however his Service Card shows

Police Long Service & Good Conduct Medal – awarded 25 November 1974 – presented by, the then, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam

Commendation:

For part played in fighting the disastrous bush fires which occurred in the County of Cumberland during March, 1965.

signed:  N.T.W. ALLAN, Commissioner of Police – 19 Aug. 1965

 

BornMonday  9 September 1929

Died on:  Sunday  21 June 2020 in his sleep

Age:  90 years,  9 months & 12 days

Cause:  Natural – age

Event location:   ?

Event date ?

 

No live stream of funeral – Pinegrove don’t have these facilities

Funeral dateFriday  26 June 2020 @ 1.30pm – 2.30pm ( in Chapel ) 3.30pm – ( Graveside )

Funeral locationWest Chapel, Pinegrove Cemetery, Kington St, Minchinbury, NSW  02 96258066

( Due to current Govt. restrictions of 20 – 50 persons at a Funeral due to the Cornona19 Virus Pandemic – this will be a Private Funeral )

 

Future Wake location??? TBA

( Due to current Govt. restrictions of 50 persons only at ‘Gatherings’,  there won’t be an immediate Wake )

Future Wake date???

( Due to current Govt. restrictions on ‘Gatherings’ due to Corona19 Virus Pandemic, some families may wish to have a Memorial Service / Wake with friends and family at a later date )

 

Funeral Parlour: Guardian Funerals, 1 First Ave, Blacktown, NSW  02 9622 1284

Buried at    Pinegrove Cemetery, Calvary 3, Lot 235, B3

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: Nil – at this time ( June 2020 )

 

JACK is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/

Australian Police YouTube Channel


 

Service Card History:

Upon joining NSWPF, Marcel was:

6′ 1.5″ tall, weighed 14 st. 2 lb, had hazel eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.

He was born in Croydon Park, NSW & Married on 23 October 1954.

He was previously employed at a Parcel Sorter – 2 weeks, Process Worker – 3 months, Fitter and Machinist 6.5 years.

He held the school Intermediate Certificate and held a Trade Certificate as Fitter & Machinist.

He failed his 1st attempt at the Cst 1/c course on 21 August 1956 but Passed on 24 June 1958 – which would explain his loss of 3 months Seniority.

He Passed his Sgt 3/c exam on 20 May 1965 and Passed his Sgt 1/c exam on 13 May 1975.

He was approved to Ride ( as a Solo Cyclist ) on 17 July 1952,

Approved ( O ) on 24 August 1953, ( I don’t know what the ‘O’ represents )

Approved S-hp on 10 August 1954 ( I don’t know what the ‘S-hp’ represents )

Approved to drive Departmental vehicles on 29 October 1958 and approved to drive General Duty utilities & light trucks on 29 January 1964.

He was approved as a High Speed Manual transmission driver on 23 May 1966.

 

 

 


At the time of publication, I have no further information – other than what is posted above.

 

Cal

25 June 2020

 


 

Email received from Jack’s daughter – Lynne on 30 June 2020.

Good morning,

 

I can’t help but be impressed with the respect you all have for each other even though dad retired around 36 years ago.

Inspector Scott Smith and six Police Officers from Mt Druitt took the time to attend the West Chapel at Pinegrove to honour dad and my mother Janet,  Friday 26th June 2020.  Family and friends were touched by the tribute and some footage and photos are available.

Dad was devoted to my mum (retired nurse/midwife) who  had a stroke in 2010 that affected her right side and speech.  Dad maintained the family home and spent every day (unless unwell) with mum.   He decided in January this year to sell the home to spend more time with mum.  He had a few health issues but was on the mend. He had a strength and determination you had to admire, no excuses.

He passed away peacefully in his sleep early in the morning on Sunday 21st June 2020 close to his loving  wife of 65 years.

I have two photos that we used at the service of the graduation of the class of 1952.  It was  taken at the Penrith academy and they were  found when preparing the Braidwood and Schofields properties for sale.

I will soon email them to you and Jody McLeod  for your records.

I have another early  picture of dad in what appears his motor cycle uniform.  A few photos later in his career on his bike and in his uniform at Wagga Wagga with a departmental  just before he retired on the 8th September 1984.  There is a  photo taken at his send off where he was presented with two plaques, one a hand made copper plaque and other memorabilia.

There are more photos and slides  to go through and if I locate any that may be of interest to your group I will forward them to you.

I am custodian of his long service good conduct medal which  was presented to him by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam who had gone out of his way to congratulate Dad and shake his hand.

I was not aware of his commendation through the fires and if it was written I hope I locate it as I still have some personal items to sift through.

I have his trade certificate,  Discharge from the Police Force and other certificates and happy to share if it is of interest.

When stationed at Parramatta he assisted the army at   Windsor through the catastrophic floods.

I recall some of his time at Liverpool Police Station through the mid to late  70s and I would often visit him there  on my way home from work.

He was on duty at Liverpool ( Feb ) 1977 when the train derailed at Granville and Mum was a nurse at Fairfield where many of the casualties were taken.  ( If Jack was stationed at Liverpool in Feb 1977 then his timeline of station attachments must be wrong.  Cal )

Dad was proud of his years in the force and valued the mateship.  He  retired at 55 to spend time and travel around the state with mum in their van and later a Winnebago.

 

Kind regards

Lynne Bak

nee Bailey

********************

Response:

Hi Lynne,

Our condolences on the loss of your father and I hope that you, and the family, gain strength from knowing that he wasn’t forgotten by those who knew him.

We look forward to attaching any, and all, the photos and video that you might like to share with us and any other memories that you may care to share.

Would also like to attach any funeral pamphlet that may have been made and a copy of his Service record and Eulogy.

 

much respect

 

Greg ‘Cal’ Callander

NSWPF # 17463

1975 – 2004


 

On Thursday  1 April 2021 – Lynne returned an email with the below attachments and also with the sad news that her mother, Janet Bailey, passed away peacefully in her sleep on Saturday 27 March 2021.

Janet will be laid to rest with Jack at Pinegrove Cemetery on Saturday 3 April 2021.

 

 

 

 

 




Claude RICHARDSON

Claude RICHARDSON

AKA  ?

Late of  ?

NSW Penrith Police College Class #  “possibly” 005

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  5328

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 29 July 1946

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 1 January 1968

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Sergeant 1st Class

Stations?, Paddington – 10 Division ( Cst 1954 ), Woollahra?, Redfern ( 7 Division ), Traffic Branch – Retirement

Service:  From ? ? pre July 1946?  to 28 January 197932 years Service

Awards: No Find on Australian Honours

Born: Wednesday  29 January 1919

Died on: Monday  7 October 2019

Age: 100 yrs  8 mths  8 days

Cause: Old Age?

Event location: ?

Event date: ?

Funeral date: ? ? ? ( Held )

Funeral location: Norwood, S.A.

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

Memorial located at: ?

 

Claude RICHARDSON

CLAUDE is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Claude Richardson attended every annual conference from 1952–1978. From 1952–1973 he was chairman of No 10 Branch (Paddington) and from 1973–1978 chairman of No 7 Branch (Redfern). From 1953–1978 he was a member of the Executive and treasurer from 1972–1978. With others, Claude was instrumental in establishing the Police Club which opened in 1962 and has written of his experience.

As his father before him, he was a staunch unionist with a longstanding commitment to protecting the rights of workers.

He was sworn in on 29 July 1946 and retired on 28 January with the rank of sergeant 1st class.

He passed away on 8 October 2019, aged 100 years.

https://pansw.org.au/about/life-members/life-member-biographies/richardson-claude

 


Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 – 2001),

Friday 4 May 1973 (No.57), page 1599

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919

Municipality of Woollahra: Appointment of Deputy Member of Parking Advisory Committee

HIS Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council and in pursuance of section 270D of the Local Government Act, 1919, has been pleased to approve the appointment of Sergeant 3rd Class James William Byers, Police Department, vice Sergeant 2nd Class Claude Richardson, as deputy member of the Parking Advisory Committee for the Municipality of Woollahra, for a period expiring on 19th February, 1975. (P.A.C. 120, pt 2)

C. B. CUTLER,

Deputy Premier and Minister for Local Government. Department of Local Government,

Sydney, 4th May, 1973. (3213)

04 May 1973 – LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919 – Trove


 

Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 – 2001),

Friday 7 April 1967 (No.36), page 1102

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919

Municipality of Waverley: Appointment of Members and Deputy Members of Parking Advisory Committee

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council and in pursuance of section 270d of the Local Government Act, 1919, has been pleased to approve of the appointment, as from 3rd April, 1967, of the following gentlemen as members and deputy members of the Parking Advisory Committee in respect of the Municipality of Waverley:

Members

Frank Edmund Pogson, Esquire, Administrative Assistant, Department of Local Government (Chairman);

Sergeant 1st Class Aubrey Augustine Goodyer, Police Department;

Harold Alban Peach, Esquire, Department of Motor Transport;

Patrick Thomas Seery, Esquire, Department of Government Transport; and

Alderman Ernest Thomas Page, Waverley Municipal Council.

Deputy Members

Sergeant 3rd Class Claude Richardson, Police Department; Frederick Sydney Bezer, Esquire, Department of Government Transport; and Alderman Joseph Einfeld, Waverley Municipal Council. (G. 67-687)

P. H. MORTON, Minister for Local Government. Department of Local Government,

Sydney, 31st March, 1967. (5289)

07 Apr 1967 – LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919 – Trove


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Wednesday 28 April 1954, page 7

Coroner Told Nine Trams Passed Man

The City Coroner, Mr. F. L. McNamara, was told yesterday that a man had lain for 30 to 45 minutes with a broken hipbone at the corner of Oxford and Moncur Streets, Waverley, while nine or 10 trams passed him.

Mr. McNamara found that the man, Arthur Reginald Townsend, of Nelson Street, Woollahra, had died accidentally at St. Vincent’s Hospital on February 26 from shock following an operation for a fractured femur, accidentally received when he fell from a moving tram on February 24.

He said: “I find it almost impossible to believe that no person saw the unfortunate deceased lying on the ground during the half to three quarters of an hour he must have been there.”

Constable Claude Richardson, of Paddington Police Station, said Townsend had told him he was getting off at Moncur Street and had one foot on the ground when the tram started off and he fell over.

Townsend had added: “The tram didn’t stop and I lay there while about nine or 10 trams went past before anybody came to my assistance.”

28 Apr 1954 – Coroner Told Nine Trams Passed Man – Trove


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Friday 4 December 1953, page 11

Boy Badly Hurt In Fall From Lorry

Bruce Carter, 6 years, of Suffolk Street, Paddington, was seriously injured yesterday when he fell off the back of a lorry in Glenmore Road, Paddington.

Central District Ambulance took him to St. Vincent’s Hospital, where he was admitted with head injuries.

Constable C. Richardson, of Paddington police is in charge of inquiries.

04 Dec 1953 – Boy Badly Hurt In Fall From Lorry – Trove


 

 

 




Eileen Patricia WILSON

Eileen Patricia WILSON

AKA  PAT

Wife to Cec SHAW # & mother Wayne SHAW # 18327

Late of Lansvale, NSW

 

NSW Police Academy Redfern – Class #  ? ? ?

New South Wales Police Force

Uniform # 1077

Regd. # ???

 

Rank:  “Special Constable” – appointed ? ? pre July 1955?

 

Final Rank = ?

 

Stations?, School Lecturing – Bourke St – Darlinghurst, Metropolitan Traffic Branch School Lecturing Section – Retirement

 

Service:  From ? ? pre July 1953?  to *10 September 1955 =  1.5 years Service

*In these early days of NSW Policing, female police were not permitted to be married.  If they did marry, they had to Resign from NSWPF.

 

Awards: No Find on Australian Honours

 

Born: Monday  28 July 1930

Died on: Friday 19 July 2019 @ 2210hrs

Age: 88 ( 9 days before her 89th birthday )

Cause: Heart failure – Dementia

 

Event location: ?

Event date: Friday  19 July 2019 @ 2210hrs

 

Funeral date: St Matthews Catholic church, 12 Tebbutt St, Windsor, NSW

Funeral location: Friday  26 July 2019 @ 1.30pm

Wake location: ?TBA

Funeral Parlour: Windsor Funeral Home – 4577 2322

 

Buried at: Cremated – Garden Chapel of Castlebrook Crematorium, Windsor Road, Rouse Hill

Memorial located at: ?

 

Mrs Cecil SHAW

 

Eileen Patrician WILSON - Point Duty - Sydney CBD
Eileen Patricia WILSON – Point Duty – Sydney CBD

Eileen Patrician WILSON - Point Duty - Sydney CBD
Eileen Patricia WILSON – Point Duty – Sydney CBD

 

Back Row (L-R): Marsia POTTER, June STRATHMORE ( R.I.P. ), ?, ? Front Row: Eileen Patricia 'Pat WILSON, Inness ? ( R.I.P. ), ?
Back Row (L-R):  Marsia POTTER ( was a Sgt 2/C ), June STRATHMORE ( was a Sgt 2/c ) ( R.I.P. ), ?, ? Front Row: Eileen Patricia ‘Pat WILSON, Inness ? ( R.I.P. ), ?

 

EILEEN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED


Funeral location: TBA


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

September 1955Eileen Patrician WILSON, a Constable with the School Lecturing Section at Darlinghurst married Cecil Alfred Shaw, a Constable and member of 22 Division, Liverpool. They married at St. Patricks Catholic Church, Parramatta.

( Source: Liverpool Police History – 1788 – 2016 )


 

SHAW, Eileen Patricia ” Pat “
28/07/1930 – 19/07/2019
Aged 88 Years
Passed away peacefully in hospital surrounded by family.
Settled in Canley Vale home with beloved husband Cecil Ike (deceased).
Dearest sister to Josie (deceased).
Loving Mother of Wayne, Debbie, Lisa, Melinda, Nicole and Louise.
Mother-in-law to 3.
Proud Grandmother to 20 and
Great Grandmother to 7 with two little souls on the way.
In God s Loving Care
Relatives and friends of Pat are warmly invited to attend her funeral service that will be held at 1.30pm on Friday 26th July 2019, at St Matthew s Catholic Church, 12 Tebbutt Street Windsor.
Following the service, the cortege will proceed to the Garden Chapel of Castlebrook Crematorium, Windsor Road, Rouse Hill.
Funerals
Published in The Daily Telegraph on 23/07/2019

 

 

 


Hey Greg, just to let you know that mum passed away on Friday, at 22:10
Us 5 girls have been with her all day every day and all day with our children as well on Friday, as we knew time was growing shorter.
Mum was resting peacefully, probably hearing us all around her, chatter and recalling older days.
One grandson was reading out the crossword puzzle clues as we all tried to guess the answers.
It was, I suppose, an early birthday gathering for mum because she would have turned 89 next Sunday, July 28.
Debbie and Louise had planned to stay the night… we all wanted to but that was impossible.
We all slowly left through the night, one by one, with plans to return in the morning, as mum’s breathing was steady.
She was given morphine every four hours to help her rest and breathe easily, which she was.
There was no change until the last person left, leaving Debbie and Louise to settle in for the night.
3 minutes later mum’s breathing began to slow down. Minutes later she quietly slipped away,
Debbie and Louise were by her side, gently talking to her, telling her to go to Dad as they held her hands.
They said she was very, very peaceful,.
I really believe that she was waiting for us to go so she could go with dad.
On Thursday I sat by her bedside and held her hand for 9 hours. Whispering to her come by letting her know that I was not going anywhere. We were all taking it in shifts.
Every time I went to pull my hand away, just to change position, she would squeeze my hand. She knew I was there and I am just so glad I was there.
Greg, all the laughs you had with mum and dad through the years and when you were patrolling with Wayne, the whole Shaw household loved your presence… except for my dog.
Thank you for your kind words too.
You are right.
Mum has been without dad for so long now.
25 years in fact!
I imagine she has gone rushing back to dad’s arms….. free from her poor old body.

 

NSW Police School Lecturing Unit - 11 July 1953<br /> PIX MAGAZINE<br /> Volume 30, No. 5 ( 11 July 1953 )<br /> Pages 21 - 23<br />
NSW Police School Lecturing Unit – 11 July 1953
PIX MAGAZINE
Volume 30, No. 5 ( 11 July 1953 )
Pages 21 – 23

NSW Police School Lecturing Unit - 11 July 1953<br /> PIX MAGAZINE<br /> Volume 30, No. 5 ( 11 July 1953 )<br /> Pages 21 - 23<br />

NSW Police School Lecturing Unit - 11 July 1953<br /> PIX MAGAZINE<br /> Volume 30, No. 5 ( 11 July 1953 )<br /> Pages 21 - 23<br />

 

 

 


 

Cumberland Argus (Parramatta, NSW : 1950 – 1962),

Wednesday 28 September 1955, page 9

WEDDING OF POLICEMAN, POLICEWOMAN

Seventy yards of billowing tulle and exquisite Chantilly lace, worn over slipper satin, went into the beautiful bridal gown, which Eileen Patricia Wilson wore at her marriage to Cecil Alfred Shaw, in St, Patrick’s Catholic Church, Parramatta.

Both bride and groom are members of the N.S.W. Police Force.

Eileen, who is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Wilson, of Blaxcell Street, Granville, was attached to the school lecturing division, Bourke Street, Darlinghurst.

Cecil, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Shaw, is a member of No. 22 Division, Liverpool.

Eileen’s bridal gown, together with the maid’s frock, fashioned by her friend, Mrs. E. Hawke, of Granville, featured a lace-fitted bodice, long sleeves and a lace draped apron front, continued to the back and finishing with a bustle bow and two hemline tails. The tulle skirt was cut with an eight foot train. Her short, four-tiered veil was held by a crown of lily of-the-valley.

Large camellias, surrounded by white hyacinths, comprised the bridal bouquet.

Josephine Anne Wilson, her only attendant, wore a full-length frock of salmon flecked nylon, with a plain salmon nylon apron front and bustle bow. She wore a halo of tuber roses in her hair.

Best man was Bernard Russell Shaw, the groom’s brother.

One hundred guests were received at ” Westella, ” Auburn, Lilac Ballroom, by Mrs. Wilson, who chose a blue figured nylon frock, topped with a blue and white coat.

Mrs. Shaw chose a lemon romaine beaded frock and black accessories.

The bride changed for her Coolangatta honeymoon in to a champagne, sculptured nylon frock, over which she wore a powder-blue velvet coat and a small matching petal hat.

They will return to their flat at Granville.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/131386212


 

 

 

 




Wallace DENT

Wallace DENT

AKA WALLY
Late of Balgownie

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  ? ? ?

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  8822[/alert_yellow]

Uniform #  361

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 28 October 1957

Constable 1st Class – appointed 28 October 1963

Senior Constable – appointed 1 July 1968

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 1 October 1973

Final Rank = Sergeant

Stations:  Wagga Wagga HWP ( 1959 – 1964 ), South Coast District,  Pt Kembla HWP, Warilla HWP, Wollongong HWP ( 1964 – ), attended the 1st ever BAS Course in Melbourne in 19?? with Dick Brook, Les Austen, Bert Hammond & Max Ebrill., Wollongong BAS – ( Breath Analysis Section ), Pt Kembla GD’s ( 1975 or 76 )( Sgt 3/c ), Traffic Office – Warilla 1980 ( Sgt 2/C ) until having a heart attack & going out HOD in 1982 or 1984.

After HOD, worked at Bramble Armoured division as a Security Guard in 1988 for 15 years.

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre Oct 1957?  to  ? ? 1982 or 1984?? years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   13 August 1937 – Wollongong

Died on:   Thursday  7 February 2019 during the a.m. in Thrroul

Age:  81

Cause:   Natural causes – Old age

Event location:  the Links Palliative Care, Wollongong

Event date:  Thursday  7 February 2019

Funeral date:   Tuesday  12 February 2019 @ noon

Funeral location:   Parsons Funerals, Princes Hwy, Bulli

Wake location:  Collegians Rugby Club, Charlotte St, Wollongong

Funeral Parlour:  H. Parsons, Princes Hwy, Bulli

Buried at:   ?

 Memorial located at:   ?

[alert_blue] WALLY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

Wally DENT Wally DENT
Wally leaves behind his wife Barbara, daughters Jody & Nicole, the girls respective husbands and grandchildren.
Further information to follow.
Cal
[divider_dotted]

[divider_dotted]

Wallace DENT; Wally DENT

Wallace DENT; Wally DENT[divider_dotted]




Delvene KING

Delvene KING

AKA  Del
Late of  ?

Victoria Police

Regd. #  31857

Victoria Police Academy squad 6 of 1999, graduated on 24 September 1999

Rank:  Constable – sworn in and appointed on 22 September 1999

Senior Constable – appointed on 22 September 2003

Leading Senior Constable – appointed on 22 September 2011

Stations:  Melbourne East, Essendon and Moonee Ponds in Melbourne, Victoria

ServiceFrom  10th of May, 1999  to  21st of March, 2018 = 18 years Service

Awards: Victoria Police Service Medal, 1st Clasp, 15 Years; National Medal, 15 Years

Born:   15 April 1975

Died on:   21 March 2018

Age:  42

Cause:   complications caused by Adult Onset Stills Disease

Event location:   ?

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:   9th of April 2018, 2pm

Funeral location:   Good Shepherd Chapel at the Abbotsford Convent

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   cremated, memorial to be confirmed

 Memorial located at:   ?

Family information: Loved Wife of Sean McConville
Mother to AJ and Milla
Daughter of Peter and Patricia King
Sister to Sharni and Adam

Delvene King

Del

Del

Del

[alert_blue]DELVENE KING is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

 [divider_dotted]

Leading Senior Constable Delvene King was stationed at Melbourne East, Essendon and Moonee Ponds in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia while serving for Victoria Police.

She has always dedicated her life to the community. Outside of policing, Del was also a former President of Rotary Club Flemington and managed several teams for Vic Synchro – Victorian Synchronised Ice Skating community.

“Rest now in eternal peace, freedom and happiness, free from all suffering and illness. You mean the world to so very many people beautiful lady, sending a world of love with you always Del.”

“The lives of so very many people near and far are so much richer for having had known loved or even met Del and her generosity still continues through her organ donations and Del will also continue to help others by way of important and much needed medical research.”

Links:

Bon Voyage to GSE Team to India – Rotary District 9800

Aussie cops in state to exchange tricks of the trade

Ice Lounge Launch Party

Rotary Networker

[divider_dotted]

 Funeral location TBA

[divider_dotted]

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]




Wesley Bruce TREES

Wesley Bruce TREES

aka  Bruce

Late of Denistone

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  7127[/alert_yellow]

Uniform #  3471

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 22 October 1951

Detective Sergeant 3rd Class – 1974

Detective Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 22 August 1976

Chief Inspector – Retirement

Stations: ?, Flemington, Lidcombe ( 1974 ), Bankstown – Retirement

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre October 1951?  to  29 October 1987 = 36 years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born:  17 September 1929

Died on:  Friday  4 August 2017 – early a.m.

Age:  87

Cause:  Natural causes

Event location:   ?

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:  Monday  14 August 2017 @ 10.15am

Funeral location:  North Chapel, Northern Suburbs Memorial Gardens & Crematorium, 199 Delhi Road, North Ryde

Buried at:  Cremated with Ashes to be scattered in his garden at home

 Memorial located at?

Bruce Trees

 

 

[alert_yellow]WES is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 [divider_dotted]

 Funeral location


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

 

Bruce passed away peacefully in his sleep in the early hours of Friday morning and, although the cause is unknown, it is believed that he simply died from natural causes.

Bruce wished to be cremated and that his ashes be scattered in his garden at the family home.

[divider_dotted]

Dearest Pam, Michelle & Colin,
So sad for the loss of Bruce. Such a wonderful life companion and dad. Sending our love and deepest sympathies.
Lois, Peter and family
Alison Atkinson lit a candle
Nambour, Australia
http://www.heavenaddress.com/whiteladyfunerals/Wesley-Bruce-AKA-Bruce-Trees/1720533/photos

 

 

[divider_dotted]

 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Thursday 14 February 1974, page 10


Man had gun, police say

SYDNEY, Wednesday, –

A man involved in a ” violent incident ” at Kirribilli yesterday was charged in North Sydney Court today with possessing an unlicensed revolver and with two counts of housebreaking at Kirribilli.

He was Mr Leos Buschenhagen, 26, plumber, of Bondi.

One charge alleged that he had in his possession yesterday at Kirribilli a .45 calibre Webley revolver without holding a licence.

The others alleged that: At Kirribilli yesterday he broke and entered the dwelling house of Alan Marshall in Carrabella Street, and stole a TV set, a pair of binoculars, 107 LP records, a travelling case and 13 bottles of spirits.

At Kirribilli yesterday he broke and entered the dwelling house of Lurline Caffrey in Carrabella Street and stole a TV set, cassette recorder, transistor radio, record player, clock, 12 sets of records, a pair of sheets and a pillowcase.

Mr Buschenhagen was led into court in-handcuffs.

Mr Evans adjourned the matter to February 21 and refused bail.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110761439

 

 

 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Wednesday 13 February 1974, page 7


Man shot by police to be charged

SYDNEY. Tuesday. – A 24-year-old man will be charged when he leaves hospital tomorrow after being shot by a policeman at Kirribilli today.

The man underwent surgery at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital tonight. A police constable required several stitches in a cut hand after the incident.

Constable J. Murray and Senior Constable B. E. Link were investigating an alleged break and enter in a block of flats in Kirribilli, when a man armed with a .38 pistol ran out and grappled with Constable Murray before forcing him to walk to where Constable Link had handcuffed his companion.

Detectives said the man forced Senior Constable Link to release the handcuffed man. Constable Murray tried to take the gun and cut his hand. The man carrying the gun was shot in the elbow as he and his companion ran off.

Another police officer found the men in a lavatory in a nearby apartment block.

North Sydney detectives charged a 24-year-old man tonight with escaping from lawful custody, having an unlicensed pistol, breaking, entering and stealing and three charges of aggravated assault.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110761205

 

 

Commissioner's Commendation Awarded to Detective Sergeant 3rd Class Wesley Bruce Trees of Lidcombe Police Station whose signature appears in the margin, in recognition of his outstanding courage and devotion to duty displayed at Kirribilli on 12 February 1974 during the police confrontation of two dangerous and desperate criminals who had sought refuge in a toilet after one of them had been wounded while threatening police with a loaded revolver. he assisted in efforts to gain entry to the toilet and subsequently participated in the arrest of the offenders without further bloodshed after they had been disarmed by another member of the force. F. Hanson, Commissioner of Police. Sydney 28 May 1975[divider_dotted]

 

 




Ronald Wayne KING

Ronald Wayne KING

Late of Boronia House, North St Marys, NSW

New South Wales Police Force

Redfern Police Academy Class 105

Regd. #  11712

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 1 November 1965

Constable – appointed 1 November 1966

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed 1 November 1974

Sergeant – appointed 30 June 1981

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 1 July 1987

Retirement

 

Final Rank?

 

Stations: ?, Redfern Police Academy – Drill, Weapons & Special Training Section ( 1960’s – 70’s ), Parramatta ( 18 Division ) – Retirement

 

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre November 1965?  to  4 April 1991 = 25+ years Service

Age at Retirement:  54 years, 11 months, 30 days

Time in Retirement:  26 years, 3 months, 26 days

 

Awards: There are two Ronald Wayne KING’s on It’s An Honour website; One being a Warrant Officer Class 2, the other being a Policeman.  I don’t know if Ron was still a Serving Member of the Army during his Policing career.

National Medal – granted either 22 August 1980 ( Warrant Officer Class 2 ) or 15 April 1981 ( SenCon )

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted either 17 September 1980 ( Warrant Officer Class 2 ) or 27 November 1990 ( Sgt )

2nd Clasp to National Medal

3rd Clasp to National Medal

Police Overseas Service Medal – Clasp CYPRUS – granted 8 July 1992 ( Cst 1/c )

National Police Service Medal – presented 8 December 2016

Army:  Infantry Combat Badge ( ICB )

General Service Medal – 1962 – Clasp – South Vietnam

General Service Medal – Year ? – Borneo Bar  ( Served as a Commando )

 

Born:  Sunday  5 April 1936

Died on:  Sunday  30 July 2017 during the evening

Age:  81 years, 3 months, 25 days

Cause:  Natural causes

 

Event location:  Boronia House, St Marys, NSW

Event date:  Sunday  30 July 2017

Funeral date:  Monday  7 August 2017 @ 1pm

Funeral location:  Pinegrove Memorial Park Northern Chapel, Kington Street Minchinbury, NSW

Buried at:  Memories Garden, Pinegrove Memorial Park, Minchinbury, NSW

 Memorial located at?

Ron King

 

Ron KING wearing the Infantry Combat Badge ( ICB )
Ron KING wearing the Infantry Combat Badge ( ICB ) under which is the General Service Ribbon (Cyprus 1963 – 1964 ), then General Service Ribbon 1962 ( Clasp – Vietnam ), Reserve Force Ribbon, National Ribbon with Clasp, UN-UNFICYP ( Police Overseas Service Ribbon – Cyprus )

 

Ron KING

RON is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


 Funeral location



FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


Ron KING

NSW Police Redfern Academy Sgt Ron King
NSW Police Redfern Academy Sgt Ron King

Ron KING

Paul Wynne RPA and Ron KING ex Instructor Police Academy<br /> Photo from Peter 'Macca' MacRae
Paul Wynne RPA and Ron KING ex Instructor Police Academy

Ron KING

Ron being presented with his National Police Service Medal by Inspector Gavin Rattenbury on 8 December 2016.
Ron being presented with his National Police Service Medal by Inspector Gavin Rattenbury on 8 December 2016.

Ron KING

Ron KING


 


Funeral pamphlet

Ronald Wayne King Service 7th August 2017 at 1pm. North Chapel, Pinegrove Memorial Park. In Loving Memory. 1936 - 2017

Welcome. Reverend Graeme Marks, Senior Assistant Minister, Christ Church Blacktown. Anglican. Words of Scripture for our encouragement. Tributes. Tribute - Allen Barry - son. Tribute - Peter King - son. Tribute Kayla Nesovic - granddaughter. Tribute - Malcolm King - Brother A time for personal reflection.

Bible Reading. John 14:1-6. Read by Reverend Luke Thomson, Assistant Minister, Christ Church, Blacktown, Anglican. " Let not your hearts be troubled. Belived in God; believe also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myslef, that where I am you may be also. And you know the way to where I am going." Thomas said to him, " Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?" Jesus said to him, " I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me". Address. Reverend Graeme Marks. Prayers. Reverend Luke Thomson.

The Lord's Prayer. Our Father, which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy Kindom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, for thine is the Kingdon, the power and the glory, for ever and ever Amen. Benedication.

We sadly saw you sinking, we watched you fade away, all our hearts were breaking, yet you fought so hard to stay. Now reunited with your one trule love, time to stand down Soldier and my you rest above.

Ron's family welcome you to join us immediately after the service until 5pm, at quakers Inn, 7 Nirimba Drive, Quakers Hill for light refreshments and further reflection.


 

 

 




Richard SMITH

Richard SMITH

Late of  ” Iona “, Fern Hill, Canterbury, NSW

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Sergeant

Stations: ?, Manning River – Taree, Major’s Creek Gold Fields ( 1851 as a Sgt ), Sergeant’s Point – Little River ( Braidwood District ) – ( 9 years to Retirement )

ServiceFrom  ? ? 1837?  to  ? ? 1860? = 23+? years Service.  Retired aged 64

Awards?

Born? ? 1796 in Wiltshire, England.  Arrived in Australia in 1835 with the 12th Regiment

Died on:   Saturday  30 May 1903

Age:  107

Cause:  Age

Event location:   Fern Hill, Canterbury

Event date:  30 May 1903

Funeral dateMonday  1 June 1903 @ 1.45pm

Funeral location:  Necropolis

Buried at:  Rookwood Cemetery, NSW

Roman Catholic Sec. M1 – Row T – Grave 170

 Memorial located at?

Richard SMITH
Richard SMITH

 

Mr. Richard Smith, who died at Canterbury a few days ago at the age of 107 years. ( The sketch is from a photo taken five years ago )
Evening News, Sydney Friday 5 June 1903

RICHARD is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


 Funeral location TBA


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Monday 1 June 1903, page 10

FUNERALS.

SMITH. — The Friends of the deceased Mr. RICHARD SMITH, late of Sergeant’s Point, Little River, Braidwood, are kindly invited to attend his Funeral; to move from Iona, Fernhill, Canterbury, THIS MONDAY, at 1.45, for the Ashfield Station, thence to the Necropolis.

Mrs. P. KIRBY and SON

Undertakers,

113 Miller-street, N. Syd.

.

SMITH. — The Friends of Messrs. T. WILLIAM,

JOHN and CORNELIUS SMITH are kindly invited to attend the funeral of their dearly beloved FATHER, Richard Smith to move from Iona, Fern Hill Canterbury THIS MONDAY at 1 45 pm for Ashfield Station thence to the Necrópolis

 

Mrs P KIRBY and Son

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14558101


 

 

Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 – 1907),

Wednesday 10 June 1903, page 26

Lived 107 Years.

THE LATE MR. RICHARD SMITH.

Though so many people are living at the present time that it cannot be claimed that there is anything exceptionally remarkable about the mere fact that a man continues to exist, still the older we get the harder it is to keep going. When, therefore, a man reaches his hundredth year, the occurrence is an extremely rare one, as was demonstrated by the fact that the last census only resulted in the discovery of sixteen persons in all New South Wales whose ages exceeded 100. But even of centenarians only a very small percentage attain the great age of the late Mr. Richard Smith, who died on May 30 at Canterbury, as reported in last issue of the “Town and Country Journal,” aged 107 years.

Though, probably, the oldest man in New South Wales, Mr. Smith retained his faculties to an astonishing degree almost up to the time of his death. Some interesting personal details concerning the life of this veteran of veterans were afforded by Mr. J. R. Smith, of “Willathran,” Vernon-street, Woollahra, the deceased gentleman’s eldest son.

A native of Wiltshire, England, where he was born in 1796, he began life amid the surroundings of a farm, and his youth and early manhood were spent in agricultural pursuits. Many of his relatives, however, had joined the army, and he followed their example. That was upwards of

NINETY YEARS AGO.

He enlisted in the 50th Regiment, known as “The Blind Half-Hundred.”

The Late Mr. Richard Smith, aged 107 Years.

When he came to Australia as a member of the 12th Regiment, in 1835, he was approaching what is usually termed middle-age, and had fifteen yearsmilitary ‘service to his credit, though William IV. was still King of England, and the late Queen Victoria – then Princess Victoria – was still a girl of 16.

Shortly after his arrival here,” said his son. “he was chosen for duty as one of the governor’s orderlies. In the course of a year or two he went over to the police service. The force at that time was very differently constituted to what is the case now, and it was under a commissioner. I remember that he has sometimes spoken of a terrible drought which occurred here in 1837, and at that time he was doing police duty on the Manning River.

For over 23 years, or right up till 1860, he remained connected with the police force,” said Mr. J. R. Smith, “at the end of which time he retired, being then 64 years of age. His retirement was not, however, due to his years, for he was still very vigorous. He merely left the police because he wished

TO OPEN A HOTEL,

notwithstanding the fact that if he had remained in the force another year or so, he would have been entitled to a pension of 8s 6d per day.

It’s a good thing for the country that he didn’t serve the other year,” said the reporter. “Let’s see – 8s 6d per day since 1861 – that means that he would have drawn something like £6000 or £7000 before he died,” .

Yes,” said Mr. Smith, “I suppose so. But he was drawing another pension right up to the time of his death, for his fifteen years’ military service, performed before he joined the police at all.”

He qualified for that 66 years ago, then?” said the reporter.

Well, not exactly. You see he wasn’t eligible for it, under the regulations, until he was 66 years of age, and. as a matter of fact, he didn’t get it until at least fourteen years after that.

Mr. Smith said that his late father, as was only to he expected, had a wonderful store of knowledge respecting incidents of the early days, and would frequently talk of his adventures with bushrangers and other lawless characters whom he encountered in the curse of his police duties.

On one occasion he told me,” said he, “a party of police, of whom he was one, was out in pursuit of a gang, who had just previously

STUCK UP A POLICE MAGISTRATE

and others. The approach of the attacking party was at first unobserved, and one of the desperadoes was seen to be parading before the fire, greatly to the amusement of the others, in the magistrate’s frock coat, silk hat, and goggles, which had been stolen. Not obeying the order of their pursuers to surrender, one or two of the gang were shot, and the rest captured.

Another incident I remember him telling me about occurred, I believe, he said, somewhere up in the direction of Maitland. An old couple had a visitor – the man’s brother, just out from England – staying with them, and, while he was out strolling one day, half a dozen bushrangers surrounded the place. As they did so the brother returned, and the crowd, seizing him unaware, pushed him in front of them in a rush at the door, thinking that the man Inside would not shoot. He, however, unaware that his brother was there, fired, and shot him dead. This attack was thought at the time to have been the work of convicts, but the guilty ones, when caught, were discovered to have been free men.

On one occasion he was one of an escort, which brought down five prisoners from Goulburn bushrangers – who were afterwards hanged on Church Hill. One of the condemned men, after being pinioned, asked for, and was granted leave to examine and select which of the five ropes that had been provided he should be hanged with.

I think,” said Mr. Smith, “that my father was the first policeman sent out to the gold fields. In 1851 he was sent to Major’s Creek, as the sergeant in charge of nine men. Sergeant’s Point, Little River

IN THE BRAIDWOOD DISTRICT

was called after him. He remained there until his retirement from the force, nine years later.

He and the late Inspector Hogg, of Braidwood, who died some years ago at a ripe old age. were close friends all their lives out here, they both enlisted in the army in England on the same day.

When did your father retire from active work?” asked the reporter.

He remained at Braidwood as an hotelkeeper for about 16 years,” was the reply, “and then he removed to the Queanbeyan district, where he lived for from 12 to 15 years, afterwards removing to Sydney. While he was in the Queanbeyan district, he was still able, I believe, to do a day’s ploughing with almost any man, although he was between 80 and 90 years old – In fact, I have heard an offer made to match him to plough against anybody. He had learned all about farm work, as I said before, previous to joining the army, and had not forgotten it.”

In reply to questions, Mr. Smith said that his father, who had not married until what, in most people, would be termed “late in life” ( though with him it proved to be comparatively early ), had left surviving him six sons and one daughter. Three of the sons reside at present in Sydney, the other two, besides himself, being Messrs. Cornelius and William Smith, both of whom live at Fern Hill, Canterbury, where their aged father died.

There were 21 grandchildren of whose existence he was aware, though he could not quite say how many children his brothers and sister had as they were in other countries. He did not think there were any great-grandchildren. One of his own sons, Mr. Harry Smith, besides being a very successful swimmer, had twice been champion long-distance runner of New South Wales, and was chosen by Simonetti, the sculptor, as the model for the figures surrounding the statue of Governor Phillip.

Were there any other instances of remarkable longevity in your father’s family?” Mr. Smith was asked.

I can tell you very little about that,” was his answer; “though I know that when we last heard of one of his brothers, many years ago, he was 96 years of age. I don’t know at what age his father died.

Was there anything exceptional about your father’s mode of living? Was he a teetotaler, or a smoker, and did he have any peculiarities in his ideas as regards diet?

No; nothing very particular, except for the rather strange circumstances that he abjured tobacco and spirits.

WHEN HE WAS 100 YEARS OF AGE.

He had been an inveterate smoker all his life. In fact, I well remember, when I was a youth, that he would often get up two, or three times in the night to have a smoke; but, just about seven years ago, he threw his pipe away, gave away some tobacco he had, and he never smoked again.

The reporter wondered how long the old man might have lived had he not given up his pipe.

He had always been fond of a glass, too,” continued Mr. Smith, “but he gave up spirits at the same time, and never touched them afterwards.”

As for his diet, he would eat anything. I never heard him complain of digestive troubles In my life, and it is, I think, a remarkable fact that after he died it was found that every tooth in his head was

PERFECTLY SOUND;

he had not lost one. I have been fortunate in that respect too, up to the present; for I have not lost one of my teeth yet.

His eyesight was also excellent, right up to the time of his death. He never wore glasses, at any time.

Since removing from Queanbeyan to Sydney, some 12 or 14 years ago,” said Mr. Smith, in reply to another question, “my father has resided, at various times, at Church-street, Camperdown; at Ross-street, Forest Lodge ; at Parramatta-road ; at Balmain-road, Leichhardt; and at North Sydney and Greenwich. He only removed to Canterbury a few weeks before his death.

He was quite active up till about five years ago, and used to take upon himself all the care of my brothers’ horses and waggons, and they were doing a pretty extensive business, too. And, although he was not so active latterly, he retained his faculties surprisingly well.

Was he a big man?” the reporter Inquired.

No; his height was only about 5ft 8in,” was the reply.

There is one thing I may mention,” said Mr. Smith, in conclusion, “and that is, my father always went to bed very early, and was always a very early riser.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/71482173


 

The above story was basically reproduced on Saturday 6 June 1903 in the Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal but with the added text from the Editor B.D. about SMITH.

Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954),

Saturday 6 June 1903, page 2

Death of a Centenarian.

The above account does not agree in several particulars with what is known by several oil residents of the district regarding the Sergeant Smith after whom Sergeant’s Point, on the Mongarlowe River, was named.

In the first place the Sergeant Smith who came here at the breaking out of the goldfields, and who was a contemporary of the later Inspector Hogg, of Braidwood, was a much younger man than the Mr Richard Smith above referred to and died we believe, several years since.

The Sergeant Smith of Mongarlowe never kept a public house in Braidwood.

Another Smith, the late Mr Edward Smith, who died some years ago, leaving a large family well known in Braidwood, Mr A. Smith, of this town, being one of the sons, also the late Mr. S. Smith, kept a public house here for a short time some forty years since, but of course it cannot be him.

However, we are not disposed to be too critical as to his identity or at all desirous of disclaiming as one of our old identities one who has lived to such a good round age.

It is certainly very singular that the deceased’s eldest son should err so much in his recollection of his father’s history, but all the same, there is a mistake somewhere. — Ed. B.D.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100204424


 

Further, to the above:

Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954),

Wednesday 10 June 1903, page 2

The Death of Mr. SMITH. –

With reference to the death of Mr. Richard Smith, of Canterbury, near Sydney, at the age of 107 years, reported in your last issue, the ‘old hands‘ We quite endorse your remarks that he was not the Sergeant Smith who formerly occupied a position in the district, Mr W. B. Bruce, who knew the Sergeant Smith with whom Mr. Richard Smith is evidently confounded intimately, informs us that the former gentleman was drowned in the Moruya river some years ago.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100205943


 

And further evidence to the above:

Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954),

Saturday 20 June 1903, page 2

LOCAL NEWS.

The Late Sergeant Smith.—

In a letter in another column Mr Hennessy sets the matter at rest about which some doubts have been expressed as to the late Mr. Richard Smith who died at Camperdown, near Sydney, at the age of 107 being identical with the Police Sergeant of that name after whom Sergeant’s Point at Little River was named.

Other persons in the district besides the writer referred to have informed us that they knew the deceased when he was stationed at Little River and held the rank of Sergeant, and when he afterwards kept the public house there under the sign of the Rising Sun, which it still bears.

Mr. J, D. Cargill, of Budawang, was one of those who knew him well in 1859. This was after be had retired from the police, when he must have been over 60 years of age. He afterwards with his family removed to Budawang, where he took a farm and resided for ten years, his wife dying while he was there, she being buried in the Church of England Cemetery as her tombstone at the present time testifies.

He afterwards with his three sons moved to Rob Roy station in the Queanbeyan district, and some years later they went to Canterbury where the old gentlemen died.

Mr. R. Geelao, who was then in the police, also knew him well at Little River, as did Mr Peter Wedd, of Durran Durra, and other old residents.

The Sergeant Smith referred to by Mr. Bruce as having been drowned some time since in the Moruya River was the officer in charge at Nelligen for several years, who on his retirement from the police went to live at Moruya.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100209188


 

Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954),

Saturday 20 June 1903, page 2

Original Correspondence.

[ To the Editor of the Dispatch.]

Sir, — In your issue of June 6th you express a doubt that the late Sergeant Smith who recently died at the ripe age of 107 was ever stationed at Little River. Your Araluen correspondent follows on in the same strain. I think I can supply you with a few facts that will remove all doubts as to the Sergeant Smith alluded to being in charge of the police station at Little River.

I think it was late in 1856 I went with a- party of men to a rush that had taken place at Little River some time previous to that date. We found on arrival at Sergeant’s Point the late D. Barrett, who died some time since in the Braidwood Hospital, keeping an hotel.

Opposite the pub, was a store kept by E. McEvoy, brother-in-law to Barrett. Lower down on the river bank was another store, kept by the late W. J. Bennison. Pat. Bollard also kept a butcher’s shop on the Point.

Sergeant Smith was the officer in charge of the police station. Under Smith was a trooper named Charlie Walmsley, who, I believe, some time after rose to the rank of sergeant and was for some time in charge of the police station at Araluen.

One member of our party was a young man named Lane, a native of Windsor. Lane‘s father had been a member of the N.S.W. Mounted Police for a great number of years, and had only retired from active service just about the time young Lane started for the diggings.

Judge of young Lane‘s surprise when he met Sergeant Smith at Little River, for he knew the sergeant to be a staunch friend of his father’s, for they bad been comrades in many a fierce encounter with blacks and bushrangers, and it is more than probable that when the bushranger dressed up in the police magistrate’s rig-out, was creating some amusement for his companions in crime.

Lane‘s father was one of the approaching body of police that put an end to the fun.

Like Sergeant Smith‘s son, Lane tells of encounters with bushrangers that he had heard from his father’s lips.

One encounter of which he has heard his father speak was with the notorious Jack Donoghoe, whose heroic fight single handed with the police was celebrated in song.

When deserted by his four companions Donoghoe took up a position under cover and awaited the attack, the police bever fashion separated and sought shelter also, both parties blazed away for some time without drawing blood.

Amongst the troopers engaged in the affray was a young recruit anxious to get his name up, the young trooper fired rapidly and bad fired all his ammunition, with the exception of one charge, when loading his pistol with the last charge, he called out to his nearest companion that he was about to fire the last shot, having exhausted his stock of ammunition.

Just then Donoghoe, trying to get a view of the enemy, exposed his head. The young trooper fired, and the bullet crashed through the bushranger’s brain.

In a future communication later on I will detail the circumstances under which Donoghoe was driven into the bush to take up arms against law and order.

I dare say, I saw Sergeant Smith, three or four times every week for 12 months. I never spoke to the old man, I, at that time, being a boy entering my teens.

W. HENNESSY.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/100209214/10964045