Joshua PAROCI

Joshua PAROCI

AKA  Josh
Husband to Service NSW Police Force member
Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?????

Rank:  Detective Senior Constable

Stations?, State Crime Command’s Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad – Parramatta,  – Death

ServiceFrom  ? ? 2008 to  19 May 2018 10 years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   ? ? 1987

Died on:   Saturday  19 May 2018

Age:  31

Cause:   Drowned

Event location:   Shotover River, Queenstown, New Zealand

Event type:  White water rafting accident

Event date:  Saturday  19 May 2018

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   ?

 Memorial located at:   ?

Joshua Paroci

 

[alert_blue]JOSHUA is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

 

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 Funeral location TBA

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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RIP Detective Senior Constable Joshua Paroci,
Our respect and condolences from our families to yours. And the Thin Blue Line.
Thank you for your service Sir ????

The NSW Police Force regrets to inform the community of the death of a serving police officer in an accident in New Zealand.

Detective Senior Constable Joshua Paroci, aged 31, died following a rafting incident in Queenstown, New Zealand on Saturday (19 May 2018).

Det S/C Paroci joined the force in 2008 and was most recently working at the State Crime Command’s Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad.

Commissioner Mick Fuller extended condolences to the Paroci family on behalf of the NSW Police Force.

“The hardest part of my job is when we lose one of our own and my thoughts are with Det S/C Paroci’s wife, who is also a police officer, family, friends and colleagues,” Commissioner Fuller said.

Det S/C Paroci was well respected by all those who knew him, and the police family will rally around his loved ones during this difficult time.

Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad Commander, Detective Superintendent John Kerlatec, said Josh was a great man and an excellent detective, and will be sorely missed by the team.

“Professionally, Josh was a tireless worker; dedicated to investigating some of the most heinous crimes against children,” Det Supt Kerlatec said.

“His passion was justice for victims. Not only was he a police officer, he was completing a law degree, which he intended to use to create better outcomes for young victims.

Josh was inspirational, and everywhere he worked, he turned colleagues into mates; today, we mourn the loss of our good mate.”

Det S/C Paroci’s family have requested their privacy at this time.

New Zealand Police continue to make inquiries on behalf of the Coroner, and with the assistance of Maritime NZ, which is conducting its own investigation into what happened.

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Nine News re accident

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Tributes flow for Australian policeman killed in rafting accident near Queenstown

Australian Joshua Paroci, pictured with his wife, who is also a police officer.
Australian Joshua Paroci, pictured with his wife, who is also a police officer.

The Australian man who died in a rafting incident near Queenstown was a detective senior constable with the New South Wales police force.

Joshua Paroci, 31, was one of a group of six Australians rafting on Saturday afternoon with Challenge Rafting on the Shotover River when they overturned near the Toilet Rapids.

Company spokeswoman Tsehai Tiffin said Paroci was being brought back from the far side of the river when he lost his grip on the rescue rope and was swept to the next rapid.

He was helped by a safety kayaker through another rapid and then to shore, but lost consciousness and could not be revived.

NSW police Commissioner Mick Fuller said Paroci would be missed.

“The hardest part of my job is when we lose one of our own and my thoughts are with Detective S/C Paroci’s wife, who is also a police officer, family, friends and colleagues,” he said in a statement.

Detective S/C Paroci was well respected by all those who knew him, and the police family will rally around his loved ones during this difficult time.”

It was the second death on the same section of the river within two months after guide Keith Haare, 62, also known as Chief, died from a medical event in late March.​

Tiffin said Challenge Rafting offered its “deepest sympathy to [Paroci‘s] family and friends”.

It was not unusual for rafts to overturn on grade four or five rivers, like the Shotover, Tiffin said. Customers were issued with equipment to help keep them warm and safe, including a wetsuit, neoprene jacket, booties, spray jacket, lifejacket and helmet.

Another member of the same group was injured and was flown to Lakes District Hospital for treatment. The rest of the group were flown out by helicopter and all flew back to Australia on Monday morning.

The weather was fine and sunny on Saturday and the river was at a medium to low flow at 16 cubic metres a second, well within standard operating parameters, Tiffin said.

Challenge Rafting worked closely with Queenstown Rafting, whose general manager, Luke Taylor, said he and his staff were devastated.

“Our hearts go out to our guests and the families of those involved in this. Both our companies wish to offer the group our sincere condolences and ongoing support,” he said.

Queenstown Rafting and Challenge Rafting have voluntarily suspended operations on the river until further notice.

NSW child abuse and sex crimes squad Commander, Detective Superintendent John Kerlatec described Paroci as a great man and an excellent detective, who would be sorely missed by the team.

“Professionally, Josh was a tireless worker; dedicated to investigating some of the most heinous crimes against children,” he said.

“His passion was justice for victims. Not only was he a police officer, he was completing a law degree, which he intended to use to create better outcomes for young victims.

“Josh was inspirational, and everywhere he worked, he turned colleagues into mates; today, we mourn the loss of our good mate.”

Police said they were investigating the cause of Saturday’s incident, and Maritime New Zealand was conducting a separate investigation.

An autopsy was expected to be carried out in Invercargill on Monday.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/104047806/one-dead-in-rafting-accident-near-queenstown?rm=m

 

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Friends pay tribute to Child Abuse Unit Detective Joshua Paroci

THE “larger than life” detective who drowned in a rafting accident in New Zealand was on a buck’s weekend with his colleague, who is due to marry next month.

Friends who worked with the Child Abuse Unit’s detective Senior Constable Joshua Paroci paid tribute to their colleague who pursued criminals with dogged determination.

The 31-year-old was due to return to work at Parramatta with his close friend, detective Senior Constable Robert Popovic, last week after they went to New Zealand four weeks before the wedding.

The two had trained together at the police academy in Goulburn and formed a tight bond. They were on the trip with three friends when tragedy struck.

Detective Senior Sergeant Paul Grech, who was Sen-Constable Paroci’s team leader at Parramatta, said Sen-Constable Popovic had been left devastated by the accident that claimed his mate’s life when a raft overturned in rapids at Skippers Canyon, near Queenstown, on May 19.

Sen-Constable Paroci, who was married and the father of a four-year-old boy, was one of six Australians on the raft.

“He’s pretty shattered,’’ Sen-Sgt Grech said of Sen-Constable Popovic.

“He’s talking about not having the wedding.

“He’s very close to his friend. They were bosom buddies. It was a buck’s trip, so there was lots of planning involved. It’s the time of their life.”

He said Sen-Constable Paroci had been in the squad for 18 months and “made a lot of noise” until he saw justice prevail.

“He was big in stature and larger than life on the floor,’’ he said.

“It impacts the office really significantly.”

Squad commander detective Superin­tendent John Kerlatec also praised Sen-Constable Paroci.

“Josh was a tireless worker, dedicated to investigating some of the most heinous crimes against children,” he said. “Not only was he a police officer, he was completing a law degree, which he intended to use to create better outcomes for young victims.”

Maritime New Zealand and the coroner are investigating.

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/parramatta/friends-pay-tribute-to-child-abuse-unit-detective-joshua-paroci/news-story/d33605bf95b690f33de6df47498d84f9

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Australian police officer dies in rafting accident near Queenstown, New Zealand

Updated

An Australian man who died during a rafting trip in New Zealand’s South Island has been identified as 31-year-old Joshua Paroci of New South Wales.

A New South Wales police officer, Detective Senior Constable Paroci was reportedly with five other Australians on the raft, operated by Challenge Rafting, which overturned on rapids on the Shotover River, north of Queenstown.

Police colleagues have described him as well respected and an excellent detective who would be sorely missed.

In a statement, the rafting company said the raft overturned about 3:45pm on Saturday near the Toilet Rapids at Skippers Canyon.

The company said the rafters followed standard rescue procedures when they were pitched into the water.

Detective Senior Constable Paroci lost his grip on the rescue rope as the raft was being towed to a bank and he was swept through another rapid.

Attempts by paramedics to resuscitate him on the shore failed.

Another member of the same group was injured and received treatment at a New Zealand hospital.

Queenstown Rafting general manager Luke Taylor said he and his staff were devastated by the incident.

“Our hearts go out to our guests and the families of those involved in this. Both our companies wish to offer the group our sincere condolences and ongoing support,” Mr Taylor said.

In a statement, NSW Police said Detective Senior Constable Paroci joined the force in 2008 and was a member of the State Crime Command’s Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad.

His wife is also a police officer.

“Detective Senior Constable Paroci was well respected by all those who knew him and the police family will rally around his loved ones during this difficult time,” Commissioner Mick Fuller said.

Detective Superintendent John Kerlatec, the Commander of the Child Abuse and Sex Crimes Squad, said the 31-year-old was “a tireless worker, dedicated to investigating some of the most heinous crimes against children”.

“His passion was justice for victims,” he said, adding that the young detective was completing a law degree which he had hoped to use to further help young victims.

“Josh was inspirational and everywhere he worked he turned colleagues into mates; today we mourn the loss of our good mate.”

Police said Detective Senior Constable Paroci’s family had asked for privacy at this time.

The rafting company voluntarily suspended operations until further notice, and Maritime New Zealand is investigating the incident.

New Zealand Police confirmed Detective Senior Constable Paroci’s death in a statement and offered “their condolences to Mr Paroci’s family and friends at this difficult time”.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said it was providing consular assistance.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-21/australian-man-dies-in-rafting-accident-near-queenstown/9782714
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Christopher McKENNA

Christopher McKENNA

Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   ????

Rank:  Constable

StationsSydney Water Police

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?  to  9 December 1848 = 6 years Service

Awards?

Born? ? 1826?

Died on:  Saturday  9 December 1848

Age:  about 22?

Cause:  Drowned off Police Schooner ‘ Satellite ‘

Event location:   South West shore of Bradley’s Head, Sydney Harbour

Event date:  Saturday  9 December 1848

Drowned body located on Sunday  10 December 1848

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral locationDevonshire St Cemetery,  Roman Catholic Section  Row:  1889   Cemetery Plot U-P

Buried at?

 Memorial located at?

 

Three Constables of the Sydney Water Police drowned in this ‘on duty’ event on the 9 December 1848.

 

[alert_red]CHRISTOPHER is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red] *BUT SHOULD BE

 

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Nothing found on NSWBDM for this name and year date.
V18482110 116/1848
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Further follow up articles to include:
Death of Cst Hugh CRAILL – Sydney Water Police
Death of Cst ? VINCENT – Sydney Water Police

 

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Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 – 1861), Saturday 30 December 1848, page 2


LOSS OF THE GOVERNMENT SCHOONER ” SATELLITE. “

We regret to announce the loss of the police schooner Satellite, during the gale of Saturday night.

She had started in the forenoon on a pleasure-trip  down the harbour, having on board the Colonial Secretary, Captains Browne, Innes, and Batty, Mr. Mann, and several other gentlemen. On returning from the Heads, about dusk, having to beat up against a westerly wind, these gentlemen left her in the hands of the crew, three in number, and came up to Sydney in Captain Browne’s boat.

A few minutes before the gale commenced, the schooner was observed by some parties standing across from Bradley’s Head to Clarke’s Island, and it is supposed that almost instantly after she must have capsized and gone down, as no trace whatever can be found of her. The names of the unfortunate men who have thus met with a watery.grave are Crawell, McKenna, and Vincent.

The Water Police boats were all over the harbour on Sunday morning, and finding no vestige of the vessel, they commenced dragging for the bodies of Crawell and Vincent, that of McKenna having been found on the rocks near Bradley’s Head. The bodies of the other two had not been found.

The telegraph mast at Fort Phillip has also been carried away by the gale. The inconvenience to the public will be very considerable unless the Government speedily erect another.

By the assistance of two punts the Satellite was floated yesterday, and towed into Woolloomooloo Bay : From all the circumstances of this melancholy case, we think that a considerable degree of blame is attached to the parties who left the schooner in the hands of three men only, two of which were, we understand, totally unacquainted with the duties of a seaman ; more especially us, from the general appearance of the weather during the day, an experienced seaman like Captain Browne might reasonably have anticipated a storm about sun-down.

One of the bodies of the unfortunate men was found yesterday evening.

People’s Advocate, Dec 16.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3713357

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Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 – 1860), Saturday 23 December 1848, page 2


The Loss of the Satellite.

A most unjustifiable attack on the Colonial Secretary was given to the world, or, more correctly speaking, to that very circumscribed portion of it with which the “Atlas ” is connected, in the columns of that journal on Saturday last.

The penman of the vituperative article would appear to be either of very recent importation, and consequently incompetent to treat of the conduct of the local Government and its officers, or, ( which is equally creditable to his impertinence ) has taken no pains to arrive at the truth of the accusation so unblushingly levelled at a gentleman whose public and private career has till now escaped the foul mouthed abuse of the slanderer.

Our present purpose is merely to rebut the calumny, and, if possible, shame the calumniator by the simple declaration that Mr. Thomson did NOT form one of the party on board the ill-fated ” Satellite ” on the pleasure trip which resulted in so melancholy a loss of life.

With respect to the alleged mal-appropriation of the Water Police Schooner by her commander, in occasionally entertaining a party of friends on board, and indulging in a cruise about the harbour, we can see neither impropriety nor ” disgrace ” in so natural a proceeding. As well might the ” Atlas ” arraign every Post Captain in the British Navy, for, with few exceptions, our gallant tars do not scruple to appropriate H. M’s. boats to the occasional entertainment of their friends in harbour, and this without risk of rebuke from the Admiralty, or the censure of any, save, perhaps, that of some expuseyite canting print whose ruling principle, like that of the termagant on the eve of matrimony, is avowedly”,” to find fault where there is no occasion.”

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/59766042

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Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), Wednesday 20 December 1848, page 2


The water police schooner Satellite was, late on Saturday night, recovered, and has been towed into Neutral Bay, where she now lies. She was found with all her sails set, and not a rope misplaced. She has sustained no damage worth speaking of, or at all events, not beyond what a few pounds will cover.

The body of one of the two missing policemen, a man named Craill, was found on Friday night, at Potts’s Point, lying between two rocks. It was in a fearful state of decomposition, and could with difficulty be identified. An inquest was held on Saturday. The evidence adduced was precisely the same as that given at a former inquest held on the body of the man named McKenna, and a finding of death from accidental drowning was recorded.

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Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), Wednesday 20 December 1848, page 2


 THE “SATELLITE” — Early yesterday morning, two punts is attached to the dredging machine proceeded to the spot where the police schooner Satellite had been found, near Bradley’s Head, in thirteen fathoms of water, and by means of the ?, she was towed into shallow water near Garden Island.
The body of the water policeman Craill was found yesterday on Potts’ Point, and brought to the Water Police Office, on which was ? ? will be held this day. We are as ? to state that all expenses incurred in getting up the schooner, and giving her the necessary repairs, will be borne by the party who were pleasuring in her on the day of the unfortunate disaster occurred. – Dec 16.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/706981
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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Tuesday 19 December 1848, page 2


The police schooner Satellite having been towed into shallow water near Garden Island on Friday last, was yesterday morning got up, and the water being pumped out of her, she was towed into Hulk Bay, having sustained little or no damage.
The vessel when got up had every sail and rope set, which shows that she must have been beating up against a westerly wind, when the southerly squall caught her, and capsized her.
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Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 – 1860), Saturday 16 December 1848, page 2


LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

Loss OF THE WATER POLICE SCHOONER, “SATELLITE.” – On Saturday last, a select party of gentlemen, accepting the invitation of Captain Browne, proceeded down the harbour on a pleasure cruise in the Satellite.

On their return about 7 p m., towards Sydney, the wind which had been variable, and blowing in sudden gusts, veered ahead, on which the party determined on leaving the schooner, and pulling to the wharf in Captain Browne’s boat.

Previous to quitting the Satellite, positive instructions were given to the three men left on board, to take in the main-top-sail, but it would stem as though they had utterly mistaken the order, as the boat had not proceeded many hundred yards before they perceived the schooner’s top-gallant-sail hoisted, and all sail set. The boat, on nearing the shore, suddenly encountered a heavy squall, which nearly capsized her, and it is presumed that the Satellite must have been struck and overwhelmed by the same, as no tidings of the unfortunate vessel could he gleaned on the following morning.

On search being made, the body of McKenna, one of the crew, was discovered cast up on the rocks near Bradley’s Head ; the bodies of his shipmates, Crawell and Vincent, have not yet been recovered.

The Schooner was subsequently found sunk, in fourteen fathoms water, and immediate steps will be taken to raise her.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/59767379

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Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 – 1860), Saturday 16 December 1848, page 2


COXSWAIN – We believe the Colonial Secretary did not form one of the party on board the Satellite schooner.

We shall be happy to refer J.A. to our Solicitor, should he require further explanation in the matter.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/59767385

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Shipping Gazette and Sydney General Trade List (NSW : 1844 – 1860), Saturday 16 December 1848, page 301


 We are sorry to have to announce the loss of the Police schooner Satellite, during the gale of Saturday night.
She had started in the forenoon on a pleasure trip down the harbour with the Colonial Treasurer, Captains Browne, Innes, and Batty, Mr. Mann, and others.
On returning from the heads, about dusk, having to beat up against a westerly wind, these gentlemen left her in the hands of the crew, three in number, and came up to Sydney in Captain Browne’s boat. A few minutes before the gale commenced the schooner was observed by some parties standing across from Bradley’s Head to Clarke’s Island, and it is supposed that almost instantly after she must have capsized and gone down, as she has since been found in that part of the harbour.
The names of the unfortunate men who have thus met with a watery grave, are Craill, McKenna, and Vincent.
The body of McKenna has been found on the rocks near Bradley’s Head, and that of Craill on Potts’s Point.
We are authorised to state that all expenses incurred in getting up the schooner, and giving her the necessary repairs, will be borne by the parties who were pleasuring in her on the day the unfortunate disaster occurred.
During the same gale a small coasting vessel of about ten tons, was driven ashore on the rocks near George’s Head, but fortunately no lives lest. The telegraph mast also at Fort Phillip, has been carried away by the violence of the gale.
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/161167776
Inquest on the body of Hugh CRAILL, whose body was taken to the Water Police Office, was head at the Hooper’s the King’s Head, Lower George-street on Saturday  16 December 1848.
Accidental drowning
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12907477
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Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), Saturday 16 December 1848, page 2


SYDNEY NEWS

( From our Correspondent )

Sydney, Thursday Evening.

THE WATER POLICE SCHOONER – No attempt could be made for the recovery of the Satellite yesterday, in consequence of the boisterous weather that prevailed.

The diving bell and the punts belonging to the dredge left Sydney before daylight this morning to make the attempt.

The bodies of the two other missing water police have not yet been recovered.

The government, I am informed, have resolved that as the boat at the time of the occurrence was out on a pleasure party, and not on ” duty “ the water police magistrate shall pay for her loss.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/707039
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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Wednesday 13 December 1848, page 2


The police schooner Satellite, which has been dragged for during the last two days, was yesterday afternoon fell in with near Bradley’s Head, in between ten and twelve fathoms water. The steam dredge and diving bell were to proceed at daylight this morning for the purpose of recovering her. Neither of the bodies of the police constables Craill and Vincent had, up to yesterday evening, been found.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12910815
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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Tuesday 12 December 1848, page 2


INQUEST. – An inquest was held yesterday by Mr. Ryan Brenan, at O’Dowd’s, the Forbes’ Hotel, King and York streets, on view of the body of Christopher McKenna. then lying dead at the residence of his mother, in York-street. The deceased was one of the three Water Police constables who were on board the Government schooner Satellite, when she was lost in the harbour during the sudden squall of Saturday night.

Mr. T. H. B. Venour, clerk of the Water Police Court, deposed to the finding of the body of the deceased late on Sunday afternoon, lying on the rocks on the south-western side of Bradley’s Head.

Captain Browne, P.M., stated that on Saturday the schooner had been down the harbour, and on returning to Sydney, at about seven o’clock in the evening, when off Clarke’s Island, the wind falling light, he (Captain B ) with others quitted the vessel, leaving her in charge of the deceased and two others of the constabulary named Craill and Vincent.

On leaving the vessel a caution was given to these parties to mind the southerly wind and have their sails taken in. They were directed to work up to Sydney. Captain B. and his party then pulled up, but within the succeeding twenty minutes were caught by the squall, and from its violence experienced great difficulty in reaching Sydney.

Finding on yesterday (Sunday) morning that the schooner had not come up, he proceeded down the harbour, and found on the rocks near Bradley’s Head the Satellite‘s main hatch gratings, and a table which he ( Captain Browne ) knew to be aboard of her when he quitted her, as also a hat belonging to the deceased.

Every possible enquiry had been made respecting the schooner, but although it appears she was seen shortly previous to the coming of the squall, no person could be found who had seen her struck by it.

The deceased, who was about twenty-two years of age, had been four years in the service, and a high encomium on his conduct during that time was passed by Captain Browne.

The deceased and the other men, at the time the schooner was left in their charge, were perfectly sober.

The jury returned a finding of accidental death by drowning.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12908510#

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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Monday 11 December 1848, page 2


We are sorry to have to announce the loss of the Police schooner Satellite, during the gale of Saturday night.

She had started in the forenoon on a pleasure trip down the harbour with the Colonial Secretary, Captains Browne, Innes, and Batty, Mr Mann, and others.

On returning from the heads, about dusk, having to beat up against a westerly wind, these gentlemen left her in the hands of the crew, three in number, and came up to Sydney in Captain Browne’s boat.

A few minutes before the gale commenced the schooner was observed by some parties standing across from Bradley’s Head to Clarke’s Island, and it is supposed that almost instantly after she must have capsized and gone down, as no trace whatever can be found of her. The names of the unfortunate men who have thus met with a watery grave, are Crawell, McKenna, and Vincent.

The Water Police boats were all over the harbour yesterday morning, and finding no vestige of the vessel, they commenced dragging for the bodies of Crawell and Vincent, that of McKenna having been found on the rocks near Bradley’s Head.

During the same gale a small coasting vessel of about ten tons, was driven ashore on the rocks near George’s Head, but fortunately no lives lost.

The telegraph mast also at Fort Phillip, has been carried away by the violence of the gale. It is to be hoped the government will lose no time in repairing this latter damage, as the loss will be a great inconvenience to the public.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12913509
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Alexander J. MUIR

Alexander J. MUIR

aka  Alex

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   ?

Rank:  Inspector – death

Stations?, Katoomba, Lismore, Wagga Wagga, ( Regent St – 2 Division ) – death

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?  to  ? August 1939 = ? years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born? ? ?

Died on:  Sunday  13 August 1939

Age:  59

Event location:  Entrance to Brisbane Water, Hawkesbury River, Woy Woy

Cause:  Drowning

Funeral date:  Tuesday  15 August 1939

Funeral location:  St. Stephen’s Presbyterian Church, Macquarie St, Sydney

Buried at:  Cremated at the Eastern Suburbs Crematorium, and interred at Rookwood cemetery ( other articles mention the ashes being interred at Botany Cemetery )

 Memorial at?

 

the Sydney Morning Herald Wed 16 August 1939 p18Mounted and foot police led the funeral cortege of Inspector A. C. Muir, who was bured with full police honours at the Eastern Suburbs crematorium yesterday. Inspector Muir was drowned in Brisbane Water on Sunday.
the Sydney Morning Herald Wed 16 August 1939 p18 Mounted and foot police led the funeral cortege of Inspector A. C. Muir, who was buried with full police honours at the Eastern Suburbs crematorium yesterday. Inspector Muir was drowned in Brisbane Water on Sunday.

 

 

[alert_blue]MUIR is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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 Funeral location ?

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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.

FURTHER INFORMATION NEEDED.

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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Wednesday 16 August 1939, page 16


FUNERAL OF INSPECTOR MUIR.

The late Inspector A J Muir who was to have taken up duty at Regent Street Police Station but who was drowned at Brisbane Waters near Woy Woy on Sunday while fishing, was given a police funeral yesterday.

After a service at St Stephens Church Macquarie Street which was attended by the Commissioner of Police, Mr W. J. McKay, and most of the police officers stationed in Sydney, the cortege moved to the Eastern Suburbs Crematorium.

Headed by the police band, mounted police and the police motor cycle squad about 80 members of all ranks marched with the cortege from the church to Stanley Street.

Many residents of Katoomba, where the late Inspector Muir was for many years in charge of the police station came to Sydney to attend the funeral.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article17605957.txt

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Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 – 1954), Wednesday 16 August 1939, page 8


MANY AT FUNERAL OF INSPECTOR

SYDNEY. Tuesday.

Policemen from many country centres attended the funeral today of the late Inspector Alexander Muir, who was drowned at Gosford last Sunday.

The cortege, headed by a police band, passed in dignified procession through the city streets, and was followed by many civilians anxious to pay their respects to a well-known police identity.

The Commissioner of Police (Mr. McKay) and the assistant Metropolitan Superintendent (Mr. Collings) were members of the funeral cortege.

CHURCH SERVICE

The Rev. A. J. Parker, formerly of Lismore, and a lifelong friend of the deceased, who officiated at the church service at St. Stephen’s Presbyterian Church, paid a high tribute to the qualities and character of the late Inspector Muir.

He was a man who was always willing to give a helping hand to those in need,” declared the Rev. Parker.

Inspector Muir was a church elder at Lismore for a considerable time.

The remains were cremated at the Eastern Suburbs Crematorium, and interred at Rookwood cemetery.

The chief mourners were his widow, Mrs. Madge Muir, son, Alister, and daughters, Mrs. Ruth Campbell and Misses Jean and Biddie Muir, daughters.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article98583912.txt

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Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 – 1942), Friday 18 August 1939, page 2


Police Inspector Muir, 59, who was drowned when a 16ft. launch overturned at the entrance to Brisbane Water on Sunday night, was formerly stationed at Lismore, and was on two months’ leave when the tragic occurrence took place. The widow, one son and three daughters survive.

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Narandera Argus and Riverina Advertiser (NSW : 1893 – 1953), Friday 18 August 1939, page 2


INSPECTOR MUIR DROWNED

Police Inspector Muir, who had only left Wagga on Friday last, was drowned, and two companions, Archibald C. Fowler, of Katoomba, and Leslie Roy Whatley, of Woy Woy, were rescued after a sixteen foot launch had overturned on the bar at the entrance to Brisbane Water early on Sunday night.

The party had been on a fishing excursion and rough weather caused the launch to capsize. The men clung to the overturned launch, but Inspector Muir was washed upwards of 100 yards away by a strong current.

Inspector Muir, who was on two months’ leave, was staying at Ettalong before beginning duty in Sydney. He had been transferred from Wagga, where be bad been a very popular officer.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article130470876.txt

 

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Northern Herald (Cairns, Qld. : 1913 – 1939), Saturday 19 August 1939, page 35


TRAGEDY ON BAR.

FATAL FISHING TRIP. SYDNEY, August 14.

Inspector Muir, of Regent-street Station, was drowned in Brisbane Water when a 16ft launch capsized in the heavy surf on Sunday. Muir was spending a holiday at Woy Woy, and, with two other men, Leslie Whaley and A. Fowler, spent the day fishing.

They were returning to Woy Woy and while crossing the sand bar were caught in a heavy swell. The surf broke over the boat and while the men were bailing out a wave overturned the boat. Whaley and Fowler clung to the upturned boat, but Muir decided to try to swim ashore, using the pine flooring board to assist him, but an hour later the plight of Whaley and Fowler was noticed and a ferry picked them up.

Muir was found 100 yards from the overturned launch unconscious. Attempts to restore animation were unsuccessful.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article150817186.txt

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Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 – 1954), Monday 14 August 1939, page 1


DROWNED

Police Inspector SYDNEY, Monday

Police Inspector Muir was drowned at Woy Woy during the week end. He was spending a short holiday in that neighborhood before taking up an important position at Regent Street Station, Sydney.

Deceased formerly had control of Katoomba, Lismore and Wagga districts. He left Wagga last week for his new position in Sydney.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article162221989.txt

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Alfred Essex BALDOCK

Alfred Essex BALDOCK

New South Wales Police Force

Chief Constable

Stations:  Norfolk Island

Born:  1821

Died  12 April 1848

27 old

Funeral  13 April 1848

Norfolk Island cemetery

Kingston, Norfolk Island

 

Alfred Essex BALDOCK - grave stone - Norfolk Island
Alfred Essex BALDOCK – grave stone – Norfolk Island

INSCRIPTION:

Sacred to the memory of Alfred Essex BALDOCK late Chief Constable of the Island. who was unfortunately drowned by the upsetting of a boat in crossing the bar on the 12th April 1848 aged 27.

Therefore be ye also ready for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh  Matt. XXIV II.

” ‘Tis His Supreme prerogative  Our subject kings to reign.  ‘Tis just that He should rule the world  Who does the world sustain.

 

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MURDER MYSTERY

 http://diane-adventurebeforedementia.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/murder-mystery.html
Way back in 2002 we went on a holiday to Norfolk Island. I can’t believe that was ten years ago. How time flies when you get old. Anyway back to the story.
Norfolk Island is a small island in the Pacific Ocean between Australia and New Zealand. It has a very colourful history. It was colonised by the British as part of Australia in 1788. It served as a penal colony for the worst convicts until 1794. From 1856 it was settled by free settlers and in1901 it became a territory of Australia and it still is today. It is also a tax haven. Today the island’s primary economic activity is tourism due to its historical buildings and colourful history including the Pitcairn Islanders and the Mutiny on the Bounty. So we did our bit for their economy and joined in the many tourist activities that they provide. (photos have been scanned from photo album)

One of the activities was a Murder Mystery Dinner, where you become a character in a murder mystery  story. You have to ask questions of the other characters and try to find out who is the murderer. At this party the murder mystery was based on a true event that happened in Norfolk Island’s past. We were given a booklet that gave us some background information on the characters and the crime. We had to dress up as the character we were given.

I was the Commandant’s wife and Bill was the Chief Constable, Alfred Baldock. He was detested by most on the island, he was a former convict but now mistreated the rest of the unfortunates. He was a homosexual which was against the law then. As you can tell we had loads of fun trying to find out which one of us was the murderer.
The next day we went exploring and visited the Norfolk Island Cemetery and Bill  found the grave stone of his character Alfred Essex Baldcock.
Alfred Essex Baldock late Chief Constable of the island, who was unfortunately drowned by the upsetting of a boat in crossing the bar on 12 th April 1848 aged 27. (click on pic to enlarge). The right hand pic is from the web and the headstone has been restored and so have many of the others. This cemetery dates back to 1825 but there is evidence of earlier burial grounds on the island.
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Alfred Essex BALDOCK - the Fatal Shore
Alfred Essex BALDOCK – the Fatal Shore

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=nKVlKHn29xcC&pg=PA547&lpg=PA547&dq=Alfred+Essex+BALDOCK&source=bl&ots=Rqgp4TIn_q&sig=UFx7gLVpVxUpsXrHb5H3fYjJySE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=mX5lVP6uFaPZmgW0roKABw&ved=0CE8Q6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=Alfred%20Essex%20BALDOCK&f=false

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  Cemetery location

 




Sergeant 1st Class Rhoderic Francis LINDSAY

Sergeant 1st Class Rhoderic Francis LINDSAY

New South Wales Police Force

Boating Accident

Swansea

20 February, 1984

On the afternoon of 20 February, 1984 Sergeant Lindsay and Senior Constable Calman were both off duty and fishing in the sergeant’s boat off Swansea. About 6.10pm the yacht Melody radioed for assistance after running aground on the bar at Swansea Channel. Sergeant Lindsay and Senior Constable Calman then set out to assist the stricken vessel. Securing a line to the Melody they attempted to tow the vessel to safety, but as their efforts were hampered by heavy seas the sergeant released the line from the yacht. Constable Calman then noticed that Sergeant Lindsay was missing from his boat and seeing blood in the water, dived into the sea to rescue his friend. Constable Calman, assisted by surf club members, then conveyed the injured sergeant to shore however it was found then that he had died of his injuries.

 

It appears that Sergeant Lindsay was either knocked or was washed overboard where he suffered extensive head injuries when struck by his boat’s propeller.

 

He was posthumously awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal and the Police Commissioner’s Commendation for Outstanding Courage and Devotion to Duty.

 

The sergeant was born in 1935 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 12 April, 1955. At the time of his death he was stationed at Newcastle.


 

National Police Remembrance Day ceremony in Lake Macquarie

Rhoderic Francis LINDSAY

 


 




Bernard Alfred ORROCK

Bernard Alfred ORROCK

( late of Alpha Rd, Willoughby )

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Constable

Stations?, Sydney Water Police – Death

Service:   From  22 January 1951  to  26 February 1955 = 4+ years Service

Awards:  Queen’s Police Medal for Gallantry

Bronze Medal from the Royal Shipwreck and Humane Society for his actions in the floods

Born? ? 1930 in Hornsby

Died on:  26 February 1955

CauseElectrocuted

Event location:  Maitland

Age:  24

Funeral date?

Funeral location? “possibly”  Macquarie Park Cemetery, Plassey Rd, Macquarie Pk

Buried at?”possibly”  Roman Catholic Portion, Row U11, Plot 0041

Memorial at

Bernard Alfred ORROCK

[alert_green]BERNARD IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

On 26 February, 1955 Constable Orrock of the Sydney Water Police was performing flood rescue duties in the Maitland area during the horrendous 1955 floods. While travelling with Army and Air Force personnel in an Army Duck toward the Louth Park area, the wireless aerial on the Duck struck live high tension power lines. As a result, Constable Orrock and two Army Signallers, Sergeant William McGrath and Signaller Eric Chard, were killed. The cause of death was asphyxiation caused by electrocution.

 

He was posthumously awarded the Queen’s Police Medal for Gallantry and a Bronze Medal from the Royal Shipwreck and Humane Society for his actions in the floods that ultimately led to his death.

 

The constable was born in 1930 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 22 January, 1951. At the time of his death he was attached to the Sydney Water Police.

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Tuesday 22 November 1955, page 5


AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY IN N.S.W. FLOODS

SYDNEY, Monday.

The Queen has conferred awards for services during the floods of last February and March.

The awards were announced by the Governor, Sir John Northcott, and the Prime Minister, Mr.Menzies, yesterday.

……….The Superintendent of Newcastle Police, Peter F. McLouglin or McLachlan, and Mr Ian Stuart Black, of Denman, receive the British Empire Medal.

The Queen’s Police Medal for gallantry was awarded posthumously to Constable Bernard Alfred Orrock, of the Sydney Water Police who was killed during rescue operations.

The Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct was awarded to four policemen and four civilians.

They are Senior Const. William Elsner STEVENS of Gilgandra. Const. 1st Class Marius Joseph William John BOURKE, Const. 1st Class Rudolph Luvaine MUNNS, Const. Svend Aage IVARSSON, of the Sydney Water Police, and Messrs. Claude Reynolds of Bundarra, Gordon Ernest Davis, of Moree, Robert Edward Montgomery, of Moree, and Keith Arthur Bennett, of Moree.

……..

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article91212609.txt

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They Sydney Morning Herald    22 November 1955      p3

Inspector Peter McLachlan, of Newcastle, who was awarded the British Empire Medal, personally took part in more than 100 rescues in the Singleton district.

He was without sleep for four days and nights directing dozens of other rescue operations, including the organisation of an aerial flood lift into Singleton, and emergency accommodation for hundreds of homeless people.

Constable Bernard Alfred Orrock, 24, of Alpha Rd, Willoughby, who was awarded the Queen’s Police Medal for Gallantry ( posthumous award ) was attached to the Water Police when he was electrocuted on an Army duck at Maitland on February 26.

The duck on which Orrock was travelling hit a 66,000 volt high tension wire near the Maitland railway bridge while trying to reach 100 people who were stranded there.

Before he was killed he assisted in the rescue and evacuation of about 70 people.

Constable Marius Joseph William John Bourke, Rudolph Luvaine Munns and Svend Aage Ivarsson, awarded the Queen’s Commendation for brave conduct, are all of the Sydney Water Police.

 

Washed Over Dam In Boats

There were in two police flood boats, which were washed over a dam, near Singleton, while trying to get Inspector McLachlan into Singleton at night.

Constables Bourke and Ivarsson later in Singleton, took part in scored of rescues under Inspector McLachlan.

Constable Munns worked with Constable Orrock at Maitland and took part in more than 100 rescues.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19551122&id=XfljAAAAIBAJ&sjid=B-UDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6173%2C5029386&hl=en

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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Saturday 14 August 1954, page 6


Ship’s Wash Sweeps Workman To Death

Wash from a ship’s propeller swept a man to death beneath a wharf at Walsh Bay yesterday.

A wharf foreman, who plunged fully clothed into the water to rescue him, received cuts and bruises when he was buffeted against the wharf.

Drowned was John Allan Mitchell, 57, of Nicholson Street, Balmain.

Mitchell, a welder, was working on the stern of the motor vessel Braeside, moored at No. 7 wharf.

He was standing on scaffolding on a raft floating between the ship’s stern and the wharf, when wash from another ship, Muliama, rocked the raft, overturned the scaffolding, and sent him tumbling into the water.

A wharf foreman, James Curry, of Cascade Street, Paddington, dived into the water and supported Mitchell until Maritime Services Board employees Stewart Dutton, of Herne Bay, and Leslie Lindwall, of Seaview Street, Dulwich Hill, reached them in a launch.

Mitchell was given artificial respiration before the arrival of the police launch Typhon, with Constables B. Orrock and W. Atkins aboard.

Central District Ambulance took Mitchell to Sydney Hospital, but he was dead on arrival.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article18430246.txt

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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Monday 24 May 1954, page 4


Man Rescued From Harbour

Water Police yesterday rescued a man clinging to a pylon in three feet of water under a wharf at Walsh Bay.

The man, William McCormack, 60, of Victoria, told police he did not know how he got into the water, but must have been there for hours.

He was blue with cold, and on the point of collapse when rescued by Constable B. Orrock, assisted by Sergeant D. Lechleitner and Constable J. Nicholson.

McCormack was admitted to Sydney Hospital suffering from immersion.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article18435779.txt

 

 

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Possibly” lived in:

1954 – North Sydney

1977 – Barton, NSW

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