George JEFFES

George JEFFES

New South Wales Police Force

Constable 1st Class 1885

Senior-constable in 1889

Sergeant in 1895

Regd. # ?

Stations:  Darlinghurst, Botany,

Darlinghurst ( again ), Regent Street ( No. 2 Division )

Injuries: Traffic Accident – pedestrian with tram
Haymarket

Event:  2 November 1911

Died:  3 November, 1911

58 old

Funeral:  4 November 1911

Buried:  Rookwood RC Cemetery. Freeman St, Rookwood.

Reference: SEC*M2*C**939

George JEFFES
George JEFFES

George JEFFES - Gravestone
George JEFFES – Gravestone

About 4pm on 2 November, 1911 the sergeant was on duty carrying out inspections of pawn shops. At the intersection of Campbell and Castlereagh Streets he failed to hear a tram coming in his direction (he was suffering from diminished hearing) and he was struck by the tram and knocked to the roadway. He was quickly conveyed to the Sydney Hospital suffering from a fractured skull and other head injuries; however he passed away the following day.

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The Evening News of 3 November, 1911 carried quite a lengthy report of the tragedy.

“SERGEANT JEFFES KILLED.
KNOCKED DOWN BY A TRAM. AN OLD SYDNEY POLICEMAN
Sergeant George Jeffes died in Sydney Hospital early this morning as the result of a city tram accident. He was on duty delivering pawn slips and inspecting pawn shops in the No. 2 (Regent-street) Police District yesterday afternoon, and while crossing Castlereagh-street, at the corner of Campbell-street, he was knocked down by tram No.81 proceeding from the railway station to Circular Quay. Senior-constable Young spoke to Jeffes at the corner of Campbell and Liverpool streets, and a few seconds later on seeing a crowd collect he went to the scene and found his comrade badly injured. He secured the Civil Ambulance, which conveyed the injured man to the hospital where he was admitted with a fractured skull. He was operated on and a lot of blood removed from his brain, but he never rallied. He will be given a police funeral tomorrow afternoon, the cortege leaving the corner of Elsternwick-street and Allen-street, Leichhardt at 1.30 p.m. for Rookwood Cemetery.

Sergeant Jeffes, who was 58 years of age, was an Englishman, and served as a bluejacket till 1882, when he came to Australia, and joined the New South Wales force. He was made a first class constable in 1885, senior-constable in 1889, and sergeant in 1895. He had thus 30 years’ service and could have retired two months ago, taking six months’ leave, but being still strong, he was, at his own desire, allowed to continue in harness, and was working in plain clothes on light duty among the pawn shops.

THE GOOD SHEPHERD. ” Sergeant Jeffes was for many years known as, the good shepherd, and he did great work   reclaiming white girls from the Chinese dens, and children from the slums and from parental hurt to their care. He was associated with Mr. Sherwood in the famous Botany poisoning case, in 1888, when Louisa Collins was hanged.

Senior-constable Sherwood ( now Metropolitan Superintendent of Police ), and Jeffes, then a constable, had charge of the cases.  Superintendent Mitchell, who is acting, said this morning that Sergeant Jeffes was a good and capable officer who had the interests of the service and the community at heart, and was most energetic in the discharge of his duties. A daughter of Sergeant Jeffes was murdered in George-street a little over twelve months ago, being shot by a young man.”

With regard to the death of the sergeant’s daughter, the Evening News of 3 July, 1909 reported that “Miss Kate Jeffes, 21, the young woman who was shot in the arm and breast by a French Canadian, named Felix Perrier, in George-street on the night of June 21, died at the Sydney Hospital at 3.30 this morning from the effects of the wounds, accentuated by the shock. She was the daughter of Sergeant Jeffes, of No. 2 Police Station”.

Evening News ( Sydney )                                              Friday  3 November 1911                                Page 9 of 16

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The sergeant was born about 1853 and joined the New South Wales Police Force in 1882. At the time of his death he was stationed at Regent Street Police Station. He is buried at Rookwood Cemetery.

[alert_red]He is NOT included in the NSW Police Honour Roll.[/alert_red]

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SERGEANT JEFFES’ DEATH.

CORONER’S INQUIRY.

The Coroner, Mr. Murphy, yesterday held an

inquiry Into the death of Sergeant George Jeffes, who was knocked down by a tram at the intersection of Castlereagh and Campbell streets, on Thursday afternoon last.

Evidence was tendered to the effect that the deceased was crossing the street at the intersection of Castlereagh and Campbell streets at about 4 pm. As the car approached, a witness called out to him, and the driver sounded the gong, cut off the current, and applied the emergency brake. The car moved on a couple of yards after striking deceased, who was carried along by the cow-catcher. Deceased’s hearing, it was stated, had been defective of late.

The Coroner found that death had resulted from injuries accidentally received through   being knocked over by a tram.

The Sydney Morning Herald                                               Tuesday  7 November 1911                        page 11 of 14

 

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DEATH OF SERGEANT JEFFES.

The ” Good Shepherd. ” A RESPECTED MEMBER OF THE   SYDNEY POLICE FORCE.

As the result of a tram accident on Thursday afternoon last, the death occurred on Friday of a well-known figure in the Sydney police force, and a much-respected and admired officer – Sergeant George Jeffes, at the age of 58 years.

Born at Northwich, Cheshire, young Jeffes was apprenticed to the ironworking trade, beginning work when but 8 years of age, in a foundry in Salford, Manchester. At 15 he was seized with the adventurous spirit, and ran away to sea, completing a term of service in the Imperial Navy. Returning to Salford, he joined the fire brigade, and in this capacity had his first experience as a police officer, for in those days the fire-fighter did dual duty. Soon he was again seized by the wanderlust, and landed in Victoria in 1879. A year later Mr. Jeffes arrived in New South Wales, shortly afterwards joining the police.

He was first stationed at Darlinghurst, but subsequently was transferred to Botany, where he was instrumental in bringing to justice Louisa Collins, the last woman who suffered the extreme penalty of the law in New South Wales. In 1889, he was again stationed at Darlinghurst, and promoted to the rank of senior-constable. He was next promoted to Sergeant, when, in 1896, he was attached to Regent-street Police Station, where he ended his career.

To a large extent the suppression of opium traffic, rampant in Sydney a few years back, was the work of Sergeant Jeffes, who, while engaged in this duty, was responsible for saving countless unfortunate women from infamy, earning for himself the sobriquet of the ” Good Shepherd ” for the splendid success attending his efforts. Although stern with Chinese law-breakers, Sergeant Jeffes had the confidence of the whole Chinese quarter. He was regarded in the slums as one whose inclination was more to assist that portion of humanity generally regarded as homeless, than to treat them with the harshness which is generally their lot. His knowledge of the back streets and the opium trade was vast ; and Sergeant Jeffes could always openly enter houses and places that might prove dangerous indeed to any other officer.

His untimely death is greatly deplored in the police force, and by many whom he succeeded in setting on the right path again. The later Sergeant Jeffes was a staunch and practical Catholic, and a member of the Sacred Heart Confraternity. He leaves a widow and two children — a daughter and a son. The Rev. Father Darby was in attendance at the last, and administered spiritual consolation.

The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, and the cortege conveyed an idea of the esteem in which the late sergeant was held. The Police Band played the ” Dead March in Saul ” and the ” Funeral March, ” and 70 uniformed policemen accompanied the hearse from deceased’s residence in Leichhardt to Petersham Railway Station, where the remains were entrained for Rookwood. There was a large gathering at the graveside, and among the mourners were his widow, Thomas Jeffes (son), Sarah Grace Jeffes (daughter), Messrs. Mark Anthony Jeffes and Charles Jeffes (brothers), Robert, Steve and Mark Jeffes (nephews), Mr. and Mrs. James Ryan ; Mr. and Mrs. Peter Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. James Paxton, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ryan ; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. Denis Ryan, Mrs. Tyler, Misses Tyler (2), Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Landrigan and Miss Mary Landrigan, Mrs. Thomas O’Toole, and Mrs. Wm. O’Toole, Mrs. J. O’Toole, Mr. and Mrs. James O’Toole, Mrs. Coghlan, Mrs. Crooks, Mr. Murphy, Mr. McQuirk, Mrs. Kembo, Mrs. Byrom, Mrs. Moran, Mrs. Hayes, Miss Vaughan, Mrs. Danhy, Mr. and Mrs. Sheedy, Miss L. Murphy, Miss Vera Jeffes, Mr. Fitzgerald, Mrs. Keating, Mrs.   Angles, Mrs, Corcoran, Mr, Kilcoyne. Six brother-sergeants acted as pall-bearers, their names being Sergeants Curry, J. Hogg, Sherwood, Curtis, Corcoran and Walker. Others present were: Superintendent Mitchell ( representing the Inspector-General ) Sub- Inspectors Kelly, Brookes and Davis, ex-Inspectors Collins and Broderick, Senior Sergeant O’Dea, Sergeant Meahan, Detective Pauling ( representing the Detective Office ), Senior-Constable’s Young, Meadth, Gambold, Neary, and Mr. Twiss ( ex-senior-constable ), There were also representatives of the different branches of the police, and the Chinese community, and a number of retired officers and friends of Mr. Jeffes’s. The Rev. Father J. Peoples, assisted by the Rev. Father M. Kirby, said the last prayers. The Police Band then played ” The Long Day Closes ”

. ” – R.I.P.

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Burial Location:

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A City Sensation.

A YOUNG WOMAN SHOT. SUICIDE OF HER ASSAILANT.

A sensational shooting affray took place in George-street, near Goulburn-street, city, about half-past 9 o’clock on Monday night, during which Kate Jeffes, 21, a daughter of Sergeant Jeffes, a well-known officer connected with the Regent-street Police Station, was wounded twice, while her assailant committed suicide.

Some weeks ago, Miss Jeffes took a situation in a Pitt-street cafe, where Felix Perrier, a French-Canadian, 35 years of age, was employed as cook. Perrier, it appears, conceived a strong attachment for the young woman, but his attentions were not encouraged, although he occasionally accompanied her to the tram of an evening, at the close of the day’s work. Perrier became so persistent in his attentions that Miss Jeffes decided to leave, and she secured a situation in dining rooms in George-street.

Eventually Perrier found out where she was employed, and called there on Monday, but she refused to see him, and he went away. On ceasing work a little after 9 o’clock, Miss Jeffes started for home, and on reaching the corner of George and Goulburn streets, saw Perrier on the footpath. He addressed her, but she refused to have anything to say to him, upon which the man drew a revolver, and at close quarters fired two shots at her. The first bullet penetrated the cartilage of the left arm and spent itself in a brown paper parcel, which contained her apron and a blouse, and which she was carrying under her arm at the time. The second bullet had a more serious effect striking her beneath the right breast. The bullet did not penetrate very deeply, however, but struck the breast-bone, which caused it to deflect, and travel around a rib under the left arm, eventually embedding itself in the back portion of her left side. She fell bleeding to the footpath, and Perrier, evidently believing that his second shot had taken fatal   effect, placed the muzzle of the revolver in his own mouth, and fired.

Naturally a crowd soon gathered, and Miss Jeffes was placed in a Cab, and taken to the Sydney Hospital. The Civil Ambulance was sent for and took Perrier to the Sydney Hospital, where life was pronounced extinct, and the body was conveyed to the Morgue, at Circular Quay. The bullet in Perrier’s case had entered at the mouth, and travelled upwards towards the brain. Dr. Parry extracted the bullet from Miss Jeffes’ side, and she was admitted to the hospital, where she is progressing satisfactorily, the wounds not being regarded as serious.

Evening News ( Sydney )                      Tuesday  22 June 1909                      page 6 of 8

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A Cook’s Terrible Crime

ATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE SENSATION IN SYDNEY

Sydney. Monday

A cook named Felix Perrier, 35, employed at the Glenrock Cafe, Pitt Street and residing at Druitt Street, City, created a sensation to night by attempting to murder Kate Jeffes, 21, daughter of Sergeant Jeffes, of the Metropolitan police, by shooting her with a revolver, and afterwards shooting himself.

The affair took place in George Street, Perrier had been keeping company with Miss Jeffes, but she resented his intentions. To night when he met her in George Street near Druitt Street, he spoke to her and she refused to answer. He then drew a revolver and fired two shots. One bullet entered the young lady’s left arm and the other the side of the right breast. Neither wound is serious. Perrier then fired another shot and put an end to his own life.

National Advocate ( Bathurst, NSW )    Tuesday  22 June 1909                  page 2 of 4

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A GEORGE-ST. TRAGEDY.

ATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE.

A DISAPPOINTED LOVER TRIES TO MURDER A YOUNG WOMAN.

THEN BLOWS HIS BRAINS OUT.

Felix Perrier, 35, lately living in Druitt-street, city, attempted to murder a young woman named Kate Jeffes, 21, in George-street, near Goulburn-street, at about 9.30 last night. He fired two shots at her at a range of less than a couple of feet, both of which took  effect, and then put the muzzle of the revolver into his own mouth and blow his brains out.

Perrier, who was apparently a foreigner, has been employed as a cook at a cafe in Pitt-street for some time, and the young woman,  who is a daughter of Sergeant Jeffes, at the No. 2 police station, met him at the cafe some nine weeks ago, when she took a situation there as a waitress. Perrier conceived a strong affection for the young woman, but she refused to encourage him. She, however, occasionally allowed him to see her to the tram of a night when work was over. He eventually became so persistent in his attentions that the young woman was compelled to leave her situation at the cafe and seek employment elsewhere. She afterwards obtained work as a waitress at some dining rooms in George-street, and her troubles with Perrier ceased for a while. But he eventually found out where she was, and, yesterday afternoon, he called at the premises in George-street, and asked to be allowed to see her. Miss Jeffes refused to see him, and in order to be free of him, she asked one of the girls in the cafe to inform Perrier that she had left the place. Perrier, on receiving this information, took his departure. After work Miss Jeffes started for home shortly before 9.30, and was walking down George-street. On nearing Goulburn-street she noticed Perrier standing on the footpath. She tried to evade him, but he stepped up to her and said: “Good night.” The young woman turned her head away, and refused to speak to him, whereupon he drew a five-chambered Belgian revolver, and fired two shots point blank at her. The first bullet penetrated the cartilage of the left arm, and spent itself in a brown paper parcel, which contained her apron and a blouse, and which she was carrying under her arm at the time. The second bullet had a more serious affect, striking her beneath the right breast. The bullet did not penetrate very deeply, however, and luckily struck the breast-bone, which caused it to deflect and travel around a rib under the left arm, eventually embedding itself in the back portion of her left side. She fell bleeding to the footpath, and Perrier, evidently believing that his second shot had taken fatal effect, placed the muzzle of the revolver in his own mouth and fired. The shots had been fired at such short range that the sleeve of the young woman’s blouse was burned with powder, and powder marks were visible on the front of her dress.

There were a number of people about, and a large crowd soon gathered. A woman named Eliza O’Connor, living in Francis street, Hyde Park, who was close by at the time, put Miss Jeffes in a cab, and took her to the hospital, while a traffic constable rang up the Civil Ambulance, which was speedily in attendance, and removed Perrier to the hospital, where Dr. Parry pronounced life extinct.     The body was then removed to the Morgue.

The bullet in Perrier’s case had entered at the mouth, and travelled upwards towards the brain. Dr. Parry extracted the bullet from Miss Jeffes’ side, and she was admitted to the hospital; where she made a statement to the police. Her injuries are not considered serious.

The revolver which Perrier used was a Belgium make, and contained four cartridges, three of which had been discharged.

Edward Crampton, a tobacconist, of 48 Druitt-street, who identified the body, and with whom Perrier had lately been living, stated that Perrier bought a revolver on Saturday last, and said that a young woman had been “pulling his leg.” His French blood would get the better of him,’ he said, and he would shoot her. The revolver was taken from him, together with a number of cartridges, but he appears to have regained possession of it. On the body were found Perrier’s discharge papers from the South African Light Horse, dated   1902. These show that he was a French Canadian by birth.

The Sydney Morning Herald                Tuesday  22 June 1909           page 7 of 12

 

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ATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE

PERRIER’S FRENCH BLOOD. MUST SHOOT THE GIRL

Sydney, June 22.

Felix Perrier, who last night shot at Kate Jeffs and then committed suicide, was a French-Canadian and had served in the South African light horse. Edward Crampton, with whom Perrier resided, told the police that Perrier bought a revolver on Saturday last. He told Crampton that a young lady had been ‘pulling his leg’ and that his French blood would ‘ get the better of him and he would shoot her ‘. Crampton took the revolver and cartridges from him, but Perrier, however, again got possession of them.

Miss Jeffs is not seriously hurt.

Kalgoorlie Miner ( W.A. )                    Wednesday  23 June 1909               page 5 of 10

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George-street Tragedy.

DEATH OF THE VICTIM.

Miss Kate Jeffes, 21, the young woman who was shot in the arm and breast by a French Canadian, named Felix Perrier, in George-street on the night of June 21, died at the Sydney Hospital at 3.30 this morning from the effects of the wounds, accentuated by the shock. She was the daughter of Sergeant Jeffes, of No. 2 Police Station.

Evening News  ( Sydney )                      Saturday  3 July 1909                         page 8 of 16

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THE GEORGE-STREET TRAGEDY.

MISS JEFFES’ DEATH.

Kate Jeffes, 21, the young woman who was shot in the arm and breast by Felix Perrier, a French Canadian in George-street near Goulburn-street, on the night of June 21 last, died at the Sydney Hospital early on Saturday morning from the effects of the wounds and the subsequent shock. She was the daughter of Sergeant Jeffes of No 2 Police Station.

The wound in Miss Jeffes’s breast proved more serious than was at first believed but it was not anticipated that it would cause death. While in hospital, however, deceased suffered considerably from shock and was unable to sleep. On Wednesday and Thursday last she was in a low state but rallied on Friday morning. At 11 o’clock on Friday night she became worse and gradually sank, death taking place at about 3.30 a.m. on Saturday.

The Sydney Morning Herald                Monday  5 July 1909                         page 7 of 12

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THE GEORGE-ST.   TRAGEDY.

SHOOTING OF MISS JEFFES. EVIDENCE AT THE INQUEST. VERDICT OF MURDER AND SUICIDE.

Mr.. H. Hawkins, P.M., at the City Coroner’s Court yesterday, held an inquiry into the deaths of Felix Perrier, 35, a cook, and Catherine Margaret Jeffes, 21 a waitress, the principals   in the tragedy on the night of June 21,  when Perrier mortally wounded Miss Jeffes and afterwards took his own life by firing two shots into his head, in George-street, near Goulburn street, City.

Edward Crampton, hairdresser and tobacconist, carrying on business in Druitt-street, City, said he had known Perrier for some time. He was a French-Canadian by birth, and a native of Montreal. Perrier came to lodge at his place on June 19, and told witness he was employed at a cafe in Pitt-street. Next day Perrier brought a revolver to the house, and witness asked him what he wanted it for. He replied, ‘I want to fight a duel.’ Witness, however, obtained the weapon. On June 21 Perrier asked.; him for it, saying that the man he was going to fight with had disappeared, and he wanted to raise a few shillings on the gun. Witness gave it to him.

George Jeffes, sergeant of police, stationed at the Regent-street Police Station, and living at 135 Rose-street, Darlington, said Catherine Jeffes was his daughter. He last saw her alive about half past 7 on the morning of June 21, in George-street. She was then going to work at a cafe in Pitt-street. Witness did not know his daughter was acquainted with Perrier. Catherine came home one night not long ago, and said she wasn’t going to business the next morning. Witness asked why, and his daughter replied, ‘A man is pestering me, and has   made appointments to meet me.’ Witness   then said, ‘You stay at home. I don’t want you to work’

Dr. Edmund Pauling said Perrier was dead when taken into Sydney Hospital. Miss Jeffes was admitted, a bullet having passed through the cartilage of the left arm, and one having entered the body below the right breast. She died on Thursday night last. Dr. Palmer, who made a post-mortem examination, said the cause of death was a bullet wound in the head.

Maria Webber, living in Lewis-street, Redfern, said she was in George-street on the night   of June 21. When near Goulburn-street she saw a man accost a girl, and say, ‘Good night.’ The girl did not take any notice, and the man put his hand to his hip pocket. He fired a revolver at the girl, and she screamed, and cried out, ‘My God!’ The man fired again, and the girl dropped to the ground insensible. Perrier then shot himself twice in the head, and dropped. Witness heard no quarrel.

Sarah Williamson, a resident of Glebe, corroborated the previous witness’ evidence.

Traffic Constable Wilson searched Perrier’s body at the Morgue. He found military discharge papers in one of the pockets. Eliza O’Connor, living at 32 Francis-street, Hyde Park, deposed she was outside Messrs. Anthony Hordern and Son’s business premises, George-street, about 9.30 on the night of June 21. Witness heard three revolver shots, and rushed round into Goulburn-street. A young woman was lying on the ground. She told witness she had been shot by a man, and asked to be taken home. Witness took her to Sydney Hospital.

Senior-constable Leary had a conversation with Catherine Jeffes at Sydney Hospital on the night of June 21. She told him she went to work at the Glenrock Cafe, in Pitt-street, about four months ago. She stayed there for some time, and made the acquaintance of a man named Perrier, who was employed as a cook at the same place. They exchanged letters. She soon afterwards left the Pitt-street cafe, and went to one in King-street. Perrier pestered her there, and she had tried to avoid him.

Mark Anthony Jeffes, uncle of the deceased girl, narrated a conversation he had had with his niece two days after the shooting. She told him that she did not want to have any thing to do with Perrier.

The Coroner found that Catherine Jeffes was murdered by Felix Perrier, and that Perrier committed suicide.

Evening News ( Sydney )                                      Friday  9 July 1909                     page 3 of 12

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Louisa Collins - last woman hanged in NSW
Louisa Collins – last woman hanged in NSW




Ernest Edward McCROHON

Ernest Edward McCROHON

Late of  14 Keir Avenue, Hurlstone Park, NSW

Grandson to John McCROHON – NSWPF – # ????

Uncle to Victor Harry McCrohon – NSWPF – # 5009

Great Uncle to Vicki Alexis McCrohon – NSWPF – # P/W 0202 – Class 141

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ‘Q‘ 9403

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1 March 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 1 April 1912

Final Rank:  Sergeant 2nd Class – Death

Stations?, Central Police Station – 1 Division, Belmore ( 1916 ), Regent St – 2 Division, Newtown – 5 Division ( ? – 26 March 1939 ), Wagga Wagga ( 27 March 1939 ‘ Sgt ‘ – ? ),

13 Division,  Clarence St Police Station – Death

ServiceFrom  1 April 1912  to  17 March 1944 =  31+ years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   21 September 1887 – Barraba, NSW

Died on:   Friday  17 March 1944 during the evening

Age:  56

Cause:   Collision – hit by train

Event location:   Hurlstone Park

Event date:   Friday  17 March 1944

Funeral date:   Monday  20 March 1944

Funeral location:   Rookwood Crematorium

Funeral Parlour: Walters and Son, Dulwich Hill

Buried at:   Cremated ?

 Memorial located at:   ?

Constable Ernest Edward McCROHON<br /> the young policeman, who at Newtown a fortnight ago, had a sensational chase after four suspects and about 3a.m. on Saturday, arrested a man who had been behaving in a suspicious manner. On handcuffing his man, after a struggle, he found that he had a revolver in his hip pocket.<br />
Constable Ernest Edward McCROHON
the young policeman, who at Newtown a fortnight ago, had a sensational chase after four suspects and about 3a.m. on Saturday, arrested a man who had been behaving in a suspicious manner. On handcuffing his man, after a struggle, he found that he had a revolver in his hip pocket.

 

[alert_blue]ERNEST is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

 

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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The Sydney Morning Herald of 18 March, 1944 reported the following double tragedy surrounding the death of Sergeant McCrohon.

 

POLICE SERGEANT  KILLED – MAN DIES GIVING  FIRST AID.

Police Sergeant Edward McCrohon, 56, attached to No. 1 Police Station, was killed by a train last night while crossing the railway track between Hurlstone Park and Canterbury stations.

John Whitfield, a railway employee, who was a passenger on the train, collapsed and died as he began to give first aid to McCrohon.

Sergeant McCrohon was on his way home when he was killed.

 

The sergeant was born on 21 September, 1887 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 1 April, 1912. He served at Metropolitan Divisions 1, 2, 5 and 13, as well as at Wagga Wagga. At the time of his death he was stationed at No. 1 Division (Central).

trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/17883834

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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Monday 20 March 1944, page 8


McCROHON. – The Relatives and Friends of the late Ernest Edward McCrohon ( Police Sergeant, No. 1 Division ), of 14 Keir Avenue, Hurlstone Park, are invited to attend his Funeral to leave our Funeral Chapel, This Monday, at 11 a.m., for the Crematorium Rookwood.

Walters and Son, Dulwich Hill Terminus.

LM1676

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/17863922#

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Army News (Darwin, NT : 1941 – 1946), Monday 20 March 1944, page 2


WHILE CROSSING THE RAILWAY LINES between Hurlstone Park and Canterbury railway stations on Friday night, Sergeant Edward Ernest McCrohon, 56, of the Clarence Street police station was struck by a train, and killed.

When John Whitfield, 62, night officer at the Belmore railway station who was a passenger on the train, alighted to give assistance, he had a sudden seizure and collapsed. He died beside the body of the police sergeant.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/47690819#

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Daily Advertiser (Wagga Wagga, NSW : 1911 – 1954), Tuesday 28 March 1939, page 4


PERSONAL

Sergeant E. E. McCrohon, formerly of Newtown, Sydney, took up duty in Wagga yesterday in succession to Sergeant Kidd, who has been transferred to Newtown.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/143641736

 

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Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 – 1954), Saturday 23 December 1916, page 5


BRAVE CONSTABLE

EFFORT TO SAVE CHILD

Mr. H. Richardson Clark, Parramatta coroner, at an inquest at Bankstown on the dead body of a boy named Thomas Adamson, aged 11½ years, who was drowned in a waterhole in Punchbowl, through getting out of his depth while searching for his sister’s shoe, complimented a brave constable.

The waterhole is in a very secluded position, about eight feet in diameter, and very deep, with no shallow approach, so that directly the hole is entered the water, is about six feet deep, and the sides of it are of clay, being extremely slippery.

The Belmore police were informed of the accident, and Constable McCrohon proceeded to the place with all speed.

He there found a man who was fishing for the boy with a rake, whereupon the constable immediately disrobed and took a header right into the hole.

Before he went in the man with the rake warned him against diving in, as it was dangerous, but notwithstanding that the constable dived right in and brought up the child at once.

The evidence at the Inquest was that the constable knew nothing whatever of the waterhole, and had never seen it before, and that after he recovered the body he and Dr. Miller worked upon it three-quarters of an hour to restore life, but unfortunately without success.

Dr. Miller, in his evidence, stated that he thought the conduct of the constable was most praiseworthy, as had there been any rocks or snags or old stumps in the waterhole McCrohon might have broken his neck when he dived in.

The coroner, in finding a verdict of accidental death, said that he had great pleasure in concurring with the opinion of Dr. Miller as to the conduct of Constable McCrohon, and that he would bring it under the favorable notice of the Inspector-General of Police.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/223383214

 

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Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 – 1954), Thursday 29 April 1915, page 4


MIDNIGHT STRUGGLE.

ALLEGATIONS AGAINST POLICE

At the Newtown Police Court yesterday, in a case in which Charles Joseph Wall, aged 27, was charged with assault, the evidence of Constable McCrohon was that while he was arresting a man at midnight of April 21, his prisoner resisted, and Wall and others tried to drag the prisoner free.

Finally witness was forced to let the man go, and he then arrested Wall.

Sergeant J. D. Scott said that at the police station Wall accused the constable of having assaulted him. Witness, at his request, looked at Wall‘s mouth, but it was not cut, and there was no sign of blood.

Wall, in defence, said he did not assist the prisoner to escape, all he did was to put his hand on McCrohon and say: ” Constable, let him go quietly. ” McCrohon was then down and was hitting the prisoner as he lay on the ground.

After the prisoner escaped, witness said to the policeman: ” I think you hit that man terrible with the baton. I think it is my place to go up and give evidence against you. ” McCrohon then arrested witness; and in the station he got witness by the mouth and shook him. His mouth was cut, and he was spitting blood.

Sydney Alexander Colls, a barman at the Oxford Hotel, Newtown, said that Wall did not interfere with the constable while the latter was struggling with his prisoner. The defendant was not intoxicated.

Sergeant Moran said he saw no injury. Defendant was shouting and was abusive.

The magistrate ( Mr. Payten ) said that he would not ask for any evidence to be called in rebuttal of the allegations against the police, but as the department might deem it necessary to hold an inquiry, he ordered a copy of the depositions to be forwarded.

In regard to the case itself, he did not think that the probability was that the constable, while violently struggling with his prisoner; could say that Wall was the man who assaulted him when there were other men there too.

No assault was disclosed that would merit punishment.

The case was dismissed.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/229330809

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Other articles involving McCROHON:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/229243434

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/239753085

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/245911889

 

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Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 – 1954), Friday 19 December 1913, page 2


PLUCKY POLICEMAN.

CAPTURE OF RUNAWAY HORSE.

The plucky action of Constable McCrohon led to the timely capture of a runaway on the Newtown railway bridge last night. A horse in a spring cart, driven by Clarence O’Loughlan, of 163 Lennox-street, Newtown, bolted from the bottom of the Newtown Tramway Depot yard, and, when heading for King-street, had put on a fine turn of speed.

McCrohon, who was crossing the bridge, noticed the galloping steed, and without hesitation caught the horse’s head as it dashed by. He was dragged a little distance, but brought the runaway to a stop before any harm was done.

Many people were about at the time, and the constable’s bravery was favorably commented upon.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/229354676

 

 

 

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Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 – 1954), Wednesday 2 July 1913, page 4


TORE THE POLICEMAN’S PANTS. —

Constable McCrohon was in King-street, St. Peters, on June 21, and when he saw Aubrey Harrison, aged 27, urge a dog to attack a horse in a cart he asked Harrison for his name and address. The man refused, and as the policeman closed with him, Harrison called to the dog, and it tore the officer’s trousers.

On the way to the watchhouse the prisoner used indecent language.

At the Newtown Police Court to-day Harrison was charged with offensive behavior, using Indecent language, assaulting McCrohon, and damaging his uniform. He was defended by Mr. L. Gannon.

Harrison denied the truth of the Charges.

The magistrate ( Mr. Smithers ) imposed fines and costs amounting to £7 11s 6d. The option was two months’ gaol.

In regard to a request that time be allowed to pay the magistrate said he would grant seven days to pay in three cases, but as far as the charge of indecent language was concerned he would, if he had the power, order Harrison to gaol.

Filthy language, he said, was the outcome of a filthy mind, and seemed to be part of the nature of a man who used it.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/229679782

 

 

 

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Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), Wednesday 4 June 1913, page 14


RECOGNISING BRAVERY.

A few weeks ago Constable McCrohon of the Newton Police, captured a burglar under sensational circumstances, and the total municipal council at the instance of Alderman Lewis, sent a letter to the Inspector-General of Police expressing its appreciation of the bravery of the constable.

At the last meeting of the council a communication was received from Mr. Day stating that he was pleased to know of the council’s views in the matter, which coincided with his own, and he had ordered a favorable entry to be made on the constable’s record sheet.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/113358852

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Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), Wednesday 16 April 1913, page 18


MEN RAN AWAY.

CONSTABLE FIRED FOUR SHOTS.

About 2 o’clock yesterday morning Constable McCrohon and Watchman Taylor, who were in King-street, Newtown, noticed two men outside Selig’s pawn office. Being suspicious concerning the men, because of the early hour; the constables went towards them. The men made off immediately, one of them dropping an iron bar about 3 foot long.

They ran down Bucknell street towards McDonaldtown railway station.

Constable McCrohon hurried after the men, calling upon them to stop. They took no notice of his command, and he fired over their heads without effect upon their movements. Three more shots were fired, but the men disappeared and have not been traced since.

An examination of the premises near where the men were first soon showed that nothing had been interfered with.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/238937172

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/229847876

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NSWBDM:

Birth:   35058/1887

Death: 1489/1944

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Harry LEEDS

Harry LEEDS

( late of ” Innisfail “, Penkivil St, Willoughby )

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Constable

Uniform #:  122

Stations:  Goulburn, Araluen, Crookwell, North Sydney, Phillip Street Police Station, George St North Police Station – Sydney

Service:  From  28 May 1907  to  21 August 1924 = 17+ years Service

Awards:  ?

Born? ? 1885 at Trial Bay

Died on:  Thursday  21 August 1924 – on his way to Duty

Cause:  Tram Accident at McMahon’s Point

Age:  47

Funeral date:  Friday  22 August 1924

Funeral location: “Innisfail”, Penkivil St, Willoughby ( home ) & graveside

Grave location:  Catholic section, Northern Suburbs Cemetery, Plassey Rd, Macquarie Park, NSW

Roman Catholic Section, Row F4, Plot 0004

GPS:  -33.790327, 151.139568

Funeral procession of Constable Leeds at North Sydney
Funeral procession of Constable Leeds at North Sydney

  [alert_red]HARRY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]  * BUT SHOULD BE

 

Constable Harrie Leeds was killed in a tramway accident at McMahon’s Point, Sydney on Thursday 21 August, 1924. Another man was also killed and several people were injured in the incident. Incredibly, the Inspector General of Police Mr James Mitchell did not consider this death to be “killed on duty”. This decision was later the subject of numerous unsuccessful representations by the Police Association of New South Wales. It was at the very least the death of a constable travelling to work, regardless of other factors and disputed facts.

 

The publication “Serving the Force”, 75 Years of the Police Association of New South Wales 1921 – 1996 briefly describes how Constable Leeds bravely leapt onto the running board of a runaway tram as it sped through McMahon’s Point. The constable was trying to help stop the tram and had been yelling to passersby to keep clear. Unfortunately, the tram hit an obstacle and the constable was thrown to his death. He was not classified as being killed on duty and his wife and five children received a pittance of a pension because he had only been in the force a short time. [17 years is probably not a “short time”]

 

One of the bewildering issues with this event is the fact that there were and are many versions of it, as indicated in an article in the Sydney Morning Herald dated 22 August, 1924, which reported that “Constable Harry Leeds, who lived at Willoughby, was on his way to duty when he met his tragic and shocking death. Of the circumstances in which he lost his life there are different versions. One story is that he was pluckily assisting to try to avert the disaster when he was crushed. It is stated, again, that he was on the leading car, and that as he jumped on to the roadway when the cars tore across the rails the rear car hit him and pinned him helplessly underneath it. He was dead when his body was recovered after much effort.”

 

And again, the Sydney Morning Herald dated 2 October, 1924 reported a lengthy description of the coroner’s findings, including the following extract.

 

Herbert Gillies Ruthven, a passenger on the tram, described his experience. He said that shortly before the smash he had been conversing with the deceased Leeds. Leeds seemed frightened when the tram had gathered speed while descending the other declines on the route from Victoria Avenue. [Ruthven] had said to him, “How about getting off here, Leeds, and walking down?” That was when the tram stopped at East Crescent Street. Just then the tram started, and the constable did not reply. Witness next saw him crouching in a hesitating manner as if he were about to take the risk of jumping from the tram. He was still on the footboard when the tram first left the rails.


The constable was born in 1885 at Trial Bay, New South Wales and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 28 May, 1907. At the time of his death he was stationed at George Street North Police Station. He lived at Willoughby and had previously served at Goulburn, Araluen, Crookwell, North Sydney and Phillip Street Police Stations.

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The Sydney Morning Herald          Friday  22 August 1924       page 9 of 16

CASUALTY LIST.

KILLED.

HARRY LEEDS, 47, of Penkivil-street, Willoughby, a police constable attached to the George-street North station.

FREDERICK MAURICE LAMBERT, 30, engineer, of the corner of Alleyne and Mann streets, Willoughby.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/16172768

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The Sydney Morning Herald          Friday  22 August 1924       page 7 of 16

FUNERALS:

LEEDS – The Relatives and Friends of the late Constable HARRY LEEDS are invited to attend his Funeral ; to leave his late residence, Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, THIS FRIDAY, at 2pm, or Catholic Cemetery, Northern Suburbs.

WOOD COFFILL LIMITED, Funeral Directors.

*

LEEDS. – The Relatives and Friends of Mrs. ALICE E. LEEDS and FAMILY are invited to attend the Funeral of her beloved HUSBAND and their FATHER, Harry ; to leave Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, THIS FRIDAY, at 2pm for Catholic Cemetery, Northern Suburbs.

*

LEEDS – Relatives and friends of Mr. HARRY LEEDS, Senior, and Miss ELSIE LEEDS, of Parramatta, are invited to attend the Funeral of his beloved SON and her BROTHER, Harry ; to leave Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, THIS FRIDAY, at 2pm, for Catholic Cemetery, Northern Suburbs.

*

LEEDS.- The Friends of Mr. and Mrs. NEIL BOYLE, Mr. and Mrs. FRANK PALMER, Mr. and Mrs. Neil LEEDS, Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD LEEDS, of Summer Hill, are invited to attend the Funeral of their beloved BROTHER, Harry Leeds ; to leave Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, THIS FRIDAY, at 2pm, for Catholic Cemetery, Northern Suburbs.

*

LEEDS – The Friends of Mrs. O’REGAN, ELLA & DONA HOWE, of Cairo-Street, North Sydney, are invited to attend the funeral of their beloved SON-IN-LAW and BROTHER-IN-LAW, Harry Leeds ; to leave Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, THIS FRIDAY, at 2pm, for Catholic Cemetery, Northern Suburbs.

*

LEEDS. – The Friends of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. LEVITT and FAMILY, of Ashfield, are invited to attend the Funeral of their beloved BROTHER-IN-LAW and UNCLE, Harry Leeds; to lave Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, THIS FRIDAY, at 2pm for Catholic Cemetery, Northern Suburbs.

WOOD COFFILL LIMITED

*

LEEDS – N.I.O.O.F., LOYAL PERSEVERANCE LODGE – The Sisters and Brothers of the above lodge are invited to attend the Funeral of the late Brother H. LEEDS; to leave his late residence, Innisfail, Penkivil-street, Willoughby, at 2pm TODAY.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/16172685#pstart1225241

 

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Evening News  ( Sydney )          Friday  22 August 1924      page 7 of 12

LAST TRIBUTE TO CONSTABLE LEEDS

A large crowd attended the funeral of Constable Harry Leeds, one of the victims of the North Sydney tramway smash, to-day. It was striking tribute to a popular officer.

The cortege, which left his home in Penkivil-street. Willoughby, for the Northern Suburbs cemetery, was headed by the Police Band playing the Dead March. About a hundred police representative of the whole metropolitan division, besides a number of tramway men marched in procession. The principal mourners were the widow and five young children, Mrs. Boyle, Mrs. Benn, Mrs. Davison, Mrs. Dickman, Mrs Palmer and Miss Elsie Leeds (sister). Mr. Harry Leeds (father). Messrs. Neil and Richard Leeds (brothers). Among those present were Mr. James Mitchell, Inspector-General of Police, Inspector Souter, North Sydney, Mr. G. Holt. District Superintendent   of Tramways, North Sydney – (representing the Tramway Department), Mr. Charles Thackeray (representing the Police Association). Many beautiful wreaths were sent by the police. Including several from C.I. Branch and No. 4 Division.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/119977024

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The Sydney Morning Herald          Saturday  23 August 1924       page 16 of 26

LATE CONSTABLE LEEDS.

IMPRESSIVE FUNERAL.

The funeral of Constable Harry Leeds, who was killed in the tram accident at McMahon’s Point, took place yesterday afternoon in the Roman Catholic portion of the Northern Suburbs cemetery.

A large crowd assembled in the vicinity of the late Constable Leed’s home in Penkivil- street, Willoughby, and, as the coffin was placed in the hearse, the crowd stood bare-headed, while Inspectors Beatty (George-street North station), to which Constable Leeds was attached and Souter (North Sydney) stood at the salute, at one side, and members of the Loyal Perseverance Lodge (Independent Order of Oddfellows) stood at the other side.

The Police Band, with muffled and draped drums, led the procession, and following the band, there came between 50 and 60 non-commissioned officers and men of the police force, representing 15 divisions. Marching immediately in front of the hearse were the Inspector-General of Police (Mr. James Mitchell) and Inspector Souter. The pall-bearers were Constables Cole, Hansen, Malcolm (No. 6 Division), and Jackson, Kerr, and Reece (No. 4 Division). Following the hearse were the mourning coaches conveying members of the family and other relatives of the deceased, then came members of the Loyal Perseverance Lodge, and about 30 motor cars and other vehicles, conveying friends of the late constable.

The route from the late Constable Leeds’s home to the cemetery was between three and four miles, and practically all the way crowds gathered to view the procession. A large number of people had assembled at Mowbray-road, and as the procession passed into the main street of Chatswood to the strains of the Dead March the scene was a solemn and striking one. The sidewalks of the thoroughfare were crowded, the men standing bare-headed, and the police on street duty standing at the salute as the hearse passed. After crossing the railway line at Chatswood the Police Band and members of the force opened out and halted while the procession passed through. Motor buses conveyed the band and police to the entrance to the cemetery, and on arrival of the hearse and mourners the procession was again formed and marched to the grave. The Rev. Father J. Wall officiated at the graveside, the service being simple but impressive.

The principal mourners were Mrs. Leeds (widow) and five young children, Messrs. Harry Leeds (father), Neil and Richard Leeds (brothers), and Mrs. Boyle, Mrs. Palmer Mrs. Benn, Mrs. Davidson, Mrs. Dickman, and Miss Elsie Leeds (sisters).

Others present Included Mr. G. Holt, District Superintendent of Tramways, North Sydney (representing the Tramway Department), District-officer F. A. Tuck, Crow’s Nest (representing the New South Wales Fire Brigade), Mr. Charles Thackeray (representing the Police Association), ex-Inspector J. Fullarton, Aldermen J. S. Muir, W. L. M. Fry, E. J. Parkes   (Willoughby Council), and Messrs. G. A. Bailey (town clerk), Hughes (health Inspector), and Murdock (building Inspector), H. B. Perringnon (Department of Labour and Industry), T. Proctor, H. C. Coulter, P. K, Gorrick, and E. Hewitt.

POLICE TO HELP WIDOW.

At North Sydney Police Court yesterday appreciative remarks regarding the late Constable Leeds were made by Mr. Daley and Mr. Thomas on behalf of the legal profession. Mr. Daley said that he had known Constable Leeds for 15 years, and he was an efficient, courageous, and loyal officer.

Inspector Souter expressed regret on behalf of the police force, and said that it was unfortunate that Constable Leeds had left a widow and five young children. He was sure, however, that the police as a body would not fail to alleviate the suffering of the late constable’s relatives.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/16179465

 

 

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The Catholic Press ( Sydney )         Thursday  4 September 1924      page 25 of 52

Tram Accident Victim.

CONSTABLE HARRY LEEDS.

Constable Harry LEEDS
Constable Harry LEEDS

THE LATE CONSTABLE LEEDS.

The recent tram accident at North Sydney was the cause of the death, of Constable Harry Leeds. Constable Leeds was one of the most popular men in the metropolitan area, and news of his death came as a severe shock to his colleagues. He joined the force in 1907, and was appointed to Goulburn, where he was married, and transferred to Araluen. From there he was sent to Crookwell, and later on to North Sydney, where he did duty for a number of years; but for the past five years he was connected with George-street North Police Station.

On the 22nd ult., at the North Sydney Police Court, Mr. Daley and Mr. Thomas, on behalf of the legal profession, paid a tribute to the worth of Constable Leeds, and offered their deep sympathy to his relatives. Inspector Souter said they could ill afford to lose such men of long service and experience. Constable Leeds leaves a widow and five young children, the youngest being a boy only six months old.

The funeral was an impressive tribute to the memory of deceased. The Police Band, under Bandmaster Hawkins and Drum-Major Flynn, together with a squad of sergeants and constables, drawn from the whole of the 15 divisions of the Metropolitan Police Force, led the cortege, and six police pals of the dead man carried the coffin, laden with wreaths. The hearse, too, was piled with wreaths.

The Inspector-General of Police (Mr. Mitchell) walked in the cortege, accompanied by Inspectors Beatty and Souter. The pall-bearers were Constables Cole, Hansen, Malcolm (No. 6 Division), Jackson, Kerr, Reece (No. 4 Division). Also in the cortege were Mr. G. Holt (District Superintendent, North Sydney), representing the Government Tramways Department), District Officer F. A. Tuck (representing New South Wales Fire Brigades), Mr. C. Thackeray (representing Mr. B. Fortesene and Police Association), Alderman Muir (representing the Mayor and Alderman of Willoughby). First-Class Constable Walsh marshalled the cortege to the Catholic portion of the Northern Suburbs Cemetery.   The streets through which the cortege passed were lined on each side with thousands of people, who stood with bowed heads. Arriving at the cemetery, the police formed an avenue, through which the cortege passed, and Rev. Father J. Wall, of Ryde, officiated at the graveside.

While the coffin was being lowered, the Police Band played ‘Abide With Me.’

The chief mourners were: The widow and five children, Mr. Harry Leeds (father), Neil and Richard (brothers), Mesdames Boyle, Benn, Davison, Dickman, Miss Elsie Leeds (sisters) Mrs. O ‘Regan, Mrs. Levett, Miss Howe, Miss O’Regan (mother and sisters of the widow). — R.I.P.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/14054317

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Freeman’s Journal ( Sydney )         Thursday  4 September 1924      page 19 of 48

THE LATE CONSTABLE HARRY LEEDS.

Constable Leeds, the victim of the recent  tram accident at North Sydney, was one of the most popular men in the metropolitan area, and news of his death    came as a severe blow to his colleagues.

He joined the police force in 1907 and was appointed to Goulburn, where he married. He was transferred to Araluen, and from there he went to Crookwell, and later on to North Sydney, where he did duty for a number of years.   For the past five years he had been connected with George-street North Police Station.

On August 22, at the North Sydney Police Court, Mr. Daley and Mr. Thomas, on behalf of the legal profession, paid a tribute to the worth of Constable Leeds,   and offered their deep sympathy to his relatives. Inspector Souter said they could ill afford to lose men of such experience and long service.

Constable Leeds leaves a widow and five young children, the youngest being a boy only six months old.

The funeral, which took place on Friday, August 22, was an impressive tribute to the memory of deceased. A large concourse of people gathered at ‘Innisfail,’ Penkivil-street, Willoughby, and genuine sorrow was manifested, particularly among those who knew the bond of affection which existed in the domestic life. At 2 p.m. the Police Band, together with a squad of sergeants and constables drawn from the whole of the fifteen divisions of the metropolitan police force, formed up outside, and six police pals of the dead man carried the coffin, laden with wreaths. The hearse was piled with wreaths. As the coffin was borne out, Inspectors Beatty (George-street North) and Souter (North Sydney) stood at the salute at one side, and six members of the Loyal Perseverance Lodge (I.O.O.F.) with bowed heads at the other.

The Inspector-General of Police (Mr. Mitchell) walked in the cortege, accompanied by Inspectors Beatty and Souter. The pall-bearers were Constables Cole, Hansen, Malcolm (No. 6. Division), Jackson, Kerr, and Reece (No. 4 Division). Also in the cortege were Mr. G. Holt (District Superintendent of North Sydney; representing Government Tramways Department), District Officer F. A. Tuck (representing N.S.W. Fire Brigades), Mr. C Thackeray (representing Mr. B. Fortescue and the Police Association), Alderman Muir (representing the Mayor and aldermen of Willoughby); Mr. Scott Fell was also represented.

First-Class Constable Walsh marshalled the cortege to the Catholic portion of the Northern Suburbs Company. The Police Band, under Bandmaster Hawkins, with Drum-Major Flynn at its head, led off with the ‘Dead March in Saul.’ The Loyal Perseverance Lodge (N.I.O.O.F.), with N.G. Bro. C. Bolger and Secretary Bro. Dimond, were also in the procession. The streets, through which the cortege passed, was lined on each side with thousands of people, who stood with bowed heads and tear-dimmed eyes. Arriving at the cemetery, the police formed an avenue through which the cortege passed, and the Rev. Father J. Wall, of Ryde, officiated at the graveside. While the coffin was being lowered the Police Band played ‘Abide With Me.’ The chief mourners were the widow and five children, Mr. Harry Leeds (father), Messrs. Neil and Richard (brothers), Mesdames Boyle, Benn, Davison, and Dickman, Miss Elsie Leeds (sisters), Mrs. O’Regan, Mrs. Levett, Miss Howe, Miss O’Regan (mother and sisters of the widow). — R.I.P.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/123253389

 

 

 

 

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Evening News ( Sydney)         Monday  29 September 1924      page 5 of 10

McMAHON’S PT. SMASH

The Coroner’s inquiry into the cause of the McMahon’s Point tram crash on August 21, in which Constable Harry Leeds and Frederick Maurice Lambert were killed, has been fixed for next Wednesday at 10 a.m.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/119969446

 

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The Sydney Morning Herald          Tuesday  30 September 1924       page 6 of 15

TRAM DISASTER.

The City Coroner’s inquest into the deaths of Constable Harry Leeds, and Frederick Maurice Lambert, in the tram disaster at McMahon’s Point on August 21 is listed to be held tomorrow.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/16161767

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Newcastle Morning Herald & Miners’ Advocate        Thursday  2 October 1924     page 5 of 8

SYDNEY TRAM SMASH. CORONER’S VERDICT :

The Sydney Coroner to-day held an inquiry, into the deaths of Frederick Lambert, aged 39, an engineer, of Willoughby, and Constable Harry Leeds,   aged 47, of Willoughby, who were killed in the tram smash at McMahon’s Point, North Sydney, on the morning of August 21. It was through the alleged failure of the brakes that a double-set ran down the steep incline towards McMahon’s Point, but when rounding a curve the front car left the rails and crashed into a house. The rear car piled itself up on to the first car, and in the smash Lambert and Leeds were killed, and a number of other passengers injured.

Edward Chambers, electrical subforeman in the Tramway Department,  said that on August 20 the two cars, 544 and 543, went into traffic at 6.20a.m., and arrived back at 8.57a.m., and were booked up as ” O.K. ” On August 21, at 1a.m., they were again booked up as ” O.K. ” At 5.49a.m. they went into traffic again, and were in good order. At 7.50a.m. he saw them at McMahon’s Point, after the accident. It was driver’s duty to report any defects in the running of a car.

Thomas Elias James, the driver of the car, was then called. He said that when they left Willoughby on the fatal trip for McMahon’s Point, he found that the controller was jambed (sic), and he could not move it one way or another. He then drove the tram from the rear of the car, and left Conductor Cowan in charge of the air brake in the front. As they neared the long hill near the terminus, he felt the car getting out of control. He attempted to use the third emergency, but found it could not be used, owing to the air control being on. He was absolutely helpless to do anything. Witness considered he had taken the best course in giving Cowan control of the air brake, as it was a very foggy morning. He attributed the accident to the greasy condition of the rails.

Conductor James Cowan, who stuck to the front of the car throughout, and who suffered severe concussion when it left the rails and crashed into the wall, was the next witness.

Mr. D. R. Hall, his solicitor, explained that his memory, so far as the accident was concerned, was an absolute blank, and he was still a very sick man. Consequently he was only asked a few questions.   He told the coroner that he could not remember anything of the run down the hill or the final crash.

“I would like to say how greatly I and the public admire him for sticking to his post right up to the end,” said the coroner, as Cowan was assisted from the box. “I an sure he will have the good wishes of the court for his speedy recovery, and its admiration for the way in which he retained his position, in the face of what looked like certain death.”

Edward Wills, chief inspector, said that the working orders put the driver in charge of the tram, and the only part of his duty he could delegate to a conductor when he had to drive from the rear was the operation of the bell and the sand. Wills maintained that the driver delegated his powers to the conductor, and thereby broke the regulations. The conductor, in this case, was in charge of the tram.

The Coroner: A man might easily make a mistake about the meaning of this rule.

Mr. Hall: A department whose motto is “Safety first” might have expressed it in more simple English and more clearly.

The coroner returned a verdict of accidental death.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/137776451

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