Ronald Walter McGOWN

 Ronald Walter McGOWN

( late of Blackheath )

Joined NSW Police Force via NSW Police Cadet system on 22 February 1971

Cadet #  2697

Redfern Police Academy Class # 132

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  15631

Rank:   NSW Police Cadet – started 22 February 1971 ( 17  yrs 5 days old )

Probationary Constable – appointed 6 February 1973 ( 19 years old )

Constable 1st Class – appointed 6 February 1978

Senior Constable – appointed 6 February 1982

Final Rank?

Stations?, Blacktown ( 1970’s – 1980’s ), Penrith HWP ( 1980’s ), either Springwood or Katoomba, Lithgow ( G.D’s & Rescue Squad ) – death

ServiceFrom  22 February 1971  to 10 June 1998 = 27+ years Service

AwardsNational medal – granted 21 August 1989

1st Clasp to National medal – granted 4 May 1998

Born:  Saturday  6 February 1954

Died on:  Wednesday  10 June 1998

Cause:  Liver Cancer – died within 3 months of diagnosis

Age:  44 years, 4 months, 4 days

Funeral date? June 1998

Funeral location:  Leura Crematorium

Buried at:  Cremated

 Memorial at:  Leura Crematorium

Rescue 27 ( Blacktown ) Ron McGOWN,
Rescue 27 ( Blacktown )  1980
Ron McGOWN

 

Rescue 27 ( Blacktown ) Ron McGOWN, Henry LEVY, Col KELSON
Rescue 27 ( Blacktown )  1980
Ron McGOWN, Henry LEVY, Col KELSON

 

Located at Leura Memorial Gardens
Located at Leura Memorial Gardens

RON IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Touch plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra
Touch plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

 

Ronald Walter McGOWN
Believed to be hanging in Blacktown Police Station.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

 

Rons’ cancer was deemed a HOD from a rescue response incident in Blacktown to a chemical spill.

Trevor Watkins was also a Rescue Operator who attended the same incident and died some time before Ron of the same cancer.  Doctors linked the 2 Police to the same chemical spill event.

Trevor, however, is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance.


 

Cadets - Class 10 / 1972
Cadets – Class 10 / 1972  ( Class 132 )


 

 

 




Juan Carlos HERNANDEZ

Juan Carlos HERNANDEZ

AKA CARL, CARLOS, BOMBHEAD & ROCKY
Late of ?

NSW Goulburn Academy Class #  226

New South Wales Police Force

Probationary Constable # 98201

Regd. #  23642

Uniform #  1583

Rank:  Commenced Training at the Goulburn Police Academy on 18 February 1987

Probationary Constable – appointed 15 May 1987

Constable – appointed 15 May 1988

Constable 1st Class – appointed

Final Rank = Constable 1st Class

Stations: ?, Paddington ( 10 Division ), State Protection Group Sydney ( SPG ) – Death

Service: From 18 February 1987 to 1 December 1992 = 5+ years Service

Awards: No find on It’s An Honour

Born28 July 1959

Died on:  Tuesday  1 December 1992 @ St Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst

Age: 33 years,  4 months,  3 days

CauseAccidentally Shot at Redfern SPG

Event location:  Redfern Police Academy

Event date:  Tuesday  1 December 1992

Funeral date:  4 December 1992

Funeral location: ?

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at:  Cremated.  Ashes collected.  Eastern Suburbs Memorial Park, Matraville

Memorial located at: ?

 

Juan Carlos HERNANDEZ

CARL IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


 

Funeral location: TBA


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

In 1992 Constable Hernandez was a member of the State Protection Group and a qualified firearms instructor. He was accidentally shot in the chest while testing police in their annual firearms proficiency tests at the Redfern Police Complex. Following emergency surgery Constable Hernandez died at St Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst the same day as the accident.

 

The constable was born in 1959 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 18 February, 1987. At the time of his death he was attached to the State Protection Group.


 

Touch Plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra - HERNANDEZ
Touch Plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

Kelvin Harband‎NSW Fallen Police New Member · 13 hrs · Juan Hernandez was accidentally shot in the chest while doing firearms training as an Instructor at the Redfern Police Academy on 1 December 1992. Emergency surgery was unable to save his life and he passed on that same day. Juan and I went through the Academy together in 1987 and he will always be remembered and a great bloke whose life was cut way to short by the tragic accident. Juan is in the middle squatting down in this photo which was taken on the day of our attestation.
Photo credit: Kelvin Harband‎   NSW Fallen Police New Member ·    Juan Hernandez was accidentally shot in the chest while doing firearms training as an Instructor at the Redfern Police Academy on 1 December 1992. Emergency surgery was unable to save his life and he passed on that same day. Juan and I went through the Academy together in 1987 and he will always be remembered and a great bloke whose life was cut way to short by the tragic accident. Juan is in the middle squatting down in this photo which was taken on the day of our attestation ( 15 May 1987 ).

 

 

Carl is also credited with designing the TOU insignia – which was maintained in respect to his.

 

 


 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Tuesday 1 December 1992, page 4

IN BRIEF

Policeman shot dead

SYDNEY: A police weapons training instructor was fatally wounded by another officer during a gun training session yesterday.

Constable Juan Carlos Hernandez, 33, an instructor with the elite State Protection Group, died in hospital several hours after being shot in the chest at the old Police Academy at Redfern.

Constable Hernandez was supervising about 15 officers at a training session when a .38 calibre police-issue revolver discharged, wounding him in the chest.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/126959025


 

 

[blockquote]

Carl.

Juan Carlos Hernandez,
Carl was how I knew you,
I will never forget,
What you helped me through.

To walk into a room,
When I was very young,
My first days in the job,
To see death, just wrong.

I was only 19 years old,
In the job for a few weeks,
In morbid fascination,
What no one really seeks.

I stood in disbelief,
Waiting for him to breath,
But he did not move,
It was hard for me to believe.

As we left the room,
You stopped me for a while,
And asked if I was ok,
Then you gave me a smile.

A smile because you knew,
It was not one of joy,
To tell me it would be ok,
I was no longer just a boy.

Death I had just seen,
Even if for the first time,
With the strength you showed me,
I would be just fine.

In shock a few years later,
I heard you had been lost,
In a twisted circumstance,
Your family paid the cost.

You were loyal to the end,
That is what I heard,
You were the ultimate Man,
So to deny your last words, absurd.

You died loving what you did,
A Policeman you will always be,
Did not matter your end,
You are now free.

I can’t believe,
It’s over 20 years,
Since I sat with you,
Had a few beers.

For years you have rested,
In the ultimate peace,
Having died in the line of duty,
But your memory does not cease.

You will never be forgotten,
Not while I still stand,
I will never ever forget,
When as a 19 year old you held my hand.

Thank you
Brother in Blue.

Died in the line of duty
1st December 1992.

[/blockquote]

Penned by Brendo Greysie ( 2014 )

 


Police Attestation Ceremony

Speakers Cusack The Hon Catherine; Gallacher The Hon Michael
Business Questions Without Notice, QWN
POLICE ATTESTATION CEREMONY
Page: 22733

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: My question is addressed to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services. Will the Minister inform the House about the newest recruits to the New South Wales Police Force?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I thank the honourable member for her question. Last Friday, 23 August 2013, it was my great pleasure to attend the attestation ceremony for class 319 at the Goulburn Police Academy. I assure members that the calibre of probationary constables coming through the doors of the academy to pursue challenging and rewarding careers as police officers in this State remains very high indeed. They passed the stringent physical and academic tests, and have demonstrated the commitment and character befitting their new role. These qualities were no more visible than when the commissioner’s valour award was presented to Senior Constable Justin Knight on the parade ground last Friday. The award was conferred for conspicuous merit and exceptional bravery when an offender armed with a sawn-off rifle fired at Senior Constable Knight with intent to murder on 20 January 2007 at Eveleigh Street, Redfern—the Block.

In the course of pursuing a suspect, Constable Knight alighted from his vehicle and pursued an offender on foot, calling for him to stop. The offender produced a sawn-off rifle and, despite the risk, Constable Knight continued to follow him. The offender fired a number of shots at Constable Knight, narrowly missing him. The constable felt one of the projectiles go past his arm and thought that he had been shot. Being aware of the sensitivity of the local community towards police and despite the escalated danger, Constable Knight did not respond by firing his service firearm. The offender fled the scene, but was later identified and charged with attempted murder of a police officer. The offender was subsequently convicted.

I ask members to reflect on those circumstances and whether we would have acted with the same level of commitment, bravery and judgement as Constable Knight on that occasion. Too often the community reacts to instances where police officers have been accused of wrongdoing, but the events of that night in 2007 remind us of the challenges and risks faced by officers of the NSW Police Force, in this case potentially quite deadly. I am confident that Senior Constable Knight’s example will flow through to the 161 probationary constables who attested and have joined a force with record authorised strength in this State.

A number of the new police officers deserve special mention. The winner of the Robert Brotherson award for the highest level of academic achievement was Probationary Constable Natalie Martin. The winners of the Steven Roser memorial award for the highest male and female achievers in physical training were Probationary Constable Mitchell Thompson and Probationary Constable Guilhermina El-Mir. The Juan Carlos Hernandez award, given to the student with the highest marksmanship score, went to probationary constables David Edwards, Anton Sahyoun and Shanahan Toering—all three tied for that award. Probationary Constable Toering also received the award for the highest achiever in the Simulated Policing Acquiring Competence program.

One of the many proud parents at the attestation was Detective Superintendent Arthur Katsogiannis, whose son Daniel is now a probationary constable and commences his career at City Central Local Area Command. It was terrific to see 23 members of the attestation of class 319 identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, of which 16 were graduates of the Indigenous Police Recruiting Our Way [IPROWD] program that I have spoken about in this forum. Congratulations to them. I had the pleasure of witnessing the graduation of 13 dog teams from the State Protection Group Dog Unit. Some were general purpose dogs and others, obviously, were sniffer dogs. That is good news for Byron Bay and its former mayor, the Hon. Jan Barham. The attestation parades provide an opportunity— [Time expired.]

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: I ask a supplementary question. Will the Minister elucidate his answer?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I pay respect to the following five officers who retired from the NSW Police Force, taking with them collectively 190-plus years: Superintendent Ben Feszczuk, Detective Superintendent Col Dyson, APM, Superintendent Ray Filewood, Detective Inspector Dennis Clarke, APM, and Inspector Leslie Dickens. All five officers led the parade on Friday. It was an incredibly proud moment for them, their families and the communities they have represented in just short of 200 years of policing. As I said to the graduating class, “If you want to look for role models, look at these five as a classic example of what you can give back to a community that will give you so much more.”

 

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LC20130827015


NSW Police Force Newly Attested Officers

Speakers Cusack The Hon Catherine; Gallacher The Hon Michael
Business Questions Without Notice, QWN
NSW POLICE FORCE NEWLY ATTESTED OFFICERS
Page: 20006

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: My question is addressed to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services. Will the Minister inform the House about the newest recruits to the NSW Police Force? The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: On 3 May it was a great pleasure to attend the attestation ceremony for class 318 at the Goulburn Police Academy, and I can assure the House that the calibre of probationary constables coming through the academy to pursue a challenging and rewarding career as a New South Wales police officer remains high. All attesting officers have made it through physical and academic tests, and, most importantly, they have demonstrated the commitment and character of people prepared to ensure the safety and security of the community they will serve. The 202 probationary constables who attested have joined a police force now boasting a record authorised strength of 16,176. As members opposite know full well, we have been increasing the authorised strength of the NSW Police Force since we took office. After the further increase this month of 80 positions from the May class, we have boosted the authorised strength by 370, and we are on our way to increasing the force by a total of 859 positions, to a record authorised strength of 16,665 officers in August 2015. This month 50 additional positions were added to the Police Transport Command, bringing its authorised strength to 401. We have also added 30 positions to the authorised strength of the Traffic and Highway Patrol Command, bringing it to 1,295. That makes an increase of 50 new authorised positions to this command, and that is halfway to our commitment to increase the strength of the command by 100. While another 202 probationary constables have been drawn to this career, I am equally pleased with how many officers stay in this exciting and rewarding profession. Indeed, there is such demand for a career in policing that the NSW Police Force has implemented a freeze on new applications. Members opposite have mischievously tried to claim that this is a sign of cuts to the Police Force. That is as far from the truth as members opposite could possibly get. Thanks to the Government making the necessary reforms to the Death and Disability Scheme set up by members opposite and restoring the confidence of serving police officers by ensuring that they will have the back-up they need, I am advised that attrition within the Police Force is currently averaging about 40 officers a month, down from the average of 70 under the previous administration. Therefore, it stands to reason that if fewer officers are leaving the force, fewer replacements are needed. Under Labor, the NSW Police Force was faced with more than 800 officers on long-term sick leave and officers leaving the force at such a rate that police could not recruit fast enough to plug the holes. Placing a temporary freeze on new applications will ensure that potential applicants do not need to spend application fees, which easily total $500, including on such items as medical certificates, when there is a substantial wait before their application can be considered. We are getting on with the job of ensuring that the NSW Police Force is better resourced, better equipped and better supported than ever before. Members opposite are peddling misinformation and seeking to undermine the community’s confidence in a police force experiencing record numbers. A number of the new police officers deserve special mention. The winner of the Robert Brotherson Award for the highest level of academic achievement was Probationary Constable Thomas Stillwell. The winners of the Steven Roser Memorial Award for the highest male and female achievers in physical training were Probationary Constable Adam Splithof and Probationary Constable Caitlin Billingham. The Juan Carlos Hernandez Award, given to the student with the highest marksmanship score, went to Probationary Constable Matthew Skellern. [Time expired.]

The Hon. CATHERINE CUSACK: I ask a supplementary question. Will the Minister elucidate his answer?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I am sure that all members would like to hear about these outstanding young probationary constables, including Probationary Constable Nathan Dechaufepie, who was the recipient of the Simulated Policing Acquiring Confidence Award. These officers can be proud of their achievements. Their families can be proud of them and, most importantly, their communities are proud of them. I am sure that the House will join me in wishing our newest police officers all the very best for their careers in the NSW Police Force.

 


 

 

Speakers MacDonald Mr Scot; Gallacher The Hon Michael
Business Questions Without Notice, QWN
POLICE GRADUATIONS
Page: 416

The Hon. SCOT MacDONALD: My question is addressed to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services. Will the Minister inform the House of the results of the latest police attestation?

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: I apologise to the House for my inability to be here last Friday. I had a very important role to fulfil as the Minister for Police and Emergency Services at the graduation of class 312 at the Police Academy in Goulburn. It was my first in my new role as Minister for Police and Emergency Services. One of the first things I had an opportunity to announce down there was clarification of the uncertainty that exists around the name of the organisation.

The Hon. Duncan Gay: It was well received.

The Hon. MICHAEL GALLACHER: It was well received. It will now return to its former name of the New South Wales Police Academy, not the police college. That announcement was very well received by the sworn officers. The attestation certainly brought back memories of when I was in a similar position, standing on the parade ground at Redfern more than 30 years ago. Whilst a lot of things have changed in policing, a lot of things have not. Obviously the equipment, the cars and the uniform have changed, but certainly one thing that has not changed is the high calibre of probationary constables coming through the academy. They are required to pass through a tough course, both physically and academically, to prove they can cut the mustard as officers in the New South Wales Police Force. Who knows, even Eric Roozendaal might apply to join the New South Wales Police Force—although he may not pass the integrity test.

They are men and women who are prepared to do their best for the people of this State and who will undertake this job on a daily basis, often in the most difficult of circumstances. The 111 probationary constables who attested at the ceremony have joined more than 15,000 officers in the Police Force. They come from all walks of life. Over 22 per cent of those who attested are women. Forty per cent come from outside metropolitan Sydney. Sixteen were born overseas, in countries such as Russia, Germany, Malaysia, China and even Botswana. They speak Arabic, Greek, Cantonese, Armenian, Dari, and Khmer. They will be posted to 59 local area commands across the State, from Albury in the south, to Richmond in the north, from Barrier in the west to the heart of Sydney. Forty-four of the officers have been assigned to non-metropolitan or rural regions.

Irrespective of where they have been posted they are on the front line. They stand between the community and the dangers of crime and other antisocial behaviour. A number of these new police officers deserve special mention. Firstly, the winner of the Robert Brotherson Award for the highest level of academic achievement was Probationary Constable Stephanie Hill. The winners of the Steven Roser Memorial Award for the highest male and female achievers in physical training were Probationary Constable John Feuerstein and Probationary Constable Sandra Chaban. The Juan Carlos Hernandez Award, given to the student with the highest marksmanship score, was Probationary Constable James Patrick. Probationary Constable Jessica Agland was the recipient of the Simulated Policing Acquiring Confidence Award.

I met some of the officers on Friday and I can confidently say that the New South Wales Police Force has a strong future. These officers can be proud of their achievements. Their family and friends can be proud of them for all the hard work they have put in to get there. The people of New South Wales can be proud of these people for choosing a selfless profession, dedicating their working lives to ensuring the safety and protection of the community. I am sure all members of the House will join me in wishing our newest police officers all the very best for their careers in the New South Wales Police Force.

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LC20110509023?open&refNavID=HA8_1




Gregory Malcolm ASHWORTH

Gregory Malcolm ASHWORTH

NSW Police Academy Class # 223

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 23153

Rank:  Commenced training at Goulburn Police Academy on 29 September 1986 ( aged 20 years, 3 months, 4 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed19 December 1986

Constable – appointed 7 March 1988 ( lost 3.5 months Seniority )

Final Rank:  Constable

Stations:  Pennant Hills

ServiceFrom  29 September 1986  to  29 August 1988 = 1+ year Service

Awards:  nil

Born:  Saturday  25 June 1966

Died on:  Monday  29 August 1988

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – Urgent Duty – Driver

Event location:  Corner of Pennant Hills Rd & Stuart Ave, Pennant Hills

Age:  22 years, 2 months, 4 days

Funeral date:  2 September 1988

Funeral location?

Buried at:  Macquarie Park Cemetery & Crematorium, Plassey Rd, Macquarie Park, 2113

Grave location:  General Lawn, Row 0, Plot 0531

GPS of Grave-33.789315       151.137817

Gregory Malcolm ASHWORTH

Touch Plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra
Touch Plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

GREG IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


 

About 4.20pm on 29 August, 1988 Constable Ashworth and Probationary Constable Currie left the Hornsby Police Station to attend an armed holdup at the West Pennant Hills branch of the National Bank. Whilst travelling along Pennant Hills Road Constable Ashworth swerved to avoid a stationary semi-trailer at the intersection of Stuart Avenue and collided with a median strip, causing the police vehicle to overturn onto the incorrect side of the roadway and hit an oncoming vehicle. As a result Constable Ashworth sustained severe head and internal injuries and although quickly attended to by Constable Currie, he died a short time later.

The constable was born in 1966 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 29 September, 1986. At the time of his death he was stationed at Pennant Hills.


 

Event location

 


 

The Holdup alarm, mentioned above, was a ‘false alarm‘.

Greg was aspiring to join the Pennant Hills Police Rescue Squad and, had he not died so early in his career, he was on his way to being nicknames ‘Bluey’ – no doubt a reference to him having red hair.

The accident happened on an uphill left hand curve near the Thornleigh tip.

As was the custom of the day, the vehicle was returned to the police station and was placed outside of the Meal Room at Hornsby Police Station where it was visible through the meal room window – awaiting Mechanical examination, and was visibly stained with blood.


 

Death Notice was published in the Sydney Morning Herald on 31 August 1988.


 

 




Andrew Thomas DIXON

Andrew Thomas DIXON

New South Wales Police Force

Goulburn Police Academy – Class 222

Regd. #  229 or 230??

Rank:  Commenced Training at Goulburn Police Academy on 18 August 1986

Probationary Constable – appointed 7 November 1986

Final Rank:  Probationary Constable

Stations:  Pennant Hills October 1986 to 3 June 1987

Awards:  Nil

Service:

From  18 August 1986  to  3 June 1987 = 11 months

Born: ? ? 1966

Died:  Wednesday  3 June 1987

Age:  20

Cause:  Illness – Suicide by Service firearm

Location:  at Lane Cover River Park, Lane Cove.

Funeral date?

Funeral location:

Eastwood

Grave Location:  Cremated

Memorial plaque at Northern Suburbs Crematorium, Delhi Road, North Ryde, NSW

Niche:  Row ‘TO’, plaque # 348

andrew-dixon-plague

Touch plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

 

Touch plate at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

Andrew Thomas DIXON. Plaque condition as of 8/9/2020
Andrew Thomas DIXON.   Plaque condition as of 8/9/2020

ANDREW IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

 

In April, 1987 Constable Dixon and other police attended a serious motor vehicle accident at Mt Colah. A person trapped in the vehicle became violent when released and Constable Dixon assisted in restraining him. During the struggle the constable was covered in a considerable amount of the injured person’s blood. It was later discovered that this person suffered from HIV/AIDS. Due to stress and concern over the disease, Constable Dixon drove to the Lane Cove River Park on 3 June, 1987 and committed suicide.

The constable was born in 1966 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 18 August, 1986. At the time of his death he was stationed at Pennant Hills.



 

From Kevin Banister – I remember this very well. I was working at Pennant Hills when Andrew arrived as a fresh faced Probationary Constable. He was a fine young man built like a brick s**thouse. When he was told that the accident victim had HIV/AIDS he began to withdraw very quickly. All at the station were concerned for his welfare and tried to help where possible.

On the afternoon of 3/06/87 Andrew had worked morning shift and I was on afternoon shift. At the hand over Andrew said goodbye with a smile on his face and went home, or so I thought. I was not aware that he was supposed to be attending the PMO (Police Medical Officer) for an appointment after work. I got a call from his mother just before sundown to say that Andrew had not come home and were concerned for his welfare. Pennant Hills was a Rescue Squad/General duties station at the time and I was the senior operator rostered on. I made a number of phone calls including to the Lane Cove station and Marrickville Rescue base. Not long after we received info that Andrew’s car had been located in a dead end street off Delhi Road beside the Lane Cove river.

As a result I and my offsider Bob Hanson attended in the Rescue vehicle. Numerous other Police vehicles arrived along with the Water Police. I organised a number of search parties and headed into the scrub towards the river. Reached the riverbank and saw that the Water Police had also began a search in the area we were in. Again, a short time later I and my offsider found the body of Andrew with his service revolver by his side. I indicated to the Water Police to come over (not using the radio) and told them that they were no longer required. The boat crew saluted and left the scene. A discrete message was sent to the command post as I knew that his parents were at the post and could hear the radio transmissions.

When we emerged from the bush with Andrew’s body many of the Police were in tears as he was a local boy and well known. His funeral was standing room only and the street blocked off for the overflow. During the period of the time of the accident and Andrew’s death he had a number of blood samples taken, but due to the technology of the time he was told that it could be some time before they knew if he had became infected. About a month after his death we were informed that he had not become infected. R.I.P. my friend.

 

Andrew Thomas DIXON

Andrew Thomas DIXON

 

 


 




Stewart COOK

Stewart COOK

Late of Nelson Bay

Academy Class 110

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  12431

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 3 April 1967

Senior Constable – appointed 3 April 1976

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 1 January 1983

Sergeant 2nd Class – Death

Stations: ?, Newcastle ( Carrington 3 April 1976 – 5 January 1968 ), Hamilton ( 6 January 1968 – 25 February 1969 ),

Tarro ( 26 February 1969 – 14 April 1975 ), Beresfield ( 15 April 1975 – 2 June 1977 ), Berrima ( 3 June 1977 – 18 October 1982 ),

Bowral ( 19 October 1982 – 7 October 1986 ), Newcastle District Licencing ( 8 October 1986 – 7 May 1987 )

ServiceFrom  20 February 1967  to  7 May 1987 = 19+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 22 April 1983 ( SenCon )

Born:  Monday  9 January 1939

Died on:  Thursday  7 May 1987

Age:  48 years, 3 months, 28 days

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – Driver – returning home from shift

Event location:  Anna Bay, NSW

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:  possibly 14 May 1987

Funeral location:  St Joseph’s Catholic Church, East Maitland

Buried at:  Cremated.  Newcastle Crematorium, Beresfield, NSW

 Memorial located at:  Newcastle Cemetery, Anderson Dve, Beresfield, NSW

NSW POLICE. Stewart COOK 7th May 1987 48 years.
Newcastle Cemetery, Anderson Dve, Beresfield, NSW

NSW POLICE. Stewart COOK 7th May 1987 48 years.

STEWART is mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Touch plate at National Wall of Police Remembrance, Canberra
Touch plate at National Wall of Police Remembrance, Canberra

 


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 About 8.10pm on 7 May, 1987, Sergeant Cook was returning home to Nelson Bay at the end of his shift. As he was driving through Anna Bay his vehicle crossed to the incorrect side of the roadway and collided with an oncoming vehicle. He sustained severe head and internal injuries and died a short time later.

 

The sergeant was born in 1939 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 20 February, 1967. At the time of his death he was attached to the Newcastle District Licensing Section.


 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Wednesday 21 June 1978, page 11

 

Rescue of chef in Berrima fire

BERRIMA: A motel chef spent 20 minutes trapped by fire on a ledge 15cm wide and 13 metres above the ground at Berrima on Monday night.

Mr Michael Birt, 62, the chef at the historic White Horse Inn, now a mote! and restaurant,found the stairs leading from his second-floor bedroom to safety were on fire.

He climbed through a window and on to the ledge outside his room to await rescue.

Senior Constable S. Cook and a bystander using an extension ladder they found nearby , rescued Mr Birt as the flames spread upward.

The fire broke out on the first floor of the 100-year-old brick building just after 9.30pm.

Mr Birt was the only occupant and was in his room when he smelt smoke and found his path to safety blocked by flames.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/131860242


 

 




John Benjamin HUTCHINS

John Benjamin HUTCHINS

AKA  ?

Late of  ?

 

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  130 

 

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  15???

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at Redfern Police Academy on ? ? ?

Probationary Constable – appointed 14 February 1972

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ? 

Detective – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? 

Final Rank =  Senior Constable

 

Stations?, Regents St Police Stn, Balmain, Five Dock, Police Communications Branch – VKG1

Service:  From ? ? pre 1972?   to   17 November 1983   =  11 years Service

 

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours

 

Born? ? 1951, Drummoyne, NSW

Died on:  17 November 1983

Age?

Cause:  MVA – Rider – 

Event location:  Victoria Rd, Ryde, NSW

Event date:  17 November 1983 

 

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location:  Northern Suburbs Crematorium, 199 Dehli Rd, North Ryde, NSW 

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: Cremated at Northern Suburbs Crematorium, 199 Dehli Rd, North Ryde, NSW, and Ashes collected by family.

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: Nil – at this time ( July 2020 )

 

ohn Benjamin HUTCHINS

Senior Constable John Benjamin HUTCHINS

JOHN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/

Australian Police YouTube Channel


 

 

About 12.25pm on 17 November, 1983 Senior Constable Hutchins was riding his motor cycle to work along Victoria Road, Ryde.

He failed to notice a vehicle that was stationary in front of him and collided with the rear of the vehicle.

Senior Constable Hutchins was conveyed to the Ryde Hospital where he was found to be dead on arrival.

 

The constable was born in 1951 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 14 February, 1972. At the time of his death he was attached to the Police Communications Branch.

 

Source:  Beyond Courage


 

 

 

 

 




John Henry WALTON

John Henry WALTON

( late of Westleigh, NSW )

NSW Police Training Centre – Redfern Academy – Class  084A

New South Wales Police Force

Regd #  9727

Joined NSW Police Force via the NSW Police Cadet system on 7 July 1958 but appears to have resigned on 7 July 1958 before re-joining around 1960.

Cadet # 1451

Rank:  NSW Police Cadet – commenced Monday 7 July 1958 until 7 July 1958.

Probationary Constable – appointed 15 August 1960

Constable – appointed 15 August 1961

Constable 1st Class – appointed  15 August 1966

Detective – appointed 22 March 1968

Detective Senior Constable – appointed 15 August 1970

Detective Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 28 April 1976

Final Rank:  Detective Sergeant 3rd Class

Stations:  Police Training Centre ( 150860 – Trainee ), Regent St ( 2 Division GDs from 190960 ), Regent St ( Traffic – Probation from 030161 ), Regent St ( Traffic – Permanent from 030261 ), Wagga Wagga ( transfer cancelled ), Canowindra ( GDs from 080563 ), 11 Division ( GDs from 101163 ), Vice Squad – H.Q. ( from 220365 ), Darlinghurst ( 3 Division – Vice Squad from 251065 ), Liverpool ( 22 Division – C.I. Duties from 280966 ), 9 Division ( C.I. Duties from 250869 ), C.I.B. – Special Crime Squad ( from 260273 ), C.I.B. – Armed Hold-up Squad to death

Service:  From 7 July 1958 to 7 July 1958.

Pre August 1960  to 23 June 1978 = 18+ years Service

Awards:  No Find in Australian Honours

Born:  Sunday  22 June 1941

Died on:  Friday  23 June 1978 ( day after his 37th birthday )

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – passenger

Event location:  Carlingford Rd & Glenview Parade, Carlingford

Age: 37 yrs  1 day

Funeral date:  Tuesday  27 June 1978

Funeral location: Macquarie Park Cemetery & Crematorium, Delhi & Plassey Rd, Macquarie Park, NSW

Buried at: RC Lawn, Block 12 / 0445

GPS:  Lat: -33.790614478   Long:  151.142994

INSCRIPTION: In loving Memory of John WALTON Died 23rd June 1978 Aged 37 years Beloved husband of Christine and father of Karen and Greg. and his beloved wife Christine Walton Died 24th March 1981 Lovingly remembered by the children

Grave Location

 

John Henry WALTON National Touch Plate, Canberra
John Henry WALTON
National Touch Plate, Canberra

JOHN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

About 2.45am on 23 June, 1978 Sergeant Walton was a passenger in a police vehicle travelling along Carlingford Road, Carlingford. A vehicle approaching in the opposite direction drove onto the incorrect side of the roadway, forcing the police vehicle off the road where it collided with a parked horse float which was parked, without lights, on the southern side of Carlingford Rd at the intersection of Glenview Parade. Detective Sergeant Walton was killed instantly.  Extensive inquiries made to locate the driver of the unknown vehicle responsible for this accident have to date proved unsuccessful.

 

The sergeant was born in 1941 and joined the New South Wales Police Force, as a Cadet, on 7 July 1958. At the time of his death he was attached to the Armed Hold-up Squad.

 

Beyond Courage


 

Prior to joining the NSWPF, John was a Junior Clerk for 10 months then joined the NSWPF Cadet system from the 7 July 1958 and finished on the 17 August 1958 for reasons unknown to me.

He then appears to have been a General Hand for 4 months and then a Clerk for 18 months before coming back to the NSWPF – Attesting as a Probationary Constable on the 15 August 1960.  His re-join date is also unknown to me.

He was 5′ 11″ tall, 12 stone 12 lb in weight with Hazel eyes, brown hair and of a medium build.  He was born in Young, NSW and was single at the time of joining but married on 23 November 1963.  He obtained his School Intermediate Certificate.

He obtained an 82.5% at completion of Training Class 84A and he had a 23 w.p.m. rate of typing – on the 4 April 1961

He also completed a three day course in Civil Defence in 1961.

He passed his Constable 1st Class exams on the 22 September 1964.

He failed his first attempt at the Sgt 3/c exams on 18 May 1973 but passed on the 16 May 1974.

He passed the Detective qualification course on 25 October 1967 and was designated a Detective on the 22 March 1968.

On the 14 November 1977 he was ” Commended for the good policemanship, excellent teamwork and devotion to duty he displayed as one of the Police responsible for the prompt arrest of Phillip WESTERN, Michael STOGIO, Lawrence JOHNSON and Robert PATTEN for the armed hold-up of the Randwick Branch of the Bank of New South Wales on 29 December 1975. 

During committal proceeding at the Central Court of Petty Sessions on 28 April 1976 the Chief Stipendiary Magistrate, Mr. Farquhar, complimented him, along with all Police connected with the case while His Honour, Judge Muir, in passing sentence on the offenders made favourable comment regarding the briefs prepared by Police for the trial.

Mervyn T Wood – Commissioner

 


 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Saturday 24 June 1978, page 3

IN BRIEF

Fatal crash

SYDNEY: Detective Sergeant John Henry Walton, 37, was killed and Detective Senior Constable John O’Hagan, 33, was seriously injured when a police car driven by Detective O’Hagan ran into a horse-float in Epping early yesterday.

24 Jun 1978 – IN BRIEF Bicentenary planning to begin soon – Trove




Eric George BAILEY GC

Eric George BAILEY GC

Father to John ‘Jack’ George BAILEY – NSWPF # 6293

New South Wales Police Force

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class # ???

( Class # 001 was in March 1947 – so Eric pre dates that. )

Regd. # 2382

Rank: Commenced Training on ? ? ?

Probationary Constable – appointed Wednesday 16 March 1927

Constable 1st Class – appointed 23 April 1938

Constable 1st Class – posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class

Stations: No. 4 Division from 14 June 1927,

The Rocks in 1928, then Gundagai, Narrandera & other rural stations.

Moruya 1938 then Blayney from 4 January 1945

ServiceFrom 16 March 1927 to 12 January 1945 = 18 years Service

Awards:  * George Cross  ( GC ) awarded, Granted 20 October 1946 – posthumously

also the George Lewis Trophy.

Bravery Commendation re arrest at Batemans Bay in 1940.

Highly Commended and awarded six months seniority for Conspicuous Bravery for the rescue of survivors, at sea, off Moruya on the 3 August 1942, after a fishing trawler had been attacked by a Japanese submarine.  Also received a Certificate of Merit from Royal Shipwreck Relief and Humane Society of NSW.

Born:  Sunday  14 October 1906 at Tenterfield

Died:  Friday  12 January 1945

Age:  38 years, 2 months, 29 days old

Cause:  Shot – Murdered

Event location:  Outside of Exchange Hotel, Adelaide St, Blayney

Funeral date:  Monday  15 January 1945

Funeral location:  Buried in Rookwood Cemetery

Grave location:  Anglican Section, Rookwood Cemetery.  Zone C, Section 08, Grave 1959

GPS:  -33.87119050511541,  151.05958014008522

Grave

Inscription:<br /> In Loving Memory of<br /> My Dear Husband and our Dear Father<br /> Eric George BAILEY<br /> Died 12th January 1945<br /> Aged 38 years<br /> Our Dear Mother<br /> Florence May BAILEY<br /> Died 1st December 1985<br /> Aged 78 years.<br /> Erected by New South Wales Government in Memory of Sergeant 2nd Class Eric George BAILEY G.C. who was shot in the Execution of his Duty at Blayney<br /> 12th January 1945.<br />

Sergeant Eric George Bailey ( 1945 )

 

Eric George BAILEY and his son - John
Eric George BAILEY and his son – John “Jack” BAILEY ( NSWPF # 6293 )

 

ERIC IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Eric George BAILEY GC. Touch plate at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra
Touch plate at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra

Memorial location:  Below plaque is located at the location of the murder.

This plaque commemorates and honours the bravery and dedication of Sergeant Eric Bailey of the N.S.W. Police Force who was shot and killed when arresting a criminal at this place on the 12th January 1945. Placed on behlaf of the community by the Blayney Shire Council by Barry Colburt, Shire President, 11 December 1989.

On 4 January 1945, Constable 1st Class Bailey commenced duty at Blayney Police Station.  On his 8th day at that station, he was dead.

On a hot summer evening, eight days later, while on duty in Adelaide Street, he was informed that a drinker at the Exchange Hotel was displaying a revolver.

Shortly after 8pm on 12 January 1945, Constable 1st Class Bailey spoke to a man, Cyril Norman, who was dressed in an American Naval Uniform outside the Exchange Hotel, Blayney. The constable told the man that he intended to search him and his belongings regarding his alleged possession of a revolver. The man suddenly produced the revolver and shot Constable Bailey in the stomach. The constable then took hold of the offender and during the ensuing struggle two more shots were fired and the offender was wounded in the wrist. Three railway employees quickly came to the constable’s aid and the offender was handcuffed and detained until the arrival of Constable GradyBailey told Grady: ” He shot me through the back.  Don’t let him get away …I had a go.  I didn’t squib it “.

The wound suffered by Constable Bailey proved to be severe and he died on admission to the Orange Base Hospital with his wife by his side. He had in fact arrested his own murderer.

 

Allegations were later made suggesting that the offender was a contract killer sent to murder another local policeman, Constable Stan Grady, who had been enthusiastically investigating sly grog sellers and SP bookies in the area. The offender was said to have inadvertently shot Constable Bailey, whom he mistook for Grady, who was off duty at the time. When shot, Constable Bailey was in mounted police uniform, and until that day Stan Grady had been the only mounted constable in Blayney, thus the offender’s error. The offender, well-known Sydney criminal Cyril Normanalias Thomas Couldrey – was convicted and sentenced to death.

Norman was charged with the murder of Bailey and that of Maurice Hannigan, a Sydney shopkeeper from whom he had stolen guns and ammunition. Although he was convicted, the death sentence was later commuted to life imprisonment.


 

Bailey was posthumously awarded the George Cross, instituted in 1940 by King George VI and intended primarily for civilians, which recognized ‘acts of the greatest heroism or of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme danger’.

The first Australian policeman to be so honoured, he was also posthumously promoted sergeant 3rd class and awarded the George Lewis trophy in 1945 for the most courageous act by a policeman.

Bailey was accorded an official police funeral in Sydney and was buried in the Anglican section of Rookwood cemetery. His daughter and son John, who was to join the New South Wales police at the age of 16, also survived him.

( John ‘Jack’ George BAILEY, NSW Police Cadet # 0613, Regd. # 6293 )


 

28 May 2020

Maz Herrmann His son John “Jack” Bailey an ex cadet was our boss at Albury during the 80s and the day he retired I spoke to him that evening and said “Jack what are you fkn doing at work; today is your last day”? He said “I’m just tidying up some things before I go.
I knew Jack when he was a Snr Sgt at Wollongong and I was the Inspectors Clerk in 1977-1980.
I joined the cops the following year 1981 – then I had to call him Sir!
He was definitely an old school copper – enough said.
May he R.I.P.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1087842541279097/

 

 


 

The Sydney Morning Herald of 11 September, 1947

announced the presentation of Sergeant Bailey’s George Cross by Sir William McKell.

 

GEORGE CROSS AWARD – INVESTITURE BY MR. McKELL.

Mrs. F. M. Bailey, of Cleveland Street, Moore Park, widow of Police Sgt. Eric G. Bailey, yesterday received the George Cross awarded to her husband for holding a man who had fatally wounded him until assistance arrived, at Blayney in January, 1945. The decoration was made at an investiture held by the Governor General, Mr. McKell, at Government House.


 

Sergeant Bailey was born in 1906 and joined the New South Wales Police Force in 1927. At the time of his death he was stationed at Blayney. He was posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class ( Although his grave states Sgt 2/c ) and awarded the George Cross and the George Lewis Trophy.

* Eric BAILEY is the ONLY Australian Police Officer to be awarded the Imperial Honour, namely the George Cross Medal.


Bailey, Eric George (1906–1945)

by Christa Ludlow

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 13, (MUP), 1993

Eric George Bailey (1906-1945), policeman, was born on 14 October 1906 at Tenterfield, New South Wales, ninth child of Arthur Peter Bailey, compositor, and his wife Jane, née Bush, both native-born. Eric worked as a postal assistant before joining the New South Wales Police Force on 16 March 1927. After training, he was transferred to Sydney’s No.4 Division on 14 June, and sent to The Rock in 1928; he then served at Gundagai, Narrandera and other rural stations. Bailey was confirmed an ordinary constable on 16 March 1928. He married Florence May O’Connor at Mount Carmel Catholic Church, Waterloo, on 24 November that year.

Promoted constable 1st class on 23 April 1938, Bailey was next stationed at Moruya on the south coast. In 1940 he arrested a criminal at Batemans Bay and was commended for bravery, cool-headedness and devotion to duty. Learning that a fishing trawler had been attacked by a Japanese submarine off Moruya on 3 August 1942, he and Sergeant Horace Miller set out at night in a pleasure launch in heavy seas to assist with the rescue of the survivors. Bailey was highly commended and awarded six months seniority for conspicuous bravery; he also received a certificate of merit from the Royal Shipwreck Relief and Humane Society of New South Wales.

On 4 January 1945 Bailey was transferred to Blayney, south-west of Bathurst. On a hot summer evening eight days later, while on duty in Adelaide Street, he was informed that a drinker at the Exchange Hotel was displaying a revolver. When Bailey questioned the offender, Cyril Norman, and declared that he would search his room, Norman drew a revolver and shot him. In the ensuing struggle two more shots were fired, but Bailey managed to handcuff Norman and restrain him until Constable Grady arrived. Bailey told Grady: ‘He shot me through the back. Don’t let him get away . . . I had a go. I didn’t squib it’. Fatally wounded by the first shot, Bailey died hours later on 12 January 1945 in Orange Base Hospital, his wife at his side.

Norman was charged with the murder and that of Maurice Hannigan, a Sydney shopkeeper from whom he had stolen guns and ammunition. Although he was convicted, the death sentence was later commuted to life imprisonment.

Bailey was posthumously awarded the George Cross, instituted in 1940 by King George VI and intended primarily for civilians, which recognized ‘acts of the greatest heroism or of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme danger’. The first Australian policeman to be so honoured, he was also posthumously promoted sergeant 3rd class and awarded the George Lewis trophy in 1945 for the most courageous act by a policeman. Bailey was accorded an official police funeral in Sydney and was buried in the Anglican section of Rookwood cemetery. His daughter and son John, who was to join the New South Wales police at the age of 16, also survived him.

Select Bibliography

  • I. Bisset, The George Cross (Lond, 1961)
  • L. Wigmore (ed), They Dared Mightily (Canb, 1963)
  • Police News (Sydney), Feb 1945, p 7, Sept 1945, p 9, Oct 1947, p 44
  • Sydney Morning Herald, 14, 20 Jan, 8, 22 Feb, 5 Aug 1945, 30 Oct 1946, 11 Sept 1947
  • Sun (Sydney), 17 Jan 1979
  • service records of E. G. Bailey (police registry, New South Wales Police Dept, Sydney).

Citation details

Christa Ludlow, ‘Bailey, Eric George (1906–1945)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bailey-eric-george-9403/text16527, published first in hardcopy 1993, accessed online 6 January 2015.

Life Summary [details]

Birth

14 October 1906
Tenterfield, New South Wales, Australia

Death

12 January 1945

Orange, New South Wales, Australia

Religious Influence
Occupation
Workplaces

 

This article was first published in hardcopy in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 13, (MUP), 1993

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bailey-eric-george-9403