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Sally Elizabeth URQUHART

Sally Elizabeth URQUHART

AKA  ?

Late of  ?

Partner ( fiancée ) of Senior Constable Trad THORNTON ( Bamaga Police Stn )

Queensland Police Academy Squad #  ? ? ?

Queensland Police Force

Regd. #  4014432

Rank:  Commenced Training on 19 February 2001

Probationary Constable- appointed 4 September 2001

Constable – appointed ? ? ? 

 

Final RankConstable

StationsMetropolitan North Region – Hendra Police Stn ( 19 Feb 2001 – 13 Oct 2002 ), Cairns Police Stn ( 14 Oct 2002 – 10 March 2003 ), Aurukun Police Station ( 11 March 2003 – 21 August 2003 ),   Bamaga Police Stn ( 18 months ) – Death

Service:  From 19 February 2001   to   7 May 2005 4 years Service

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours

 

Born? ? ?

Died on7 May 2005

Age28

Cause:  Passenger – Downed Aerotropics flight from Bamaga to Cairns, Qld

Event location:   rugged mountain terrain 11kms northwest of Lockhart River Aboriginal Commission, Qld

Event date7 May 2005

 

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location? 

 

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: ?

 

SALLY IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/

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In Memory of Constable Sally Urquhart

 

Sally URQUHART

Location:  Column 3 - Left leg, Rear portion, Row 4  Sally Urquhart
Location: Column 3 – Left leg, Rear portion, Row 4

 

Constable Constable Sally Urquhart and Senior Constable Trad Thornton on the northernmost point of the Australian Mainland.
Constable Sally Urquhart and Senior Constable Trad Thornton on the northernmost point of the Australian Mainland.

 

 

Constable Sally Urquhart registered number 4014432 was a Queensland Police Officer from the 19thFebruary 2001 until the 7th May 2005.

Constable Sally Urquhart was on-board an Aerotropics flight from Bamaga bound for Cairns when it crashed into dense rainforest and rugged mountain terrain 11kms northwest of Lockhart River Aboriginal Commission, killing all fifteen occupants on the 7thMay 2005. This tragic loss has affected the whole community in the Far North, in particular the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community of Bamaga and Injinoo.

Constable Sally Urquhart had been stationed at Bamaga Police station, with her fiancé Senior Constable Trad Thornton for the past 18months.

Sally was the eldest of three children born to Shane and Elizabeth Urquhart. She grew up as the daughter of School teachers and subsequently lived throughout Queensland.  Sally was a young lady born for success, she was school captain at both primary and high school; a model student.

In the words of her father,“ She touched the hearts of everyone she met from childhood to present, in the many parts of Queensland where we have lived ”.

After finishing school she went on to complete a double degree at the University of Queensland in Law and Science, winning the University prize for Family Law.

Whilst at uni, Sally shared accommodation with a police officer, Plain Clothes Detective Peta Ross and it was during this time that Sally set her sights on joining the Queensland Police.

Sally and her dog ' Prince '
Sally and her dog ‘ Prince ‘

After graduating from university, Sally commenced recruit training at the Queensland Police Academy at Oxley on the 19thFebruary 2001 and graduated on the 4th September2001.

Her first posting was to the Metropolitan North Region where she was stationed at Hendra. Even at this early stage in her Career Sally was showing signs of great potential. Her service history indicates that she excelled in all aspects of general duties and worked well in a team environment.

It was here that she met her finance, Senior Constable Trad Thornton. Trad was working in the Public Safety Response Team, (PSRT), at the time.

Sally was posted to Cairns Station on the 14th October2002, where she performed general duties in Team 4.  Her Supervisor / Team Leader identified early that Sally was an officer who was prepared to accept any responsibility or task and displayed a high work ethic.  She was well suited to general duties policing and excelled at all aspects of her work.

Sally’s professionalism and understanding towards all members of the public went beyond that of her duty as a Police Officer. She was always willing to assist members of the community and was commended by the then Assistant Commissioner Allan Roberts for her efforts.

Trad was transferred to Cairns a short time later and after 4 months, the pair were identified as suitable officers to work in the Aboriginal community in the Cape York Peninsular and were transferred to Aurukun Station where they policed from the 11th March until the 21st August 2003.

Aurukun is a station that has recently increased from 4 to 7 staff, with a population of approximately 1200. Most of the work involves policing aboriginal community which in itself is a huge task, the sacrifices that officers make to go there are enormous, however the life experiences are priceless.

Sally excelled in her work and she was involved with all levels of the community. Sally’s personality and demeanour ensured that she was readily accepted by the community. Sally had a presence about her that brought calm to situations that verged on mayhem and conflict. Whilst stationed at Aurukun her rapport with the community members was one of respect, trust and honesty.

These qualities and her dedication to duty ensured that The Queensland Police were respected, in a sometimes difficult environment. Sally’s attitude to work and her diligent and tenacious nature ensured that she was going to achieve whatever she desired.

Sergeant Andrew Clarkson ( current Officer in charge of Aurukun ) remembers Sally dealing with confronting and daunting situations that required great courage and composure. He remarks that Sally excelled in these situations, and it was reassuring to know that she was with you.

Sgt CLARKSON remembers her personality, her smile and her innate ability to say the right words at any given time making the rigors of policing Aurukun enjoyable. “ I will always remember the day that I was promoted to Officer in Charge, Aurukun not for the promotion, but for the way that Sally rushed over to me when she heard the news, gave me a hug and a kiss and then made a fuss over it all ”.

Sally was a selfless person who ensured that others would always come first. She was a dedicated police officer who values ensured that justice was served. When I heard of the tragedy, I pondered as to why could one who’s light shines so strong and bright be taken from us.

Local kids at Aurukun swimming pool
Local kids at Aurukun swimming pool

Policing within any Cape Community within the Far Northern Region is a daunting experience for police officers to say the least. Officers within these communities develop the ability to foresee behavioural changes within the community. Officers are exposed to a myriad of situations and events that test their abilities. To be tenacious, resourceful and professional at all times is sometimes a feat within itself.

Since the implementation of Alcohol Management Plans (AMP’s) communities have undergone a dramatic metamorphosis. With the lifting of the ‘veil’ of alcohol, policing within the communities has changed tact from the much talked about reactive policing style to a more proactive community based approach. This change has been embraced by the community and supported by both elders and councils.

Policing for female officers is compounded further by local culture and tradition. Male’s in these communities are reluctant to deal with female officers.  From my observations all the females that I have worked with at Aurukun have been able to establish a rapport and gain respect within the communities, that some male officers have failed to achieve. These officers have utilised their various skills and instincts to finesse and diffuse potentially volatile situations.

The ability to arbitrate, negotiate and resolve situations are attributes that police utilise everyday. Working within remote and isolate communities ensures that these skills are honed and developed to there absolute potential. The ability to endear oneself to a community and make a difference was never more evident, with the tragic loss of Sally. Elders and councillors from the community stopped me to talk to me about Sally and how ‘ good a person she was ’. Silas Wolmby an elder and traditional landholder of Aurukun stated to me that “ she made him smile, and he knew that she would always do the right thing. ”

From Aurukun she was transferred to Bamaga Police station. This area consists of 5 police. Sally was one of two female officers in Bamaga. The second being Senior Constable Joanne Bailey, the following comments are from Jo.

Sally was nothing more than a champion. She would undertake any task with such enthusiasm, whether it be major criminal investigations such as rape and indecent dealings to minor jobs that are required to efficiently run a small station. Sally was instrumental in organising court days and her organisational and leadership skills were way above her policing years.

Besides her policing skills, Sally had an amazing quality of ‘ brightening up the room ’. She was always genuinely happy to see you at any time and nothing was a bother. Her laughter could be heard across the houses, which would straight away make you smile.

Trad and Sally made many friends in Bamaga. Since they were engaged in June 2004, she shared her excitement with her closest friends. Her wedding plans were all sorted out, again she was organised down to the jelly beans on the table!

But it was not to be, and like many people from the Far North the 7th May 2005 will remain as the worst day they have ever experienced. But things are getting easier, and as a good friend of ours said recently, we are truly more blessed to have known Sally, even if it was only for a short time. She is sadly missed.

Sally's graduation day - pictured with squad mates Constable Krissie Warriner and Constable Mardi Watts
Sally’s graduation day – pictured with squad mates Constable Krissie Warriner and Constable Mardi Watts

Sally on Patrol in Bamaga
Sally on Patrol in Bamaga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Journal for Women and Policing

Pages 12 – 14

https://acwap.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue16.pdf


 

 

 

 

Fresh blow to air crash victims’ families

THE owners and operators of a commercial plane involved in one of Australia’s worst air disasters have launched legal action that could stop the victims’ families ever getting answers.

Two pilots and 13 passengers were killed in the May 2005 Lockhart River tragedy when an Aerotropics commercial flight crashed into a ridge line and exploded in flames, killing all on board during a flight from Bamaga.

In the latest roadblock for victims’ families, owners of the doomed aircraft have launched an appeal in a bid to block a wrongful-death lawsuit in the US state of Missouri, just weeks after the victims’ families won a legal battle to allow the case to go to trial in July next year.

Brisbane man Shane Urquhart lost his policewoman daughter Sally in the crash and said the long-running legal hurdles were “frustrating” and “ludicrous”.

“We’re talking about human lives here, ordinary people and they were all good people going about their daily business,” he said.

“There’s no such thing as closure, there’s no closure when you lose someone but there may be justice but that certainly hasn’t happened here.”

The horror crash was the worst air disasters in Queensland in more than four decades and claimed the lives of a leading scientist, a popular policewoman, three key members of a football team, and a 25-year-old mother of six.

The families allege in the Missouri court action that the aircraft had several defects and that the crash was “the direct and proximate result” of one of more of those defects.

The alleged defects include claims the plane did not contain an effective ground proximity warning system, it was not equipped with autopilot and flight instruments were either hard to read, confusing, or not in proper view.

Lawyers for the plane’s owners and operators who are being sued by 61 family members of the crash victims, the majority of whom live in Queensland, launched an appeal on September 6 against last months’ Brisbane Supreme Court ruling allowing the Missouri case to go ahead.

The appeal argues the Supreme Court ought to rule that the Missouri action is “vexatious and oppressive” and that “nothing relevant” could be gained in the overseas action over and above what could be gained in Australia.

The families are pursuing legal action in Missouri where they claim the aircraft was delivered, inspected and placed into operation.

The 61 family members are expected to fly to Missouri to give evidence or testify via video link.

In Missouri, a jury will determine the amount of damages awarded instead of a judge and there are no orders for costs as there are in Australia.

However it’s not yet clear whether the US case will run according to Queensland or Missouri law.

Toowoomba lawyer Pat Nunan has been representing the victims’ families for more than a decade and said the delays were difficult.

“It’s terrible and it’s had a great impact on the families of the victims,” he said.

“Litigation is one of the great stressors of all time and it has been horrendous for them.”

He said the families were desperate for answers.

“We’re trying to get their day in court to determine what actually did go wrong and make sure it doesn’t happen again,” he said.

“It’s like a hot dagger into a wound every time something comes up in these cases.”

Brisbane man Shane Urquhart lost his policewoman daughter Sally in the crash and said the long-running legal hurdles were “frustrating” and “ludicrous”.

“We’re talking about human lives here, ordinary people and they were all good people going about their daily business,” he said.

“There’s no such thing as closure, there’s no closure when you lose someone but there may be justice but that certainly hasn’t happened here.”

The appeal returns to the Court of Appeal tomorrow.

 

Fresh blow to air crash victims’ families | Morning Bulletin


 

 

Sahar Mourad

A father has revealed the chilling phone call he received moments after the horror plane crash which killed his daughter and 14 others on board.

The crash, considered one of Australia’s worst aviation disasters, led to the deaths of 15 people in 2005 after a plane struck a ridge in the Lockhart River, Queensland.

Grieving families of the passengers are still asking for answers after a Coroner’s Inquest and Senate inquiry failed to conclusively reveal what caused the crash.

Constable Shane Urquhart, whose daughter Sally was one of the passengers on the plane, has revealed the haunting words he heard immediately after the crash.

‘The phone rang and when I answered, it was Sally’s fiance Trad and I’ll never forget the words…He just very, very quietly said ”Shane, Sally’s plane is missing”,’ he told A Current Affair.

Since the devastating incident, loved ones have been looking for answers to what happened on the plane which caused it to crash.

Mr Urquhart said there’s ‘no such thing as closure’ and all the families’ victims deserve answers.

‘They don’t deserve or didn’t deserve what happened to them.’

The policewoman was due to marry Trad four months after the incident, but instead her fiancée and family were left with the heartbreaking task of burying her.

An inquiry into the crash found 19 different factors led to the fatal collision, with the main one being pilot error.

But Mr Urquhart does not accept this, saying the inquest took the easy decision to blame someone who is not around to defend themselves.

‘In aviation accidents where everybody has not survived, who are they going to blame? The pilots, because no-one is available to tell the story and it’s very, very easy to do that,’ he told the network.

The victims’ families lawyer Patrick Noona alleged there was something already wrong with the aircraft, revealing they would be taking legal action against the plane’s owners in the United States.

The insurers are fighting to stop the legal proceedings but nothing will occur until the case appears in the Brisbane Supreme Court next month.

If the families win then a wrongful death lawsuit will be heard in Missouri next year.

Mr Urquhart said his daughter would be cheering on the families saying, ‘don’t let the bastards win’.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/ill-never-forget-the-words-father-reveals-the-chilling-phone-call-he-received-moments-after-plane-crash-which-killed-his-daughter-and-14-others-on-board-in-mysterious-circumstances/ar-BBNVHOV?fullscreen=true#image=4

 


 

 

Lockhart River air disaster

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Lockhart River air disaster occurred on 7 May 2005, when Aero-Tropics Air Services Flight 675 crashed while on approach to land at Lockhart River Airport in Queensland, Australia, on a ridge known as South Pap 6 nautical miles (11 km) north-west of the airport.[2] All fifteen on board died as the aircraft was completely destroyed by impact forces and subsequent fire. The Fairchild Swearingen Metroliner commuter aircraft, registered VH-TFU,[3] was owned by Transair Ltd and operated by Aero-Tropics. The flight was scheduled from Bamaga on Cape York to the regional centre of Cairns, with a stopover in Lockhart River. It was the worst air crash in Australia in 36 years since MacRobertson Miller Airlines Flight 1750 on 31 December 1968.[4]

 

Investigation

The Queensland Coroner’s Inquest in 2007, found that, despite evidence that there were a number of issues leading up to the crash, pilot error was the prime cause. Families of those who lost their lives in the disaster have been highly critical of the Coroner’s findings and the deficiencies in the operations of the regulator, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), and the poor company structure and practices of Transair Ltd.

The investigation was aided by flight information from the aircraft’s flight data recorder. As the cockpit voice recorder was unserviceable, and had been for some time, the conversations occurring between the flight crew will never be known.

Senate inquiry

As a result of intense lobbying by the father of one of the victims, Constable Sally Urquhart, and others, the Australian Senate’s Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee resolved to conduct an inquiry into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, its operations and other matters. The Inquiry was convened on 2–3 July 2008 at Parliament House, Canberra. As well as Mr Shane Urquhart’s submission, there were sixty others which were considered by the Inquiry. The vast majority of the submissions were highly critical of most aspects of CASA’s operations.[who?] Several people and organisations, including Mr Urquhart, supported their submissions in person at the Inquiry. In September 2008, the Committee Chair, Senator Glenn Sterle, released the report of the inquiry to the Transport Minister Mr Anthony Albanese and the public.

The recommendations from the report are:

1. That the Australian Government strengthens CASA’s governance framework and administrative capability by:

a. introducing a small board of up to five members to provide enhanced oversight and strategic direction for CASA; and
b. undertaking a review of CASA’s funding arrangements to ensure CASA is equipped to deal with new regulatory challenges.
2. In accordance with the findings of the Hawke Taskforce, that CASA’s Regulatory Reform Program be brought to a conclusion as quickly as possible to provide certainty to industry and to ensure CASA and industry are ready to address future safety challenges.
3. That the Australian National Audit Office audit CASA’s implementation and administration of its Safety Management Systems approach.

Further incidents

Following the Lockhart River crash, Transair in Australia went into liquidation in late 2006.[5] Aerotropics also no longer operates because the Civil Aviation Safety Authority cancelled its Air Operator Certificate due to ongoing safety breaches. Transair continued to operate its PNG business until 31 August 2010 when the company’s Cessna Citation ran off the runway on landing at Misima Island near Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea. The previous owner of Transair in Australia, Les Wright, died along with three others in the ensuing inferno. There was one survivor.

Notes

 

 

  1. Hans Mick (17 August 2007). “Lockhart River plane crash findings handed down”. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 14 January 2014.

References

 

 

Lockhart River air disaster – Wikipedia


 

Remembrance post Constable Sally Urquhart

10 years on we remember those lost in the Lockhart River Plane Crash

May 7, 2005, saw 13 passengers and 2 crew board an Aerotropics flight in Bamaga bound for Cairns.

Constable Sally Urquhart was one of those passengers heading to Townsville Police Academy for work and farewelled her fiancé at the Bamaga Airport.

Whilst enroute, their Metroliner crashed on ‘South Pap’ on the Iron Range about 11km from Lockhart River airstrip at about 11.44am.

Police commenced Operation Delta Devlin with Inspector Russell Rhodes as the Forward Commander for the Crash Investigation and recovery.
nspector Rhodes is now in his 4th decade of policing and he cited this job as his most demanding job as a Forward Commander as it was an extremely demanding search and recovery effort over a seven day period.

Whilst he had a very good team working with him, they were challenged by the tough terrain and weather conditions.

He said, “I do stress that it was never about us and no matter how hard it was going to be we were always going to do whatever it took to help those families.”

No one can prepare you for a sudden loss of a loved one. When it comes in tragic circumstances, it’s like a bolt from the blue that makes no sense at all.

Many of us in the QPS had the pleasure of working with Constable Sally Urquhart and treasure the time we had with her. She was an absolutely delightful young woman.

Beautiful inside and out, charismatic in nature, she was a little pocket rocket, smart as a whip, a dedicated police officer with so much potential to succeed. She was your typical girl next door and engaged to be married to a fellow officer later in 2005. Both were so excited to spend their lives together.

Constable Sally Urquhart was a much loved friend and colleague to many of us in the Queensland Police Service. Sal made our lives that much richer for just knowing her and she will always be remembered as a beautiful young woman, full of life and forever young.

Today ceremonies were held in Bamaga at the Airport and the Oxley Police Academy to mark the 10th anniversary of the plane crash.

Constable Sally Urquhart’s family were present at the Police Academy to hear the Commissioner of Police Ian Stewart and Mr John O’Gorman (Retired Police Inspector) pay tribute to Sally, honouring her service, at the 10th anniversary of her death.
In recognition of the shared tragedy of the plane crash, Sally’s nieces and nephews released 15 balloons for each of those who lost their lives 10 years ago at the Oxley Academy ceremony.

Our deepest sympathies go out to all the families and friends of those lost in the Lockhart River Plane crash 10 years ago.

They remain alive in our hearts and treasured memories will not be forgotten.
RIP Sally


 

 

Honouring victims of shocking fatal flight

A DECADE ago today, two pilots and 13 passengers boarded an aeroplane in Bamaga bound for Cairns – but they would never complete the fateful journey.

Memorial services will be held around the state today to remember the 15 people killed in the Lockhart River air disaster 10 years ago.

On May 7, 2005, an Aerotropics flight with 15 people on board from Bamaga to Cairns crashed into South Pap Ridge, 11km northwest of the Lockhart River Aboriginal commission.

Trad Thornton will be one of dozens of family members remembering a loved one taken too soon.

Mr Thornton, now a police sergeant based in Brisbane, was a senior constable in 2005 when his fiancée Sally Urquhart was killed in one of the worst aeroplane crashes in Australia’s history.

Constable Urquhart, a 28-year-old police officer, based in Bamaga and celebrated for her strong sense of social justice, was on her way to Townsville for a constable development course when she died.

Sgt Thornton will attend a memorial service at Oxley Police Academy for Constable Urquhart, who was killed only weeks before she was due to marry the fellow officer.

“She was an absolutely amazing person and an exceptional police officer,” he said.

“It’s just one of those days that I suppose is going to be etched in my mind for the rest of my life like the day we were going to get married and the day we got engaged.

Sally Urquhart and fiance Trad Thornton. Sally Urquhart died when the TransAir passenger plane smashed into a hill in May 2005 on approach to the Far Northern community of Lockhart River, killing all 15 people aboard.
Sally Urquhart and fiancée Trad Thornton. Sally Urquhart died when the TransAir passenger plane smashed into a hill in May 2005 on approach to the Far Northern community of Lockhart River, killing all 15 people aboard.

“I’m very happy that she will be remembered but it is my opinion you don’t ever get over something like this but you learn to live with it.”

He said Constable Urquhart was such an exceptional police officer that after only three years in the service she had the Chief Superintendent and Assistant Commissioner travel more than 1000km to talk to her about her career progression.

“It was very impressive to see two high-ranking police fly 1000km to talk to someone about their police career,” he said. “She was very well educated with law and science degrees and she was very capable.

“She had the perfect personality to be a police officer.” Sgt Thornton now has a family and two young boys but he said he would never fully recover from losing his fiancée.

“In my mind I am able to separate the emotion from the plane crash and talk about the investigation but when it comes to Sally it’s a closed book,” he said.

“I see things and try and do things I think Sally would want me to do.

“Instead of wasting a day grieving and dwelling on the past I’m going to try and think about the good times.”

Father, Shane Urquhart said he would never fully recover from the tragedy.

“We live with it every day still, 10 years on – it’s always there,” he said. “There’s no such thing as closure.

“The memorial is about remembering Sally and thinking of the 14 other innocent people who were just going about their lives.”

 

.au/news/honouring-victims-of-shocking-fatal-flight/news-story/7ac2cd090f61f20854e8520b89d20960


 

A Call From Lockhart River

 

This program tells the poignant story of a popular young police officer widely described as one of the ‘best and brightest’ in the Queensland Force.

Sally Urquhart was one of 15 people killed four years ago when a plane crashed at Lockhart River in a remote region of Far North Queensland.

It was categorised as the worst airline disaster in Australia for nearly forty years.

At the time of her death Sally Urquhart was engaged to a police colleague also serving in the Far North. In a call to her mother just before the flight, Sally talked about the upcoming wedding and described her fear of getting on the plane. “I just hate it… it rattles” she said.

Sally’s father Shane is a primary school principal, with no expertise of any kind in aviation.

But when official investigations into the crash left questions unanswered, he set out on a single minded mission that took him to the most powerful forums in the land – with consequences for everyone in regional Australia and beyond.

Transcript

A Call From Lockhart River – Australian Story


 

 

Plane crash families fight for justice

 

FAMILIES of the victims of one of Australia’s worst ­aviation disasters have been blocked by insurance giant QBE from long-running legal action in the United States.

Fifteen people died in the 2005 Lockhart River crash on Cape York, but relatives yesterday told The Courier-Mail how they were “shocked and appalled” by a court order to end a nine-year lawsuit in the US against part-owners of the ill-fated Cairns-based Aero Tropics airline.

Lawyers for QBE obtained an order from the Supreme Court in Queensland restraining the Lockhart River families from taking any action other than to dismiss the damages claim before the US courts.

Twelve years on from the tragedy, the father of police ­officer Sally Urquhart, who died in the May 6, 2005 crash, said families had been victims of “bully boy tactics” and “intimidation” by Australia’s biggest insurance company.

Brisbane schoolteacher Shane Urquhart, who lived in Caboolture at the time of the accident, said none of the families or their lawyers had been notified of the latest legal action before the court order.

“We’ve been fighting for justice for our lost loved ones for so long, and now we feel the judge and the legal system has been duped,” he said.

“It’s not just us, but anyone who gets on a plane in Australia needs to know the sort of bastardry one of the biggest aviation insurers in the country will use against victims of air disasters and their families,” he said. “None of the plaintiffs were informed. None of our lawyers contacted.”

QBE, according to its website, provides insurance to airlines, aircraft, airports, pilots, refuellers, baggage handlers and maintenance operators.

Reverend Mary Eseli’s son, Fred Bowie, and sister-in-law, Mardie Bowie, were among six victims of the air crash from the tiny indigenous communities of Injinoo and Bamaga, at the tip of Cape York.

 

“It has been an open wound in our hearts that has never healed,” she said.

“QBE has paid compensation and costs, where appropriate, in respect of the claims by relatives of the deceased passengers against the operator of the aircraft.”

Plane crash families fight for justice | Queensland Times

 


 

Sally URQUHART

Sally URQUHART
Sally URQUHART & her father

Sally URQUHART

Sally URQUHART
Father of Sally Urquhart

 


 

 

 

 

 

 




Anne Christine LABONE

Anne Christine LABONE

AKA  ANNIE

Late of  Oak Flats, NSW

New South Wales Police Force Administration Officer

Regd. #  8120633

RankAdministration Officer

 

Commenced work on Monday 16 March 1981 ( aged 24 years, 3 months, 15 days )

Final Rank =  Administration Officer

Retired from work on 30 November 2016

 

Stations:  Warilla Police Station & Port Kembla Police Station

 

Service:  From 16 March 1981   to   30 November 2016 =  35 years, 8 months, 14 days Service

 

Age at Retirement:  60 years, 1 day

Time in Retirement:  3 years, 3 months, 25 days

 

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours system

Administration Officer Award – granted 2013:  Anne Labone (30 years).

 

BornThursday  29 November 1956

Died onThursday  26 March 2020

Age63 yrs  3 mths  26 days

 

Cause‘possibly’ a blood infection?

Event location:   ?

Event date ?

 

Funeral date:  Monday 6 April 2020

Funeral location?  ( Due to current Govt. restrictions of 10 persons at a Funeral due to the Cornona19 Virus Pandemic – this will be a Private Funeral )

 

Future Wake location? TBA ( Due to current Govt. restrictions of 2 persons only at ‘Gatherings’,  there won’t be an immediate Wake )

Future Wake date: ( Due to current Govt. restrictions on ‘Gatherings’ due to Corona19 Virus Pandemic, some families may wish to have a Memorial Service / Wake with friends and family at a later date )

 

Funeral Parlour: Hansen & Cole, 634 Northcliffe Dve, Kembla Grange, NSW

Buried at: ?

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument:

MEMORIAL SERVICE

Hansen & Cole,

634 Northcliffe Dve, Kembla Grange, NSW

Saturday  27 March 2021 @ 11am


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/

 


 

MEMORIAL SERVICE – 2021

LABONE, Anne Christine

LABONE Anne Christine of Oak Flats

Passed away peacefully surrounded by her loving family on March 26, 2020. Cherished sister and sister-in-law of Ken & Christine, Phil & Heather, Don, Graham & Jennifer.

Aged 63 Years
She Loved And Cared For All Animals

Relatives and friends of Anne are invited to attend her Memorial Service to be held at the Northcliffe Chapel of Hansen & Cole, 634 Northcliffe Drive, Kembla Grange on Saturday March 27, 2021 commencing at 11am.

 

 


 

Ann Labone passed away on 26 March after being in hospital for a few weeks.

The cause of her death was ‘possibly’ from some blood disorder which may or may not have been contracted when she was in Peru last November, 2019.

 

Annie, You were a bloody good sport with all the lads at Warilla over the years and a great Admin Officer.

You worked in various rolls at the old Warilla Police Station from HWP and Detectives.

You were a great worker at Port Kembla in Court Processing.

I have video of you participating in a Cricket match between Warilla GD’s and HWP when we played in 1987 – but, unfortunately, the quality isn’t worth displaying.

Annie, may you forever Rest In Peace.

 

 

Cal

 

Annie LABONE - 2018

Annie LABONE - 2018


 

 

 

 




Killed just for doing their jobs

Killed just for doing their jobs: The heroic police who put their lives on the line – only to be ambushed in lonely alleys and hacked to death with machetes by angry young men

  • National Police Remembrance Day will honour 757 police killed on duty
  • Ceremonies across the nation and the south Pacific will respect the fallen
  • Police remembered include those shot or stabbed while investigating crimes
  • Constables Steve Tynan and Damian Eyre were gunned down in Melbourne’s infamous Walsh Street shootings while investigating an abandoned car
  • Constable David Carty was stabbed to death by men in a Sydney car park 
  • Geoffrey Bowen was killed by a parcel bomb during an Adelaide drug case

They went off to work for the day and never came home to their wives or families.

Constables Steven John Tynan, 22, and Damien Jeffrey Eyre, 20, were ambushed and shot by one of Melbourne most notorious crime families after they were deliberately lured to abandoned car and gunned down.

The two young Victorians are among 757 police officers killed in the line of duty who will be honoured across the nation today in a series of ceremonies to mark National Police Remembrance Day.

The Australian Federal Police will host a dusk service at the National Police Memorial on Monday evening to honour all Australian police officers who have lost their lives while serving the Australian community.

Mounted police line up at the National Police Memorial to commemorate the 757 Australian police officers who have died in the line of duty while serving the community in each state and territory
Mounted police line up at the National Police Memorial to commemorate the 757 Australian police officers who have died in the line of duty while serving the community in each state and territory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Each state and territory police jurisdiction across Australia will pay tribute to the fallen officers, as well as those in Papua New Guinea, New Zealand, Samoa and the Solomon Islands.

The National Police Memorial lists every Australian Police officer who has been killed or who has died as a result of their duties, starting with Constable Joseph Luker in 1803.

Luker was set upon while investigating burglaries on the night of August 25, 1803 in East Sydney and beaten to death, having a piece of his own sword embedded in his skull.

The 756 police officers who have followed Luker to the grave died from several different causes – car accidents while doing their job, plane crashes en route to a crime investigation and murder, by being shot, stabbed or blown up in a targeted letter bomb.

Despite constant calls from senior police or politicians to jail police killers for life, some of the most shocking murders have resulted in short sentences or acquittals.

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These are the police murders which shocked the nation:

Constable Steven John Tynan was just 22-years-old when he and fellow officer Damian Jeffery Eyre, 20, were lured to a street where they were ambushed and shot in a deliberate murder by one of Melbourne's most notorious criminals, Victor Peirce
Constable Steven John Tynan was just 22-years-old when he and fellow officer Damian Jeffery Eyre, 20, were lured to a street where they were ambushed and shot in a deliberate murder by one of Melbourne’s most notorious criminals, Victor Peirce

It was 4.50am on October 12, 1988, when Constable Damian Eyre and his fellow officer went to investigate an alleged abandoned car in the Melbourne suburb of South Yarra. Both were shot in the back of the head at close range and as Eyre lay dying, his service revolver was take from its holster and he was again shot in the head
It was 4.50am on October 12, 1988, when Constable Damian Eyre and his fellow officer went to investigate an alleged abandoned car in the Melbourne suburb of South Yarra. Both were shot in the back of the head at close range and as Eyre lay dying, his service revolver was take from its holster and he was again shot in the head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shot in the back of the head: Constable Steven John Tynan (above, left) was just 22-years-old when he and fellow officer Damian Jeffery Eyre, 20, (right) were lured to a street where they were ambushed and shot in the head in a deliberate murder by one of Melbourne’s most notorious criminals, Victor Peirce

The Walsh Street killings
At 4.50am on Wednesday October, 12, 1988,  Constables Steve Tynan and Damien Eyre responded to a report about a suspicious abandoned vehicle on a street in the inner south Melbourne suburb of South Yarra.

The two young officers turned up at 222 Walsh Street, unaware that they had been deliberately lured there by members of the notorious Melbourne crime family, the Pettingills.

One of four sons of the infamous Kath Pettingill – the former brothel owner upon whom the crime matriarch played by Jacki Weaver in the film Animal Kingdom is based –  was Victor Peirce.

Peirce, who was shot dead in 2002, planned the ambush, according to an interview with his widow, Wendy, who said he had deliberately lured police to the scene for the purpose of murdering them.

Both Tynan and Eyre were shot in the back of the head at close range; while Eyre lay dying, his service revolver was taken from its holster and he was again shot in the head.

Peirce, his brother Trevor Pettingill and two other men, , Anthony Leigh Farrell and Peter David McEvoy, went on trial for the murders, but were acquitted in the Supreme Court of Victoria.

 

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Kicked to death: Constable David Carty, 25, was set upon by young men a western Sydney tavern in April, 1997. He had earlier reprimanded for using obscene language. The men kicked him and struck him with bottles and machetes he lay in the tavern car park in what was later described as a 'brutal, ferocious and savage' attack. His killer is now out of prison
Kicked to death: Constable David Carty, 25, was set upon by young men a western Sydney tavern in April, 1997. He had earlier reprimanded for using obscene language. The men kicked him and struck him with bottles and machetes he lay in the tavern car park in what was later described as a ‘brutal, ferocious and savage’ attack. His killer is now out of prison.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The brutal slaying of David Carty

On duty in the western Sydney suburb of Fairfield on April 17, 1997, Constable David Carty and other police spoke to a number of people on the street while conducting foot patrols.

When they had signed off for the evening, Carty and fellow officers went to the nearby Cambridge Tavern to relax over a few drinks.

Carty, 25, who was engaged to be married, was the among the last of the officers to leave the hotel at around 2.10am.He was set upon by a number of men in the tavern car park, among them some of the individuals he had reprimanded for using obscene language while on his earlier foot patrol.

During the attack, which was later described by a judge as brutal, ferocious and savage, Carty was fatally stabbed in the heart and then kicked, punched and stomped on by a group of men as he lay on the ground.

Senior Constable Michelle Auld who went to his assistance was also seriously assaulted.

According to his post mortem, Carty had several incised wounds to his head, bruising and trauma consistent with kicking, blunt trauma consistent with having been hit with a beer bottle, part of his earlobe has been cut, and he had a ‘scalping’ wound to the back of the head, possibly caused by a a sharp-edged machete.

Edward Esho, then aged 21, was convicted and sentenced to six years and five months for the killing and has since been released from prison.

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In the early hours of Sunday, August 16, 1998, Victoria Police Officers Sergeant Gary Silk and Senior Constable Rodney Miller (pictured) were staking out the Silky Emperor Restaurant in Moorabbin, in Melbourne's south-eastern suburbs during an investigation into a spate of armed robberies when they were gunned down at close range
In the early hours of Sunday, August 16, 1998, Victoria Police Officers Sergeant Gary Silk and Senior Constable Rodney Miller (pictured) were staking out the Silky Emperor Restaurant in Moorabbin, in Melbourne’s south-eastern suburbs during an investigation into a spate of armed robberies when they were gunned down at close range.

 

Father of six Bandali Debs (pictured) was convicted of the murders of Gary Silk and Rodney Miller, who were shot at close range when the police officers were closing in on an investigation into armed robberies in Melbourne's south-eastern suburb in August, 1998
Father of six Bandali Debs (pictured) was convicted of the murders of Gary Silk and Rodney Miller, who were shot at close range when the police officers were closing in on an investigation into armed robberies in Melbourne’s south-eastern suburb in August, 1998.

Apprentice builder Jason Joseph Roberts is serving life in prison for the shooting murders of two police officers who were investigating a string of armed robberies
Apprentice builder Jason Joseph Roberts is serving life in prison for the shooting murders of two police officers who were investigating a string of armed robberies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Moorabbin police murders

In the early hours of Sunday, August 16, 1998, Victoria Police Officers Sergeant Gary Silk and Senior Constable Rodney Miller were staking out the Silky Emperor Restaurant in Moorabbin, in Melbourne’s south-eastern suburbs during an investigation into a spate of armed robberies.

At 12.20 am, the two officers were gunned down at close range and the shooters fled.

Evidence at the crime scene included pieces of glass, which police later matched to a Hyundai hatchback and were eventually able to track down the exact model – and the vehicle, which was registered to the daughter of a known criminal, Bandali Debs.

Debs and an apprentice builder, Jason Joseph Roberts, were charged with the murders and with a string of armed robberies and in 2002 were found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Debs  was subsequently convicted of two more murders, of sex workers, Kristy Harty, 18, and Donna Hicks, 34, during the 1990s, and is currently under investigation for the 24-year-old cold case murder of Sarah MacDiarmid, who disappeared from a railway station in 1990 and whose body has never been found.

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Killed by the mafia: Geoffrey Bowen was a senior investigator into Italian organised crime in Australia when he targeted the alleged financier of a cannabis operation. Weeks later he opened a parcel delivered to crime headquarters in Adelaide and it blew up, killing him.
Killed by the mafia: Geoffrey Bowen was a senior investigator into Italian organised crime in Australia when he targeted the alleged financier of a cannabis operation. Weeks later he opened a parcel delivered to crime headquarters in Adelaide and it blew up, killing him. Officers, who will wear ribbons (above, right) for National Police Remembrance Day, have never solved his murder.

Police officers around Australian and the south Pacific region will wear ribbons (pictured) for National Police Remembrance Day, which commemorates the more than seven hundred officers who have died while on duty
Police officers around Australian and the south Pacific region will wear ribbons (pictured) for National Police Remembrance Day, which commemorates the more than seven hundred officers who have died while on duty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Death by letter bomb

 Detective Sergeant Geoffrey Bowen was a Western Australian police officer who on March 2, 1994, was on secondment to the National Crime Authority in the NCA’s office in the Adelaide central business district.

St the time, he was investigating a man called Domenic Perre over a suspected mafia drug operation.

Detective Bowen was a senior investigator exclusively involved with Operation Cerberus, the investigation into Italian organised crime in Australia.

Two years earlier, police had uncovered a huge cannabis growing operation and charged men of Calabrian decsent who were believed to be members of the secret mafia society, ‘Ndrangheta.

Bowen had concluded that Perre was the financier and controller of the operation and the man was due to face court, when a parcel addressed to Bowen slipped through the security system at the NCA office and blew up in Bowen’s hands.

Neither Perre, nor anyone else, has been convicted for Bowen’s murder.

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Lyncon Williams and his partner arrived to investigate a shooting in north Adelaide and had just pulled up the patrol car when a 17-year-old shot and killed him
Lyncon Williams and his partner arrived to investigate a shooting in north Adelaide and had just pulled up the patrol car when a 17-year-old shot and killed him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The shooting of Lync Williams

Lyncon Williams did not even have the chance to get out of his patrol car when he arrived with his junior partner at the scene in Blair Athol, in northern Adelaide on August 29, 1985.

The police officers were responding to reports of gunfire when they pulled up on Ross Avenue and a 17-year-old shot him.

Police arrested and charged the shooter with murder. He was convicted and sentenced to imprisonment at the Governor’s pleasure.

Police Association president Peter Alexander later reflected on Williams’ death, saying ‘I didn’t know Lync Williams but ’ I’ll always remember the circumstances of that murder.

‘I remember the shock of it and the grief for his family and workmates. It was a tragedy that was reflected right across the job.’

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Constables Robert Spears (above, left) and Peter Addison (right) went to investigate a domestic violence matter at Crescent Head on the Mid North Coast of NSW and were shot by a drunken John McGowan who lay in wait dressed in camouflage gear and armed with a .223 calibre Ruger Rifle.
Constables Robert Spears (above, left) and Peter Addison (right) went to investigate a domestic violence matter at Crescent Head on the Mid North Coast of NSW and were shot by a drunken John McGowan who lay in wait dressed in camouflage gear and armed with a .223 calibre Ruger Rifle.

Senior Constable Peter Addison
Senior Constable Peter Addison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Addison and Robert Spears

At 12.35am on July 9, 1995 Constables Peter Addison and Robert Spears were on the night shift at at the Kempsey Police Station on the NSW Mid North Coast.

They were called to a malicious damage and domestic violence complaint at the nearby coastal town of Crescent Head, where they attended one address and then drove to a house on Main Street.

They parked the car and began to walk towards the front door; they were unaware that a drunken man called John McGowan was lying in wait in the carport dressed in camouflage gear and armed with a .223 calibre Ruger rifle.

Neither of the officers had bullet proof vests or carried sufficient weaponry and in the next few moments they were ‘outgunned’.

McGowan shot Spears dead. At 1.22am, Senior Constable Addison radioed a message for urgent assistance.

Addison managed to enter a house across the road to use a phone for help, when he was told there was not one he left the house only to be shot himself.

McGowan then shot himself.

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Attacked with a knife: David Thomas Barr responded to a domestic scene and was stabbed through the heart by his attacker and later died in hospital. He was the father of two young girls
Attacked with a knife: David Thomas Barr responded to a domestic scene and was stabbed through the heart by his attacker and later died in hospital. He was the father of two young girls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father of two knifed through the heart

 On July 29, 1990, South Australian police officer David Thomas Barr was responding with his partner, officer Jamie Lewcock, to a report of a man threatening a woman.

The father-of-two young girls, Barr was attacked soon after he arrived at the scene as he attempted to arrest the man who was wielding a knife and refusing repeated requests to lay down thew weapon.

The man plunged the knife deep into the Barr’s heart. Barr was rushed to hospital, where doctors tried desperately to save him.

As his wife Gwenda waited in a room, Barr succumbed to massive loss of blood and died.

Gwenda Barr, who had been married for nine years and had daughters Nicola and Sarah, then aged eight and six, later described how devastated she had been by the death.

‘I was shocked stunned and numb’ she said. ‘I couldn’t believe it. I didn’t want to believe it either. It was terrifying.’

Barr’s murderer was sentenced to life imprisonment. Barr was later awarded posthumously the Australian Bravery Medal.

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Detective Inspector Bryson Charles Anderson was stabbed to death while attending a siege in Oakville, 50km north-west of Sydney's CBD on December 6, 2012
Detective Inspector Bryson Charles Anderson was stabbed to death while attending a siege in Oakville, 50km north-west of Sydney’s CBD on December 6, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When residents on a property complained to police that a number of arrows had been fired from a neighbouring farm, senior police officer Bryson Charles Anderson attended the scene.

It was shortly after 4.15pm on December 6, 2012 and Detective Inspector Anderson went to the property and was speaking with a man who was at the back door of the residence.

The man produced a knife and stabbed him to the face and chest. Anderson assisted other officers in subduing the offender and a female accomplice before he collapsed from his injuries.

He was unable to be revived and died at the scene.

Anderson had been a police officer for 26 years.

At a ceremony in Queensland on Monday, Police Commissioner Ian Stewart highlighted the inherent risks faced by police officers everyday as they provide for the safety and security of Queensland and acknowledged the tireless work of all QPS members, across a diverse state.

‘Our thoughts are with the families, friends and colleagues of those officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice, as we honour their memories on National Police Remembrance Day,’Commissioner Stewart said.

‘The QPS operates 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year; and we have at least 15,000 interactions with the public every day, with each police officer swearing an oath to protect and serve the community,’Commissioner Stewart said

‘There are times however, when no matter how dedicated, committed and courageous our officers are, they face unbeatable odds.’

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2773110/Killed-duty-National-Police-Remembrance-Day-honour-officers-murders-doing-everyday-job-shocked-nation.html

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Glen Anthony HUITSON

Glen Anthony HUITSON, BM VA

aka  Japalyi

Northern Territory Police Force

Regd. # 1520

Rank:  Brevet Sergeant

Stations?, O.I.C. – Adelaide River Police Stn

ServiceFrom  ? January 1987 to  3 August 2000 = 13+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 6 August 1999

Bravery Medal – BM – granted 14 February 2000

Valour Award & bar – VA for act performed in February 1999

Born:  20 November 1961, Bridgetown, W.A.

Died on:  3 August 2000

Cause:  Murdered – shot

Location:  Stuart Hwy & Old Bynoe Rd, Livingstone, N.T.

Age:  37

Funeral date:  Saturday  7 August 1999

Funeral location:  St Mary’s Cathedral, Darwin

Buried at:  Cremated.  Ashes scattered at Daly River Crossing, N.T.

Memorial Service:  Saturday  3 August 2019 ( 20th Anniversary ) 10.30am –

Glen Huitson Memorial, cnr Stuart Hwy & Old Bynoe Rd, Livingstone, N.T.

Glen HUITSON - NTPolice

 

Brevet Sergeant Glen HUITSON
Brevet Sergeant Glen HUITSON

[alert_green]GLEN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

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Brevet Sergeant Glen Huitson memorial, 3 August 2015

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???? GLEN HUITSON MEMORIAL ????

TWENTY YEAR REMEMBRANCE SERVICE

Saturday 3rd August 2019 will mark the 20th anniversary of the death of Brevet Sergeant Glen Huitson who was killed in the line of duty in 1999 whilst stationed at Adelaide River.

We will honour Glen with a gathering on Saturday 3rd August 2019 from 10.30am at the Glen Huitson Memorial, located at the corner of the Stuart Highway and Old Bynoe Road, Livingstone, N.T.

All current and former members are invited to join Glen’s family in remembering a husband, father, son, and workmate who was tragically taken from his family 20 years ago.

 

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Glen Anthony HUITSON – Inquest document

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Glen HUITSON joined the Northern Territory in January 1987.  He served in both Southern and Northern districts of the Northern Territory.

During his service in the Northern Territory Police, Glen Huitson received a Commendation from the Commissioner of Police on 17 March 1994 when he attended a disturbance at a Community near Alice Springs.  He disarmed a drunken person who was armed with a knife star picket and was threatening another person with a billy of boiling water.

In February of 1999 in Litchfield Park, Glen Huitson disarmed an armed man who was threatening the driver and passengers of a bus.  He received a Valour Award over this incident.

On 3 August 1999 Glen Huitson was on duty at a road block on the Stuart Highway, 60 kms south of Darwin, in bushland.

There were on watch for an armed offender who had already shot and wounded two other persons several kilometres away during the previous night.

The armed offender had managed to come through bush on one side of the road block where he opened fire with a .30/30 calibre rifle.  He fired the first round into the back of a civilian then a second shot at Huitson which struck him and was fatal.

For this incident he received the Australian Bravery Medal and a bar to his Valour Medal.

http://www.npm.org.au/huitson

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Glen Huitson Park

Front Inscription Glen Huitson Park This park was named in memory of the late Sgt. Glen Anthony Huitson BM,VA, Service No. 1520 on 3 August 2000. Sgt. Huitson was the officer in charge of the Adelaide River Police Station. He died on 3rd August 1999 as a result of gun shot wounds received in the execution of his duties whilst manning a roadblock on the corner of the Stuart Highway and Old Bynoe Road. Twice Decorated as a serving Police Officer, Glen Huitson lived his personal life with the same intensity, and was an integral part of community life in Adelaide River. His untimely death has a left a gap in this community which will never be filled. Glen is survived by his Widow Lisa and children Joey & Ruby. Citizens of the Coomalie Region joined with serving Members of the Northern Territory Police Force at this site on 3rd August 2001 to dedicate this memorial stone on the occasion of the second anniversary of Sgt. Huitson`s death. We honour the life and the achievements of a remarkable citizen. May He Rest In Peace
Glen HUITSON park – memorial plaque

This park was named in memory of the late Sgt. Glen Anthony Huitson BM, VA, Service No. 1520 on 3 August 2000.

Sgt. Huitson was the officer in charge of the Adelaide River Police Station.  He died on 3rd August 1999 as a result of gun shot wounds received in the execution of his duties whilst manning a roadblock on the corner of the Stuart Highway and Old Bynoe Road.

Twice Decorated as a serving Police Officer, Glen Huitson lived his personal life with the same intensity, and was an integral part of community life in Adelaide River.  His untimely death has left a gap in this community which will never be filled.  Glen is survived by his Widow Lisa and children Joey & Ruby.

Citizens of the Coomalie Region joined with serving Members of the Northern Territory Police Force at this site on 3rd August 2001 to dedicate this memorial stone on the occasion of the second anniversary of Sgt. Huitson’s death.

We honour the life and the achievements of a remarkable citizen.

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.gdaustralia.com/july2015photos.html/content/IMG_8914_large.html

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Huitson Shooting

“On 3rd August 1999, at about 10:45 am, there was a shooting incident on the Stuart Highway at the corner of Old Bynoe Road in the Darwin rural district. In the course of the incident, two persons were shot dead. One, Glen Anthony Huitson, was a Sergeant of police on duty at the time he was killed.” (Coroner’s Findings)

Glen was performing duties on a roadblock with his partner in Livingstone at the Old Bynoe Road Turn off on the Stuart Highway, 55 Kilometres south of Darwin. They were stopping traffic entering the police cordon following a shooting incident the previous evening when the offender Rodney Ansell ambushed the roadblock shooting Huitson fataly and wounding a civilian in the back with his 30/30 rifle. For this incident he received the Australia Bravery Medal and a bar to his Valour Medal posthumously.

On the night of the 2nd of August 1999 Rodney William Ansell and Cherrie Ann Hewson went to a property on Kentish Road. Ansell fired 6 shots at a caravan occupied by Stephen Robertson and Lee-Anne Musgrave who were minding the property. A neighbour, David Hobden, drove his truck over to see what was happening and Ansell fired through the windscreen blinding him. He ran to his residence and another occupant, Brian Williams, ran over to stop Ansell who was trying to steal Hobden’s truck. Ansell shot Williams in the hand. He lost an index finger and shots were fired at his house. Ansell appeared to be yelling about child abduction which was a delusion that had manifested itself during his amphetamine addiction. He fled into scrubland with a 30/30 rifle and Hobden’s shotgun.

Police responded and set up a forward command post in the area. Roadblocks were set up on the Stuart Highway and other roads. Sergeant Glen Huitson and Senior Constable James O’Brien manned the roadblock on the corner of Old Bynoe Road and the Stuart Highway armed with their Glock Pistols a shotgun and a .308 rifle. It appears that during the night Ansell had escaped the cordon but for some reason chose to sneak up on the roadblock at Old Bynoe Road. Hewson had left the area.

At about 10.45 am on the 3rd of August 1999 the roadblock at Old Bynoe Road was still in place. A local man had approached the road block to talk to the police members and was leaning on the police vehicle when suddenly he was shot in the pelvis from behind a large water pipe in nearby scrub. Huitson used the shotgun from the police car and O’Brien returned fire with his Glock pistol. Huitson was hit by a 30/30 round and fell to the ground. O’Brien reloaded the shotgun and returned fire. He called on Ansell to put his weapons down but he called back “Your all dead”.

In response to the gun battle two Territory Response Group vehicles raced to the scene. Just prior to the roadblock the first vehicle swerved and braked and was struck by the second vehicle causing it to roll over. As police exited both vehicles and began to take up positions Ansell got up on one knee to position himself to fire at the arriving police members. This left him exposed to fire from O’Brien and the shotgun fire finally stopped him. As the Coroner, Mr Wallace, said “There is little doubt his (O’Brien’s) bravery prevented further loss of life”.

It was later determined that there were seven entry wounds on his body from return fire from Huitson and O’Brien and numerous grazes. His covered position behind the water pipe and a small tree had protected Ansell from more serious injury until he was forced to change position.

Background – Glen Huitson

Glen Huitson joined the Northern Territory Police in January 1987, served in both Southern and Northern districts and was stationed at Adelaide River Police Station.

He received a Commendation from the Commissioner of Police on 17 March 1944 when he attended a disturbance at a Community near Alice Springs. He disarmed a drunken person who was armed with a knife star picket and was threatening another person with a billy of boiling water.

In February of 1999 in Litchfield Park Glen Huitson disarmed an armed man who was threatening the driver and passengers of a bus. He received a Valour Award over this incident.

Glen was survived by his wife Lisa and young children Joseph (2) and Ruby (6 months).

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HUITSON, Glen

This page only contains a eulogy.  If you have material that can be added contact the webmaster.
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR SERGEANT GLEN ANTHONY HUITSON
ST MARY’S CATHEDRAL, DARWIN, NORTHERN TERRITORY
SATURDAY 7 AUGUST 1999
EULOGY GIVEN BY COMMISSIONER BRIAN BATESSERGEANT GLEN HUITSON WAS A DEVOTED AND LOVING HUSBAND AND FATHER OF LISA, JOSEPH AND RUBY. I CAN ONLY CONVEY THE HEARTFELT CONDOLENCES AND SYMPATHY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE FORCE AND INDEED THE COMMUNITY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY TO GLEN’S WIFE, CHILDREN AND BOTH THEIR FAMILIES. WE WILL DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO HELP THEM, NOT ONLY THROUGH THIS TIME BUT IN THE TIME TO COME.IN HIS LETTER OF APPLICATION TO JOIN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE FORCE, SERGEANT GLEN HUITSON SAID, AND I QUOTE:“I WAS BORN ON 20 NOVEMBER 1961 IN BRIDGETOWN, WESTERN AUSTRALIA, THE OLDEST SON IN A FAMILY OF THREE. MY PARENTS OWNED AND OPERATED A SMALL TIN MINE ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF GREENBUSHES WHERE I LIVED FOR 12 YEARS. GREEN BUSHES WAS A GREAT ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH TO GROW UP AS A CHILD, BEING A SMALL TOWN SURROUNDED BY BUSH. WE SPENT MANY HOURS EXPLORING AND DISCOVERING NATURE.LOOKING BACK ON MY CHILDHOOD I AM GRATEFUL TO MY PARENTS FOR THE STRICT BUT FAIR METHOD OF INSTILLING IN ME A SET OF MORAL STANDARDS AND PRINCIPLES IN KEEPING WITH COMMUNITY IDEALS. THIS GUIDANCE WAS TO BENEFIT ME LATER IN LIFE.”

GLEN GOES ON TO TALK ABOUT HIS GROWING UP YEARS AND HIS EARLY EMPLOYMENT, PARTICULARLY WHEN THE FAMILY MOVED IN 1978 TO BUSSLETON WHERE HE WAS INVOLVED IN THE LOCAL FOOTBALL CLUB AS A PLAYER AND AN ADMINISTRATOR, AS A COACH AND UMPIRE AND FOR THREE YEARS AS A FIREMAN IN THE VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE AND WITH THE LOCAL ROSTRUM CLUB. TOWARDS THE END OF THIS LETTER OF APPLICATION GLEN SAYS, AND I AGAIN QUOTE:

“APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS AGO I DECIDED THAT IF AT THE AGE OF 25 I WAS STILL DISAPPOINTED WITH THE WAY MY CAREER WAS HEADING, THIS WOULD BE THE TIME TO MAKE A START IN A POSITION IN LIFE THAT I WOULD ENJOY. THE MOST HONEST WAY I FOUND TO FIND A CAREER I WANTED WAS TO SIT DOWN WITH A PEN AND PAPER AND WRITE DOWN JOBS IN WHICH I WOULD WORK FOR NO FINANCIAL REWARD. MY LIST CONTAINED THE FOLLOWING: FISHERIES INSPECTOR, CUSTOMS OFFICER, AMBULANCE OFFICER, WELFARE WORKER AND A POLICE OFFICER.

SINCE WRITING DOWN THAT LIST I HAVE WORKED TOWARDS EQUIPPING MYSELF FOR ONE OF THOSE POSITIONS. THIS HAS INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: BEING A FIREMAN WITH OUR LOCAL VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE, ACHIEVING A FIRST AID CERTIFICATE WITH A ST JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE, INVOLVING MYSELF HEAVILY IN COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, MAINLY THROUGH SPORT, AND INVOLVING MYSELF IN PUBLIC SPEAKING. AFTER READING ABOUT THE POSITION OF POLICE OFFICER FOR THE NORTHERN TERRITORY I DECIDED THAT THIS WOULD INDEED OFFER ME THE CAREER I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR. AS A POLICE OFFICER IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY I WOULD BE ABLE TO MAKE A SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTION IN MAKING THE NORTHERN TERRITORY A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE IN, THEREBY ACHIEVING MY GOAL OF JOB SATISFACTION.”

ALL OF US WITHIN THE POLICE FORCE AND INDEED THE DEPARTMENT OF POLICE, FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES, ARE EXTREMELY SHOCKED BY THE DEATH OF SERGEANT GLEN HUITSON. HIS LOSS IS A TRAGEDY FOR THE POLICE SERVICE AND THERE ARE SIMPLY NO WORDS TO DESCRIBE THAT SENSE OF LOSS, THE WASTE AND THE TRAGEDY THAT THE WHOLE POLICE FAMILY FEELS TODAY.

I WOULD ALSO ACKNOWLEDGE THE PRESENCE HERE TODAY OF SERVING POLICE OFFICERS FROM ALL STATES AND TERRITORIES OF AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND.

IT IS TRITE TO SAY THAT ALL POLICE FAMILIES KNOW THE DANGERS OF POLICE WORK, BUT NOTHING CAN EVER PREPARE US FOR SOMETHING LIKE GLEN’S DEATH.

NO POLICE FORCE COULD BE MORE PROUD THAN TO HAVE IN ITS RANKS AN OFFICER OF THE CALIBRE OF GLEN HUITSON. HE TOUCHED AND AFFECTED SO MANY PEOPLE’S LIVES, NOT ONLY WITHIN THE POLICE FORCE BUT WITHIN THE COMMUNITY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY THAT HE SWORE TO SERVE AND PROTECT.

AND HE DID MORE THAN THAT – BECAUSE ON NO LESS THAN THREE OCCASIONS, THE THIRD TRAGICALLY RESULTING IN HIS DEATH, HE WAS CONFRONTED WITH LIFE-THREATENING SITUATIONS.

GLEN RECEIVED MY COMMENDATION FOR AN INCIDENT ON 17 MARCH 1994 WHEN HE ATTENDED A DISTURBANCE AT A COMMUNITY NEAR ALICE SPRINGS.

HE DISARMED A DRUNKEN PERSON WHO WAS ARMED WITH A KNIFE, STEEL BAR, NULLA NULLA AND A STAR PICKET. THE PERSON WAS THREATENING ANOTHER COMMUNITY MEMBER WITH A BILLY OF BOILING WATER. WITHOUT REGARD FOR HIS OWN SAFETY SERGEANT HUITSON PREVENTED THIS PERSON THROWING THE BOILING WATER BUT IN FACT WAS STRUCK AND COVERED IN BOILING WATER HIMSELF OVER HIS UPPER BACK, RIGHT UPPER ARM AND LEFT FOREARM. HIS QUICK ACTIONS ALLOWED OTHER POLICE OFFICERS TO RESTRAIN THE OFFENDER AND REMOVE HIM AS A THREAT TO THE COMMUNITY. THE BURNS GLEN RECEIVED CAUSED HIM CONSIDERABLE PAIN AND SUFFERING AND HE REQUIRED HOSPITAL TREATMENT.

AND THEN THERE WAS THE INCIDENT IN FEBRUARY THIS YEAR WHEN SERGEANT HUITSON DISARMED AN ARMED MAN WHO HAD JUMPED ON THE BULLBAR OF A TOURIST BUS IN LITCHFIELD PARK.

THE MAN WAS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS AND ARMED WITH A LOADED .22 RIFLE AND WAS THREATENING THE DRIVER AND PASSENGERS OF THE BUS ON BATCHELOR ROAD.

GLEN KNEW THAT HELP WAS ABOUT 15 MINUTES AWAY AND WAS DEEPLY CONCERNED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE DRIVER, PASSENGERS AND PASSING MOTORISTS. HE SINGLE-HANDEDLY ATTEMPTED TO DIRECT TRAFFIC, ENGAGE THE MAN IN CONVERSATION AND KEEP POLICE COMMUNICATIONS ADVISED OF THE SITUATION. HE THEN APPROACHED THE MAN TO DISTRACT HIS ATTENTION FROM THE BUS AND PASSENGERS, PLACING HIMSELF AT CONSIDERABLE RISK.

GLEN ENGAGED THE MAN IN CONVERSATION FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES AND EVENTUALLY CONVINCED HIM TO PLACE THE FIREARM ON THE BULLBAR OF THE BUS AND WALK A SHORT DISTANCE AWAY WHERE GLEN TACKLED HIM TO THE GROUND AND WAS THEN HELPED BY OTHER POLICE WHO HAD JUST ARRIVED. THIS WAS WITHOUT DOUBT AN OUTSTANDING EXAMPLE OF PERSONAL COURAGE, AND SERGEANT HUITSON WAS IN FACT DUE TO RECEIVE A VALOUR AWARD OVER THAT INCIDENT.

IN SERGEANT GLEN HUITSON THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE HAD A TRUE BUSH COPPER AND AN IDEAL ROLE MODEL FOR OTHER POLICE.

HE WAS A TOTAL PROFESSIONAL WHO GOT ALONG WITH COLLEAGUES AND THE PUBLIC ALIKE AND WAS EXTREMELY POPULAR WITH ABORIGINAL PEOPLE HE WORKED WITH, IN THE COMMUNITIES ACROSS THE TERRITORY. WHAT A TREMENDOUS LOSS HE IS, NOT ONLY TO THIS POLICE FORCE BUT TO THE TERRITORY.

IN CLOSING THERE IS PERHAPS NO BETTER WAY TO TALK ABOUT THIS OUTSTANDING AND COMPASSIONATE POLICE OFFICER THAN BY TELLING YOU ABOUT A REPORT HE RECENTLY SUBMITTED, AND I THINK IT IS IMPORTANT I SHARE THIS WITH YOU ALL.

GLEN HAD RESEARCHED THE HISTORY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE SERVICE AND HE FOUND MANY EXAMPLES OF UNRECOGNISED SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY BY FORMER MEMBERS, AND PARTICULARLY POLICE TRACKERS. HE SAID IN HIS MEMO THAT THIS UNRECOGNISED WORK WAS, AT THE TIME, NO DOUBT CONSIDERED TO BE JUST PART OF THE JOB, AND UNLESS YOU HAPPENED TO DIE ON DUTY OR REACHED A HIGH RANK, VERY LITTLE WAS DONE TO PRESERVE THE MEMORY OF THOSE MANY FORMER MEMBERS.

GLEN APPRECIATED THE SERENITY AND BEAUTY OF THE ADELAIDE RIVER WAR CEMETERY WHERE HE ALSO NOTICED SEVERAL PLAQUES DEDICATED TO MILITARY MEMBERS. HE HAD SEVERAL IDEAS TO HONOUR THE MEMORY OF POLICE MEMBERS, INCLUDING PLANTING TREES WITH PLAQUES DEDICATED TO MEMBERS AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A MEMORIAL AVENUE IN OUR POLICE COMPLEX, THE PETER McAULAY CENTRE. HE SUGGESTED NEW PLAQUES COULD BE DEDICATED ANNUALLY ON A SIGNIFICANT DAY, FOR EXAMPLE, POLICE REMEMBRANCE DAY. THERE TOO, HE EMPHASISED THE WHOLE COMMUNITY SHOULD BE INVITED AND INVOLVED.

IT IS MY INTENTION TO HONOUR GLEN’S SUGGESTIONS IN THAT REPORT, AND ALSO PAY TRIBUTE TO HIM, IN A WAY I FEEL SURE HE AND YOU WOULD APPROVE OF.

FINALLY, IN THE WORDS OF THE 13TH CHAPTER OF CORINTHIANS:

“THERE REMAINS THEN, FAITH, HOPE, LOVE, THESE THREE; BUT THE GREATEST OF THESE IS LOVE.”

 

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ABC News: Aboriginal communities to send reps to police officer’s funeral

Trudy and Rod Bray Fri, 6 Aug 1999 00:26:27 -0700

Fri, 6 Aug 1999 11:41 AEST
Aboriginal communities to send reps to police officer's
funeral.

The Gurindji Aboriginal people, from two communities south-west of Darwin, are sending
representatives to the funeral of a Northern Territory police officer.

Sergeant Glen Huitson was killed by Rodney William Ansell on Tuesday.

The sergeant's partner, Constable Jamie O'Brien, returned the fire, killing Ansell.

A Gurindji representative, Roslyn Frith, says the sergeant was given the skin name, Japalyi,
because of the community's respect and love for him.

She says he will be missed greatly.

"To the community he wasn't just a policeman, he was just another person who belonged to
the community," Ms Frith said.

"He got involved - like if there were ceremonies he'd go down and make sure everything was
alright.

"With the younger generation, he took them out. Like he was with the emergency services out
here, he went out fishing and hunting with them," she said.

� 1999 Australian Broadcasting Corporation

https://www.mail-archive.com/recoznet2@paradigm4.com.au/msg01295.html

 

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NT: Aborigines planning funeral for Ansell in Arnhem Land

AAP General News (Australia)
08-09-1999
NT: Aborigines planning funeral for Ansell in Arnhem Land

By Catharine Munro

DARWIN, Aug 9 AAP – Rod Ansell, the original Crocodile Dundee who shot dead a policeman last week, is expected be given an Aboriginal funeral in Arnhem Land.

Ansell, 44, was killed in a shootout with police after fatally wounding Sergeant Glen Huitson, 37, about 50km south of Darwin last Tuesday.

The violent deaths followed a 12-hour search for Ansell, who had shot at two houses in the area the previous night.

His motives remain a mystery and the case is being investigated by the coroner.

The events shocked Darwin, where Ansell was known as a buffalo hunter and a bushman who had been living on an Aboriginal-owned property in Arnhem Land, about 600km south-east of Darwin.

Ansell’s two sons, Shaun and Callum, are believed to have requested that an Aboriginal community at Mt Catt, near Bulman in central Arnhem Land, allow a funeral to be held on their grounds.

“The two boys said they want to have the funeral at Mt Catt,” said Lorna Martin, who works at the clinic at Bulman.

Ansell spent some time in the area in the 1980s as a buffalo catcher and continued to make frequent visits.

The service will interrupt an important ceremony being held at Mt Catt but arrangements were being made for the proceedings to be halted for one day for the funeral on Thursday, Mrs Martin said.

“Everybody said it’s okay,” she said.

Ansell’s parents, George and Eva, both in their 70s, are understood to have journeyed to the Northern Territory from their home in Murgon, 260km north-west of Brisbane, to say goodbye to their son.

Meanwhile, the widow of the slain policeman, Lisa, said she had just returned from Daly River Crossing, where she had scattered her husband’s ashes.

Mrs Huitson told reporters she had spent three happy years there with Sgt Huitson and they had taken their son, Joseph, two and Ruby, six months, back there to be baptised.

“It was just a special place for us,” Mrs Huitson said.

Sgt Huitson‘s brother Bevan, sister Julie and parents Carole and John attended a press conference to thank the police and the people of the NT for their support.

“We are absolutely amazed at your generosity, the funds raised, the flowers sent and the well wishes and toys for Joseph and Ruby,” Bevan Huitson said.
http://crownfd.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/nt-aborigines-planning-funeral-for.html

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Rod Ansell - The inspiration behind Crocodile Dundee
Rod Ansell – The inspiration behind Crocodile Dundee

 

 

 

The day the real Crocodile Dundee Rod Ansell was shot dead

Rod Ansell in the Outback in 1987.
Rod Ansell in the Outback in 1987.

ROD Ansell’s amazing story of Outback survival is one many Australians know – although they’ve probably never heard of his name.

As strong as an ox and as brave as a lion, the blond haired, barefoot bushman survived for more than seven weeks on a small island at the mouth of a crocodile-infested river in the remote Northern Territory, sleeping up a tree with a brown snake at night to avoid the salties lurking below.

His story was the inspiration for the 1986 film Crocodile Dundee. But the film only tells part of the story of Ansell’s wild life.

More than a decade after his tale of survival brought fame and fortune to actor Paul Hogan, the real Crocodile Dundee was shot dead by police after a drug-crazed rampage that saw a police officer killed and three other men wounded.

***

STRONG men in uniform broke down on the side of the Stuart Highway the day Territory police officer Glen Huitson was shot dead in a gun battle with Rod Ansell.

It was like a scene from a cops and robbers movie.

But nobody won.

Sergeant Huitson was gunned down at a roadblock in bushland 60km south of Darwin by Ansell, who had been on the run from police.

Ansell was shot in the chest as Senior Constable James O’Brien returned fire.

“The only verbal communication I had with the gunman was when I was reloading the shotgun for the first time,” the surviving officer, who has never spoken openly about the ordeal, said in a statement almost 15 years ago.

“I called out to him to put his weapons down. He called back, ‘You’re all dead‘.”

Ansell was deranged and wired on speed, more than 20 years after he emerged from the wild, a handsome young hunter armed only with a knife, a gun and a story to tell, his boat having capsized on the remote Victoria River.

His crazed life came to an end on August 3, 1999, but not before he had gunned down a police officer, leaving two young children to grow up without a father.

Northern Territory police say they lost “an all-round good bloke” that day.

Sgt Huitson’s family was robbed of much more.

In 1994, Sgt Huitson had been commended for bravery after arresting a knife-wielding drunk man – who was also armed with a star picket and a billy of boiling water in a bid to harm another person – at a community near Alice Springs.

He received a Valour Award after he talked delusional man Wayne Costan – who had tried to hijack a tourist coach with a sawn-off .22 rifle – into dropping the weapon, before tackling him to the ground at Litchfield Park in February 1999.

Six months later Sgt Huitson was killed, aged 37.

His then-infant daughter, Ruby, and five-year-old son, Joseph, grew up without their dad.

His widow, Lisa, took home her husband’s posthumous Australia Bravery Medal and a broken heart.

Former NT Police assistant commissioner John Daulby was among those who raced out to the double killing.

“Everyone was stunned,” he said. “It was just a tragedy.”

 Darwin police officer Glen Huitson was one of two policemen shot by gunman Rod Ansell.

“The grief at the scene is something that sticks with me – grown men in tears.”

Ansell had wounded two men on a shooting spree in Darwin and fled into the bush, raving mad, on the night of August 2, 1999.

He was convinced members of the Freemasons had kidnapped his sons – Callum, then aged 20, and Shawn, 18.

His girlfriend, Cherie Ann Hewson, had told him that as a child she had witnessed the sacrifice of young girls that her family – members of the secret medieval fraternity – “brought out of the woods”. They were bound, raped and slaughtered, she said.

The shared paranoia came to a head when Ms Hewson claimed she spotted three bow hunters, dressed in camouflage with night vision goggles, near their bush camp.

NT Coroner Dick Wallace would later say the “wretched drivel” was at the root of Ansell‘s madness, after the couple visited mates Steven Robinson and his partner, Lee-Anne Musgrave, on a property at Noonamah, about 50km south of Darwin.

Ansell fired six shots at their caravan on Kentish Rd.

Resident David Hobden jumped in his truck, armed with his double-barrel shotty, and went to investigate the shootings. He lost an eye when Ansell put a bullet through the windscreen of his truck.

He ran to alert his neighbour, Brian Williams, who “waxed wrath” at the state of his mate’s face and grabbed a baseball bat.

He charged at Ansell, who was trying to steal Mr Hobden’s truck.

 “I smacked him straight down the forehead, and that’s when he blew my hand off,” Mr Williams told police.

“He was going on about stealing his children, and Freemasons, and being a baby killer … oh, just, he was mad, mate.”

Ansell fired shots at the Williams‘ house.

Then he ran away, his rifle in one hand and Mr Hobden‘s shotgun in the other.

Ms Hewson disappeared before the police shootout. Some feared she had committed suicide.

About 11pm, Territory Response Group sent two troop carriers with six cops in each to set up a command post. They manned the north roadblock.

Adelaide River police station boss Sgt Huitson and his second-in-charge, Sen-Const O’Brien, guarded the south cordon – at the corner of Old Bynoe Rd – with a pistol each, a 12-gauge shotgun and standard police issue .308 rifle.

About 10.30am the next day, a removals worker named Jonathan Anthonysz was leaning on the cop car, chatting to the officers when a bullet blew a hole “the size of a baseball” in his pelvis.

He was flung forward, screaming, on to the ground.

Mr Anthonysz’s colleague – David Hobden‘s brother, Anthony – dragged him out of view as Snr-Const. O’Brien covered them.

The shots were coming from light scrub behind a roadside water pipe.

The cunning fugitive had sneaked through the bush and was hidden by dappled tree shadows.

In his statement, Snr-Const O’Brien said: “I heard Glen shout out, ‘Get on the ground’.

I swung round to look over the boot of the car with my Glock drawn …

“I saw my shots hit the ground close to where (Ansell) was,” he said.

Sgt Huitson called TRG for help and grabbed a 12-gauge shotgun.

He fired a shot through the windows of the police car and two shots over the roof.

But a bullet from Ansell‘s .30-30 lever-action rifle ricocheted off the top of the metal door and struck him in the abdomen.

His bulletproof vest hadn’t been properly fastened. The bullet tore through a velcro strap that should have been covered by a Kevlar panel.

Sgt Huitson fell, landing on top of the shotgun.

Snr-Const O’Brien, who wasn’t wearing a vest, dodged a bullet and rolled his bleeding colleague off the shotgun, reloaded it and returned fire.

“I realised unless TRG arrived I could run out of ammunition, in which case I would have to retreat with the others,” he said.

“I loaded two more rounds, looked up and saw the gunman wriggling forward.

“I heard a sound like a match being struck just past the right side of my head.”

Then the TRG troop carriers came hurtling down the highway.

The first driver hit the brakes and swerved as he heard gun fire – the 4WD rolled when the second car crashed into it, unable to stop in time.

Ansell got up on one knee and began lining up the cops, who were crawling out of the vehicle.

Snr-Const O’Brien got a clear shot.

The autopsy showed 33 bullet wounds and grazes to Ansell‘s body.

Two were fatal. One shot had ripped through his aorta.

He fell face down in the dirt.

Sgt Huitson was declared dead after being rushed to Royal Darwin Hospital.

Snr-Const O’Brien was scrutinised and cleared of any wrongdoing after a rigorous police investigation.

His actions were praised as “simply outstanding” when Magistrate Wallace handed down his coronial findings in September 2000.

“If he felt any fear, it seems to have been submerged by his concern for his wounded colleague and others,” he said. “There can be little doubt his bravery prevented further loss of life.”

Ms Hewson handed herself in to Queensland police four days later.

Evidence that Ansell clung to the back of a road train and escaped the roadblocks fuelled a question that would never be answered – why would a skilled bushman give up his ticket to freedom and return to gun down police when he could have slipped away?

IT was no secret the 44-year-old buffalo hunter and grazier was bitter.

Writer Robert Milliken, who spent time with Ansell while working on projects in the NT, said Ansell never saw a penny for the myth surrounding his tangled life, despite being the inspiration for the main character in Crocodile Dundee, which propelled actor Paul Hogan to fame in 1986.

Ansell blamed his troubles on a Federal Government program to wipe out wild buffalo, his livelihood, to eradicate tuberculosis from the cattle industry. He had told reporters he was living on unemployment benefits and “bush tucker”.

Magistrate Wallace heard Ansell believed police and the government were against him.

He had moved to the Territory aged 15 from the small town of Murgon, 270km north of Brisbane, in country Queensland.

The ordeal that brought him fame happened when he took a fishing trip in a motorboat on the Victoria River in May 1977.

When the boat sank, he jumped in a dinghy and salvaged his two eight-week-old bull terriers, a rifle, a knife, some canned food and bedding. The tinny drifted out to sea, washing up on a small island at the mouth of the Fitzmaurice River.

He slept in the fork of a tree, out of reach of crocodiles, at night, but shared the branches with a brown tree snake.

Ansell never counted on being rescued. He roamed for seven weeks before stumbling on two Aboriginal stockmen and their boss.

But he kept the adventure under his hat – fearing his recklessness would upset his mother – until media got hold of the yarn.

Dubbed the “modern day Robinson Crusoe”, Ansell said: “I think if you come through in one piece, then nothing else really matters.

“It’s like going out to shoot a kangaroo.

“You don’t come back and say you missed by half an inch – you either got him or you didn’t.”

Mr Milliken described Ansell as “strikingly handsome with blond hair, blue eyes and bare feet” when he met him in 1988. It was the year Ansell was named Territorian of the Year for his role in putting the Top End on the map.

At the time, he lived with his wife, Joanne van Os, and their two small sons on their buffalo farm at Melaleuca, between Darwin and Kakadu.

“He was charming,” Mr Milliken said.

“He seems never to have worn shoes, even when travelling on aircraft and staying in city hotels at the height of his fame.

“The press went mad over his story and no one seemed to mind if the details grew ever more incredible.

“A hero had been born.”

He said Ansell once told British TV personality Michael Parkinson he preferred to sleep on the floor of his five-star Sydney hotel in his swag rather than in the kingsize bed.

Ansell’s Parkinson interview sparked the interest of Hogan and led to the creation of Mick “Crocodile” Dundee.

But the fame took its toll on Ansell’s personal life. His marriage disintegrated.

In 1992, he was convicted of cattle rustling and assaulting the owner of a cattle station in Arnhem Land.

Police raided Melaleuca. He eventually lost the property.

For more than a year before his death, Ansell had been living with Ms Hewson, a former tour guide, on a billabong at the Aboriginal outstation Urapunga, on the Roper River, about 480km south of Darwin.

He was initiated as a white member of local Aboriginal clan and got on well with the Ngukkur community. But the spiral into a drug-induced psychosis continued as Ansell smoked cannabis and injected amphetamines with vengeance.

“I didn’t know Ansell really well, but I’d met him a few times,” long-time Territorian and former reporter Chips Mackinolty said.

“He was tough as nails, the sort of person that could do what he said he did, and did do it when he was working as a stockman, as a wrangler and that stuff.

“He was an extraordinary person at that level, but it ended up in tears.”

Mr Mackinolty was heading to Katherine and had been allowed through the roadblock earlier on the day the killing happened.

“It was one of those ‘goose steps on your own grave’ sort of feelings – you were very close to what ended up being a very awful thing.

“It’s always sad when the threat of poverty and frustrated ambition get mixed up and send people off the edge, big time,” Mr Mackinolty said.

“I was completely shocked, as were a lot of people who knew him in the earlier years.”

In his coronial ruling, Magistrate Wallace said the contrast between the “original Crocodile Dundee who appeared on television” and the emaciated drug addict – who weighed just 53kg when he opened fire on police – could hardly be more marked.

“His drug abuse rendered his mind so addled he believed fantasies that a child would dismiss with contempt,” he said.

“His pointless and destructive actions caused immediate agony and suffering to the men he wounded.”

The infamous rampage means Ansell is remembered in Darwin not as a knockabout bushman, but as the man who murdered a heroic cop.

 

 

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Sergeant Glen Huitson

Glen Huitson - roadside crossAlong the side of the Stuart Highway, heading to Batchelor and points south, there’s a turnoff at Old Bynoe Road. On this corner there’s a simple cross like far too many you see on Australian roads.  This one is the same in that it marks the point where a loved one lost his or her life. The ever-present, neatly-arrayed booze bottles testify to the fact that his friends have not forgotten him.

However this site is also different. It doesn’t mark a road fatality, but rather the death of a police officer on duty, Sergeant Glen Anthony Huitson, killed protecting the community from a man who had gone on an overnight shooting spree.  The further tragedy is that this death, left a young widow and two little children who will never know their father: the risks that police face daily in doing their duty.

The Policeman from the bush
The Policeman from the bush

By all accounts Glen Huitson was a quietly impressive young man and an excellent policeman who was soon to receive the Police Valour medal, given posthumously to his wife, Lisa. Huitson had worked out bush and was well respected by the communities he’d worked in. Stationed at Adelaide River at the time of the shooting, Huitson is also remembered by a memorial there.

Across the new railway track on the Old Bynoe Road, there’s a different kind of memorial from the simple cross with beer bottles. It’s the official memorial in Glen Huitson Park. It has an impressively large stone brought from a distance and plaques to honour the man and the police officer.

Roadside memorial stone
Roadside memorial stone

I recognise that another family lost a person they’d loved that day. No doubt as they pass Huitson’s memorial they think of their own loved one. However for me this is about the loss of a man doing his duty. As you go about your routines today, please remember all those police officers who daily risk their lives to protect us.

I leave you with Glen Huitson’s eulogy, testifying to his concern for others and his true community spirit. Rest in Peace, Sergeant Glen Huitson, you did your duty well.

 

On the Darwin Esplanade, near the Cenotaph, there’s is a memorial to all Northern Territory Police and Emergency Services workers who gave their lives in service to the community.
On the Darwin Esplanade, near the Cenotaph, there’s is a memorial to all Northern Territory Police and Emergency Services workers who gave their lives in service to the community.

4 thoughts on “Sergeant Glen Huitson”

  1. What a wonderful tribute …thank you for bringing us this introduction to a man without whom the world is a poorer place.

    • Thanks Chris. It happened a couple of years after we got here and was a great tragedy. I really feel for his family and the loss of a good man.

  2. I stumbled across this post today… For some reason Glen came to my mind, and I did a search. Maybe this all came about as I saw a photo of his gorgeous sister and his 2 beautiful children.
    Glen was a friend and I know his family well. He was a great man and it was an extremely sad day the day he left this life.

    • hi Vicki, sorry I hadn’t realised I’d omitted to reply. Thanks for sharing…it was indeed a tragic day for all concerned…we have a connection through the other officer that day though we didn’t know him at the time.

https://troppont.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/sergeant-glen-huitson/

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Family and friends pay tribute to brave officer

IT was 15 years on Sunday since one of NT Police’s darkest days.

On August 3, 1999 Brevet Sergeant Glen Anthony Huitson was manning a roadblock on the Stuart Highway at Livingstone when he was shot and killed by “Crocodile Dundee” Rod Ansell.

Ansell was then hit with fatal return fire by Sgt Huitson’s partner, Senior Constable Jamie O’Brien.

He was the first policeman to be murdered on duty in the Territory for 47 years, and to this date he remains the last.

Sgt Huitson’s wife Lisa said the anniversary was always emotional.

“But he’s always with us and it’s good to see his colleagues and friends return,” she said.

“It’s nice to come back.”

The couple’s children Joe and Ruby were just 2 and 10 months old when their father was killed.

Police Commissioner John McRoberts said the memorial was a sobering reminder of the dangers of policing.

“It’s really good to pay our respects to a man who died doing what he loved and wanted to do – which was serve and protect,” he said.

Sgt Huitson joined the NT Police in January 1987. He served in both Southern and Northern districts.

During his service, he received a Commendation from the Commissioner of Police in March 1994 when he attended a disturbance at a community near Alice Springs. He disarmed a drunk armed with a knife and star picket, and was threatening another person with a billy of boiling water.

Then in February of 1999 in Litchfield Park, he disarmed an armed man who was threatening the driver and passengers of a bus. He received a Valour Award over this incident.

For the incident which cost him his life, he was awarded the Australia Bravery Medal, and a bar to his Valour Medal.

http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/family-and-friends-pay-tribute-to-brave-officer/story-fnk0b1zt-1227012766662

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Wall to Wall Ride for Remembrance

In 2009, two mates, both police officers and both keen motorcyclists, started a conversation over a beer or two. “How about we organise some mates to ride to Canberra and meet at our National Memorial?”

Assistant Commissioner Michael Corboy from the NSW Police Force and Inspector Brian Rix of the Victorian Police had been motivated and inspired by the immense popularity of an American police motorcycle and charity event held in Austin, Texas.

Known as the “Ride for the Fallen”, the ride is a special tribute that honours the service and sacrifices of the many law enforcement officers killed in the service of Texas over its long and proud history.

Around the same time, a chance meeting with Western Australia Assistant Commissioner Steve Brown invariably turned into discussions of motorcycling and plans for Police Commissioner Karl O’Callaghan to lead a children’s charity ride across the country.

So a few phone calls later and with the much valued support and assistance of the Police Federation of Australia, a group of like minded police, serving and retired, were brought together to develop Australia’s own memorial ride.

With the National Police Memorial as a focal point and highlighting the positive image of police in the promotion of motorcycle safety and awareness, this has now become a much anticipated annual charity event in commemoration of the service and sacrifice of our police and for each of the State’s to raise much needed funds in support of their police charity organisations.

Each of the Australian Police Forces has a dedicated place of remembrance and reflection, where they pay homage to and remember their police officers who have died as a result of their service to the community.  From these sites a very special journey begins with the intention of arriving at the outskirts of our national capital to meet and join the other contingents of riders from across Australia.

In a final gesture of police solidarity and remembrance, the ride travels through Canberra to the National Police Memorial for a short, but poignant ceremony to commence the week in honour of our colleagues and mates; their names recorded on the touch stones of the memorial wall.

The Wall to Wall : Ride for Remembrance is promoted through a national organising committee under the auspice of the Police Federation of Australia and the National Police Memorial.  Stringent operational and financial controls are maintained to ensure the charitable status of the event and that funds raised are directly used to support the identified policing legacy organisations and charities.

Fully supported by all the police jurisdictions, every State and Territory is represented. Our past rides have been led by the Police Commissioners of the Australian Federal Police, Western Australia, New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Tasmania, all of whom share the thrills and excitement found only on a motorbike and who are integral role models in demonstrating our message of motorcycling safety and awareness

Open to serving and retired members (sworn and unsworn) and all other friends, family and proud supporters of policing, the ride is not only a wonderful commemoration of service and sacrifice , but also a fantastic social event for enthusiastic motor cyclists across Australia in celebration of the police family.

So make this the year that you get the bike out from the back of the garage and serviced, renew or obtain you riders licence and join us on a special ride in support of all that is good within the motorcycling community and the policing across Australia.

Our Website will be updated regularly throughout August and September with news of event, routes to be travelled and groups to join up with.

Like Us on Facebook and join our conversations in the lead up to our Australia’s own, Wall to Wall : Ride for Remembrance.

Police Association of Victoria President, Brian Rix travelled by motorcycle to every Capital city in Australia during the month of July 2011 to deliver a hand-made wooden Wall to Wall Ride Baton to each Police Commissioner.  The Batons have been engraved with each jurisdiction’s Police Service Logo alongside the Wall to Wall Ride Logo and have a hollow centre allowing for the names of any fallen members to be inserted and carried by their Commissioner (or an appointed representative) on the Wall to Wall Ride to Canberra.  These Batons will form an important part of the Wall to Wall Ride Ceremony in future.

  

Two decades ago at Lightning Ridge NSW Supt Stanley Single began fashioning wooden batons as a gift for departing officers.   As an extra special touch each hand-made baton featured small opal doublets – one gem for each year served at the command. Supt Single, originally a fitter and turner by trade, served at Lightning Ridge from 1990 until he transferred to Walgett as commander in 1996.  He said that, by then, word had spread about his novel departing gifts.   “It just took off from there and it became a monster,” he said.   “Everywhere I went everyone wanted one for their send-offs.”   Then he got the call from Assistant Commissioner Mick Corboy about making his handiwork hobby a part of policing history – and future.  The perpetual batons created for the ride are a hand-crafted wooden style classical baton, slightly embellished with the Wall to Wall logo and a laser engraving of the NSW Police Force badge, along with the wording: ‘We remember them.’

Supt Single said a unique feature of the batons will be their hollow centre.  “When I started making batons back in Lightning Ridge I found it to be therapeutic – but it was a bit more work this time around because of the hollow centre, which required a bit more engineering,” he said.  “There have been a few malfunctioning problems and it has been quite time consuming, however the hollow tube can contain a scroll sealed within with the names of any deceased police officers for that particular calendar year, bearing in mind the best result would be that each baton arrives at the Wall of Remembrance empty.”  Each Australian Hardwood baton took around three hours to make, and each one was individually turned freehand – meaning that although they are similar in shape, size and style, no two are identical.  A ceremonial ritual will mark the presentation of the batons at the Wall to Wall Ride’s arrival point in Canberra.  In addition to the nine batons created for each commissioner of the nation’s policing jurisdictions, Supt Single has also produced a tenth baton to be auctioned off for charity on the day of the ride.  The auction baton features engravings of each of the nine Australian police badges and will contain a scroll bearing the signatures of all the current commissioners.  The vision is that from this year onwards, each police commissioner from each Australian jurisdiction will keep their perpetual baton safe, to be carried by them each year in the Wall to Wall Ride, and containing within its hollow centre a list of that year’s deceased officers.  And in years to come each commissioner will also hope, as they reach for the scroll inside, to discover an empty page.

 http://www.walltowallride.com/about-us

 

 

 

 

 

2014

Ride – Lunch break at NSW Police Academy, Goulburn on Saturday 13 September 2014

photos taken by Greg Callander – Retired SenCon, NSWPF

[blockquote]NSW Police Academy Lunch break for the riders between Sydney and Canberra during the Wall to Wall Ride for Remembrance – Year 5.[/blockquote]

 

36 OF 237.  Remainder will be uploaded when I have the time.

[divider]

2013

Ride – Lunch break at NSW Police Academy, Goulburn on Saturday 14 September 2013

photos taken by Greg Callander – Retired SenCon, NSWPF

[blockquote]Ride – Lunch break at NSW Police Academy, Goulburn on Saturday 14 September 2013[/blockquote]

 

[divider]

2012

Ride – Lunch break at NSW Police Academy, Goulburn on Saturday 15 September 2012

photos taken by Greg Callander – Retired SenCon, NSWPF

                              [blockquote]SATURDAY 15 SEPTEMBER 2012
WALL to WALL POLICE RIDE FOR REMEMBRANCE – TO HONOR ALL THOSE POLICE WHO HAVE BEEN KILLED ON-DUTY SINCE AUSTRALIAN POLICING STARTED OVER 150 YEARS AGO.
THIS IS THE CONTINGENT THAT ARRIVED AT THE NSW POLICE ACADEMY, GOULBURN, FROM AROUND 11AM AND LEFT AROUND 1PM FOR THE RUN TO THE NATIONAL WALL IN CANBERRA.
THIS IS THE SECOND YEAR THIS EVENT HAS BEEN HELD.[/blockquote]

 

 

 

[divider]

2011

Ride – Lunch break at NSW Police Academy, Goulburn on Saturday 17 September 2011

photos taken by Greg Callander – Retired SenCon, NSWPF

to be uploaded by 21 September 2014




James AFFLECK

James AFFLECKVA

aka  Jim,   Jamie to his family

New South Wales Police Force

Police Academy Class 160

ProCst Regd. #  92373

Regd. # 18315

Rank:  Commenced training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 3 July 1978 ( Aged 20 years, 11 months, 24 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed 18 September 1978 ( Aged 21 years, 2 months, 9 days )

Constable 1st Class – appointed 29 August 1984

Senior Constable – appointed 29 August 1988

Final Rank:  Senior Constable

ServiceFrom 3 July 1978 to 14 January 2001 = 22 years, 6 months, 11 days Service

Stations?, Hurstville HWP, Campbelltown HWP – Death

Awards:  National Medal – granted 2 February 1995

Born Tuesday  9 July 1957

Died:  Sunday  14 January 2001

Age:  43 yrs  6 mths  5 days

Cause:  Murdered – by Motor Vehicle whilst using Road Spikes to stop a stolen vehicle which drove straight at, and collided with, him.

Location:  Hume Hwy ( north bound ), Glen Alpine

Funeral date:   Thursday  18 January 2001

Funeral location:  Camden Civic Centre

Grave:  Cremated

Grave site:  Interred in Woronora Cemetery on 3 June 2003

General Plaque Lawn.  Lawn 4  Position 0796

Memorial 1/:  Jim Affleck Bridge, Hume Hwy, Glen Alpine, NSW

Memorial 2/:  HWP Vehicle ( 213 ) attached to Campbelltown – Registration JA-213  213 was the Call Sign of his HWP Vehicle.

 

Jim AFFLECK
Jim AFFLECK

 

James AFFLECK, Jim AFFLECK, JA-213, JA213
JA-213 NSW Registration – in Memory of Jim Affleck

 

Jim AFFLECK, James AFFLECK. Senior Constable James AFFLECK. Glen Alpine, New South Wales, 14 January 2001

 

About 8.40am on 14 January, 2001 police were attempting to stop a stolen vehicle during a high speed pursuit at Mittagong. Approval was given to place road spikes on the roadway and Senior Constable Affleck and other police did this near the Mark Evans Bridge, Glen Alpine. When the offending vehicle, travelling north, reached the spikes the driver intentionally swerved from one side of the north bound laned road to the other, hitting the senior constable, who was killed instantly. The driver was later arrested and charged with murder.

 

The senior constable was born in 1957 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 18 September, 1978. At the time of his death he was attached to the Campbelltown Highway Patrol.

 

Jim IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


 

On the 14th of January 2001, Senior Constable Jim Affleck VA was hit and killed by a vehicle trying to evade police during a police pursuit on the Hume Highway, Glen Alpine.
To celebrate his life and remember his sacrifice 20 years on, there will be a memorial service and wreath laying held at Campbelltown Police Station at 8:30am on Thursday the 14th January 2021. This will be followed by a light morning tea.
An invitation has been extended to Jim’s friends, family and colleagues to attend.

 

 

 

 


 

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/competitions/campbelltown-mourns-13th-anniversary-of-police-officers-death/story-fngy6zd2-1226802284880

Campbelltown mourns 13th anniversary of police officer’s death

Police and Jim Affleck’s family share hugs and fond memories of the late Jim Affleck. Picture: ROBERT POZO Source: News Limited

A photo of Jim Affleck sat atop his car at a memorial service yesterday. Picture: ROBERT POZO

A photo of Jim Affleck sat atop his car at a memorial service yesterday. Picture: ROBERT POZO Source: News Limited



 

 

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/05/13/1021002431568.html

Driver who ran down officer ‘was re-enacting computer game’

By Ellen Connolly
May 14 2002

 

The scene of Senior Constable Affleck’s death. Photo: Nick Moir

The driver of a stolen car who killed a highway patrol officer during a police chase was re-enacting one of his PlayStation computer games, The Need for Speed – Hot Pursuit, the Supreme Court heard yesterday.

Trevor Edward Holton, 26, has pleaded not guilty to murdering Senior Constable Jim Affleck, 43, near Campbelltown on January 14 last year.

In his opening address yesterday, the Crown prosecutor, Mark Tedeschi, QC, said that during the pursuit Holton was ”testing his car rallying skills” and was ”engaged in a real life re-enactment of the computer game”.

”To him the lives of other road users and the lives of police officers were just there as props to provide the thrill of the chase, and they were expendable in the pursuit of that thrill. Jim Affleck’s death was just part of this real-life game.”

The court was told the chase began about 8.30am after another man, who was a passenger in the four-wheel-drive, committed a bag snatch at Moss Vale. Also in the car was the man’s four-year-old stepdaughter.

For the next 40 minutes police chased the stolen vehicle as it drove on the wrong side of the road along the M5 freeway and the old Hume Highway, reaching speeds of up to 180kmh.

At one stage the passenger got out of the car and tried to take the girl with him but Holton sped off with her.

Senior Constable Affleck tried to stop the vehicle by throwing road spikes across the M5 but Holton swerved across two lanes to miss the spikes and hit the officer, Mr Tedeschi said. His body landed 80 metres away.

The stolen vehicle somersaulted and landed on its roof, with the girl, uninjured, still in the back. Holton fled but was arrested that night.

In a police interview Holton had said he ”was not prepared, at any stage, to get pulled over or stop”. He had seen Senior Constable Affleck running across the road in front of him trying to get the spikes under the vehicle.

”I couldn’t swerve; I couldn’t dodge him. I was going too fast. It’s like he [Affleck] didn’t care what happened.

”To me it was like it was suicide. He could see how fast I was going. He could see I could not stop.

”I have just been so angry … he could have avoided me so easy.”

He had said he knew about road spikes from playing the computer game, in which the main method of avoiding spikes is to veer off the road onto a median strip or the grass.

The trial continues.


 

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/08/23/1030052974371.html

Fury at killer’s ‘lenient’ jail term

By Ellen Connolly
August 24 2002


The state Opposition has called for compulsory life terms to be imposed on anyone who kills a police officer, after the “lenient” sentencing of a man who ran down a highway patrol officer.

Trevor Edward Holton, 27, was jailed yesterday for a minimum 12 years for the murder of Senior Constable Jim Affleck, killed while laying road spikes during a high-speed pursuit in western Sydney on January 14 last year.

In handing down sentence in the Supreme Court, Acting Justice Thomas Davidson said the jail term had to deter others and demonstrate that such acts against police in the execution of their duty would not be supported by the courts.

But the shadow attorney-general, Chris Hartcher, said this was not reflected in the sentence and called on the judicial system to stand behind police officers.

“Mr Holton should go to jail for the rest of his natural life. He certainly would if the coalition was in office,” Mr Hartcher said.

The Attorney-General, Bob Debus, said he had sought advice from the Director of Public Prosecutions on prospects for an appeal. “Understandably, there is considerable community concern about the sentence imposed,” Mr Debus said.

The court heard Holton was re-enacting one of his PlayStation computer games and was testing his car rally skills during the 40-minute pursuit.

Constable Affleck’s distraught family said it was “extremely disappointed” at the sentence and wanted harsher terms imposed on anyone convicted of murdering a police officer.

“If someone is prepared to kill a police officer they’re prepared to kill anybody, and I think they should have a sentence which is much stronger for police,” the victim’s brother, Paul Affleck, said outside court. “They’re out there doing their job, protecting us, and it should be reflected in the sentencing. Mr Carr’s talking about minimum sentences all the time.”

Inspector Hans Rupp, who led the investigation, said: “Trish has lost a good husband, his work colleagues have lost a great mate and, unfortunately for NSW, we’ve lost a great policeman. You just can’t replace police of the calibre of Jim Affleck.”

Holton was sentenced to a maximum 16 years.


 

 

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/11/01/1067597201712.html?from=storyrhs

Outrage at police killer’s mercy bid

By Sean Berry
November 2, 2003


The family of murdered policeman Jim Affleck has described his killer’s attempt to appeal against a 12-year jail sentence as “an outrage”.

A year after Trevor Edward Holton was sentenced to serve a minimum of 12 years (maximum of 16) in jail for the highway patrol officer’s murder, he has initiated an appeal against the severity of the sentence in the Court of Criminal Appeal.

Holton, of Claymore, south-west Sydney, was sentenced in August after he ran down and killed Affleck in January 2001.

He hit Affleck with a stolen four-wheel-drive when he swerved to avoid road spikes the policeman was laying across the M5 Freeway at Campbelltown.

Delivering the sentence in the Supreme Court, Acting Judge Thomas Davidson said the jail term needed to act as a deterrent and demonstrate that such acts against police in the execution of their duty would not be tolerated.

However, the Department of Public Prosecutions has since lodged an appeal against the leniency of the sentence, with a hearing due next month.

The Crown’s stance is in contrast to Holton’s planned appeal against the harshness of the same sentence.

“If he does [appeal], it may well be that the Crown appeal in December will be vacated,” a court spokesman said. “The court likes to deal with these things as one.”

Any appeal against the severity flies in the face of the outrage that greeted the sentencing last year.

“We thought he deserved more,” the victim’s brother, Paul Affleck, said. “Before the sentencing we sat down with [then police minister] Michael Costa. He gave us an idea of what they were looking at for minimum sentences and more stringent sentencing.

“It has now been 12 months since the sentencing and nothing has been done. How many more policemen have to die before someone does something?”

NSW shadow attorney-general Andrew Tink said he had a simple approach to the matter.

“Anyone who kills a police officer while they are carrying out their duties should go to jail for life,” he said. “That is our strong stance.”

Mr Affleck said Holton’s bid to reduce his sentence was not a surprise, just unfortunate.

“We have been expecting that all along, just the way the defence was talking after the trial,” he said.

“Anyone who kills a policeman should spend his life in jail – he had a criminal record going back until he was 13 or something.

“I think it’s ridiculous and I don’t know why we tolerate these things. I just think it’s ridiculous he has the opportunity to [appeal].

“I think anyone who kills anyone doesn’t deserve any freedom.”


 

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/06/30/1088488031043.html?from=storylhs

Police killer spared more time in jail

By Les Kennedy
July 1, 2004

A policeman who died after being run over by a fleeing car thief should have shot his killer “between the eyes”, his widow says.

The widow of Senior Constable Jim Affleck was speaking yesterday after a court rejected the Crown’s appeal against the leniency of the sentence given to the man who ran him down.

Trish Affleck compared the situation her husband was in when he was killed by Trevor Edward Holton to that faced by another policeman, Inspector Shane Cribb, who has been charged over the shooting of a criminal who drove a getaway car at him three years ago.

“You have got Inspector Cribb looking down the barrel of a jail term for doing what I wish to God Jim had done. I wish to God he would have shot Holton between the eyes,” Mrs Affleck said with tears in her eyes.

The NSW Court of Appeal, in a 2-1 decision, yesterday rejected the Crown’s argument for a tougher sentence for Holton, who was jailed in August 2002 for a minimum of 12 years, and a maximum 16, for the murder of Senior Constable Affleck.

On January 14, 2001, the stolen four-wheel-drive Holton was driving hit Senior Constable Affleck, a highway patrolman, as he laid out road spikes on M5 to stop the vehicle. Holton was being pursued by police after committing a robbery.

Holton also appealed against his conviction, but that was unanimously dismissed by justices Michael Grove, Robert Hulme and Rex Smart yesterday.


 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kdm_94N7bJA   YouTube:

Published on Sep 14, 2012

Wall To Wall Ride 2012 – M5 Motorway South of Sydney. Slowing down in tribute to Jim Affleck, crossing the bridge named in his honour. Polair was hovering above filming, but because I didn’t check my vertical camera angle, I missed it!

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151824341491135&set=a.10150274302951135.329251.51121891134&type=1


ix. JAMES AFFLECK

In January 2001 Senior Constable Jim Affleck was a Highway Patrol Officer who was run over a killed whilst deploying a set of ‘road spikes’ during a high speed police pursuit. The offending driver actually drove his vehicle at Affleck in a deliberate attempt to run him down. He was subsequently charged with murder.


Deadly toll

By Jonathan Pearlman
November 6, 2004

Alone in his patrol car, Chris Thornton had the police siren flashing as he chased a white sedan through Woy Woy.

Thornton, 35, a highway patrolman, had been in the force for 15 years. He was, his mother says, “the best driver I have ever seen”.

The reason for the chase that night in April 2002 is unknown. Both cars were seen travelling at high speed. Thornton was about 50 metres behind.

Meanwhile, Leonard Rowley, 56, an unlicensed driver, was driving to his local KFC to pick up dinner. He saw the first car flash past and judged – wrongly – that he had time to turn out in front of the patrol car. Thornton tried to avoid Rowley’s car but clipped the back, veered onto the wrong side of the road and hit a power pole.

Thornton died on the spot, which is marked by a permanent stainless-steel cross. Rowley later received a suspended two-year sentence.

“His life from the age of 12 was about helping people,” says Thornton’s mother, Freada Thornton. “He was in the surf club and he was there to rescue people and then he went into the force and he was doing the same thing.” His father, Barry Thornton, says: “He loved life. He had been in Gosford for 15 years and was so popular with the community there.”

Police pursuits are, says Barry, a necessary evil: “If they don’t catch the criminals there will be more deaths on the roads. The ones that they’re in pursuit of are the idiots that have done the wrong thing to start with.”

But pursuits have come at a cost to the NSW Police Department. Fifteen officers have died as a result of high-speed chases, beginning with the death of Constable George Boore in 1937.

Details provided by the NSW Police Association show a steady stream of fatalities involving cars and motorcycles. The full list of casualties is as follows:

April 2, 1937: Constable George Boore;

June 2, 1954: Constable Cecil Sewell;

November 14, 1958: Constable Brian Boaden;

December 23, 1958: Constable William Lord;

October 14, 1961: Constable James Kinnane;

September 7, 1963: Constable Colin Robb;

December 2, 1976: Constable Terry Moncur;

January 3, 1985: Constable Wayne Rixon;

July 25, 1985: Detective-Constable Steven Tier;

October 20, 1987: Constable Themelis Macarounas;

August 24, 1988: Constable Peter Carter;

June 13, 1989: Constable Peter Figtree;

June 14, 1989: Senior Constable Glenn Rampling;

January 14, 2001: Senior Constable James Affleck;

April 13, 2002: Senior Constable Christopher Thornton.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/Police-Pursuits/Deadly-toll/2004/11/05/1099547386960.html


 




David Andrew CARTY

David Andrew CARTY

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed  19 August 1994

Constable – appointed  August 1995

Served:  From  20 February 1994  to  18 April 1997 = 3+ years Service

Stations:  Liverpool, Fairfield ( 20 November 1994 – 18 April 1997 )

Awards:  Commissioners Valour Award

No find on It’s An Honour

Born:  1971

Age:  25

Died:  18 April 1997

Cause:  Stabbed ( Murdered )

Event date: 18 April 1997

Event location:  Cambridge Tavern, Horsley Dve & Smart St, Fairfield

Location of the Murder:

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried / Cremated?

Memorial location1/ Police Dog Carts  ( coincidentally also stabbed to death )

2/ David Carty Reserve, Fairfield East, NSW ( cnr Fairfield St & The Horsley Dve )

3/ David Carty Conference Room – Fairfield Police Station, Smart St, Fairfield, NSW  ( Dedicated / Opened on 18 April 2017 )

Constable David Carty ( 1997 )
Constable David Carty ( 1997 )

 

David Carty - whilst a Student Police Officer
David Carty – whilst a Student Police Officer

DAVID IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

 

About 8pm on 17 April, 1997 Constable Carty and other police had reason to speak to a number of people in the street at Fairfield while carrying out foot patrols. Some time later the constable and other police, then off duty, attended a local hotel, the Cambridge Tavern. About 2.10am as he was leaving the hotel Constable Carty was set upon by a number of offenders, including some of those he had spoken to earlier, and was stabbed to death. Senior Constable Michelle Auld, who had gone to his assistance, was also seriously assaulted in the cowardly attack.

 

Both Constable Carty and Senior Constable Auld were awarded the Commissioner’s Valour Award.

 

The constable was born in 1971 and was sworn in as a probationary constable in August, 1994. At the time of his death he was stationed at Fairfield.


Constable David Andrew CARTY touch pad at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.
Constable David Andrew CARTY touch pad at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.


 

A small section of St John Of God, Richmond Hospital, where Police ( and others ) with PTSD have gone for Inpatient Treatment.<br /> <br /> This is a small Memorial that previous patients ( Police ) have done to remember our friends who have fallen before us. The Black &amp; Dark Blue Memorial stones are by Army members<br /> <br /> Details mentioned:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> JRNR<br /> <br /> S. McALINEY<br /> <br /> 020493<br /> <br /> RIP LWF<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="https://www.australianpolice.com.au/todd-malcolm-blunt/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">25684</a><br /> <br /> 1988/237<br /> <br /> ( 25684 = Regd # )<br /> <br /> 1988 is year Attested. 237 is the Class # )<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="https://www.australianpolice.com.au/david-andrew-carty/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">David CARTY</a><br /> <br /> R.I.P. Brother<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> OZZY 5 HODGY ( Appears to have a Legacy Crest glued to it )<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> II<br /> <br /> M. LAMBERT<br /> <br /> R.I.P.<br /> <br /> 22.8.11<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> D &amp; E PLATOON<br /> <br /> 69 - 70<br /> <br /> LWF<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> II<br /> <br /> L. GAVIN<br /> <br /> RIP<br /> <br /> 29.11.11<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="https://www.australianpolice.com.au/paul-brian-wilcox/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">PAUL WILCOX</a><br /> <br /> R.I.P. BROTHER<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="https://www.australianpolice.com.au/shelley-leanne-davis/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">SHELLY DAVIS</a><br /> <br /> 1977 - 2004<br /> <br /> Photo posted up on NSW Cops, Old, Bold &amp; Retired FB Group on 28 May 2017.
A small section of St John Of God, Richmond Hospital, where Police ( and others ) with PTSD have gone for Inpatient Treatment.

This is a small Memorial that previous patients ( Police ) have done to remember our friends who have fallen before us. The Black & Dark Blue Memorial stones are by Army members.

Details mentioned:

JRNR

S. McALINEY

020493

RIP LWF

25684

1988/237

( 25684 = Regd # )

1988 is year Attested. 237 is the Class # )

David CARTY

R.I.P. Brother

OZZY 5 HODGY ( Appears to have a Legacy Crest glued to it )

II

M. LAMBERT

R.I.P.

22.8.11

D & E PLATOON

69 – 70

LWF

II

L. GAVIN

RIP

29.11.11

PAUL WILCOX

R.I.P. BROTHER

SHELLY DAVIS

1977 – 2004

Photo posted up on NSW Cops, Old, Bold & Retired FB Group on 28 May 2017.

 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday  18 April 2017      20 year Memorial

18 April 2017
18 April 2017

David Carty Reserve 18 April 2017
18 April 2017

 

Fairfield Police Station Wall of Remembrance Smart St, Fairfield
Fairfield Police Station Wall of Remembrance Smart St, Fairfield

 

David Carty Conference Room - Fairfield Police Station ( Dedicated / Opened on 18 April 2017 )
David Carty Conference Room – Fairfield Police Station ( Dedicated / Opened on 18 April 2017 )


Constable David Carty was remembered as a respected man at the 17th anniversary of his death

 Constable David Carty is remembered as a respectable country man.
Constable David Carty is remembered as a respectable country man.

THE pain of April 18 doesn’t get any easier for Fairfield police officers who recall Constable David Carty as a respectable country man.

Const Carty (pictured) was remembered by police officers and former colleagues at Fairfield police station on Friday, the 17th anniversary of his brutal death.

On April 18, 1997, Const Carty, 25, was stabbed in the Cambridge Tavern car park, after having a drink with colleagues after a late shift.

Superintendent Peter Lennon said April 18 was one date he and his fellow officers would never forget. “He (Const Carty) came from the country and was well-respected by everyone,” he said.

During the memorial service, a minute’s silence was held and wreaths were laid in memory of the young man.

Supt Lennon said being in the police force meant brave men and women confronted dangers as they performed their duties.

“Police officers put their lives on the line every day for their community,” he said. “Whilst this event was after hours, he was still a serving officer because he was known to be a police officer when the incident occurred.”

HONOURING DAVID CARTY

David Andrew Carty, from Parkes, joined the NSW Police Force on February 20, 1994

After being posted to Liverpool police station, he was transferred to Fairfield police station on November 20, 1994, and confirmed to the rank of Constable on August 19, 1995

During the early hours of April 18, 1997, Constable Carty, 25, was stabbed in the car park of Fairfield’s Cambridge Tavern, where he had enjoyed a drink with colleagues after a late shift

His memory was honoured at Fairfield police station on Friday for the 17th anniversary of his death

 Friday was the 17th anniversary of the murder of David Carty. Fairfield police officers held a minute's silence at the station’s Wall of Remembrance. Picture: Tim Clapin
Friday was the 17th anniversary of the murder of David Carty. Fairfield police officers held a minute’s silence at the station’s Wall of Remembrance. Picture: Tim Clapin

 

 Fairfield police officers and former colleagues holding a memorial for the 15th anniversary of the death of Constable David Carty.
Fairfield police officers and former colleagues holding a memorial for the 15th anniversary of the death of Constable David Carty.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/south-west/constable-david-carty-was-remembered-as-a-respected-man-at-the-17th-anniversary-of-his-death/story-fngr8hxh-1226892214839

 


Slain local police officer remembered

The David Carty Memorial set up at this week’s service in Sydney.
The David Carty Memorial set up at this week’s service in Sydney.

NSW Police Force held a memorial service on Wednesday to commemorate the life and service of former Parkes man Constable David Carty, who was slain 15 years ago.

Const Carty was stabbed to death as he left licensed premises in the Sydney suburb of Fairfield in the early hours of Friday, April 18, 1997, after having a drink with colleagues following a late shift.

At 10am on Wednesday April 18, 2012, colleagues and friends gathered at Fairfield Police Station for a memorial service, on the 15th anniversary of his death.

Minister for Police and Emergency Services, Michael Gallacher, NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione, South West Metropolitan Region Commander, Assistant Commissioner Frank Mennilli, Fairfield Local Area Commander, Superintendent Peter Lennon, former colleagues, local police officers, local members of Parliament and members of the Fairfield community also attended.

Minister for Police and Emergency Services, Michael Gallacher, and NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione, pay their respects to slain local police officer, David Carty and Wednesday’s special memorial service in Sydney.
Minister for Police and Emergency Services, Michael Gallacher, and NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione, pay their respects to slain local police officer, David Carty and Wednesday’s special memorial service in Sydney.

Senior Catholic Police Chaplain, Father Paul O’Donoghue, led the blessing for serving police and emergency service officers.

Constable Carty’s family also held a memorial service on the family property in Parkes where Lachlan Local Area Commander, Robert Ryan, and local police officers paid their respects.

Supt Lennon said while it was painful to recall the circumstances of Constable Carty’s death, it was important for his memory to be honoured.

“David was a young man with a great future, personally and professionally,” Supt Lennon said.

“He had committed himself to protecting his community and paid the ultimate price.

“Every day, officers confront dangers as they perform their duties, and the memory of a departed colleague reminds us that a safe community can come at a high price for officers and their families,” Supt Lennon said.

Police officers during the ceremony
Police officers during the ceremony

Constable Carty joined the NSW Police Force on February 20, 1994, attesting as a Probationary Constable on August 19, 1994, and began working at Liverpool.

On November 20, 1994, he was transferred to Fairfield and confirmed to the rank of Constable on August 19, 1995.

Before joining the NSW Police, David Carty worked on the family farm and showed as much dedication and independence there as he did as a Constable.

“Constable Carty’s relatively short experience in the NSW Police Force showed him to be an exemplary police officer,” Supt Lennon said.

http://www.parkeschampionpost.com.au/story/192991/slain-local-police-officer-remembered/#slide=1


 

Tribute to Constable David Andrew Carty

About this Item
Speakers Zangari Mr Guy; Page Mr Donald
Business Private Members Statements, PRIV
TRIBUTE TO CONSTABLE DAVID ANDREW CARTY
Page: 11204

Mr GUY ZANGARI (Fairfield) [12.11 p.m.]: On 18 April 2012 Fairfield police station held a 15-year memorial service for the late Constable David Carty. The memorial was to be held at David Carty Reserve but due to the torrential rain it was held at Fairfield police station. Besides the Fairfield memorial, a memorial was held also at the Carty family property in Parkes where Lachlan Local Area Commander Robert Ryan and local police officers paid their respects, together with the Carty family. The memorial at Fairfield was attended by the police commissioner, assistant commissioners, police Minister and local and State government representatives. Local fire, ambulance and State Emergency Service representatives paid their respects on this solemn occasion. Also present were the emergency response officers who, in the words of Superintendent Peter Lennon, moved heaven and earth to save this officer’s life. Inspector Brendan McMahon was the official master of ceremonies, with Commissioner Andrew Scipione offering kind and comforting words to the entire community. Superintendent Peter Lennon brought home the message of the loss to the community of David Carty and how to this day, so many years later, people in Fairfield still feel the pain. Father Paul O’Donoghue offered blessings and prayers to the gathering. Following the prayers a wreath-laying ceremony took place. It was at that point that emotion set in and not a dry eye could be seen in the gathering. Many of those who were present did not know David but they had grieved his loss for years. I recall that David’s death in 1997 was a shock to the entire community. So brutal was his death that churches around Fairfield held masses and services in his memory. At that time I was teaching at Patrician Brothers College, Fairfield, and I remember witnessing the grief that beset the community. Students and teachers held prayer services following David’s death. Sitting at the memorial service gave me the empty feeling that Fairfield experienced in 1997. I can only imagine what it was like for David’s work colleagues and especially for his family. David Carty was a country boy who came to Sydney to fulfil his dream of becoming a police officer. He joined the NSW Police Force on 20 February 1994, was sworn in as a probationary constable in August 1994 and began working at Liverpool. On 20 November 1994 Constable Carty was transferred to Fairfield and quickly established himself in the Fairfield Local Area Command and in the community as a hardworking police officer. On 17 April 1997, whilst on a daily foot patrol, David and other police officers had reason to speak to a number of people on a local Fairfield street. Later that evening, whilst off duty, Constable Carty and his colleagues attended the Cambridge Tavern. At about 2.10 a.m., as he was leaving the tavern, David was set upon by a number of offenders, including some of those he had spoken to earlier that day. Constable David Carty was stabbed to death by his attackers. Senior Constable Michelle Auld also was seriously assaulted whilst giving David assistance. Early that morning a piece of Fairfield was taken away. We will never forget David Carty. As a community we keep his memory alive by having a reserve named in his honour—the David Carty Reserve. There are plans in the Fairfield community to include a memorial garden in the reserve, to create a place where the community can offer prayers and thanks to the late Constable David Carty and reflect on the many sacrifices that he ultimately made as a result of his vocation as a police officer. David was never given a chance to marry, to have children and to experience what so many of us take for granted. What we as legislators can do is to ensure that our police are given the powers and support they need not only to keep the community safe but also to keep uniformed officers safe in the line of duty. Constable David Carty will never be forgotten by Fairfield.

Mr DONALD PAGE (Ballina—Minister for Local Government, and Minister for the North Coast) [12.15 p.m.]: I take this opportunity to thank the member for Fairfield for reminding us of the terrible murder of David Carty. I am sure that all members and the people of New South Wales remember the despicable murder that took place late at night in a car park outside licensed premises when David Carty was off duty. David Carty’s father, John Carty, is a constituent of the member for Dubbo who is in the Chamber. I was interested to hear the member for Fairfield mention the David Carty memorial that is to be established in the Fairfield reserve—a nice tribute to a man whose life was cut short by a most heinous crime.

http://23.101.218.132/Prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LA20120508004?open&refNavID=HA8_1


 

 

 




Peter John ADDISON & Robert Bruce SPEARS

Peter John ADDISON

( late of Port Macquarie )

New South Wales Police Force

Redfern Police Academy Class # 175

Regd. #  19914

Rank: Commenced training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 17 August 1981 ( aged 22 years, 6 months, 15 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed 6 November 1981 ( 22 years, 9 months, 4 days )

Constable – appointed 6 November 1982

Constable 1st Class – appointed 6 November 1986

Senior Constable – death

Final Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations?, Kempsey

ServiceFrom  17 August 1981  to  9 July 1995 = 13 years, 10 months, 22 days Service

Awards: No find on It’s An Honour

Commissioner’s Medal for Valour – posthumously

 National Police Service Medal – granted 9 July 2015 – posthumously

Born:  Monday  2 February 1959

Died onSunday  9 July 1995

Death location:  Main Street, Crescent Heads

CauseShot – murdered

Age36 years, 5 months, 7 days

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at: Rose Garden, Innes Gardens Memorial Park, NSW: 

Grave location:   Lat/Long: -31.462153 , 152.858907

 Memorial location:  Killuke St, Crescent Head’s

 

PETER IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

SenCon Peter John ADDISON - shot - 9 July 1995 - Crescent Head
SenCon Peter John ADDISON – shot – 9 July 1995 – Crescent Head

 

Peter John ADDISON - touch plate at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.
Peter John ADDISON – touch plate at National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

 

Grave plaque for Peter ADDISON
Grave plaque for Peter ADDISON

 

<strong>Redfern Police Academy Class 175 - Sub Class A</strong><br /><strong><span style="color: #808000;">Back Row L to R</span></strong>:<br />R. <strong>BARRIE</strong> # 19933, R.F. <strong>EDWARDS</strong>, <a href="https://www.australianpolice.com.au/peter-john-addison-robert-bruce-spears/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>Peter John ADDISON</strong> # 19914</a>, A.J. <strong>CATTELL</strong> # 20205, J. <strong>DeROTA</strong> # 19902, G.J. <strong>DUNCAN</strong> # 19913, D.P. <strong>ELLIS</strong> # 19906, E.S. <strong>BIRCHALL</strong> # 19917<br /><strong><span style="color: #808000;">Centre Row L to R</span></strong>:<br />Sgt 3/c J.A. <strong>SHIPLEE</strong> # 11230, P. <strong>DAVIES</strong> # 19919, D.F. <strong>BAILEY</strong> # 19916, P.G. <strong>DUNWORTH</strong> # 19937, M.D. <strong>BALDOCK</strong> # 20162, P.A. <strong>BLAIR</strong> # 19942, S.G. <strong>BENNETT</strong> # 19934, Sgt 3/c R.E. <strong>FORD</strong> # 10076<br /><strong><span style="color: #808000;">Front Row L to R</span></strong>:<br />A.C. <strong>BURNS</strong> # 19904, J.M. <strong>CLUGSTON</strong> # 19895, Donna M. <strong>BURTON</strong> ( Donna McMAHON / Donna Thompson ) # 19929 , M.E. <strong>AUSTIN</strong> # 19908, <a href="https://www.australianpolice.com.au/suzanne-joy-dearnley/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Suzanne Joy DEARNLEY # 19945</a>, J.A. <strong>CAMPBELL</strong> # 19903, M.L. <strong>CORNISH</strong> # 19898, J.A. <strong>DAHLBERG</strong>, D.M. <strong>CONNELL</strong> # 19891
Redfern Police Academy Class 175 – Sub Class A
Back Row L to R:
R. BARRIE # 19933, R.F. EDWARDS, Peter John ADDISON # 19914, A.J. CATTELL # 20205, J. DeROTA # 19902, G.J. DUNCAN # 19913, D.P. ELLIS # 19906, E.S. BIRCHALL # 19917
Centre Row L to R:
Sgt 3/c J.A. SHIPLEE # 11230, P. DAVIES # 19919, D.F. BAILEY # 19916, P.G. DUNWORTH # 19937, M.D. BALDOCK # 20162, P.A. BLAIR # 19942, S.G. BENNETT # 19934, Sgt 3/c R.E. FORD # 10076
Front Row L to R:
A.C. BURNS # 19904, J.M. CLUGSTON # 19895, Donna M. BURTON ( Donna McMAHON / Donna Thompson ) # 19929 , M.E. AUSTIN # 19908, Suzanne Joy DEARNLEY # 19945, J.A. CAMPBELL # 19903, M.L. CORNISH # 19898, J.A. DAHLBERG, D.M. CONNELL # 19891

&

 

 

Robert Bruce SPEARS

 ( late of Port Macquarie )

New South Wales Police Force

Redfern Police Academy Class # 227

ProCst # 98500

Regd. #  23854

Rank: Commenced training at Goulburn Police Academy on Wednesday 1 April 1987 ( aged 28 years, 16 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed 26 June 1987 ( aged 28 years, 3 months, 10 days )

Constable – appointed 26 June 1988

Senior Constable – death

Final Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations?, Liverpool, Kempsey

ServiceFrom 1 April 1987   to 9 July 1995 = 8 years, 3 months, 8 days Service

Awards: No find on It’s An Honour

Commissioner’s Medal for Valour – posthumously

National Police Service Medal – granted 9 July 2015 – posthumously

BornMonday  16 March 1959

Died onSunday  9 July 1995

CauseShot – murdered

Age36 years, 3 months, 23 days

Funeral date?

Funeral location?, Liverpool, NSW

Buried at?

Grave location:   Lat/Long: -31.462153 , 152.858907

Compass Rose Garden, Innes Gardens Memorial Park, NSW: 

 Memorial location:  Killuke St, Crescent Head’s

ROBERT IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

SenCon Robert Bruce SPEARS - shot - 9 July 1995 - Crescent Head
SenCon Robert Bruce SPEARS – shot – 9 July 1995 – Crescent Head

 

Bob Spears and his son
Bob Spears and his son

 

Touch plate for Senior Constable Robert SPEARS at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.
Touch plate for Senior Constable Robert SPEARS at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

 

Grave plate for Robert SPEARS
Grave plate for Robert SPEARS

Crescent Head memorial as of July 5, 2013. The memorial to Senior Constables Peter Addison and Robert Spears is being well cared for. 2013 marks the 18th anniversary of their death. Such a sad waste of the lives of such good men. Their bravery was exceptional. R.I.P.
Crescent Head memorial as of July 5, 2013.
The memorial to Senior Constables Peter Addison and Robert Spears is being well cared for.
2013 marks the 18th anniversary of their death.
Such a sad waste of the lives of such good men.
Their bravery was exceptional. R.I.P.

 

 

About 12.35am on 9 July, 1995 the constables were performing night shift at the Kempsey Police Station when they were called to a malicious damage complaint at the nearby township of Crescent Head. Having attended one address in relation to the complaint they drove to a dwelling in Main Street, Crescent Head. There they parked the police vehicle in a driveway and began to walk toward the front door.

At 1.22am an urgent radio message was received from Senior Constable Addison requesting urgent assistance. It was later learned that the offender McGowan had hidden near the carport of the dwelling and, camouflaged and armed with a high-powered Ruger rifle, had opened fire on the two police.

While withdrawing to the police vehicle Senior Constable Spears received a severe wound to the head and collapsed onto the ground. After exchanging shots with the offender Senior Constable Addison quickly sought help from neighbours. While apparently seeking a house with a telephone so he could call for assistance for his partner, he was also shot to death.

The murderer then committed suicide with the rifle.

At the inquest into the deaths of the two constables the New South Wales Coroner Mr Derek Hand commended both men for their extraordinary courage. Special mention was made of Senior Constable Addison‘s bravery in that “No-one would have blamed him if he had decided to seek safety. Not only was he obviously concerned about Constable Spears but he was faced with an armed man who could have caused much more death and injury in the neighbourhood”.

Mr Hand also commended the brave actions of Detective Senior Constable Michael Clark, Ambulance Officer Edward Hill and Mr Gregory Barnett.

Senior Constable Addison was born in 1959 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 6 November, 1981. At the time of his death he was stationed at Kempsey. He was posthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Medal for Valour.

Senior Constable Spears was born in 1959 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 26 June, 1987. At the time of his death he was stationed at Kempsey. He was posthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Medal for Valour.

 


 

New South Wales. State Coroner (1995). [Inquests into the deaths of Robert Bruce Spears, Peter John Addison and John Craig McGowan : transcript of the Coroner’s address, findings and recommendations of 13 October 1995.]. New South Wales State Coroner’s Court, [Penrith, N.S.W  ( no link )

 

 


 

Commemorative service
10:30am, Thursday 9 July 2015
Addison/Spears memorial site
Corner of Baker Dr and Killuke Cr,
Crescent Head

Valour not forgotten

 

A ceremony this month will mark the 20th anniversary of one of our darkest days.

STORY SHAUN FEWINGS
PUBLIC AFFAIRS BRANCH

On the face of it, it was a routine call to a domestic violence complaint but within an hour two police officers were ambushed and shot dead.

When Kempsey-based police officers, Senior Constables Peter Addison VA and Robert Spears VA arrived in the small mid north coast town of Crescent Head, they came under attack from a hidden assassin. Local electrician John McGowan was drunk and dressed in camouflage gear, hiding near a car port on his Walker Street property.

The 35-year-old, armed with a high-powered modified Ruger 14 rifle, opened fire on the officers as they got out of their 4WD. The pair took cover behind their vehicle and exchanged shots with the gunman.

As Snr Cst Addison got back in the car to radio for backup, McGowan shot his partner in the head.

Snr Cst Addison ran to a neighbouring house to seek help but it didn’t have a telephone. He continued to exchange shots with the offender but was also shot dead. The killer then turned the gun on himself.

It happened at 1.22am on 9 July, 1995 and remains one of the darkest days in the history of the NSWPF. The deaths led to major reforms, including the introduction of automatic pistols and bullet proof vests for first response officers, improved radio equipment and coverage, and advances in police tactical training.

A special ceremony will mark the 20th anniversary of their deaths at a memorial site within the town. Commissioner Andrew Scipione will present the widows of Senior Constables Addison and Spears with National Police Service Medals in honour of their courage, service and diligence.

Today the ranks of the NSWPF are filled with many officers too young to remember the Crescent Head shootings but who remain protected by the legacy of two brave police officers.July 2015Police Monthly3

Police Monthly July 2015 – Addison_Spears.pdf

 


 

The medals awarded to widows of Peter Addison and Robert Spears. Picture: Lindsay Moller
The medals awarded to widows of Peter Addison and Robert Spears. Picture: Lindsay Moller


$18 loader may have saved police life
Feb. 6, 2001, 9:02 p.m.

ONE of two police officers killed after being ambushed by a drunken gunmen at Crescent Head in 1995 may have survived if he had been issued with an $18 speedloader the Industrial Relations Court has been told.

NSW WorkCover Authority is proceeding with eight summonses against the Crown over alleged Occupational, Health and Safety Act breaches by the NSW Police Service stemming from the shooting deaths of Kempsey policemen, Senior Constables Robert Spears and Peter Addison.

The matter, being heard by Justice Hungerford, began in Sydney on Monday and is expected to take three weeks to complete.

Senior Constables Addison and Spears, both Port Macquarie residents, were shot by John McGowan on July 9, 1995 when they went to investigate a domestic violence complaint.

In the preceding Coronial Inquest, Coroner Derrick Hand found the two officers had been ‘massively outgunned’, lacked bulletproof vests and were hampered by poor radio communications.

WorkCover alleges the breaches of the Act contributed to the deaths of the policemen and specifically refers to inadequate equipment and training and the alleged failure to provide self-loading firearms.

When the officers arrived at the home of McGowan he was armed .223 calibre Ruger Rifle.

Constable Spears was shot dead in McGowan’s first salvo before Const. Addison managed to enter a house across the road to use a phone for help, when he was told there was not one he left the house only to be shot dead himself.

McGowan then shot himself.

WorkCover alleges the Crown failed to ensure the health and safety of Const. Addison and Spears by not providing them with a speedloader or a self-loader weapon such as a the 9mm Glock pistol, which holds 17 rounds, now used by the service.

WorkCover’s Barrister Steven Crawshaw told the court a speedloader, a round device used to load all six bullets into the then standard police weapon, a .38 Smith and Wesson, would have let Const. Addison reload more efficiently under pressure.

Police Service Barrister, Peter Hastings, QC, told the court Const. Addison did not appear to be reloading at the time he was killed so the issue was irrelevant.

The officers were issued with speed strip reloaders that enable rounds to be loaded two at a time.

The court heard Const. Addison had fired all six rounds from his revolver and investigators found his unused speed strip lying near his body.

WorkCover has also alleged that the police service failed to provide the two officers with training addressing in a practical way the tactics to be employed in a high-risk situation such as they were faced with and the systems the police service had in place to ensure training was deficient.

http://www.portnews.com.au/story/983236/18-loader-may-have-saved-police-life/


 

Training of police attacked
May 3, 2001, 9:06 p.m.

SIX years after the shooting deaths of two Kempsey police officers a NSW court has found the NSW Police Service negligent in not providing adequate training and communications for the officers.

Senior Constables Robert Spears and Peter Addison, both Port Macquarie residents, were gunned down by a drunken John McGowan when they went to investigate a domestic violence complaint at Crescent Head on July 9, 1995.

NSW WorkCover, in January, started proceedings against the NSW Police Service through the NSW Industrial Relations Court over breaches of the Occupational, Health and Safety Act in relation to the deaths of Constables Addison and Spears.

On Wednesday, Justice Barrie Hungerford found that the NSW Police Service failed to provide adequate training and radio equipment.

Justice Hungerford found that the radio communications equipment was inadequate.

In the judgement Justice Hungerford said Senior Constable Spears and Addison were placed at risk of injury in that they could not communicate with other officers and vice versa.

“This created a working environment in which there was a greater risk of physical harm,” he said.

Justice Hungerford said there was evidence that supported the proposition that the officers concerned had not received up-to-date training in the various matters relevant to operational situations.

“Those subject matters, specifically, were weapons handling, tactics in high-risk situations, method of approach to buildings, concealment and the use of lights and torches.

“The very nature of the circumstances as they existed at Crescent Head during the subject incident made relevant the type of training the two officers had not recently received,” Justice Hungerford said.

Justice Hungerford dismissed eight other charges brought against the NSW Police Service by WorkCover relating to firearms, firearm equipment and training and operational duties.

The case was adjourned for a number of weeks to give the Police Service time to prepare mitigating evidence to be presented to Justice Hungerford before he announces the penalty.

On that night in 1995, after talking to a woman complaining of domestic violence threats, Constables Spears and Addison attended McGowan’s house in Walker Street at Crescent Head.

It is believed an altercation occurred between McGowan and the two officers. At some point McGowan produced a modified Ruger 14 rifle and the two officers retreated behind their 4WD.

McGowan then fired a number of shots at the officers while they sheltered behind their vehicle. Both officers returned fire from their position. A short time later Constables Addison and Spears got into the 4WD.

While Constable Addison radioed that they were in trouble McGowan shot Constable Spears in the head.

Constable Addison then again radioed that an officer was down before retreating across the road and entering a house in a bid to use a telephone to call for help.

After realising the house didn’t have a telephone Constable Addison left the house and exchanged shots with McGowan who was still beside the police vehicle.

A witness stated that then Constable Addison might have emptied his revolver while retreating to the rear of the house he just exited.

For reasons which were not clear, it is believed that Constable Addison attempted to go forward, with an empty gun and his torch shinning, but was shot dead by McGowan .

McGowan then shot himself and was found the next morning slumped on the lawn.

http://www.portnews.com.au/story/984635/training-of-police-attacked/


 

Police Service fined over shootings

THE NSW Police Service has been fined $220,000 for not providing adequate training to two Kempsey police officers killed in a shootout at Crescent Head in 1995.

Senior Constable Peter Addison and Senior Constable Robert Spears, both residents of Port Macquarie, were shot and killed by John McGowan when they went to investigate a domestic violence complaint in the seaside village on the night of Saturday, July 9, 1995.

NSW WorkCover started proceedings, in the NSW Industrial Court, against the NSW Police Service in January 2001.

NSW WorkCover alleged a number of breaches of the Occupational, Health and Safety Act in relation to the deaths of Constables Addison and Spears.

In May of last year Justice Barrie Hungerford found that NSW Police had not provided Constables Spears and Addison with up-to-date training in high-risk situation tactics.

Justice Hungerford described the offence as being ‘extremely serious’ and noted that the officers had not undergone mandatory training in the use and reloading of weapons, use of torches, defensive tactics and communications.

In assessing the penalty, Justice Hungerford said the action taken by the Police Service since that fatal day to develop training programs and its previously clear occupational health and safety record.

“It is not unreasonable to conclude, in light of the clearly dangerous nature of the industry in which the Police Service operates, that the fact it has a clear occupational health and safety record is a weighty factor in its favour…,” Justice Hungerford said in his decision.

“Another relevant subjective consideration is the action taken by the defendant in respect of the Police Service in developing training programs for police officers, including the important program of ammunition training, and its leading role in that respect compared with police forces in other states,” he said.

WorkCover NSW acting general manager Michelle Patterson said “this tragic incident highlights the need for all employers to undertake appropriate risk management and to provide adequate training so that employees are able to carry out their duties”.

http://www.portnews.com.au/story/988050/police-service-fined-over-shootings/


Their pops would be proud

The web of family connections and history has only brought the Addisons and Spears closer.

The trio of boys, their sisters, their parents, and their grandmothers are almost inseparable.

Next year, they will all attend Police Remembrance Day for the first time as a whole family to reflect again on the lives Bob Spears and Peter Addison.

Killuke St memorial Stone to Addison &amp; Spears - 2015
Killuke St memorial Stone to Addison & Spears – 2015

“It will be an opportunity for all colleagues to show we haven’t forgotten what happened,” Superintendent Paul Fehon said on Monday.

“It’s for us to remember, and for us to let the families know we will never forget their bravery.

“There was an impact on so many people.”

Police chaplain Father Paul Gooley will lead the service, which will be co-celebrated by Fr John Casey who was the LAC’s chaplain 20 years ago and conducted Sen. Const. Addison’s funeral.

Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione will then present the National Police Service medals to the widows of the two officers to mark the men’s heroism and diligence to duty.

Deputy commissioners Catherine Burn and Nick Kaldas will also be at the service, as well as former commissioners, politicians and the heads of Ambulance NSW and Fire and Rescue NSW.

Former State Coroner Derrick Hand, who investigated the murders, is another notable guest.

The general public is also invited to attend, with plenty of space available in surrounding parkland.

The slain officers’ families will lay wreaths, followed by Commissioner Scipione and fellow police.

The community are also able to lay a wreath. A reception will take place following the ceremony at the Crescent Head Country Club.

TWO families united in the most horrific of circumstances are forever joined through the generations.

Senior Constables Peter Addison and Robert Spears, both 36, were killed by a gunman after responding to a domestic violence call in Crescent Head on the Mid North Coast on July 9, 1995.

Their children Glenn Addison and Jade Spears, who were 16 and 15 at the time, met after their fathers’ deaths and went on to get married.

The pair, with their children Blake, 14, Joe, 12, and Charlie, 10, joined their mothers Liana and Kathy as well as family and friends today at a ceremony in the coastal town to mark the 20th anniversary of the tragedy.

Speaking on behalf of the family, Liana (Addison) Stewart, said their families would always be connected not only because of their loss but through the marriage of their children.

“There has to be good come out of this,” Liana said. “Our families will always be connected.”

Haley Addison and Liana (Addison) Stewart at the special 20th Anniversary ceremony. Picture: Lindsay Moller
Haley Addison and Liana (Addison) Stewart at the special 20th Anniversary ceremony. Picture: Lindsay Moller

Jade Spears with her son and husband Glenn Addison at Crescent Head. Picture: Lindsay Moller
Jade Spears with her son and husband Glenn Addison at Crescent Head. Picture: Lindsay Moller

 

She said the ceremony was a special day for the family and she knew “without a doubt” their legacy would stay strong.

“It’s nice they have never been forgot,” she said.

Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione presented National Police Service medals to the widows of the slain officers today in honour of the men, who gave their lives while attempting to apprehend an armed offender.

The Kempsey-based senior constables had been dispatched to Crescent Head to investigate a report of domestic violence in the early hours of July 9, 1995.

As they arrived in Walker St, the policemen came under fire from drunken gunman John McGowan, dressed in camouflage gear and hiding near a carport.

The officers returned fire as they sought cover behind their four wheel drive. Addison tried to call for back-up on their police radio when Spears was fatally wounded.

Robert Spears was fatally wounded trying to apprehend an armed gunman.
Robert Spears was fatally wounded trying to apprehend an armed gunman.

Peter Addison who was gunned down in the line of duty.
Peter Addison who was gunned down in the line of duty.

 

In a desperate bid to seek help for his dying friend, Addison ran to a nearby house but it didn’t have a telephone.

As he tried to enter another property, still returning fire, the 14-year police veteran was also shot dead by the gunman, who then turned his high-powered rifle on himself.

Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said the heroic officers had “stood their ground, defending themselves and their community from a cowardly assassin”.

“Peter Addison was not prepared to leave his wounded friend and colleague… together they made the ultimate sacrifice and we will never forget them for it,” he said

Their deaths led to major reforms within the force including the transition from revolvers to automatic pistols, bulletproof vests for first response officers, improved radio coverage and equipment as well as state-of-the-art tactical training for uniformed police.

 

Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione handing the National Police Service medal to Kathy Spears. Picture: Lindsay Moller
Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione handing the National Police Service medal to Kathy Spears. Picture: Lindsay Moller

 

The Spears and Addison families are connected by love and tragedy thanks to a marriage between the officer’s children. Picture: Lindsay Moller
The Spears and Addison families are connected by love and tragedy thanks to a marriage between the officer’s children. Picture: Lindsay Moller

 

Walker St, the scene of the Crescent Head shootings, on July 9, 1995.
Walker St, the scene of the Crescent Head shootings, on July 9, 1995.

 

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/families-of-slain-officers-peter-addison-and-robert-spears-united-by-love/story-fni0cx12-1227435275075


 

Crescent Heads police killings: Two decades on, ceremony will mark sacrifice made by senior constables on duty

Pair on night shift when they attended to domestic dispute call

Arrived to find gunman in camouflage gear carrying high-powered rifle

Gunman shot two policemen dead before killing himself

Tragedy led to major reforms within police force

IT WAS supposed to be a routine domestic violence call, but what happened next not only tore apart two families but also stunned a NSW coastal town.

Senior Constables Robert Spears and Peter Addison made the ultimate sacrifice when they were killed in the line of duty while protecting the community of Crescent Head on the Mid North Coast from an armed gunman on July 9, 1995.

Today is the 20th anniversary of their deaths and Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione has presented National Police Service medals to the widows of the slain officers in honour of the pair’s heroism and diligence to duty.

Spears and Addison, both 36, respectively the fathers of two and three children, had moved to the Mid North Coast for a better lifestyle.

The Daily Telegraph reported at that time that on the night on July 8, 1995, the officers had kissed their families goodbye and headed out for the late shift at Kempsey Police Station.

At 12.35am the officers received a distress call about a domestic violence incident at nearby Crescent Head from the former girlfriend of electrician John McGowan.

The scene after two police officers responding to a domestic disturbance call were gunned down by John McGowan.
The scene after two police officers responding to a domestic disturbance call were gunned down by John McGowan.

Senior police officers next to the covered body of McGowan.
Senior police officers next to the covered body of McGowan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When they arrived into the township around 1am, The Daily Telegraph Mirror reported the police officers were confronted by a drunken McGowan dressed in camouflage gear and armed with a high-powered rifle.

THE DAY MURDER CAME TO MY SLEEPY BEACH TOWN

The officers were armed with police-issue .38 Smith and Wesson revolvers.

A call for back-up was made around 1.22am.

A NSW police spokesman told The Daily Telegraph yesterday that Spears was fatally wounded first, having been shot in the head.

John McGowan shot and killed the two policemen before committing suicide in the street.
John McGowan shot and killed the two policemen before committing suicide in the street.

Unable to get radio assistance, the spokesman said Addison dashed to a nearby home to use the landline but the occupants did not have one.

On his way to a second house, Addison was shot dead.

McGowan then turned the gun on himself.

In the hours after the incident, police swarmed into the town, warning residents to stay inside their homes.

 Police guard lines route of Senior Constable Robert Spears' funeral at Liverpool.

Police guard lines route of Senior Constable Robert Spears‘ funeral at Liverpool.

 Glen Addison weeps as his brother Scott consoles him at their father's funeral.
Glen Addison weeps as his brother Scott consoles him at their father’s funeral.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Uniformed police link arms at funeral of colleague Senior Constable Addison.
Uniformed police link arms at funeral of colleague Senior Constable Addison.

 Police carry the coffin of Senior Constable Peter Addison.
Police carry the coffin of Senior Constable Peter Addison.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At that stage they did not know the gunman had killed himself.

It has been reported that police found his body around 9am.

Not long after the senior constables deaths, the fallen officers were awarded the Police Force’s highest honour, the Commissioner’s Valour Award.

Their deaths led to major reforms within the force including the transition from revolvers to automatic pistols, bulletproof vests for first response officers, improved radio coverage and equipment as well as state-of-the-art tactical training for uniformed police.

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione says the shootings of two police officers at Crescent head is the darkest day in the NSW police history.

Around 250 people gathered at Crescent head including families and friends of the dead officers where their widows were awarded with medals for officers valour.

“Senior Constables, Peter Addison and Robert Spears, walked into an ambush,” he said.

“Human instinct would demand you remove yourself from harm’s way in a situation like that, but not these brave officers.

“They knew they had to try to stop this gunman who could have gone on to kill or injure others.

“They stood their ground, defending themselves and their community from a cowardly assassin.

“Peter Addison was not prepared to leave his wounded friend and colleague…together they made the ultimate sacrifice and we will never forget them for it.”

A memorial plaque was unveiled in the town in 1996 just a few hundred metres away from the street where the officers were slain.

The plaque reads: “The Kempsey Shire Council on behalf of the community, has erected this memorial acknowledging the personal courage and sacrifice of Senior Constables Peter Addison and Robert Spears, who gave their lives while attempting to apprehend an armed offender on the 9th July, 1995.”

Police Commission Andrew Scipione joined a host of other dignitaries at the Crescent Head memorial to mark the 20th anniversary of their deaths.

A long list of dignitaries including former Police Commissioners, Tony Lauer and Neil Taylor, attended today’s ceremony to honour the officers for their bravery and dedication to duty.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/crescent-heads-police-killings-two-decades-on-ceremony-will-mark-sacrifice-made-by-senior-constables-on-duty/story-fni0cx4q-1227433992584


 

The NSW Police Heritage story

p 261 & 261

Historical Firearms

 

1920s to 1972 — REVOLVERS & SELF LOADING PISTOLS

Following the shooting murders of Senior Constables Peter John Addison and Robert Bruce Spears at Crescent Head, on the 9
July, 1995, the Police Association pressed for a serious review of the firearms on issue to general duties police, with the aim of having
the .38 special Smith & Wesson model 10 revolver replaced with a self loading pistol.

The model 10 had been in service for 30 years. Addison and Spears were shot dead by John McGowan, who was armed with a .223 calibre Ruger Mini 14 self loading rifle.

McGowan had several loaded magazines and his rifle was painted in camouflage paint.

The two policemen went to McGowan’s residence in Walker Street, Crescent Head, following a complaint that McGowan made threats to his former girlfriend. Addison and Spears exchanged shots with McGowan but were obviously outgunned. It appeared that when Spears tried to reload his revolver, the speed strip containing his ammunition fell to the ground. McGowan shot himself dead after shooting Addison and Spears and his rifle was found next to his body. It was estimated that McGowan fired 30 shots from the rifle,
with some of McGowan’s bullets hitting neighbouring houses and killing a stray dog.

Peter Addison joined the police in 1981 and Robert Spears had been in the police since 1987. Both men were posthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Medal for Valour.
Since the late 1980s, the adequacy of the revolver for police duties had been in question and the self loading pistol was favoured as a replacement for the Smith & Wesson model 10 revolver. In 1998, the Glock model 22 self loading pistol chambered for the .40 S&W cartridge was being issued to replace the .38 calibre Smith & Wesson model 10 revolver.

The Glock is not the first type of self loading pistol that has been issued to NSW Police.
From the late 1920s, until phasing in of the Smith & Wesson model 10 revolver in the 1960s, an assorted variety of pistols and revolvers were used for police use, many coming from confiscated and surrendered stocks as well as government purchase. Throughout this period leading up to 1965, revolvers such as the .32 Colt Police Positive, the Colt Pocket Positive and also the .38 special Smith & Wesson model 10, were issued to ranks below sergeants 1st class were issued with .25 calibre self loading pistols. While this may have been the desired mode of issue, the types of pistols and revolvers issued depended on things such as supply and availability.


 

 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Friday 14 July 1995, page 6

 

Firearms amnesty follows tragedy

SYDNEY: The NSW Government has announced a 12 month firearms amnesty effective immediately.

The Premier, Bob Carr, said yesterday that anyone who was holding an illegal firearm should surrender it to police.

” I have asked the Minister for Police, Paul Whelan, to widely publicise the amnesty, ” Mr Carr said.

” The amnesty means the owner of an illegal and prohibited firearm can hand it over to the police without fear of prosecution. ”

The Victorian Government announced a permanent gun amnesty on Tuesday and Mr Carr said then that he wanted an amnesty up and running in NSW as soon as possible.

He made the announcement yesterday after returning from the funeral of Senior Constable Peter Addison, who with his partner, Senior Constable Robert Spears, was gunned down outside a house at Crescent Head on the NSW mid-north coast on Sunday morning.

The pair had gone to the address in response to a domestic dispute.

The gunman, John McGowan, shot himself in the head later.

He had made his Ruger 14 mini-rank rifle illegal by attaching two magazines so the weapon could fire 30 rounds without reloading. The legal limit is five.

And police said the rifle was not licensed.

” The challenge we face here is that there was a gun, illegal under NSW law, in the possession of someone who did not have a shooter’s licence, ” Mr Carr said.

” Now obviously an amnesty that would drain the number of guns out of the community makes sense. ”

NSW had a gun amnesty after the August 1991 Strathfield massacre when Wade Frankum opened fire and shot dead six people in a suburban shopping plaza before turning the gun on himself.

In April 1994, the NSW Police Service switched on its Computerised Operational Policing System list, on which the name and address of every licensed shooter in the state is on the computer database.

There is a also a “persons’ of special interest” category on COPS which would cater for people with a psychological history of violence or a criminal record.

14 Jul 1995 – Firearms amnesty follows tragedy – Trove


 

 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Monday 10 July 1995, page 1

Coastal holiday village woken to the sound of murder

 

KEMPSEY: The serenity of a north-coast township was broken early yesterday when two police officers were shot dead while on duty and their killer committed suicide by turning his gun on himself.

Police said that just after 1am Senior Constables Peter Addison and Robert Spears, both aged 36, had arrived at a house in Crescent Head, 21km south-east of Kempsey, in response to a call about malicious damage to a car.

Within minutes, the pair, who had transferred to Kempsey with their young families about six months ago, were gunned down as they walked toward the house, by a man reportedly drunk and depressed over a failed love affair.

Police have confirmed that no one else was in the house with the man.

Nearby residents heard a series of shots and shouting then further blasts from a semi-automatic rifle as 35-year-old electrician John McGowan tried to comprehend his deed.

Special Protection Group members and negotiators from Sydney were rushed to the house, and residents were warned to stay in doors.

Traffic was barred from entering the town.

Anita Crowley, who lives a few streets away from the shooting, said she was woken up by the shots.

“I thought it was firecrackers,” she said. “I heard somebody shouting and yelling ‘ get down ‘.”

Police said negotiators were assessing the situation when, just before 9am, McGowan’s body was found on the front lawn of the house. He had turned the gun on himself and died from a single gunshot wound to the head.

The small town is now trying to come to terms with how a man who seemed “just a normal bloke” could shoot two police officers.

One resident, who did not want to be named, said McGowan was well-known. “He was just a normal bloke, just a resident of Crescent Head,” the man said.

“He was a bloke who would go to the club once a week, have a drink with mates, go to work five days a week.”

Another resident, who lives close to Walker Street, said: “This is just a quiet little holiday village where people come to enjoy themselves. This is the last thing you would expect from it.”

Kempsey’s Mayor, Stuart McIntyre, whose shire takes in Crescent Heads, said the shootings were an “absolute disaster” for the close-knit community, which has a population of 1200.

“It has absolutely stunned everybody,” Mr McIntyre said. “It’s one of those things which you think could never happen here.”

NSW Police Commissioner Tony Lauer said he was deeply saddened by the shooting.

“Two young police officers, going about their duties with commitment and dedication, have made the ultimate sacrifice while protecting their community,” Mr Lauer said in a statement. “These tragic events remind us of the unforeseen possibilities any police officer can face while performing their duties.”

NSW Police Association secretary Lloyd Taylor described the killings as “bad and a bloody disastrous day in policing”.

“Policing can be at times a mundane, sedentary job but it is also a job in which you can pay with your life,” Mr Taylor said.

He said the association had sent members to Kempsey to help the dead officers’ wives and children cope with the tragedy.

Local National Party MP Bruce Jeffery called for police to be issued with bullet-proof vests or soft body armour for all potentially dangerous situations.

“What has happened has highlighted the degree of danger police can face every day,” he said.

“The potential cost of these vests is a small consideration when you consider they would be protecting lives.”

The deaths of the constables brought the toll of NSW police shot and killed on duty to six in the past 10 years.

In 1986, Sergeant Paul Quinn died of a gunshot wound received on duty at Bathurst; in 1988 probationary Constable Sharon Wilson died after being accidently shot by a colleague at Leeton; in 1989, Constable Alan McQueen died after being shot when he and his partner disturbed a man trying to steal a car in central Sydney; and in 1992 Constable Juan Hernandez died when he accidently shot himself during weapons training at the Redfern Police Complex.

A police spokeswoman said Senior Constables Addison and Spears would be buried this week. The results of McGowan’s post-mortem examination should be released early this week.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/128286561


 

 

 

 

 




Stephen John TIER

Stephen John tier

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  18680

Redfern Police Academy Class # 163

Rank:   Commenced Training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 9 April 1979 ( aged 18 years, 11 months, 6 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed Monday 25 June 1979 ( aged 19 years, 1 month, 2 days )

Constable – appointed 25 June 1980

Detective – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed 25 June 1984

Final Rank:  Detective Constable 1st Class

Stations?, Dapto – Death

ServedFrom 9 April 1979  to  24 July 1985 = 6 years, 3 months, 15 days Service

BornTuesday 3 May 1960

Age:  25 years, 2 months, 21 days

DiedWednesday 24 July 1985

CauseMotor Vehicle Pursuit – Driver, Princes Hwy, Kembla Grange ( Unanderra )

Funeral Date? 1985

Funeral location?

Grave location:  Lakeside Cemetery, Kanahooka Rd, Kanahooka, NSW

Memorial location: External Wall leading into Lake Illawarra Police Station and photo, on wall, inside Lake Illawarra Police Station

 

On 24 July, 1985 Detective Constable Tier was the driver, and single occupant, of an unmarked police vehicle engaged in the pursuit of an unknown vehicle on the Princes Highway, Unanderra.  During the pursuit the police vehicle left the roadway and collided with a telegraph pole.

 

The constable was born in 1960 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 15 January, 1979.

At the time of his death he was stationed at Dapto.

 

STEPHEN is mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Steve Tier holding his son, Joshua Tier.
Stephen Tier holding his son, Joshua Tier.

 

Det Cst Stephen John Tier
Det Cst Stephen John Tier – 20 April 1983 playing Police Football for Wollongong.

NSW Police Force Detective Constable Stephen John TIER Died in the line of duty. Unanderra, NSW 24 July 1985

NSW Police Force. This memorial is in recognition to the following members of the NSW Police Force who have made the ultimate sacrifice. Dedicated by the Lake Illawarra Local Area Command. 29 September 2014. National Police Remembrance Day.

2014-4855

2014-3505
Stephen TIER – Touch pad at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

 

Stephen John TIER - Grave

Stephen John TIER, Steve TIER
Stephen John TIER Memorial inside Oak Flats Police Station, NSW.


 

 

Police Remembrance Day:

Family members lay a wreath for Det Const Stephen John Tier. Picture: ANDY ZAKELI
Family members lay a wreath for Det Const Stephen John Tier. Picture: ANDY ZAKELI   Lake Illawarra Commander Acting Superintendent Andrew Koutsoufis to the left.

Almost 60 years on, Kenneth Nash still misses his uncle Allen.

Sergeant Allen William Nash, aged 40, was killed in the line of duty by a gun-wielding offender at Primbee in 1956.

Sgt Nash was one of eight officers stationed in the Lake Illawarra local area command who were recognised with memorial plaques on a wall of honour outside Lake Illawarra police station on Monday, as part of Police Remembrance Day commemorations.

Dozens of current and retired officers, families, friends, politicians, councillors and members of the public gathered at Oak Flats for a ceremony to unveil the memorial wall, and honour past and present officers.

 

Since 1862, more than 250 NSW Police officers have died in the line of duty.

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/2591540/lake-illawarra-officers-honoured-on-police-remembrance-day-photos/


 

 

Deadly toll

By Jonathan Pearlman
November 6, 2004

Alone in his patrol car, Chris Thornton had the police siren flashing as he chased a white sedan through Woy Woy.

Thornton, 35, a highway patrolman, had been in the force for 15 years. He was, his mother says, “the best driver I have ever seen”.

The reason for the chase that night in April 2002 is unknown. Both cars were seen travelling at high speed. Thornton was about 50 metres behind.

Meanwhile, Leonard Rowley, 56, an unlicensed driver, was driving to his local KFC to pick up dinner. He saw the first car flash past and judged – wrongly – that he had time to turn out in front of the patrol car. Thornton tried to avoid Rowley’s car but clipped the back, veered onto the wrong side of the road and hit a power pole.

Thornton died on the spot, which is marked by a permanent stainless-steel cross. Rowley later received a suspended two-year sentence.

“His life from the age of 12 was about helping people,” says Thornton’s mother, Freada Thornton. “He was in the surf club and he was there to rescue people and then he went into the force and he was doing the same thing.” His father, Barry Thornton, says: “He loved life. He had been in Gosford for 15 years and was so popular with the community there.”

Police pursuits are, says Barry, a necessary evil: “If they don’t catch the criminals there will be more deaths on the roads. The ones that they’re in pursuit of are the idiots that have done the wrong thing to start with.”

But pursuits have come at a cost to the NSW Police Department. Fifteen officers have died as a result of high-speed chases, beginning with the death of Constable George Boore in 1937.

Details provided by the NSW Police Association show a steady stream of fatalities involving cars and motorcycles. The full list of casualties is as follows:

April 2, 1937: Constable George Boore;

June 2, 1954: Constable Cecil Sewell;

November 14, 1958: Constable Brian Boaden;

December 23, 1958: Constable William Lord;

October 14, 1961: Constable James Kinnane;

September 7, 1963: Constable Colin Robb;

December 2, 1976: Constable Terry Moncur;

January 3, 1985: Constable Wayne Rixon;

July 25, 1985: Detective-Constable Stephen Tier;

October 20, 1987: Constable Themelis Macarounas;

August 24, 1988: Constable Peter Carter;

June 13, 1989: Constable Peter Figtree;

June 14, 1989: Senior Constable Glenn Rampling;

January 14, 2001: Senior Constable James Affleck;

April 13, 2002: Senior Constable Christopher Thornton.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/Police-Pursuits/Deadly-toll/2004/11/05/1099547386960.html


 

 




John Henry WALTON

John Henry WALTON

( late of Westleigh, NSW )

NSW Police Training Centre – Redfern Academy – Class  084A

New South Wales Police Force

Regd #  9727

Joined NSW Police Force via the NSW Police Cadet system on 7 July 1958 but appears to have resigned on 7 July 1958 before re-joining around 1960.

Cadet # 1451

Rank:  NSW Police Cadet – commenced Monday 7 July 1958 until 7 July 1958.

Probationary Constable – appointed 15 August 1960

Constable – appointed 15 August 1961

Constable 1st Class – appointed  15 August 1966

Detective – appointed 22 March 1968

Detective Senior Constable – appointed 15 August 1970

Detective Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 28 April 1976

Final Rank:  Detective Sergeant 3rd Class

Stations:  Police Training Centre ( 150860 – Trainee ), Regent St ( 2 Division GDs from 190960 ), Regent St ( Traffic – Probation from 030161 ), Regent St ( Traffic – Permanent from 030261 ), Wagga Wagga ( transfer cancelled ), Canowindra ( GDs from 080563 ), 11 Division ( GDs from 101163 ), Vice Squad – H.Q. ( from 220365 ), Darlinghurst ( 3 Division – Vice Squad from 251065 ), Liverpool ( 22 Division – C.I. Duties from 280966 ), 9 Division ( C.I. Duties from 250869 ), C.I.B. – Special Crime Squad ( from 260273 ), C.I.B. – Armed Hold-up Squad to death

Service:  From 7 July 1958 to 7 July 1958.

Pre August 1960  to 23 June 1978 = 18+ years Service

Awards:  No Find in Australian Honours

Born:  Sunday  22 June 1941

Died on:  Friday  23 June 1978 ( day after his 37th birthday )

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – passenger

Event location:  Carlingford Rd & Glenview Parade, Carlingford

Age: 37 yrs  1 day

Funeral date:  Tuesday  27 June 1978

Funeral location: Macquarie Park Cemetery & Crematorium, Delhi & Plassey Rd, Macquarie Park, NSW

Buried at: RC Lawn, Block 12 / 0445

GPS:  Lat: -33.790614478   Long:  151.142994

INSCRIPTION: In loving Memory of John WALTON Died 23rd June 1978 Aged 37 years Beloved husband of Christine and father of Karen and Greg. and his beloved wife Christine Walton Died 24th March 1981 Lovingly remembered by the children

Grave Location

 

John Henry WALTON National Touch Plate, Canberra
John Henry WALTON
National Touch Plate, Canberra

JOHN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

About 2.45am on 23 June, 1978 Sergeant Walton was a passenger in a police vehicle travelling along Carlingford Road, Carlingford. A vehicle approaching in the opposite direction drove onto the incorrect side of the roadway, forcing the police vehicle off the road where it collided with a parked horse float which was parked, without lights, on the southern side of Carlingford Rd at the intersection of Glenview Parade. Detective Sergeant Walton was killed instantly.  Extensive inquiries made to locate the driver of the unknown vehicle responsible for this accident have to date proved unsuccessful.

 

The sergeant was born in 1941 and joined the New South Wales Police Force, as a Cadet, on 7 July 1958. At the time of his death he was attached to the Armed Hold-up Squad.

 

Beyond Courage


 

Prior to joining the NSWPF, John was a Junior Clerk for 10 months then joined the NSWPF Cadet system from the 7 July 1958 and finished on the 17 August 1958 for reasons unknown to me.

He then appears to have been a General Hand for 4 months and then a Clerk for 18 months before coming back to the NSWPF – Attesting as a Probationary Constable on the 15 August 1960.  His re-join date is also unknown to me.

He was 5′ 11″ tall, 12 stone 12 lb in weight with Hazel eyes, brown hair and of a medium build.  He was born in Young, NSW and was single at the time of joining but married on 23 November 1963.  He obtained his School Intermediate Certificate.

He obtained an 82.5% at completion of Training Class 84A and he had a 23 w.p.m. rate of typing – on the 4 April 1961

He also completed a three day course in Civil Defence in 1961.

He passed his Constable 1st Class exams on the 22 September 1964.

He failed his first attempt at the Sgt 3/c exams on 18 May 1973 but passed on the 16 May 1974.

He passed the Detective qualification course on 25 October 1967 and was designated a Detective on the 22 March 1968.

On the 14 November 1977 he was ” Commended for the good policemanship, excellent teamwork and devotion to duty he displayed as one of the Police responsible for the prompt arrest of Phillip WESTERN, Michael STOGIO, Lawrence JOHNSON and Robert PATTEN for the armed hold-up of the Randwick Branch of the Bank of New South Wales on 29 December 1975. 

During committal proceeding at the Central Court of Petty Sessions on 28 April 1976 the Chief Stipendiary Magistrate, Mr. Farquhar, complimented him, along with all Police connected with the case while His Honour, Judge Muir, in passing sentence on the offenders made favourable comment regarding the briefs prepared by Police for the trial.

Mervyn T Wood – Commissioner

 


 

Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995),

Saturday 24 June 1978, page 3

IN BRIEF

Fatal crash

SYDNEY: Detective Sergeant John Henry Walton, 37, was killed and Detective Senior Constable John O’Hagan, 33, was seriously injured when a police car driven by Detective O’Hagan ran into a horse-float in Epping early yesterday.

24 Jun 1978 – IN BRIEF Bicentenary planning to begin soon – Trove