Renee Anne LONGFORD

Renee Anne LONGFORD

NSW Goulburn Police Academy PREP Class # 268

Married to NSWPF Member Sgt Peter Cotton, # ?????

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 31467

Rank:  Commenced Training at Goulburn Police Academy on Sunday 17 November 1996 ( aged 19 years & 20 days )( spent 5 months, 29 days at Academy )

Probationary Constable – appointed Friday 16 May 1997 ( aged 19 years, 6 months, 18 days )

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1/c – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed ? ? 2008?

Final Rank:  Sergeant

Stations?, Liverpool GDs( 22 Division )( May 1997 – 2000 ), Cabramatta GDs( 34 Division )( 2000 – ? )( involved in Operation Puccini ), Picton GDs ( Sgt )( 35 Division ), Bowral ( 2008 – death )

ServiceFrom 17 November 1996 to 24 January 2012 = 15 years,  2 months, 7 days Service

Awards:  No find on Australian Honours system

Born:  Friday  28 October 1977

Died on:  Tuesday  24 January 2012

 

Cause:  Cancer ( Angiosarcoma )

Age:  34 years, 2 months, 24 days

Event Date: Diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of cancer since late 2010

Funeral date:  Friday  10 February 2012 @ 12.30pm

Funeral location:  St John’s Anglican Church, Menangle Rd, Camden, NSW

Buried at:  Cremated – Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Leppington, NSW

Memorial: NSW Police Force Service Memorial Wall, Sydney Police Centre, Surry Hills, E10 ( right wall )

 

Renee Anne LONGFORD

Renee Anne LONGFORD, Renee LONGFORD
Photo: Courtesy of Joe Stanioch # 14194 Liverpool Police History

 

RENEE is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

This is a song I ( Tom Longford ) started writing for Renee when she was first diagnosed with Angiosarcoma.

After completing the first verse, I had optimistically hoped that each subsequent verse would be brighter than the last, and that the song would eventually include a happy ending.

Unfortunately, I was never given the opportunity to add anything positive for the rest of Renee’s battle.

I finished the song after we lost Renee and shared it with our Parents and our Brother.

I hope to one day record it properly with my band – but at this stage, if you’re interested in listening, you’ll just be hearing a version recorded via web-mic on my laptop.

Renee Anne LONGFORD


 

Sergeant Longford, of Picton, died on January 24 after battling a rare and aggressive form of cancer since late 2010.

She served as a police officer for 14 years and worked at Liverpool and Cabramatta before she began working at Bowral in 2008.

Superintendent Worboys said Sergeant Longford would be remembered as an excellent communicator who was positive about her duties, with no task ever too big or small.

“Sergeant Longford was the sort of officer that police commanders just want to have around,” he said.

“Renee was just as good at chasing and catching criminals as she was comforting victims of crime.

“She will be sadly missed and our thoughts are with her family.”

(20+) Facebook


LONGFORD, Renee Anne
28.10.1977 – 24.1.2012
Beloved wife of Peter,
loving Mum of Dean, Jake and Emma.
Very much loved daughter of Dell and John,
loved sister of David & Nat, and Tim & Alison.
Will be sadly missed by all her family and friends.
Aged 34 years
Forever in our hearts
RENEE’s relatives and friends are warmly invited to attend her Funeral Service to be held in St John’s Anglican Church, Menangle Road, Camden on Friday, 10th February 2012, commencing at 12.30pm.
Following the service the cortege will proceed to Forest Lawn Crematorium.
In lieu of flowers, donations to cancer research would be appreciated, a donation box will be available at the church.
Macarthur Lady Funerals Family
Owned & Operated Narellan/Camden 4647 9294
Campbelltown 4648 4388
NSW FDA

 

 

 

Published in The Daily Telegraph on Feb. 6, 2012.

 

‘Humbling’ farewell to policewoman

Sgt Longford died on January 24 after battling a rare and aggressive form of cancer since late 2010.

She served as a police officer for 14 years and worked at Liverpool and Cabramatta before she began working at Bowral in 2008.

Sgt Longford and husband Peter Cotton, a police officer based at Picton, have three children, Dean, Jake and two-year-old Emma.

Sgt Cotton said his wife was also step mother to two of his children from a previous relationship.

About 500 people attended the service at St John’s Anglican Church in Camden, among those Sgt Longford’s colleagues, some wearing plain clothes and others in uniform.

Sgt Cotton said the rain stopped when his wife was brought to the family home before the funeral and the wet weather held off until after the service.

A police guard of honour saluted Sgt Longford as she was taken into the church and Sgt Cotton said it was only when leaving that he realised how many people had come to pay their respects to his wife.

“They lined the road way and it surprised me on the way out because I knew how many people we had left behind (in the church).

“I’ve done a lot of police funerals in my time and it was one of the biggest I had been to let alone been involved with.”

Sgt Cotton said a second service was then held at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Leppington, where the police guard of honour continued the display respect.

He said Goulburn LAC commander Superintendent Gary Worboys and family friends Ben and Tim Mallott were among those who spoke about Sgt Longford at the service.

Supt Worboys said Sgt Longford’s funeral was a fitting tribute to her dedication to her job as a police officer.

He said Sgt Longford would be remembered as an excellent communicator that was positive about her duties, with no task ever too big or small.

“Sgt Longford was the sort of officer that police commanders just want to have around,” he said.

“Renee was just as good at chasing and catching criminals as she was comforting victims of crime.

“She will be sadly missed and our thoughts are with her family.”

Sgt Cotton said the service was the best the family could have hoped for.

“It was quite humbling and quite fitting.

“I’m very proud that she’d touched the hearts of so many people.”

Renee Anne LONGFORD, Renee LONGFORD
Sgt Longford being taken into St John’s Anglican Church in Camden on Friday for an official police funeral service. Photo by Jeff de Pasquale

 

Renee Anne LONGFORD, Renee LONGFORD
Colleagues of Sgt Longford, led by Senior Constable Natalie Innes, speaking at the funeral service on Friday. Photo by Jeff de Pasquale

‘Humbling’ farewell to policewoman | Southern Highland News | Bowral, NSW


Officer fights against cancer

 

RENEE LONGFORD isn't letting an aggressive form of cancer plaguing her body defeat her.
RENEE LONGFORD isn’t letting an aggressive form of cancer plaguing her body defeat her.

 

Tracey Bailey, Jill Linford, Dareen Farr and Renee and Emma Longford catch up at Bowral Police Station last week.Photo by Ben McClellan
Tracey Bailey, Jill Linford, Dareen Farr ( # 23446 ) and Renee and Emma Longford catch up at Bowral Police Station last week.Photo by Ben McClellan

 

RENEE LONGFORD isn't letting an aggressive form of cancer plaguing her body defeat her.
Picton bowling day organisers Constable Leisa Faulkner and Constable Kim Rutley, Renee Longford, Picton Bowling Club GM Debbie Egan and Mens Bowls president Bob Lang last December.  Photo by Jonathan Ng

 

The Bowral police sergeant, who has been off work since September last year, dropped in on some of her colleagues last week to thank them and the community for all the money raised to help her family.

A fundraising dinner at Mittagong RSL last November along with a host of smaller events and donations raised $47,255.

The family lives in Picton and a fundraising bowls day, where everyone was asked to don Ms Longford’s favourite colour yellow, was another success last December.

Ms Longford’s partner Peter Cotton, also a police officer , has retuned to work at Camden. The couple have five children between them.

The couple has three children, including a one-year-old, and Mr Cotton has two children from a previous relationship.

The 33-year-old has been an officer for 13 years and served at Liverpool and Cabramatta before moving to Bowral as a sergeant in October, 2008.

Ms Longford used the visit to publicly thank the Highlands community.

“Thanks to the business community for their donations and all my colleagues who have been fantastic,” she said.

“Thanks to Graeme Day for hosting the night and Tony Fountain for running the auction.”

Ms Longford has undergone six rounds of chemotherapy and she said the cancer around her hips and spine has stopped growing.

She said she was considering using an experimental kidney transplant drug that could help.

While she would never walk the beat again she was focused on getting back to work.

“I’d love to get back to work,” she said.

Bowral colleague Jill Linford said the station had been overwhelmed by the support the community had shown.

“It’s really, really nice,” she said.

Sergeant Darren Farr, one of the longest serving officers at Bowral, said he didn’t realise how much support was out in the community for the police.

Longford appeal

A BANK account has been opened with the BDCU to help Renee Longford and her family:

BSB: 802 101. ACCOUNT: 352 583. A/c NAME: Renee Longford Appeal

southernhighlandnews.com.au/story/1070377/officer-fights-against-cancer/


 

Renee Anne LONGFORD, Renee LONGFORD


 

Renee Anne LONGFORD, Renee LONGFORD


 

Summer Cruise Benefit Night

Saturday 15 January 2011

The Club hosted a Cruise Night on Saturday 15 January 2011 with proceeds going to Renee Longford, the daughter of one of our life members, John Longford.

​Renee was recently diagnosed with an aggressive type of bone cancer. The Club members decided to help by organising a cruise night at our clubrooms with all proceeds going to Renee.

The night started about 6.00pm and it wasn’t long before the car park was filled with Hot Rods, Customs and American Muscle Cars. There were many more vehicles parked in the street. All in all there were in excess of 100 cars.

The Flattrakkers provided the music for the evening and the kids were entertained with a giant jumping castle. The members were kept busy cooking the BBQ for the crowd of over 500 people. A monster raffle was held during the night with prizes donated by various members and other supporters of the evening.

It was a great night which was enjoyed by all and we thank everyone for their support. We were able to hand Renee an amount of $3000.00 which will assist her and her family during this difficult time.

A special thanks must go to Mick and Pam Cooley who co-ordinated the night as well as all the members who donated items for the raffle.

Here are a few photos taken during the night.


 

Renee Anne LONGFORD, The Highland's Way

Renee LONGFORD, Renee COTTON

Renee LONGFORD, Renee COTTON

Renee LONGFORD, Renee COTTON


 

 

 

 

 

 




Sally Elizabeth URQUHART

Sally Elizabeth URQUHART

AKA  ?

Late of  ?

Partner ( fiancée ) of Senior Constable Trad THORNTON ( Bamaga Police Stn )

Queensland Police Academy Squad #  ? ? ?

Queensland Police Force

Regd. #  4014432

Rank:  Commenced Training on 19 February 2001

Probationary Constable- appointed 4 September 2001

Constable – appointed ? ? ? 

 

Final RankConstable

StationsMetropolitan North Region – Hendra Police Stn ( 19 Feb 2001 – 13 Oct 2002 ), Cairns Police Stn ( 14 Oct 2002 – 10 March 2003 ), Aurukun Police Station ( 11 March 2003 – 21 August 2003 ),   Bamaga Police Stn ( 18 months ) – Death

Service:  From 19 February 2001   to   7 May 2005 4 years Service

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours

 

Born? ? ?

Died on7 May 2005

Age28

Cause:  Passenger – Downed Aerotropics flight from Bamaga to Cairns, Qld

Event location:   rugged mountain terrain 11kms northwest of Lockhart River Aboriginal Commission, Qld

Event date7 May 2005

 

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location? 

 

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: ?

 

SALLY IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/QueenslandFallenPolice/

 


 

In Memory of Constable Sally Urquhart

 

Sally URQUHART

Location:  Column 3 - Left leg, Rear portion, Row 4  Sally Urquhart
Location: Column 3 – Left leg, Rear portion, Row 4

 

Constable Constable Sally Urquhart and Senior Constable Trad Thornton on the northernmost point of the Australian Mainland.
Constable Sally Urquhart and Senior Constable Trad Thornton on the northernmost point of the Australian Mainland.

 

 

Constable Sally Urquhart registered number 4014432 was a Queensland Police Officer from the 19thFebruary 2001 until the 7th May 2005.

Constable Sally Urquhart was on-board an Aerotropics flight from Bamaga bound for Cairns when it crashed into dense rainforest and rugged mountain terrain 11kms northwest of Lockhart River Aboriginal Commission, killing all fifteen occupants on the 7thMay 2005. This tragic loss has affected the whole community in the Far North, in particular the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community of Bamaga and Injinoo.

Constable Sally Urquhart had been stationed at Bamaga Police station, with her fiancé Senior Constable Trad Thornton for the past 18months.

Sally was the eldest of three children born to Shane and Elizabeth Urquhart. She grew up as the daughter of School teachers and subsequently lived throughout Queensland.  Sally was a young lady born for success, she was school captain at both primary and high school; a model student.

In the words of her father,“ She touched the hearts of everyone she met from childhood to present, in the many parts of Queensland where we have lived ”.

After finishing school she went on to complete a double degree at the University of Queensland in Law and Science, winning the University prize for Family Law.

Whilst at uni, Sally shared accommodation with a police officer, Plain Clothes Detective Peta Ross and it was during this time that Sally set her sights on joining the Queensland Police.

Sally and her dog ' Prince '
Sally and her dog ‘ Prince ‘

After graduating from university, Sally commenced recruit training at the Queensland Police Academy at Oxley on the 19thFebruary 2001 and graduated on the 4th September2001.

Her first posting was to the Metropolitan North Region where she was stationed at Hendra. Even at this early stage in her Career Sally was showing signs of great potential. Her service history indicates that she excelled in all aspects of general duties and worked well in a team environment.

It was here that she met her finance, Senior Constable Trad Thornton. Trad was working in the Public Safety Response Team, (PSRT), at the time.

Sally was posted to Cairns Station on the 14th October2002, where she performed general duties in Team 4.  Her Supervisor / Team Leader identified early that Sally was an officer who was prepared to accept any responsibility or task and displayed a high work ethic.  She was well suited to general duties policing and excelled at all aspects of her work.

Sally’s professionalism and understanding towards all members of the public went beyond that of her duty as a Police Officer. She was always willing to assist members of the community and was commended by the then Assistant Commissioner Allan Roberts for her efforts.

Trad was transferred to Cairns a short time later and after 4 months, the pair were identified as suitable officers to work in the Aboriginal community in the Cape York Peninsular and were transferred to Aurukun Station where they policed from the 11th March until the 21st August 2003.

Aurukun is a station that has recently increased from 4 to 7 staff, with a population of approximately 1200. Most of the work involves policing aboriginal community which in itself is a huge task, the sacrifices that officers make to go there are enormous, however the life experiences are priceless.

Sally excelled in her work and she was involved with all levels of the community. Sally’s personality and demeanour ensured that she was readily accepted by the community. Sally had a presence about her that brought calm to situations that verged on mayhem and conflict. Whilst stationed at Aurukun her rapport with the community members was one of respect, trust and honesty.

These qualities and her dedication to duty ensured that The Queensland Police were respected, in a sometimes difficult environment. Sally’s attitude to work and her diligent and tenacious nature ensured that she was going to achieve whatever she desired.

Sergeant Andrew Clarkson ( current Officer in charge of Aurukun ) remembers Sally dealing with confronting and daunting situations that required great courage and composure. He remarks that Sally excelled in these situations, and it was reassuring to know that she was with you.

Sgt CLARKSON remembers her personality, her smile and her innate ability to say the right words at any given time making the rigors of policing Aurukun enjoyable. “ I will always remember the day that I was promoted to Officer in Charge, Aurukun not for the promotion, but for the way that Sally rushed over to me when she heard the news, gave me a hug and a kiss and then made a fuss over it all ”.

Sally was a selfless person who ensured that others would always come first. She was a dedicated police officer who values ensured that justice was served. When I heard of the tragedy, I pondered as to why could one who’s light shines so strong and bright be taken from us.

Local kids at Aurukun swimming pool
Local kids at Aurukun swimming pool

Policing within any Cape Community within the Far Northern Region is a daunting experience for police officers to say the least. Officers within these communities develop the ability to foresee behavioural changes within the community. Officers are exposed to a myriad of situations and events that test their abilities. To be tenacious, resourceful and professional at all times is sometimes a feat within itself.

Since the implementation of Alcohol Management Plans (AMP’s) communities have undergone a dramatic metamorphosis. With the lifting of the ‘veil’ of alcohol, policing within the communities has changed tact from the much talked about reactive policing style to a more proactive community based approach. This change has been embraced by the community and supported by both elders and councils.

Policing for female officers is compounded further by local culture and tradition. Male’s in these communities are reluctant to deal with female officers.  From my observations all the females that I have worked with at Aurukun have been able to establish a rapport and gain respect within the communities, that some male officers have failed to achieve. These officers have utilised their various skills and instincts to finesse and diffuse potentially volatile situations.

The ability to arbitrate, negotiate and resolve situations are attributes that police utilise everyday. Working within remote and isolate communities ensures that these skills are honed and developed to there absolute potential. The ability to endear oneself to a community and make a difference was never more evident, with the tragic loss of Sally. Elders and councillors from the community stopped me to talk to me about Sally and how ‘ good a person she was ’. Silas Wolmby an elder and traditional landholder of Aurukun stated to me that “ she made him smile, and he knew that she would always do the right thing. ”

From Aurukun she was transferred to Bamaga Police station. This area consists of 5 police. Sally was one of two female officers in Bamaga. The second being Senior Constable Joanne Bailey, the following comments are from Jo.

Sally was nothing more than a champion. She would undertake any task with such enthusiasm, whether it be major criminal investigations such as rape and indecent dealings to minor jobs that are required to efficiently run a small station. Sally was instrumental in organising court days and her organisational and leadership skills were way above her policing years.

Besides her policing skills, Sally had an amazing quality of ‘ brightening up the room ’. She was always genuinely happy to see you at any time and nothing was a bother. Her laughter could be heard across the houses, which would straight away make you smile.

Trad and Sally made many friends in Bamaga. Since they were engaged in June 2004, she shared her excitement with her closest friends. Her wedding plans were all sorted out, again she was organised down to the jelly beans on the table!

But it was not to be, and like many people from the Far North the 7th May 2005 will remain as the worst day they have ever experienced. But things are getting easier, and as a good friend of ours said recently, we are truly more blessed to have known Sally, even if it was only for a short time. She is sadly missed.

Sally's graduation day - pictured with squad mates Constable Krissie Warriner and Constable Mardi Watts
Sally’s graduation day – pictured with squad mates Constable Krissie Warriner and Constable Mardi Watts

Sally on Patrol in Bamaga
Sally on Patrol in Bamaga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Journal for Women and Policing

Pages 12 – 14

https://acwap.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue16.pdf


 

 

 

 

Fresh blow to air crash victims’ families

THE owners and operators of a commercial plane involved in one of Australia’s worst air disasters have launched legal action that could stop the victims’ families ever getting answers.

Two pilots and 13 passengers were killed in the May 2005 Lockhart River tragedy when an Aerotropics commercial flight crashed into a ridge line and exploded in flames, killing all on board during a flight from Bamaga.

In the latest roadblock for victims’ families, owners of the doomed aircraft have launched an appeal in a bid to block a wrongful-death lawsuit in the US state of Missouri, just weeks after the victims’ families won a legal battle to allow the case to go to trial in July next year.

Brisbane man Shane Urquhart lost his policewoman daughter Sally in the crash and said the long-running legal hurdles were “frustrating” and “ludicrous”.

“We’re talking about human lives here, ordinary people and they were all good people going about their daily business,” he said.

“There’s no such thing as closure, there’s no closure when you lose someone but there may be justice but that certainly hasn’t happened here.”

The horror crash was the worst air disasters in Queensland in more than four decades and claimed the lives of a leading scientist, a popular policewoman, three key members of a football team, and a 25-year-old mother of six.

The families allege in the Missouri court action that the aircraft had several defects and that the crash was “the direct and proximate result” of one of more of those defects.

The alleged defects include claims the plane did not contain an effective ground proximity warning system, it was not equipped with autopilot and flight instruments were either hard to read, confusing, or not in proper view.

Lawyers for the plane’s owners and operators who are being sued by 61 family members of the crash victims, the majority of whom live in Queensland, launched an appeal on September 6 against last months’ Brisbane Supreme Court ruling allowing the Missouri case to go ahead.

The appeal argues the Supreme Court ought to rule that the Missouri action is “vexatious and oppressive” and that “nothing relevant” could be gained in the overseas action over and above what could be gained in Australia.

The families are pursuing legal action in Missouri where they claim the aircraft was delivered, inspected and placed into operation.

The 61 family members are expected to fly to Missouri to give evidence or testify via video link.

In Missouri, a jury will determine the amount of damages awarded instead of a judge and there are no orders for costs as there are in Australia.

However it’s not yet clear whether the US case will run according to Queensland or Missouri law.

Toowoomba lawyer Pat Nunan has been representing the victims’ families for more than a decade and said the delays were difficult.

“It’s terrible and it’s had a great impact on the families of the victims,” he said.

“Litigation is one of the great stressors of all time and it has been horrendous for them.”

He said the families were desperate for answers.

“We’re trying to get their day in court to determine what actually did go wrong and make sure it doesn’t happen again,” he said.

“It’s like a hot dagger into a wound every time something comes up in these cases.”

Brisbane man Shane Urquhart lost his policewoman daughter Sally in the crash and said the long-running legal hurdles were “frustrating” and “ludicrous”.

“We’re talking about human lives here, ordinary people and they were all good people going about their daily business,” he said.

“There’s no such thing as closure, there’s no closure when you lose someone but there may be justice but that certainly hasn’t happened here.”

The appeal returns to the Court of Appeal tomorrow.

 

Fresh blow to air crash victims’ families | Morning Bulletin


 

 

Sahar Mourad

A father has revealed the chilling phone call he received moments after the horror plane crash which killed his daughter and 14 others on board.

The crash, considered one of Australia’s worst aviation disasters, led to the deaths of 15 people in 2005 after a plane struck a ridge in the Lockhart River, Queensland.

Grieving families of the passengers are still asking for answers after a Coroner’s Inquest and Senate inquiry failed to conclusively reveal what caused the crash.

Constable Shane Urquhart, whose daughter Sally was one of the passengers on the plane, has revealed the haunting words he heard immediately after the crash.

‘The phone rang and when I answered, it was Sally’s fiance Trad and I’ll never forget the words…He just very, very quietly said ”Shane, Sally’s plane is missing”,’ he told A Current Affair.

Since the devastating incident, loved ones have been looking for answers to what happened on the plane which caused it to crash.

Mr Urquhart said there’s ‘no such thing as closure’ and all the families’ victims deserve answers.

‘They don’t deserve or didn’t deserve what happened to them.’

The policewoman was due to marry Trad four months after the incident, but instead her fiancée and family were left with the heartbreaking task of burying her.

An inquiry into the crash found 19 different factors led to the fatal collision, with the main one being pilot error.

But Mr Urquhart does not accept this, saying the inquest took the easy decision to blame someone who is not around to defend themselves.

‘In aviation accidents where everybody has not survived, who are they going to blame? The pilots, because no-one is available to tell the story and it’s very, very easy to do that,’ he told the network.

The victims’ families lawyer Patrick Noona alleged there was something already wrong with the aircraft, revealing they would be taking legal action against the plane’s owners in the United States.

The insurers are fighting to stop the legal proceedings but nothing will occur until the case appears in the Brisbane Supreme Court next month.

If the families win then a wrongful death lawsuit will be heard in Missouri next year.

Mr Urquhart said his daughter would be cheering on the families saying, ‘don’t let the bastards win’.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/ill-never-forget-the-words-father-reveals-the-chilling-phone-call-he-received-moments-after-plane-crash-which-killed-his-daughter-and-14-others-on-board-in-mysterious-circumstances/ar-BBNVHOV?fullscreen=true#image=4

 


 

 

Lockhart River air disaster

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Lockhart River air disaster occurred on 7 May 2005, when Aero-Tropics Air Services Flight 675 crashed while on approach to land at Lockhart River Airport in Queensland, Australia, on a ridge known as South Pap 6 nautical miles (11 km) north-west of the airport.[2] All fifteen on board died as the aircraft was completely destroyed by impact forces and subsequent fire. The Fairchild Swearingen Metroliner commuter aircraft, registered VH-TFU,[3] was owned by Transair Ltd and operated by Aero-Tropics. The flight was scheduled from Bamaga on Cape York to the regional centre of Cairns, with a stopover in Lockhart River. It was the worst air crash in Australia in 36 years since MacRobertson Miller Airlines Flight 1750 on 31 December 1968.[4]

 

Investigation

The Queensland Coroner’s Inquest in 2007, found that, despite evidence that there were a number of issues leading up to the crash, pilot error was the prime cause. Families of those who lost their lives in the disaster have been highly critical of the Coroner’s findings and the deficiencies in the operations of the regulator, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), and the poor company structure and practices of Transair Ltd.

The investigation was aided by flight information from the aircraft’s flight data recorder. As the cockpit voice recorder was unserviceable, and had been for some time, the conversations occurring between the flight crew will never be known.

Senate inquiry

As a result of intense lobbying by the father of one of the victims, Constable Sally Urquhart, and others, the Australian Senate’s Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee resolved to conduct an inquiry into the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, its operations and other matters. The Inquiry was convened on 2–3 July 2008 at Parliament House, Canberra. As well as Mr Shane Urquhart’s submission, there were sixty others which were considered by the Inquiry. The vast majority of the submissions were highly critical of most aspects of CASA’s operations.[who?] Several people and organisations, including Mr Urquhart, supported their submissions in person at the Inquiry. In September 2008, the Committee Chair, Senator Glenn Sterle, released the report of the inquiry to the Transport Minister Mr Anthony Albanese and the public.

The recommendations from the report are:

1. That the Australian Government strengthens CASA’s governance framework and administrative capability by:

a. introducing a small board of up to five members to provide enhanced oversight and strategic direction for CASA; and
b. undertaking a review of CASA’s funding arrangements to ensure CASA is equipped to deal with new regulatory challenges.
2. In accordance with the findings of the Hawke Taskforce, that CASA’s Regulatory Reform Program be brought to a conclusion as quickly as possible to provide certainty to industry and to ensure CASA and industry are ready to address future safety challenges.
3. That the Australian National Audit Office audit CASA’s implementation and administration of its Safety Management Systems approach.

Further incidents

Following the Lockhart River crash, Transair in Australia went into liquidation in late 2006.[5] Aerotropics also no longer operates because the Civil Aviation Safety Authority cancelled its Air Operator Certificate due to ongoing safety breaches. Transair continued to operate its PNG business until 31 August 2010 when the company’s Cessna Citation ran off the runway on landing at Misima Island near Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea. The previous owner of Transair in Australia, Les Wright, died along with three others in the ensuing inferno. There was one survivor.

Notes

 

 

  1. Hans Mick (17 August 2007). “Lockhart River plane crash findings handed down”. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 14 January 2014.

References

 

 

Lockhart River air disaster – Wikipedia


 

Remembrance post Constable Sally Urquhart

10 years on we remember those lost in the Lockhart River Plane Crash

May 7, 2005, saw 13 passengers and 2 crew board an Aerotropics flight in Bamaga bound for Cairns.

Constable Sally Urquhart was one of those passengers heading to Townsville Police Academy for work and farewelled her fiancé at the Bamaga Airport.

Whilst enroute, their Metroliner crashed on ‘South Pap’ on the Iron Range about 11km from Lockhart River airstrip at about 11.44am.

Police commenced Operation Delta Devlin with Inspector Russell Rhodes as the Forward Commander for the Crash Investigation and recovery.
nspector Rhodes is now in his 4th decade of policing and he cited this job as his most demanding job as a Forward Commander as it was an extremely demanding search and recovery effort over a seven day period.

Whilst he had a very good team working with him, they were challenged by the tough terrain and weather conditions.

He said, “I do stress that it was never about us and no matter how hard it was going to be we were always going to do whatever it took to help those families.”

No one can prepare you for a sudden loss of a loved one. When it comes in tragic circumstances, it’s like a bolt from the blue that makes no sense at all.

Many of us in the QPS had the pleasure of working with Constable Sally Urquhart and treasure the time we had with her. She was an absolutely delightful young woman.

Beautiful inside and out, charismatic in nature, she was a little pocket rocket, smart as a whip, a dedicated police officer with so much potential to succeed. She was your typical girl next door and engaged to be married to a fellow officer later in 2005. Both were so excited to spend their lives together.

Constable Sally Urquhart was a much loved friend and colleague to many of us in the Queensland Police Service. Sal made our lives that much richer for just knowing her and she will always be remembered as a beautiful young woman, full of life and forever young.

Today ceremonies were held in Bamaga at the Airport and the Oxley Police Academy to mark the 10th anniversary of the plane crash.

Constable Sally Urquhart’s family were present at the Police Academy to hear the Commissioner of Police Ian Stewart and Mr John O’Gorman (Retired Police Inspector) pay tribute to Sally, honouring her service, at the 10th anniversary of her death.
In recognition of the shared tragedy of the plane crash, Sally’s nieces and nephews released 15 balloons for each of those who lost their lives 10 years ago at the Oxley Academy ceremony.

Our deepest sympathies go out to all the families and friends of those lost in the Lockhart River Plane crash 10 years ago.

They remain alive in our hearts and treasured memories will not be forgotten.
RIP Sally


 

 

Honouring victims of shocking fatal flight

A DECADE ago today, two pilots and 13 passengers boarded an aeroplane in Bamaga bound for Cairns – but they would never complete the fateful journey.

Memorial services will be held around the state today to remember the 15 people killed in the Lockhart River air disaster 10 years ago.

On May 7, 2005, an Aerotropics flight with 15 people on board from Bamaga to Cairns crashed into South Pap Ridge, 11km northwest of the Lockhart River Aboriginal commission.

Trad Thornton will be one of dozens of family members remembering a loved one taken too soon.

Mr Thornton, now a police sergeant based in Brisbane, was a senior constable in 2005 when his fiancée Sally Urquhart was killed in one of the worst aeroplane crashes in Australia’s history.

Constable Urquhart, a 28-year-old police officer, based in Bamaga and celebrated for her strong sense of social justice, was on her way to Townsville for a constable development course when she died.

Sgt Thornton will attend a memorial service at Oxley Police Academy for Constable Urquhart, who was killed only weeks before she was due to marry the fellow officer.

“She was an absolutely amazing person and an exceptional police officer,” he said.

“It’s just one of those days that I suppose is going to be etched in my mind for the rest of my life like the day we were going to get married and the day we got engaged.

Sally Urquhart and fiance Trad Thornton. Sally Urquhart died when the TransAir passenger plane smashed into a hill in May 2005 on approach to the Far Northern community of Lockhart River, killing all 15 people aboard.
Sally Urquhart and fiancée Trad Thornton. Sally Urquhart died when the TransAir passenger plane smashed into a hill in May 2005 on approach to the Far Northern community of Lockhart River, killing all 15 people aboard.

“I’m very happy that she will be remembered but it is my opinion you don’t ever get over something like this but you learn to live with it.”

He said Constable Urquhart was such an exceptional police officer that after only three years in the service she had the Chief Superintendent and Assistant Commissioner travel more than 1000km to talk to her about her career progression.

“It was very impressive to see two high-ranking police fly 1000km to talk to someone about their police career,” he said. “She was very well educated with law and science degrees and she was very capable.

“She had the perfect personality to be a police officer.” Sgt Thornton now has a family and two young boys but he said he would never fully recover from losing his fiancée.

“In my mind I am able to separate the emotion from the plane crash and talk about the investigation but when it comes to Sally it’s a closed book,” he said.

“I see things and try and do things I think Sally would want me to do.

“Instead of wasting a day grieving and dwelling on the past I’m going to try and think about the good times.”

Father, Shane Urquhart said he would never fully recover from the tragedy.

“We live with it every day still, 10 years on – it’s always there,” he said. “There’s no such thing as closure.

“The memorial is about remembering Sally and thinking of the 14 other innocent people who were just going about their lives.”

 

.au/news/honouring-victims-of-shocking-fatal-flight/news-story/7ac2cd090f61f20854e8520b89d20960


 

A Call From Lockhart River

 

This program tells the poignant story of a popular young police officer widely described as one of the ‘best and brightest’ in the Queensland Force.

Sally Urquhart was one of 15 people killed four years ago when a plane crashed at Lockhart River in a remote region of Far North Queensland.

It was categorised as the worst airline disaster in Australia for nearly forty years.

At the time of her death Sally Urquhart was engaged to a police colleague also serving in the Far North. In a call to her mother just before the flight, Sally talked about the upcoming wedding and described her fear of getting on the plane. “I just hate it… it rattles” she said.

Sally’s father Shane is a primary school principal, with no expertise of any kind in aviation.

But when official investigations into the crash left questions unanswered, he set out on a single minded mission that took him to the most powerful forums in the land – with consequences for everyone in regional Australia and beyond.

Transcript

A Call From Lockhart River – Australian Story


 

 

Plane crash families fight for justice

 

FAMILIES of the victims of one of Australia’s worst ­aviation disasters have been blocked by insurance giant QBE from long-running legal action in the United States.

Fifteen people died in the 2005 Lockhart River crash on Cape York, but relatives yesterday told The Courier-Mail how they were “shocked and appalled” by a court order to end a nine-year lawsuit in the US against part-owners of the ill-fated Cairns-based Aero Tropics airline.

Lawyers for QBE obtained an order from the Supreme Court in Queensland restraining the Lockhart River families from taking any action other than to dismiss the damages claim before the US courts.

Twelve years on from the tragedy, the father of police ­officer Sally Urquhart, who died in the May 6, 2005 crash, said families had been victims of “bully boy tactics” and “intimidation” by Australia’s biggest insurance company.

Brisbane schoolteacher Shane Urquhart, who lived in Caboolture at the time of the accident, said none of the families or their lawyers had been notified of the latest legal action before the court order.

“We’ve been fighting for justice for our lost loved ones for so long, and now we feel the judge and the legal system has been duped,” he said.

“It’s not just us, but anyone who gets on a plane in Australia needs to know the sort of bastardry one of the biggest aviation insurers in the country will use against victims of air disasters and their families,” he said. “None of the plaintiffs were informed. None of our lawyers contacted.”

QBE, according to its website, provides insurance to airlines, aircraft, airports, pilots, refuellers, baggage handlers and maintenance operators.

Reverend Mary Eseli’s son, Fred Bowie, and sister-in-law, Mardie Bowie, were among six victims of the air crash from the tiny indigenous communities of Injinoo and Bamaga, at the tip of Cape York.

 

“It has been an open wound in our hearts that has never healed,” she said.

“QBE has paid compensation and costs, where appropriate, in respect of the claims by relatives of the deceased passengers against the operator of the aircraft.”

Plane crash families fight for justice | Queensland Times

 


 

Sally URQUHART

Sally URQUHART
Sally URQUHART & her father

Sally URQUHART

Sally URQUHART
Father of Sally Urquhart

 


 

 

 

 

 

 




Edward BARNETT

Edward BARNETT

AKA  ?

Late of  Havelock, Victoria

Victoria Police Force

Regd. #  537

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Senior Constable

Stations?, Carisbrook – Death

Service:  From ? ? ?  to 1 February 1858? years Service

Awards: Victoria Police Star – posthumously awarded on Thursday 1 August 2019

Born: ? ? 1828 – 1829

Died on: Monday  1 February 1858

Age: 29

Cause: Murdered – shot through the right lung – exited out the left lung ( no doubt – standing side on to the bullet )

Event location: White Hills goldfield, near Carisbrook, Victoria

Event date: Monday  1 February 1858 shortly after 1am

Funeral date: Tuesday  2 February 1858

Funeral locationCarisbrook Cemetery, Majorca Rd, Carisbrook, Victoria

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: Carisbrook Cemetery, Majorca Rd, Carisbrook, Victoria

Methodist: Section 3, Row 9, Grave 15

Memorial located at: His Victoria Police Star is framed and hanging inside of Maryborough Police Station, Victoria

 

INSCRIPTION:<br /> Sacred to the Memory of Edward Barnett<br /> Native of Tallow, County Waterford, Ireland.<br /> Late Senior Constable of the Victoria Police.<br /> Who was shot dead while gallantly performing his duty in endeavouring to arrest an armed bushranger on the night of the 31 January 1858 on Havelock Diggings.<br /> This Tablet is erected by the chief Commissioner of Police, The Officers and Constables of the District as a mark of esteem and respect.<br /> "In the midst of life we are in death"<br /> https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/119635060/edward-barnett
INSCRIPTION:
Sacred to the Memory of Edward Barnett
Native of Tallow, County Waterford, Ireland.
Late Senior Constable of the Victoria Police.
Who was shot dead while gallantly performing his duty in endeavouring to arrest an armed bushranger on the night of the 31 January 1858 on Havelock Diggings.
This Tablet is erected by the chief Commissioner of Police, The Officers and Constables of the District as a mark of esteem and respect.
“In the midst of life we are in death”

EDWARD IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

BARNETT was attempting to arrest William BROOK, who had just murdered restaurateur Charles Lopez during an attempted robbery.

Fleeing the scene, Brook opened fire on Barnett, with a bullet fatally striking him in the heart.

Brook was later arrested and died of injuries sustained during the robbery of Lopez, whom had stabbed BROOK.  It took BROOK 16 hours to die.

BARNETT staggered only a few yards before he fell – calling out “Oh God, I am shot”.

 

 

Edward BARNETT 01 – VicPol – Died 1858 – Page 1

Edward BARNETT 02 – VicPol – Died 1858 – Page 2

Edward BARNETT 03 – VicPol – Died 1858 – Page 2

 


 

Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946),

Saturday 31 August 1929, page 6

GALLANT POLICEMAN’S GRAVE.

MURDERS OF 1858 RECALLED.

By H. A. Barnes.

ALMOST hidden by rubbish and weeds, a tombstone which was recently discovered in the Carisbrook cemetery recalls the story of a policeman who lost his life while gallantly pursuing an armed bushranger on the Havelock diggings in 1858.

The grave was found by Constable J. Casey, said residents of the district, who had been clearing the cemetery of weeds.

At the suggestion of police officials, it was decided to have the tombstone and grave renovated.

Half the cost was borne by the Chief Commissioner ( Brigadier-General Blarney ).

The Inscription on the stone had become almost unreadable, but it has been restored by recutting in a marble slab.

It reads as follows:

Sacred to the memory of

EDWARD BARNETT,

native of Tallow, County Waterford, Ireland,

Late Senior-constable of the Victoria police,

Who was shot dead whilst gallantly performing his duty to endeavouring to arrest an armed bushranger on the night of Jan. 31, 1858, on Havelock Diggings.

This tablet is erected by the Chief Commissioner of Police, the Officers and Constables of the district, as a mark of esteem and respect.

In the midst of Life we are in Death.

 

For official purposes, Senior-constable Brown, of Russell street, obtained the facts of Barnett’s death from newspaper files and police gazettes of 1858.

In those days Havelock went under the strange but pretty name of White Hills.

Thousands of adventurers flocked to the district when gold was discovered, and overnight, it seemed, every kind of crime was being freely committed. Life was cheaper than gold at White Hills.

The “hold-up” which resulted in the death of Senior-constable Barnett occurred early on the morning of February 1, 1858, according to records of the period, although the tombstones fixes the date as January 31.

Charles Lopez and his wife, who conducted the Gumtree Restaurant in a dimly lighted tent, were standing behind their improvised counter, checking the pile of money that had been received during the day.

Notes, silver, and gold-some of it won from the fields around them — had been sorted, and husband and wife were handling the money when three men suddenly rushed into the tent demanding liquor.

Lopez told them to “get out,” but they replied by dragging him into the street. What happened outside in the next few seconds is not known, but two shots were fired in quick succession. Mrs. Lopez ran after her husband, but could see nothing until she stumbled across the body of Senior-constable Barnett, who was then dying.

—————————

A graphic story of the shooting was told to the coroner at the time by Henry Bradley the cook employed at the Gumtree.

He rushed out of the tent to see Lopez chasing three men. As they raced past a store owned by a man named Thomas, one of the men turned and fired, but the shot did not take effect.

Lopez caught up to the armed robber, and in the struggle that followed another shot was fired. Lopez reeled, evidently badly hurt, but in almost his last breath he slashed and stabbed the murderer with a large knife, inflicting terrible injuries, Lopez then fell back dead. The robber turned and ran again, but this time Bradley and Senior-constable Barnett, who had heard the first shot, gained on him rapidly.

Weakened by loss of blood from his knife wounds, the fugitive evidently perceived that escape was impossible. He stopped suddenly in his tracks, and fired what proved to be his last bullet point blank at Barnett, who was then only two yards away. Crying “0 God, I’m shot!” Barnett stumbled forward and dropped dead. He had been shot through the heart.

His last bullet gone, the murderer again tried to escape, but Bradley and some miners eventually captured him. He was taken to the Carisbrook police camp, where he died from the wounds inflicted by Lopez. The murderer’s name was reported to be Joseph Brooks, aged 56 years, a native of America.

The murders had a remarkable sequel, according to facts mentioned in a recent issue of the “Police Journal ( Victoria ).

Barnett‘s death was deplored by many miners on the Havelock diggings. He bad been a popular and respected officer, and evidently as their own form of vengeance more than 1,500 miners set out to clear the township of “undesirables.”

They were in the mood for lynching.

Their first act was to set alight to a notorious place known as ” The Manchester. ” When nothing but ashes remained of this shanty, the mob marched through the town, and attacked the ” Star and Garter. ” No hand was stayed until the place had been wrecked. Liquor flowed into the street from broken bottles, jars, and barrels; and bonfires were made of the bedding and furniture.

The position of many places in White Hills looked desperate until a rumour of the finding of a wounded man at Tuckwell‘s called the howling mob away on a man hunt.

31 Aug 1929 – GALLANT POLICEMAN’S GRAVE. – Trove


 

Ovens and Murray Advertiser (Beechworth, Vic. : 1855 – 1918),

Tuesday 9 February 1858, page 2

 

MURDER AT HAVELOCK.

FUNERAL OF THE POLICEMAN.

On Tuesday the remains of Edward Barnett the unfortunate police constable, were interred in the New Cemetery, at Carisbrook.

The body was followed to the grave by Mr. S S Furnell, officer in charge of the district, and Mr. Inspector Hare, of Maryborough, and the whole body of the police stationed at Carisbrook, as well as by several friends of the deceased and gentlemen of the neighbourhood, amongst whom were F Call, Esq., P.M., R. Southee, Esq, Chairman of the Municipality of Carisbrook, and other members of that body.

The burial service was read by Mr. Furnell in a most impressive manner.

The deceased was much respected by the officers and men of the police force for his attention to his duties and general good conduct.

He was constable in charge at Chinaman’s Flat during the rush there, and performed his duties in a most satisfactory manner.

A tombstone, with a suitable inscription will be erected to the memory of the poor fellow.

FUNERAL OF LOPEZ

On Wednesday morning the remains of the unfortunate man Lopez were conveyed to their last resting place.

The melancholy cortege consisted of three vehicles, one or two horsemen, and a few of the diggers on foot.

The body was conveyed from Havelock to the old burying-ground on the Quartz Hill ( now Bristol Hill – 2019 ), Maryborough, where it was interred.

The grave was surrounded by many of the friends of the deceased during the ceremony.

09 Feb 1858 – THE MURDER AT HAVELOCK. – Trove

 

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/196827615/charles-lopez = this link has Charles Lopez having died on 8 Feb 1858 – aged 35.  No photos or other information.


 

Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954),

Tuesday 16 February 1858, page 6

THE MURDERS AT THE WHITE HILLS.

ADJOURNED INQUEST.

The adjourned inquest on the bodies of Lopez and Constable Barnett, was held at the Charlie Napier Hotel, Havelock Flat, White Hills, on Monday last, when the following evidence was taken : —

Samuel Edwards sworn : Am a blacksmith, residing at the White Hills. On the morning of the 1st inst., about one o’clock, was awakened by a great noise in the street.

Got up and ran in the direction that the other people were running. Got as far as a large tree, when I saw a man running in a stooping position. He got up and ran about 200 yards. I followed him, and got within six feet of him, when he snapped a pistol at me. The pistol did not go off. A policeman named Barnett (now dead), was running after the man Brook, who snapped the pistol at me.

Brook fired and shot the policeman dead. When the policeman received the shot he exclaimed, ” I’m shot to the heart.

The spring that he gave when shot knocked the man Brook down. I fell over him. They both fell together. I then took the pistol now produced out of the man Brook’s hand. I identified the man Brook, lying dead at the police camp, as the man who shot Edward Barnett, the policeman.

I heard two shots fired before I came out of my tent, and two afterwards. After Barnett fell on Brook there were no more shots fired. I handed over the pistol to the police. When the man Brook was running he kept his hand on his stomach. Did not see any wound on him.

Constable John McCormick deposed to having seen the bodies brought in to the police camp, and receiving the prisoner and the pistol from the last witness.

Dr. Cooper sworn : Deposed to having made a post mortem examination of the bodies of Lopez and Barnett, assisted by Dr. Dunne.

On the body of Edward Barnett found a gunshot wound two or three inches below the right collar bone. There were no external marks of violence.

On tracing the course of the ball, found it running backwards and to the left side, passing in its course between the first and second ribs, near the junction of the cartilage, through the anterior edge of the superior portion of the right lung, superior portion of the pericardium, perforating the superior vena cava and windpipe, thence through the posterior portion of the superior lobe of the left lung, and passing out of the chest between the fourth and fifth ribs at their angles, perforating the left blade bone about half an inch from the posterior margin.

The bullet now produced I found just beneath the skin. All the other organs were healthy.

The cause of death was the gunshot wound. The bullet exactly fits the pistol produced.

When the deceased Edward Barnett was brought to the police camp he was apparently dead, but gasped twice. I saw the wound in his chest which caused his death.

I also made a post mortem examination of the body of Lopez.

He was brought to the police camp immediately after Edward Barnett, and was quite dead.

I found a gunshot wound about two inches below and to the left of the left nipple. There were no other external marks of violence.

The ball had passed in a direction backwards, through the fifth rib, about an inch and a half from its articulation with the cartilage, through the anterior edge of the left lung, through the left side of the pericardium, then entering the root of the left lung, wounding the left pulmonary artery, and the left bronchial tube, passing out of the chest through the ninth rib, and was found just beneath, the skin, below the inferior angle of the blade-bone.

The bullet is the same size as the one that was found in the body of Edward Barnett.

The cause of death was the gunshot wound.

The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against Joseph Brook, now deceased.

— Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser.

16 Feb 1858 – THE MURDERS AT THE WHITE HILLS. – Trove

 


 

Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918),

Tuesday 9 March 1858, page 2

BALLAARAT.

The HAVELOCK MURDER.— Joseph Gibson, alias Laycock, alias Yorkey, was charged at the Police Court, on Friday, on suspicion of being concerned in the murder of the storekeeper Lopez and Senior Constable Barnett, at Havelock diggings, on the 1st February last. Detective Hyland proved the arrest of the prisoner at 5 o’clock on the same morning, and stated that he answered the description in the Gazette. Prisoner was remanded to Curisbrook. — Times

09 Mar 1858 – BALLAARAT. – Trove

 


Maryborough and Dunolly Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 – 1867 ; 1914 – 1918), Friday 10 September 1858, page 3

LOCAL INCIDENTS OF THE MONTH.

Edward Barnett. constable, Havelock, family residence Tallow, Ireland, £241 9s, died 1st February, 1858, (shot at the same time as Lopez);

10 Sep 1858 – LOCAL INCIDENTS OF THE MONTH. – Trove

 


 

 

 

 

 




Timothy David PROCTOR

Timothy David PROCTOR

AKA TIM

Son, Brother, Husband, Father to be – May you Rest In Peace

Late of Prestons

NSW Goulburn Police Academy Class #  333

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  52561

Rank:  Probationary Constable

Final Rank = Probationary Constable  Promoted to Constable

StationsLiverpool – Death

ServiceFrom  ? pre 27 April 2018  to  3 February 2019 =  10 MONTHS Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Posthumously Awarded the National Police Medal

Born: Thursday  15 June 1989

Died on:  Sunday  3 February 2019 at Liverpool Hospital

Age:  29

Cause:   Motor Vehicle Collision – Driver – Private vehicle “On Duty”

Event location:  Heathcote Rd – north of New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Hts

Event date:  Thursday  31 January 2019 about 2pm

Funeral date:   Monday  11 February 2019 @ 11am

Funeral location:   All Saints Catholic Church, George St, Liverpool, NSW

“Private vehicle parking is available”  Contact Cal@AustralianPolice.com.au for details

Wake location:  ?TBA

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   ?

 Memorial located at:   ?

Timothy PROCTOR

  TIMOTHY IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


Tim had attended the Pistol Range at Lucas Hts for Firearm Training in his own private vehicle and was returning to Liverpool Police Station to return his firearm when this collision occurred.
It has to be asked whether this collision would have been survivable, for Tim, had he been in a modern police vehicle with air bags.
Tim’s Life Support was turned off on Friday morning due to the horrific and non survivable injuries that Timothy suffered in this collision.


Rob Sasagi Cup flyer 2019 – in support for Tim


NSW Police Legacy – Tim Proctor Appeal

Funds to support Tim’s wife and unborn child.  Please follow the hyperlink just above and donate.

Death of NSW Police Force officer, Probationary Constable Timothy Proctor

The NSW Police Force regrets to inform the community of the death of a serving police officer after a crash in Sydney’s south last week.

Probationary Constable Timothy Proctor, aged 29, died in hospital this morning (Sunday 3 February 2019) following a four-vehicle crash at Lucas Heights on Thursday 31 January 2019.

P/Cst Proctor attested as part of ‘Class 333’ on Friday 27 April 2018 and was working in general duties at Liverpool City Police Area Command.

Commissioner Mick Fuller has extended his condolences to the Proctor family on behalf of the NSW Police Force.

“My thoughts are with Timothy’s wife Dianne, his family, friends and colleagues at this incredibly difficult time,” Commissioner Fuller said.

“Timothy was certainly well on the way to a wonderful policing career and was well respected by his colleagues and all who knew him.

“He joined the Police Force after being a volunteer fire-fighter and had a tremendous passion and commitment for all emergency services and the community,” Commissioner Fuller said.

P/Cst Proctor’s family has requested their privacy at this time.

https://www.miragenews.com/death-of-nsw-police-force-officer-probationary-constable-timothy-proctor/?fbclid=IwAR2zyBjdnGUPAbnHnEbBmJOpZCXDwXF-IVL4tWevk1Cc-zeXaEonEHJQIhE

‘Well respected’ policeman Timothy Proctor dies after head-on collision

A NSW police officer who was involved in a head-on crash in Sydney’s south last week has died in hospital.

Timothy Proctor, 29, a probationary constable who worked in the Liverpool region, was driving northbound on Heathcote Road at Lucas Heights about 2pm on Thursday when a Honda Civic crossed to the wrong side of the road and crashed into him and two other cars.

Mr Proctor was cut out of his car and rushed to Liverpool hospital, where he remained in a critical condition until his death on Sunday morning.

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller paid tribute to Mr Proctor’s time in the police force and offered his condolences to the man’s family.

“Timothy was certainly well on the way to a wonderful policing career and was well respected by his colleagues and all who knew him,” Commissioner Fuller said.

“He joined the police force after being a volunteer firefighter and had a tremendous passion and commitment for all emergency services and the community.

“My thoughts are with Timothy’s wife Dianne, his family, friends and colleagues at this incredibly difficult time,” he said.

Police Association of NSW president Tony King said his staff were “providing support on the ground with the family, friends and colleagues at the hospital since this tragedy unfolded and we will continue to support them as they attempt come to terms with the tragic loss”.

“Collisions like this are always difficult but it hits even harder when it one of your own involved,” Mr King said.

In the collision, the Honda Civic was driving southbound in the 100km/h zone when it failed to negotiate a bend, continuing straight and clipping a Toyota Yaris before it hit Mr Proctor’s red Honda Jazz.

The 65-year-old female driver of the Honda Civic was taken to Liverpool hospital, where she remained in a critical condition on Sunday.

Police said a Mitsubishi Triton which had been driving behind the officer was unable to stop in time and was also involved in the crash.

Two teenagers in the Triton and the driver of the Yaris were not injured.

Vision of the crash, broadcast by Nine News on Friday, shows the Civic travelling in the left-hand lane before it drifts across the middle lane and hits the officer’s oncoming hatchback.

Van driver Kamran Rowshanzadeh, whose dash cam recorded the crash, said he initially thought the car was trying to cut into his lane without using its indicator.

“Next thing I know it was actually drifting,” he said.

He was able to swerve around the cars as they impacted in the single northbound lane. “The car literally came off the ground and the back kicked up and I dodged it. It was just so sudden and so quick,” Mr Rowshanzadeh said.

He added that he heard the officer brake at the last second.

Mr Proctor graduated from the NSW Police Academy in April 2018, as part of class 333, and was one of 15 officers posted to the Liverpool region.

Speaking to the Liverpool City Champion shortly after his graduation, Mr Proctor said he was formerly a volunteer firefighter and had worked in IT repairing laptops before deciding to pursue a career in policing.

He said he had grown up in the area and noticed a “bad perception” of police, which he wanted to change.

Police continue to investigate the collision.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/well-respected-policeman-timothy-proctor-dies-after-head-on-collision-20190203-p50vdp.html?fbclid=IwAR3IX4PyL0b5fQzbtdxCi_akpNm9uBDoiTRXSWP4EoW8BVQkcjttXsD8WhY

WARNING:  VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC VISION & AUDIO


Liverpool welcome 15 eager police recruits

https://www.liverpoolchampion.com.au/story/5374318/welcome-to-liverpool-beat/

Shocking vision shows horror Sydney crash that left drivers, including junior cop, fighting for life

Warning: Graphic images below in this article.

Two drivers involved in a horror head-on car crash in Sydney’s south remain fighting for life in hospital, as shocking footage obtained by 9News has showed the moment both vehicles collided.

Emergency services were called to Heathcote Road, north of New Illawarra Road in Lucas Heights, about 2pm yesterday following reports four cars had been involved in a serious crash.

Timothy PROCTOR

Dashcam footage of the incident shows a Honda Civic, travelling south on the road, crossing a lane of traffic and then onto the wrong side of the road.

The vehicle first nudged an oncoming Toyota Yaris before smashing head-on into a Honda Jazz, driven by 29-year-old male probationary police officer Timothy Proctor from the Liverpool City Area Command.

Both the officer and the 65-year-old female driver of the Civic had to be cut free from their vehicles, and remain in critical conditions today at Liverpool Hospital more than 24 hours after the crash.

Timothy PROCTOR

It is understood the officer had just completed a training exercise at a facility in the area and was travelling in his private vehicle to Liverpool Police Station to drop off his firearm, at the time of the incident.

Timothy PROCTOR

After being pulled from the wreckage of his vehicle, he was placed into an induced coma at the scene.

Following the initial point of impact, a Mitsubishi Triton driven by a 19-year-old woman crashed into the woman’s Civic.

Timothy PROCTOR

The teenager, her 18-year-old male passenger and the 63-year-old driver of the Yaris all escaped injury.

“Obviously, police turning up to a police officer injured is extremely upsetting for first responders – and it was a devastating accident,” acting inspector Melissa Thompson told reporters yesterday.

Timothy PROCTOR

The horror collision forced the closure of Heathcote Road for six hours yesterday afternoon as major crash investigators examined the scene.

Kamran Rowshanzadeh Kamran Rowshanzadeh

Witness Kamran Rowshanzadeh, an electrician from Moorebank who was on his way to a call-out job at the time of the incident, said he first thought the Civic was trying to cross into his lane at about 100km/h.

“It was split second, and the next thing I know is the high impact,” he told 9News.

“The car literally came off the ground and the back kicked up and I dodged it.

“I just heard (Mr Proctor) brake at the last second. It’s like 200km/h int a wall.

“Just thinking about it shakes you.”

© Nine Digital Pty Ltd 2019

https://www.9news.com.au/2019/02/01/15/17/sydney-news-lucas-heights-car-crash-dashcam-video-police-officer-driver-critical


Timothy PROCTOR Timothy PROCTOR

Timothy PROCTOR

Three people, including an on-duty police officer, have been hospitalised after a multi-vehicle crash in Sydney’s south.

Just after 2pm today, police, paramedics and fire crews were called to Heathcote Road, north of New Illawarra Road in Lucas Heights, after reports three vehicles were involved in a serious crash.

Seven ambulance crews and a medical team were called to the location and NSW Fire Rescue were required to help free one person trapped.

A police officer aged in his 30s, and a female driver of another vehicle were both taken to Liverpool Hospital in a critical condition.

A third person was taken to Sutherland Hospital.

The officer had just completed a training exercise at a facility in the area and was travelling in his private vehicle.

Traffic is heavy in the area and Heathcote Road remains closed in both directions with diversions in place at Alec Campbell Drive and New Illawarra Road.

Police are warning drivers to expect delays and make alternative arrangements if possible.

The crash investigation unit is currently at the site.


 

CAUTION: VIEWER DISCRETION:

VIDEO OF ACTUAL MVA SCENE

e





Michael Thomas DeCourcey O’BRIEN

Michael Thomas DeCourcey O’BRIEN

Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ‘Q‘  6158

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank:  Probationary Constable – Death

Stations:  Central – 1 Division – Death

ServiceFrom  17 March 1891  to  31 May 1891 = 6 WEEKS Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   ? ? c1865 – Ireland

Died on:   Sunday  31 May 1891 about 1pm at Sydney Hospital

Age:  25

Cause:   Horse accident – struck by horse and run over by buggy

Event location:  Goulburn St & George St, Sydney CBD

Event date:  Saturday  30 May 1891 about 8am

Funeral date:   Wednesday  3 June 1891

Funeral location:   Rookwood Necropolis

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   Catholic Section, Sec M1, FF, 144

Grave location

Memorial located at:   ?

Sacred to the Memor of Constable M. T. De Courcey O'BRIEN  Native of Limerick, Ireland Aged 25 years Killed in the execution of his duty at Sydney 30 May 1891 R.I.P.

Sacred to the Memor of Constable M. T. De Courcey O'BRIEN  Native of Limerick, Ireland Aged 25 years Killed in the execution of his duty at Sydney 30 May 1891 R.I.P.

[alert_green]MICHAEL IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green] * Added to National Police Memorial in 2017

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Kevin Banister
NSW Fallen Police FB Group   Thursday  31 May 2018

Probationary Constable Michael Thomas DeCourcey O’BRIEN
Born c1865 Ireland.
Died 31/5/1891 aged 26. About 8am on Saturday 30 May, 1891 Probationary Constable O’Brien was on duty in the vicinity of Goulburn and George Streets, Sydney when he attempted to stop a runaway horse and buggy. As he did so he was struck by the horse, knocked to the ground, and was run over by the buggy. He was taken to the Sydney Hospital suffering from extensive head injuries however he passed away about 1pm the following day. He was in the Police for only 6 weeks.  He was a single man.

A number of newspaper reports state that he had a large funeral attended by many Police from the Inspector General down with a long Police procession leaving from Sydney hospital where he died from his injuries.
According to the SMH 2/6/1891 the funeral was to leave the Sydney Hospital at 1.30pm on 3/6/1891 for the Necropolis (Rookwood). (Catholic Section) O’Brien, Michael Thomas, 03 Jun 1891, 26, SEC*M1*FF**144.

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Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Monday 1 June 1891, page 4


 

MONDAY, JUNE 1, 1891.

CONSTABLE Michael Thomas O’Brien, who was injured in George-street on Saturday morning whilst attempting to arrest the progress of a runaway horse, died in the Sydney Hospital yesterday afternoon.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13826481

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Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), Monday 1 June 1891, page 5


the late constable O’Brien.

The Inspector-General of Police has received with extreme concern the report of the death of Constable Thomas De Coursey O’Brien, which adds another number to the honorable list of the police who have sacrificed their lives in the execution of their duty, the force and the public having in this instance lost the services of a promising and efficient officer.

Mr. Fosbery desires that every respect may be shown at the deceased’s funeral by the attendance of as many of his officers and comrades as can be safely spared from duty.

Mr. Fosbery will be present himself.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/228177990

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Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), Monday 1 June 1891, page 6


STOPPING A RUNAWAY.

A Constable Injured.

In his efforts to stop a runaway this morning Constable O’Brien, of No. 1 Station, was somewhat seriously injured. He was on duty in George-street, and when passing the tobacco shop of Messrs. Craig and Aitken a horse attached to a cart belonging to the firm bolted; owing to someone throwing a cracker in front of the animal.

Immediately the runaway made off O’Brien started in pursuit; and, catching up to the horse, seized hold of the reins, when, through the animal swerving, the constable was struck in the chest by the shaft and knocked down.

Before the officer could regain his feet the wheels passed over his body, and O’Brien was left lying on the ground seriously hurt. On being admitted to the Sydney Hospital the victim was seen to have received one or two very nasty scalp wounds, in addition to being seriously injured about the chest and body.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/228177996

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Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), Thursday 4 June 1891, page 6


FUNERAL OF THE LATE CONSTABLE O’BRIEN.

The funeral of the late Constable O’Brien, who succumbed in the Sydney Hospital on Sunday to injuries received the previous day, in a plucky attempt to stop a runaway in George-street, took place this afternoon.

Though only a recent addition to the force, O’Brien had placed himself on the most friendly terms with men and officers alike, and the young fellow’s frank and jovial disposition won what it merited — the high esteem and respect of every comrade.

The funeral, which started from the hospital, was numerously attended, and among those who paid the last tribute to the memory of the deceased were the Inspector-General of Police (Mr. E. Fosbery), Mr. Superintendent Read and nearly all the inspectors of the metropolitan divisions.

About 100 constables walked on foot, preceding the hearse, while about an equal number, including commissioned and non commissioned officers, brought up the rear in cabs and other vehicles. Immediately following the hearse were two mourning couches containing the brother and more intimate friends of the deceased.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/228176420

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Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), Thursday 4 June 1891, page 6


Yesterday’s Brevities

Constable O’Brien, who was knocked down in attempting to stop a runaway horse on Saturday, and who succumbed to his injuries in the Sydney Hospital on Sunday, was buried at the Roman  Catholic Cemetery, Rookwood, today.

The Inspector-General of Police, the superintendent, a number of inspectors, sub-inspectors, and about 150 men attended the funeral, out of respect to the deceased gallant young officer.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/113883023

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Frank EVANS

Frank EVANS

Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   ‘ Q ‘  7475

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank:  Probationary Constable

Stations:  Redfern Police

ServiceFrom  25 January 1900  to  21 April 1900 = 2+ MONTHS Service

Awards:   ?

Born:   ? ? 1875 in Wales

Died on:   Saturday  21 April 1900

Age:  28

Cause:   Accidentally entangled with a rotating circular saw

Event location:  Fresh Food and Ice Company Ltd premises, Harbor and Liverpool Streets, Sydney

Event date:  Saturday  21 April 1900

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   Rookwood Necropolis in an unmarked grave

 Memorial located at:   ?

 

 

 [alert_red]FRANK is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]  * BUT SHOULD BE

[alert_green]FRANK IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green] as of 2017

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 Funeral location TBA

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Probationary Constable Frank EVANS
Redfern Police
Industrial Accident
21 April, 1900 – 118 years ago
Resting Place – Unknown

About 6am on 21 April, 1900 the constable was on foot patrol in Liverpool Street, Sydney, near Byrne’s Wharf. He apparently walked into the Fresh Food and Ice Company Ltd premises and while examining large circular saws in operation, his cape was caught by a saw blade and he was dragged onto it and almost cut in half.

The Evening News of 23 April, 1900 reported the constable’s horrific death.

A POLICEMAN’S AWFUL DEATH.

The City Coroner held an inquest on Saturday, at the South Sydney Morgue, concerning the death of Frank Evans, the unfortunate man who, early on Saturday morning, was almost cut in halves by a circular saw at the premises of the Fresh Food and Ice Company, Limited, Harbor and Liverpool Streets.

Sergeant J. H. Day, of No. 2 Station, deposed that deceased was a probationary constable attached to the depot. According to the police records, he was 28 years of age, a native of Wales, and a single man, who had no relatives in the colony.

Witness saw him on duty about ten minutes to 5 on Saturday morning in Liverpool Street, near Byrne’s Wharf, and witness then stationed him opposite the premises of the Fresh Food and Ice Company, in Liverpool Street.

An hour later witness saw the deceased lying dead near an ice-cutting machine in the company’s shed. Deceased, in the sergeant’s opinion was a very intelligent man.

John Harnett, the foreman delivery labourer at the ice-cutting shed, said that on Saturday morning he was in charge of the ice-cutting machines. Deceased got on to the platform on which the saws were working, and walked into the sheds, and looked at the machines. He afterwards stooped down, and watched the cutting process.

The witness then gave an account of the accident, practically identical with that already published in Saturday’s ‘News.’

Witness did not allow strangers to go into the premises unless on business, but he took no exception to the deceased doing so, as he was a constable.

Prior to the accident witness had no time to warn Evans of his danger, as everything happened so quickly.

The distance between the two sets of saws was about 6ft.

After further evidence of a corroborative character, the jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to injuries received by accidentally coming in contact with a circular saw at the works of the Fresh Food and Ice Company, in Liverpool Street.

The constable was born in Wales in 1875 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 25 January, 1900. He was stationed at the Redfern Police Depot.

His death is recorded in the New South Wales Police Gazette of 30 May, 1900.

He is now listed in the official New South Wales Police Honour Roll.

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William EIFFE

William EIFFE

Late of Singleton

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  P 1154

For the purposes of this website ‘P‘ = represents those Police joining Pre 1862 when NSWPF “Officially” commenced

Rank:  Constable

Stations?, Singleton

ServiceFrom  11 August 1857  to  24 January 1867 = 9+ years Service

Awards:   ?

Born:   ? ? 1833 – 1834

Died on:   Thursday  24 January 1867

Age:  33 – 34

Cause:   Shot – accidental

Event location:  between Bendemeer & Tamworth, NSW

Event date:  16 January 1867

Funeral date:   Friday  25 January 1857

Funeral location:   Old Bendemeer Cemetery

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   Old Bendemeer Cemetery ( private property and unmarked )

 Memorial located at:   Bendemeer Cemetery, NSW

 

 


[alert_green]WILLIAM IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance – but under an incorrect surname of EFFE which they won’t correct[/alert_green]

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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On 16 January 1867 Constable Fyffe was performing gold escort duty on a coach travelling between Bendemeer and Tamworth.
It is thought that the shaking of the coach caused a rifle to accidentally discharge shooting the Constable.
The wounded Constable was left in a shepherd’s hut while the coach continued to Tamworth to obtain medical assistance.
Dr Scott of Tamworth provided assistance for Constable Fyffe however the wound was to prove fatal and he died the following Thursday.
The Constable was born in 1834 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 11 August 1857.
 http://npm.org.au/honour-roll-entry/?eid=3691
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Constable William Eiffe memorial unveiled by Oxley police at Bendemeer Cemetery

A PERMANENT memorial to recognise a fallen officer has been unveiled near Tamworth on the 150th anniversary of his death.

Constable William Eiffe died from a gunshot wound to the thigh on January 24, 1867, and is buried in an unmarked grave in the Bendemeer cemetery.

Oxley police together with Tamworth Regional Council – who helped to construct the memorial – commemorated his career in the force in a service on Tuesday morning.

”It’s a great part of the local history to have this recorded and I think it brings some interest in the local cemetery and the history of Bendemeer,” Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd said.

“And, hopefully for centuries to come, people will be able to come here and look at this and remember what has happened in our past.”

The Singleton-based officer was on a police escort on the night before his death when he was accidentally shot in the leg.

“On the evening of Wednesday the 23rd of January, 1867, there was a gold escort moving through the Moonbi Ranges, approximately seven miles from Bendemeer,” Oxley Sergeant Josh McKenzie said.

“A rain show had caused members of the escort to retreat into the carriage, another member of the escort had handed his rifle to Constable Eiffe, he rested the rifle across his thighs with the butt resting against the side of the coach.

“It is thought that the shaking and bouncing of the carriage has caused the rifle to accidentally discharge, shooting Constable Eiffe in the thigh.”

Constable Eiffe was left at Shepherds Hut nearby and the coach returned to Tamworth.

Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth<br /> Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.<br />
Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth
Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.

 

Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth<br /> Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.<br />
Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth
Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.

 

Paying tribute: Senior Oxley police, along with officers from Kootingal, Walcha, Nowendoc and Tamworth, pictured with Tamworth councillor Phil Betts.<br />
Paying tribute: Senior Oxley police, along with officers from Kootingal, Walcha, Nowendoc and Tamworth, pictured with Tamworth councillor Phil Betts.

Paying tribute: Senior Oxley police, along with officers from Kootingal, Walcha, Nowendoc and Tamworth, pictured with Tamworth councillor Phil Betts.<br />

Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Leading Senior Constable Ron Stoltenberg and Cr Phil Betts.<br />
Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Leading Senior Constable Ron Stoltenberg and Cr Phil Betts.

 

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.
William EIFFE Memorial
William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

“Dr Scott of Tamworth was taken to the hut but unfortunately Constable William EIFFE died from the effects of the gunshot wound at noon on the 24th of January, 1867.”

Acting Superintendent Budd said the service was a reminder of how far the force had come in 150 years.

It is thought that the shaking and bouncing of the carriage has caused the rifle to accidentally discharge.

Sergeant Josh McKenzie

“One of the things that would be a tragedy today is for this to occur and his family to not be supported,” he said. “In the days of Constable William Eiffe, his wife and four children would have been destitute without the support we have today and we should be grateful for that.”

https://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/story/4423228/fallen-officer-remembered-video-photos/?cs=159
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Of Note:  Searching NSW State Archives & Records on 14 May 2018:
There are NO surnames of FYFFE
There are NO surnames of EFFE
There are NO surnames of EIFFE
There were no Williams born in 1834
There is no Registered number 1154 on that website.  There is 1153 ( Beatty ) and 1155 ( Moloney ) but no 1154
A wildcard search on ‘FFE‘ didn’t reveal any similar names or anyone born in 1834 on THAT website.
Danny Webster notes on 24 January 2017:
He is sometimes referred to as “Fyffe” and “Effe”, however the Registers of Police Employment 1847–1885 provides the spelling as “Eiffe”, his registered number as 1154, the fact that he was married at the time of appointment and that he was a former soldier.
The New South Wales Police Gazettes of 5 March, 1862, 3 April, 1867 (£100 gratuity awarded to his wife), and 3 July, 1867 indicate “Eiffe”.
His death was registered at Armidale as “Eiffe”.
He is incorrectly listed in the official New South Wales Police Honour Roll as William “Effe”.
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This was originally recorded as:

Constable William FYFFE

Accidentally Shot

Tamworth

24 January, 1867

 

On 16 January, 1867 Constable Fyffe was performing gold escort duty on a coach travelling between Bendemeer and Tamworth. It is thought that the shaking of the coach caused a rifle to accidentally discharge, shooting the constable. The wounded constable was left in a shepherd’s hut while the coach continued to Tamworth to obtain medical assistance. Dr Scott of Tamworth provided assistance for the constable, however the wound was to prove fatal and he died the following Thursday. He is sometimes referred to as William Effe.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald dated 25 January, 1867 reported that news from Tamworth had been received that ” Last evening, Constable Fyffe, on gold escort duty, was accidentally shot in the thigh whilst riding in the coach on Moonby Ranges, seven miles from Bendemere. His rifle accidentally discharged, it is supposed, by the shaking of the coach. He was left at a shepherd’s hut. The escort proceeded to Tamworth, and on its arrival there Dr. Scott was immediately started off. Fyffe died from the effects of the wound at noon today. He has left a wife and large family at Singleton.

 

The constable was born in 1834 and joined the police force on 11 August, 1857. In 1862 he became a member of the newly-formed New South Wales Police Force. At the time of his death he was stationed at Singleton.

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Stephen David Clifford PEPPERELL

Stephen David Clifford PEPPERELL

NSW Police Cadet # 2754

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  16054[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  NSW Police Cadet – commenced 6 December 1971

Probationary Constable – appointed 23 November 1973

Constable 1st Class – appointed 23 November 1978

Senior Constable – appointed 23 November 1982

Final Rank = Senior Constable – Death

Stations?, Tamworth ( 1980 – 1982 ), Kootingal ( 1982 – death ) ( 25 years at the ONE Station )

ServiceFrom  6 December 1971  to  ? ? 2007 = 36 years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 28 May 1990

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 24 March 2000

Born:  23 November 1954

Died on? October 2007

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – Motor Cycle – Off Duty – Private cycle

Age:  53

Funeral date:  19 October 2007

Funeral location:  St Paul’s Anglican Church, Tamworth

Buried at?

 

PROUDLY REMEMBERED: Senior Constable Stephen Pepperell has been honoured with the unveiling of an official police memorial in Sydney. Photo: Supplied
PROUDLY REMEMBERED: Senior Constable Stephen Pepperell has been honoured with the unveiling of an official police memorial in Sydney. Photo: Supplied

Memorial: NSW Police force Service Memorial Wall, Sydney Police Centre, Surry Hills, D34 ( left wall )

 

 

 [alert_blue]STEPHEN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * Not Job related

* BUT IS MENTIONED ON THE SYDNEY POLICE CENTRE, MEMORIAL WALL



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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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Big crowd farewells Kootingal policeman

Updated

Hundreds of people have packed St Paul’s Anglican Church in Tamworth, in north-west New South Wales, for the funeral today of long serving Kootingal policeman Steve Pepperell.

The crowd at this morning’s service was told of a family man who faced tragedy in his life, but who also made an enormous contribution to the police service since his induction in the early 1970s.

Senior Constable Pepperell was killed in a motorbike accident last week, sending shockwaves through the community he had served for many years.

The overflowing crowd watched the service on big screen TVs that had been placed outside the church.

The head of the Tamworth-based Oxley local area command, Tony Jefferson, says he remembers an officer who trained many young officers, who in turn have made a large contribution to the police service.

“He’d walk in here when he’d report to Tamworth with this devilish smirk on his face, and you’d never know what he’d been up to,” he said.

He says he will miss Senior Constable Pepperell’s roguish sense of humour.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2007-10-19/big-crowd-farewells-kootingal-policeman/703628

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Kootingal police officer honoured on memorial plaque

“So we have a lot of respect and gratitude towards the police, and appreciation that after seven years they continue to remember Dad. It is a really nice tribute.”

It was also his work outside the force  made him a familiar face around Kootingal.

Senior Constable Pepperell  was member and president of the Kootingal Lions Club, president of Kootingal Bowling Club, a Group 4 referee and also an avid Harley-Davidson rider.

He continues to be honoured with the Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield football match, which is played annually in Kootingal and raises funds for the Cancer Council – a cause close to his heart after he suffered Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

http://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/story/3385934/kootingal-police-officer-honoured-on-memorial-plaque/

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2017 Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield Day
2017 Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield Day

 

2017 Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield Day
2017 Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield Day

 

 

KOOTINGAL-MOONBI TO HOST STEVE PEPPERELL SHIELD MEMORIAL DAY

 

The Kootingal-Moonbi rugby league club is calling on teams competing in Group 4 to pledge their support behind the, 2018 Steve Pepperell Shield Memorial Day.

The day honours Steve Pepperell’s tireless dedication to the community of Kootingal, with all proceeds from the day going to the New South Wales Cancer Council.

Prize money is up for grabs for the winner and runners-up. The fundraiser will be held on March 10.

http://www.nbnnews.com.au/2017/12/29/kootingal-moonbi-to-host-steve-pepperell-shield-memorial-day/

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Pepperell Shield biggest yet as second division gets into gear

GROUP 4 Second Division clubs have been converging on Kootingal for the past five years to play a bit of footy before the start of the season and raise some money for the Cancer Council.

The sixth Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield tomorrow will be one of the biggest yet with eight teams entered.

Even re-formed clubs Walcha and Boggabri have joined their new second division opponents is supporting the event, played in honour of the late Steve Pepperell.

Walcha and Boggabri meet in their first game of the day in an all-Kangaroo derby, before Walcha tackles Quirindi and Boggy faces Manilla.

All teams will play two games each and the winner will be the team with the best record for the day.

Werris Creek is the defending champion having won every trophy available to a second division club last season. With so many teams entered the day is a long one.

The first game is at 9am when Manilla tackles Bendemeer, with the last game to finish about 5.30pm before the presentation of the shield.

There will also be some exhibition league tag games between Dungowan, Kootingal, Quirindi and Walcha – the first league tag games to be played under the Group 4 banner.

http://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/story/1381236/pepperell-shield-biggest-yet-as-second-division-gets-into-gear/

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Magpies grab a third Pepperell shield

WERRIS Creek maintained its love affair with the pre-season Steve Pepperell Memorial Shield competition on Saturday.

The Magpies won it for the third time in its five-year history at Kootingal after winning both of their games.

The Creek faced reigning Group 4 Second Division premiers Barraba in the final game and needed to win it to be a chance to taking the title.

Against a Bulldogs side severely weakened since that grand final success the Magpies were convincing winners.

“We won our last game, beat Barraba 30-6,” Creek coach Ron Dellar said.

“We just beat them around the ruck because we were fitter than them.”

There were six teams involved in the tournament.

All six played two games each, with the trophy going to the side with the best record at the end of the day.

Kootingal also won both of its games but Creek won on for and against differential after it also rolled local rivals Quirindi 16-6 earlier in the day.

Kooty also beat Quirindi but its first match against Dungowan only produced a 4-nil win.

Bendemeer was the other side involved.

Creek is celebrating its centenary this season and winning the charity event is a great way to start it.

“We were good around the ruck,” Dellar said.

“That’s where we got them.

“Peter Darcy scored two tries in the Barraba game.

“He played well.

“And Phil Beaton and Thomas Brown were good too.”

Money raised at the Pep Shield goes to the Cancer Council.

Creek continues its build-up to the second division season with a three-way trial next week.

“We play Gunnedah at Werris Creek and Kooty is also coming down,” Dellar said.

“That should be a good and then we have the (Wests) Knockout.”




Maurice Raymond McDIARMID

Maurice Raymond McDIARMID

AKA Maurie

( Double Police Murder )

Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  8451[/alert_yellow]

Uniform #  2463

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 9 July 1956

Senior Constable – appointed 26 September 1967

Sergeant 3rd Class – posthumously on ?

Stations: ?, Blacktown – Death

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre July 1956?  to  30 September 1971 = 15+ years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour but I would suspect that he also received a Queen’s Police Medal for Gallantry

Born:  20 May 1932

Died on:  Thursday  30 September 1971

Age:  39

Cause:  Shot – Murdered – shotgun

Event location:  Mimosa Ave, Toongabbie  Approximate GPS:  -33.781884,  150.951727

Event date:  Thursday  30 September 1971

Funeral date:  Tuesday  5 October 1971

Funeral location?

Buried at:  Cremated

Pinegrove Memorial Park Location:

Peace Rose Gardens

Section: Family Memorial

Lot: Left 110

Lat/Lng: -33.78922, 150.84705

 Memorial located at:  1/  Pinegrove Memorial Park, Eastern Creek

2/  Blacktown Police Station. Memorial photos was in the foyer, then the boss’s foyer & now in the corridor between the front counter & muster room.

3/ Plinth at the entrance to the Memorial Rose Garden, NSW Police Academy, Goulburn.

Maurice Raymond McDIARMID at Redfern Police Academy
Maurice Raymond McDIARMID at Redfern Police Academy

Maurice Raymond McDIARMID

Maurice with wife, Joy, and son Mark. Also Dawn - his sister-in-law & her daughter Karen.
Maurice with wife, Joy, and son Mark. Also Dawn – his sister-in-law & her daughter Karen.

 

Funeral at Blacktown before the Service at Pinegrove Cemetery.

Memorial Gardens at the front of Blacktown Police Station – Dedicated in September 2017.

 

 

To the memory of Sergeant First Class William Watson RILEY, Sergeant Third Class Maurice Raymond McDIARMID who were fatally shot on Police Duty at Toongabbie on the 30th September 1971

 Pinegrove Memorial Park Location: Peace Rose Gardens Section: Family Memorial Lot: Left 110 Lat/Lng: -33.78922, 150.84705
Pinegrove Memorial Park Location: Peace Rose Gardens Section: Family Memorial Lot: Left 110 Lat/Lng: -33.78922, 150.84705

[alert_green]MAURICE IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

Touch Plate at the National Police Wall for Remembrance, Canberra. Maurice Raymond McDIARMID
Touch Plate at the National Police Wall for Remembrance, Canberra. Maurice Raymond McDIARMID

 

Blacktown Police Stn Memorial dedication on Retired Police Day - 28 September 2017 to RILEY & McDIARMID
Blacktown Police Stn Memorial dedication on Retired Police Day – 28 September 2017 to RILEY & McDIARMID

 

Blacktown Police Stn Memorial dedication on Retired Police Day - 28 September 2017 to RILEY & McDIARMID
Blacktown Police Chief Inspector Bob Fitzgerald

Blacktown Police Stn Memorial dedication on Retired Police Day - 28 September 2017 to RILEY & McDIARMID

Memorial site at Pinegrove Memorial Gardens, Eastern Creek
This whole garden is a memorial to both McDIARMID & RILEY. RILEY is in the foreground with McDIARMID being in front of the darker bolder to the left.

 

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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On 30 September, 1971, Sergeant 2nd Class Riley and Senior Constable McDiarmid attended a dwelling in Mimosa Avenue, Toongabbie to investigate a report that a man had shot and killed his brother at that address. On arrival the police saw the offender RonaldClarke who quickly ran to the rear of the house. Senior Constable McDiarmid followed him while the sergeant entered through the front door. As the senior constable entered through the back door the offender opened fire with a shotgun, inflicting a fatal wound. It appears the offender then went back through the house where he also shot and killed Sergeant Riley. Although the senior constable was still alive when other police arrived he died a short time later in an ambulance on the way to hospital. The offender was shot and killed by police ( Cst 1/c Alf GREGORY ) the same day.

 

William Riley was born in 1921 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 3 December, 1945. At the time of his death he was stationed at Blacktown. He was posthumously promoted to Sergeant 1st Class.

 

Maurice McDiarmid was born in 1932 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 9 July, 1956. At the time of his death he was stationed at Blacktown. He was posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class.

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Report of the Police Department for 1972.  Printed 28 August 1973

George Lewis Memorial Trophy
This trophy for the year 1971, which is for the most courageous act performed by a member of the New South Wales Police Force, was awarded posthumously to the late Sergeant 1st Class W. W. Riley and the late Sergeant 3rd Class M. R. McDiarmid who were stationed at 27 Division.
The trophies were presented to Mrs Riley and Mrs McDiarmid at the Police Academy during 1972.

PETER MITCHELL TRUST AWARDS
The ten awards under this Trust for the year 1971 were made to the following police, the trophies being presented at the Police Academy during 1972:
Most Courageous Act Posthumously awarded to the late Sergeant 1st Class W. W. Riley and the late Sergeant 3rd Class M. R. McDiarmid in conjunction with the George Lewis Memorial Trophy.

 

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Tuesday 21 March 1972, page 3


Plaque

SYDNEY, Monday. — At the Pine Grove Memorial Park near Rooty Hill today, Bishop Hulme-Moir, chaplain of the NSW Police Force, dedicated a plaque in memory of Sergeant Maurice McDiarmid and Sergeant William Riley, who were shot when attempting to arrest an armed man at Toongabbie on September 30 last year.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/102204297

 

 

 

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Wednesday 6 October 1971, page 3

Funeral

SYDNEY, Tuesday. -More than 400 policemen attended the funeral this morning of the two policemen shot by a man in Toongabbie last Thursday. Both men, Sergeant William Watson Riley and Senior Constable Maurice Raymond McDiarmid, were given full police honours at their funeral.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110680624

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Thursday 13 January 1972, page 11


Payments to 3 police widows

SYDNEY, Wednesday. – The NSW Government agreed today to make, as “an act of grace”, lump-sum payments of $12,500 to each of three police officers’ widows.

“The Premier, Sir Robert Askin, said the payments would be in addition to the pensions and dependant’s allowances already paid out of the police superannuation and reward fund.

The three policemen involved in the payments are Senior Constable W. E. King, who was murdered at East Gresford police station on August 13 last year, and Sergeants W. Riley and M. McDiarmid, who were shot by a man at Toongabbie on September 30 last year.

Sir Robert said members of the police force had always been specifically excluded from the definition of “worker” under the Workers Compensation Act.

He said the Commissioner of Police, Mr Allan, had brought to the notice of the Government that, in certain matters of workers’ compensation, police were in an anomalous position in relation to other Crown employees.

Sir Robert said a full examination would be made of overall benefits of workers’ compensation available to police.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/101752567

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Blacktown Police dedicate memorial to slain officers William Riley and Maurice McDiarmid

Harrison Vesey@harrisonvesey

NOT FORGOTTEN: Blacktown Police Chief Inspector Bob Fitzgerald pays his respects at a memorial to slain officers Sergeant 1st Class William Riley and Sergeant 3rd Class Maurice McDiarmid. Picture: Harrison Vesey
NOT FORGOTTEN: Blacktown Police Chief Inspector Bob Fitzgerald pays his respects at a memorial to slain officers Sergeant 1st Class William Riley and Sergeant 3rd Class Maurice McDiarmid. Picture: Harrison Vesey

A solemn memorial stands to remind Blacktown police officers of the price paid by two of their colleagues.

William Riley and Maurice McDiarmid were both killed in the line of duty on September 30, 1971, while trying to apprehend a murder suspect in Toongabbie.

They are now remembered by commemorative plaques outside Blacktown Police Station, as well as a plinth at the entrance to the memorial rose garden at the NSW Police Academy.

The plinth features two police caps pictured the way they fell when the men were murdered, and bears the words: “For The People”.

Detective Senior Sergeant Adam Wilson, Probationary Constable Peta Kendall, Acting Inspector Lauren Martin and Chief Inspector Bob Fitzgerald.
Detective Senior Sergeant Adam Wilson, Probationary Constable Peta Kendall, Acting Inspector Lauren Martin and Chief Inspector Bob Fitzgerald.

Chief Inspector Bob Fitzgerald said the permanent memorials were important for police and the community.

I hope it’s a reminder when you come to work, you do the job to the best of your ability and go home to your family,” he said.

Acting Inspector Lauren Martin said Police Remembrance Day gave every officer a chance to think about those who didn’t make it home.

It’s good to have a visual reminder so you can reflect on what could happen when you come to work,” she said.

Sergeant 2nd class Riley and Senior Constable McDiarmid were attending a home in Mimosa Avenue, Toongabbie, following reports a man had raped a woman and shot her lover, who was also his brother.

The offender, Ronald Clarke, shot and killed both officers as they attempted to surround him. He was shot and killed by police in Hillview later that day.

It is a very sad day for all those who believe in upholding the law and order,” Police Commissioner Norman Allen said at the time.

Both officers were posthumously promoted for their outstanding courage and devotion to duty.

More than 400 officers attended their funeral in Blacktown. They were laid to rest at Pinegrove Cemetery with plaques bearing the inscription: “Doing His Duty”.

Outside Blacktown Police Station

The story Blacktown Police honour slain colleagues first appeared on Blacktown Sun.

http://www.queenslandcountrylife.com.au/story/4969361/blacktown-police-honour-slain-colleagues/?cs=1179#slide=1

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Saturday 27 November 1971, page 9


Two policemen commended by coroner

SYDNEY, Friday. — A Sydney coroner has commended two policemen who chased and stopped “an armed and desperate man“.

The man, Mr Ronald Desmond Clarke, had earlier shot and killed two other policemen after having killed his own brother in Toongabbie on September 30.

The coroner, Mr J. Parnell, SM, found on Wednesday that Mr Clarke in turn died in a car of cerebral lacerations and gun shot wounds to the brain inflicted by a person defending himself.

Constable A. C. Gregory, giving evidence at the inquest into the deaths of the four men, said that he and Constable L. ( Les ) A. Crawford in a police truck had rammed Mr Clarke‘s car, causing him to lose control.

Constable Gregory had seen Mr Clarke transfer a gun from his left hand to his right. The gun had been pointing at the policeman’s face and the constable had fired “one shot towards his shoulder“.

The impact of this bullet appeared to throw him towards the passenger side of his car, but he still had the revolver, which he now held in both hands, levelled at my face“, Constable Gregory said.

He appeared to be endeavouring to discharge the gun and it was then that I fired two quick shots at him“.

The four men who were killed were Sergeant First Class William Watson Riley, 50, and Sergeant Maurice Raymond McDiarmid, 39, of Blacktown, and Ronald Desmond Clarke, 20, and Warren John Clarke, 22, both of Toongabbie.

( Both policemen were promoted posthumously. Sergeant Riley was raised from second-class to first class, and Sergeant McDiarmid from senior constable to sergeant third class. )

Mr Parnell found that Mr Warren John Clarke died from gunshot wounds inflicted by his brother, Mr Ronald Desmond Clarke.

He found also that Sergeant Riley died from a fractured skull and lacerations to the brain, and Sergeant McDiarmid died in an ambulance between Toongabbie and Blacktown Hospital.

Both died as a result of bullet wounds inflicted by Clarke.

He said Mr Ronald Clarke, a professional criminal, had shot his brother, Warren Clarke, after having raped his brother’s de facto wife.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110690828

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Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 – 1995), Friday 1 October 1971, page 1


Shooting in Sydney Brothers, two police die

 

The car in which Mr Ronald Clark tried to escape. Rego ADX-6??

SYDNEY, Thursday. – Two policemen and two other men were shot dead in the outer western Sydney suburb of Toongabbie today.

The policemen were shot while investigating a report of rape and murder.

Earlier, Mr Warren Clark about 22, died in his bed. Police said his elder brother, Ronald. 23, had shot him through the head with a .22 calibre repeater rifle.

A young woman, living in the house in Mimosa Ave, Toongabbie. with Mr Warren Clark, told police that Mr Ronald Clark had awakened her and then shot his brother.

The woman alleged that Mr Ronald Clark then raped her and forced her to accompany him in his car.

After driving her around for several hours, he had released her at Black town.

The woman went to Blacktown police station.

She was in a hysterical condition.

Sergeant Second-Class William Riley, 50. and Senior-Constable Morrie McDiarmid, 39. left the station immediately to go to the house.

While they were on their way the police radio directed other police to the house.

The next-door neighbour, in Mimosa Ave, Toongabbie. Mrs Ethel Roberts, 54. said she first knew something was wrong when a police officer ran down a driveway at the side of her house.

He began kicking on the door of the house next door.

“He eventually forced the door and went inside”, she said.

“All was quiet for perhaps two minutes, then three shots rang out.

“I ran to the front porch as a young blond man ran from the house with a rifle in his hand, entered a car and screeched off down the road”‘. Mrs Roberts said.

“After he drove off, I saw a policeman’s blood stained hand grasping the back steps of the house”.

Stem flow of blood

“I ran to the road where a woman was delivering bread and told her to call an ambulance”.

Another neighbour, Mrs Dawn Harris, was called by Mrs Roberts, who was trying to stem the flow of blood from Constable McDiarmid.

“When I reached the house a policeman was propped against the back steps”, Mrs Harris said.

“His mouth and part of his face were torn and shredded from the shotgun blast.

“Another policeman was lying dead on the ground.

“In a bedroom in the house another man covered with a sheet was also dead and blood could be seen everywhere”.

Police said later they believe Sergeant Riley died immediately when he was shot at point-blank range with a shotgun.

Constable McDiarmid was taken by ambulance to Blacktown Hospital. He died shortly after arrival.

Meanwhile an all-points bulletin was broadcast over the VKG police network for all cars to be on the lookout for a bright blue 1950 sedan.

The broadcast warned, ‘This man is dangerous. He has a .22 rifle, a shotgun and two police pistols”.

“We have sighted him”, one car replied. “He is going toward Hillview”.

“We have stopped the car”, was the officer’s next report.

Constable Alfred Gregory and Constable Les Crawford said later they had rammed the suspect’s car with their police van.

The sedan got out of control and crashed into a bowser at a service station.

Constable Gregory jumped out of the van. As he approached the car he saw Mr Clark take one of the police pistols from the seat and transfer it to his right hand.

Three shots from pistol

Constable Gregory fired three shots from his pistol.

One of his shots struck Mr Clark in the side of the head, killing him.

In the car, police found several Commonwealth Bank cash bags, a blood stained nightgown and two suitcases containing mostly women’s clothing.

Two police revolvers, a .22 repeater rifle and a sawn-off shotgun were also recovered.

Tonight forensic and ballistic experts were still examining them.

The policemen killed are each survived by a widow and two children.

Sergeant Riley joined the force in 1945 and Constable McDiarmid in 1956.

A CIB spokesman said this afternoon the families were eligible for a special allowance paid to police killed while on duty.

He said that the lack of witnesses, particularly when the two policemen were shot, was hampering investigations.

 

 

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110679922

 

 

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POLICE KILLED OR WHO DIED FROM INJURIES RECEIVED IN THE EXECUTION OF THEIR DUTIES

On 13th August, 1971, Senior Constable William Edward King, who was then the officer-in-charge of police, East Gresford, was shot dead at East Gresford Police Station by a man who fired upon him with a rifle.

On 29th August, 1971, Constable 1st Class Patrick Mark Hackett died from injuries received in a motor accident at Polis, Cyprus, whilst performing duty with the New South Wales Police component of the Australian Police Contingent of the United Nations Peace Keeping Force.

On 30th September, 1971, Sergeant Second Class William Watson Riley and Senior Constable Maurice Raymond McDiarmid, both then attached to Blacktown Police Station, were shot dead in a house at Toongabbie which they had entered to arrest a man who a short time before had murdered his brother and raped a woman in the same house.

A police funeral with full ceremonial honours was accorded these deceased officers at which appropriate tributes were paid.

In recognition of their outstanding courage Sergeant Riley and Senior Constable McDiarmid were posthumously promoted by me to Sergeant 1st Class and Sergeant 3rd Class respectively. In addition, I submitted recommendations to the Premier for favour of consideration of Royal Awards being granted in both cases.

To assist the widows of the deceased police the Premier approved the payment to each of them of the sum of $12,500 as a gratuity. This payment did not in any way affect their entitlements to payments under the provisions of the Police Regulation (Superannuation) Act.

Report to the Police Department for 1971 – printed 7 September 1972

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Henry James FETHERSTON

Henry James FETHERSTON

Late of  ?

Queensland Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations: ?, Maryborough ( from 1879 )

ServiceFrom  ? ? 1878  to  23 February 1885 = 7 years Service

Awards?

Born? ? 1859 in Ireland

Died on:  23 February 1885 @ 7am

Age:  26

Cause:  Thrown from bolting Police horse which then fell upon him

Event location:  the Police Paddocks in Tinana

Event date:  22 February 1885

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location?

Buried at:  Maryborough Cemetery, Walker St, Maryborough, Qld

 Memorial located at?

In Memory of Henry James FETHERSTON who died 23rd February 1885 aged 26 years. Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright , for the end of that man is peace. Pslam 37 vers 37. His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed in him that nature might stand up and say to all the world - this was a man. Shakespere. This monument was erected in remembrance of a faithful comrade and beloved friend, by the members of the Wide Bay Police Force and Citizens of Maryborough.
Photograph 7 July 2014

 

In Memory of Henry James FETHERSTON who died 23rd February 1885 aged 26 years. Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright , for the end of that man is peace. Pslam 37 vers 37. His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed in him that nature might stand up and say to all the world - this was a man. Shakespere. This monument was erected in remembrance of a faithful comrade and beloved friend, by the members of the Wide Bay Police Force and Citizens of Maryborough.
Photograph 7 July 2014

 

 

[alert_green]HENRY IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

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 Approximate Grave location


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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Ceremony to unveil restored monument to fallen officer

Retired police officer of 41 years Noel Sparks and his wife stumbled across the dilapidated grave of Senior Constable Henry James Fetherston when visiting the Maryborough Cemetery after the 2012 floods to check on Denise's great-grandmother's grave.
Retired police officer of 41 years Noel Sparks and his wife stumbled across the dilapidated grave of Senior Constable Henry James Fetherston when visiting the Maryborough Cemetery after the 2012 floods to check on Denise’s great-grandmother’s grave.

 

WHEN Noel Sparks stumbled across the dilapidated grave of a young policeman who died in 1885, he did not know he was starting a journey that would result in the official recognition of the officer’s sacrifice.

Mr Sparks, himself a retired police officer, and his wife Denise visited Maryborough Cemetery in 2012 to check on Denise’s great-grandmother’s grave after the floods.

With a reading from Psalms and verses by Shakespeare on the side of the monument, Mr Sparks knew immediately that Senior Constable Henry James Fetheston ( misspelt – should be Fetherston ), who was just 26 when he died, had been a well-respected member of the community.

He would spend the next five years working towards honouring Snr Const Fetheston‘s sacrifice and helping to ensure the monument marking the young man’s grave would be completely restored to its former glory.

Yesterday ( 11 August 2017 ) a crowd of about 50 police officers, the restoration team, dignitaries and the public gathered to unveil the monument.

Snr Const Fetheston was born in Ireland and was sworn into the the Queensland Police Force in 1878 after migrating to Australia.

In 1879 he was posted to Maryborough.

Snr Const Fetheston was riding through the Police Paddocks in Tinana on February 23, 1885 when his horse bolted.

As he tried to calm him, he was thrown off, landing on a log before being crushed by the falling horse.

He was found at 5am and died at 7am the next day from internal injuries. ( this sentence is poorly worded. He died on 23rd, so either this sentence is wrong or the accident happened at 5am on the 22nd February and died at 7am the next day = 23rd )

Just prior to Police Remembrance Day last year ( 2016 ), his name was added to the Queensland Police Honour Roll and the national police Memorial in Canberra, acknowledging the officer had died while on duty.

After his death the community funded the monument that stands over his grave.

It was estimated that the monument would cost at least $70,000 to build if it was made today.

The well respected young man attended Maryborough’s Anglican church regularly and was a member of the rowing club and a local cricket club.

They sought the help of Warren Harland of Wide Bay Memorials.

“We worked under his direction and Warren was responsible for the restoration of the stone works including the marble and sandstone on the monument,” Noel said.

https://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/news/ceremony-unveil-restored-monument-fallen-officer/3211656/
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Senior Constable Henry James Fetherston Grave

Senior Constable Henry James Fetherston died from injuries sustained from a horse-riding incident in Maryborough in 22 February 1885.  He was 26 years of age and was subsequently buried in the Maryborough Cemetery.

A substantial monument commemorates his death and appears to be in a reasonable state of repair.

The FQPM propose to examine the monument in detail with a view to arranging the cleaning and restoration of the headstone and surrounds.

The President and Secretary were fortunate to meet with retired QPS representatives who have an interest in the restoration of police graves, in particular in the Maryborough area.  We spoke with retired QPS member Noel Sparks and his wife, who were keen to coordinate the necessary work on the Fetherston’ grave.

Noel has made a preliminary assessment of the work required and is of the view that the monument has been slightly undermined and requires additional support.  The remaining work would include cleaning the monument, painting the iron fence and cleaning the grave surface and perhaps covering with weed mat and decorative stones.

It is believed that much of the restoration can be achieved with volunteer labour and any other work necessary quotes obtained.  FQPM would consider any submissions for financial support.

http://www.friendsqpmuseum.com.au/projects/

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