Gordon Charles FARNHAM

 Gordon Charles FARNHAM – DCM, MM

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations:  Broken Hill, Wagga Wagga,

Service 1:  From  ? ? ?  to  ? ? pre 1914 – Broken Hill

Service 2:  From  15 April 1919  to  10 March 1920 – Wagga Wagga – Resigned

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Australian Imperial Force

Regiment 1:  3rd Field Ambulance, B Squadron

Regiment 2: 3rd Light Trench Mortar Battery

Enlisted:  24 August 1914, Morphetville, South Australia

Service #  151 & 176

Rank 1:  Corporal # 151

Rank 2:  Lance Corporal # 176

Embarkation 1:  3rd Field Ambulance, B Squadron – Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board Transport A12 ” Saldanah ” on 21 October 1914

Embarkation 2:  3rd Light Trench Motar Battery – Unit embarked from

Age:  26

Next of kin:  Father:  Thomas Farnham, Cessnock, NSW

Religion:  C of E

Single / Married:  Single

War Service:  Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front

21 October 1914:  Lance Corporal, 3rd Field Ambulance

21 October 1914:  Embarked HMAT Saldanha, Adelaide

1 March 1917:        Corporal, 3rd Light Trench Mortar Battery

Returned to Australia:  4 December 1918

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AwardsDistinguished Conduct Medal – granted 6 September 1915 – ‘For great gallantry on the 25th April, 1915, and throughout the landing operations near Gaba Tepe (Dardanelles). In attending to the wounded under a heavy fire, he showed the greatest zeal and disregard of danger, and at all times gave a fine exhibition of coolness and devotion to duty.’
Source: ‘London Gazette’ No. 8844
Date: 6 September 1915

Military Medal – granted on 7 October 1918 – ‘In the operations against the enemy positions at MONT DE MERRIS near STRAZEELE on night 2nd/3rd June, 1918 Corporal FARNHAM displayed great gallantry and initiative. When a gun close by which was firing on a very strong enemy machine gun position on the flank was put out of action, Corporal FARNHAM, regardless of his personal safety, carried the ammunition through the enemy’s barrage to his own gun position and expended both his own and the disabled gun crews’ quota. By great skill he was able to fire alternate shots at his own and the disabled gun crews’ targets, thereby saving casualties from flanking machine gun fire. He set a splendid example of gallantry and initiative.’
Source: ‘Commonwealth Gazette’ No.

1914 – 15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Born18 June 1888 at Cessnock, NSW

Died on:  Friday  28 January 1921

Place of death:  Wagga Wagga, NSW

Cause:  Food poisoning

Age:  32

Funeral date:  Friday  28 January 1921

Funeral location:  Wagga Wagga

Buried at:  Methodist portion of the Cessnock cemetery

Memorial at?

Gordon Charles FARNHAM
Gordon Charles FARNHAM

[alert_blue]GORDON is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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The Cessnock Eagle & South Maitland Recorder     Friday  28 January 1921     page 5 of 6

DEATH OF MR. GORDON FARNHAM A CESSNOCK DISTINGUISHED SOLDIER.

The relatives of Mr. Gordon Farnham D.C.M., M.M. were shocked to receive word this morning of his death at Wagga Wagga. The sad information came as a great shock as it was not even known by his relatives that he was ill. The deceased was a native of Cessnock, being born in the premises now occupied by Mr. Dennis Kenny, in Main Street. The deceased was 30 years of age and was an Anzac, being one of the first Australians to enlist. He enlisted from Broken Hill, where he was a member of the police force.

The late Mr Farnham secured the Distinguished Conduct medal at Gallipoli and the Military medal in France.

He returned on furlough in the early part of 1919 and during his stay at his home town the Armistice was signed.

His remains will be brought to Cessnock and will be interred in the Church of England cemetery on Sunday afternoon.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/99448638

 

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 Daily Advertiser ( Wagga Wagga )                   Saturday  29 January 1921              page 6 of 8

OBITUARY.

MR. GORDON C. FARNHAM.

The death of Mr. Gordon C. Farnham, licensee of the Club House Hotel, Wagga, caused great regret, as the deceased was well-known throughout the district. Mr. Farnham was present at the boxing contests in the Riverina Hall on Wednesday night, and after returning to his hotel ate a supper which included cucumber, and had an iced drink. Later not feeling too well he had a glass of brandy, but during the night he suffered considerably from internal pains. In the morning his condition was such that Dr. Martin was called in, and he diagnosed the case as one of gastritis and enteritis. The sufferer was removed to a private hospital, but although everything possible was done for him he passed away about 3 o’clock on Friday morning. Dr. Martin certified that death was due to food     poisoning, and this was endorsed by the deputy coroner after a formal inquiry.

The deceased, who was an   ‘Anzac,’ rose to the rank of sergeant-major in the 1st Divisional Engineers, and earned the coveted awards of the D.C.M. and the M.M. At the time of his death he was on the committee of the Returned Soldiers’ League.

Prior to enlisting he was a member of the police force, attached to the Wagga station, and he rejoined the force on April 15, 1919, on his return from the front, and resigned on March 10, 1920, to take over the Club House Hotel.

He leaves a wife, five brothers, and two sisters.

The funeral left Traill-street for the Wagga railway station at 4.30pm on Friday, from where the remains were conveyed by rail to Cessnock for interment in the Methodist portion of the Cessnock cemetery.   The chief mourners were the wife of the deceased, Mrs. W. Ball, and Messrs. D. Harris and N. J. Richards. A large number of members of the Returned Soldiers’ League marched behind the hearse, including the president, Ald. Gissing, the pall bearers being Messrs. V. Charker, T. A. Plummer, J. S. Wild, L. H. Shaw, T. A. Smith, and A. Stephenson. Sister Proctor, and members of the Red Cross League were also present, while Senior-sergeant Gallaher, Sergeant O’Brien, Senior-constable Cooper, Constables Brownlee and Waugh, and Tracker McLean represented the Wagga police. There were many beautiful floral tributes.

The funeral arrangements were entrusted to Messrs. McIntosh Bros.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/142355550

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Service Number listed as 176 and 151

AN ADELAIDE D.C.M.

Lance-Corporal Farnham, who came to Adelaide from Broken Hill to enlist, has won the Distinguished Conduct Medal for “showing the greatest zeal and disregard for danger during the landing at Gabi Tepe.” Lance-Corporal Farnham is a native of Cessnock (N.S.W.), and is 27 years of age. Like all the country recruits from the Cessnock district, he had a varied experience in rural pursuits in his native State, and was also for a time in New Zealand, and for 18 months prior to enlisting had been in the New South Wales police force, being stationed at Broken Hill. At the historic landing on April 25 he was for 10 hours under fire, “during which time,” says the official report, “he attended the wounded continuously, and made a fine exhibition of coolness and devotion to duty.” Lance-Corporal Farnham   was in the trenches from April to the end of August, and is now on police patrol duty guarding prisoners. His parents are very old residents of Cessnock.”from the Adelaide Advertiser 06 Oct 1915 (trove.nla.gov.au)

 

D.C.M. FOR CESSNOCK.

The distinguished conduct medal has been won by Lance-corporal Gordon Farnham, a former resident of Cessnock, for “showing the greatest zeal and disregard for danger during the landing at Gaba Tepe.” The D.C.M. hero, who is a native of Cessnock, is 27 years of age, and previously was employed at the Aberdare Colliery and blacksmith. He is a fine example of Australian manhood, and has many friends in Cessnock who are naturally proud of him. His parents also live in Cessnock. After leaving his native town, Farnham journeyed to New Zealand, from whence he went to Broken Hill, where for eighteen months previous to his enlistment he was a member of the police force. The call of war was too strong, however, and he enlisted in Adelaide with the Third Field Ambulance Corps. He subsequently took part in the famous landing of the 25th April, and was for ten hours under fire, “during which time,” says the official report, “he attended the wounded continuously, and made a fine exhibition of coolness and devotion to duty.”from the Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate 08 Oct 1915 (nla.gov.au)

 

OBITUARY. MR. GORDON C. FARNHAM.

The death of Mr. Gordon C. Farnham, licensee of the Club House Hotel, Wagga, caused great regret, as the deceased was well-known through out the district. Mr. Farnham was present at the boxing contests in the Riverina Hall on Wednesday night, and after returning to his hotel ate a supper which included cucumber, and had an iced drink. Later not feeling too well he had a glass of brandy, but during the night he suffered considerably from intenial pains. In the morning his condition was such that Dr. Martin was called in, and he diagnosed the case as one of gastritis and enteritis. The sufferer was removed to a private hospital, but although everything possible was done for him he passed away about 3 o’clock on Friday morning. Dr. Martin certified that death was due to food poisoning, and this was endorsed by the deputy coroner after a formal inquiry.

The deceased, who was an ‘Anzac,’ rose to the rank of sergeant-major in the 1st Divisional Engineers, and earned the coveted awards of the D.C.M. and the M.M. At the time of his death he was on the committee of the Returned Soldiers’ League. Prior to enlisting he was a member of the police force, attached to the Wagga station, and he rejoined the force on April 15, 1919, on his return from the front, and resigned on March 10, 1920, to take over the Club House Hotel. He leaves a wife, five brothers, and two sisters. The funeral left Traill-street for the Wagga railway station at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, from where the remains were conveyed by rail to Cessnock for interment in the Methodist portion of the Cessnock cemetery. The chief mourners were the wife of the deceased, Mrs. W. Ball, and Messrs. D. Harris and N. J. Richards. A large number of members of the Returned Soldiers’ League marched behind the hearse, including the president, Ald. Gissing, the pall bearers being Messrs. V. Charker, T. A. Plummer, J. S. Wild, L. H. Shaw, T. A. Smith, and A. Stephenson. Sister Proctor, and members of the Red Cross League were also present, while Senior-sergeant Gallaher, Sergeant O’Brien, Senior-constable Cooper, Constables Brownlee and Waugh, and Tracker McLean represented the Wagga police. There were many beautiful floral tributes. The funeral arrangements were entrusted to Messrs. McIntosh Bros.”from the Wagga Daily Advertiser 29 Jan 1921 (nla.gov.au)

https://rslvirtualwarmemorial.org.au/explore/people/137462

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NSW Births, Deaths & Marriages

Death:  4551/1921  Father:  Thomas  Mother:  Susan   Wagga Wagga District

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John ELSEY

John ELSEY

Victorian ( Melbourne ) Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  ( 1 ) Sergeant,  ( 2 ) ex-Detective Constable

Stations?

Service:  From  ? 1852  to  ?

Awards?

Born?

Died on:  15 August 1856

Cause:  Suicide – slit own throat

Location:  Galway Arms Hotel, Melbourne

Age:  about 30 ?

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at?


[alert_yellow]JOHN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

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The Argus  ( Melbourne )     Saturday 16 August 1856    page 5 of 8

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.

 

SUICIDE OF AN EX- DETECTIVE OFFICER

Early yesterday morning it was discovered that John Elsey, late of the detective force of this city, had committed suicide by cutting his throat. The deceased was lodging in the Galway Arms Hotel, in Flinders-lane, and on his not making his customary appearance at breakfast, some person went to his room, and found the unfortunate man lying on his face on the floor, with his throat cut, and quite dead.

The deceased was about thirty years of age, a married man, and a native of Kentucky. Some time ago he left his wife behind him at Castlemaine, and went home to America. On his return, it appeared that she had formed an acquaintance with another man, by whom, it is alleged, she had two children.

Elsey obtained a situation in the detective force but was soon after summoned to Castlemaine to provide his wife with a maintenance, and the Bench made an order of £1 per week. This award the deceased was dissatisfied with, and as Mr. Smith, the late superintendent of the detective force, wished, to keep back from his salary the amount awarded by the Bench to his wife, the deceased left the force. This happened about a month ago.

Since that time Elsey appears to have been harassed by applications on the part of the man who is living with his wife for the award of the Castlemaine Bench for her maintenance, and the deceased had since given way to dissipation, and formed acquaintances with disreputable women. His health appears to have broken down, and those circumstances together are supposed to have led to the committal of the rash act.

An inquest will be held over the body this morning.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/7134976

 

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Empire ( Sydney )      Friday  22 August 1856   page 6 of 8




John McNALLY

John McNALLY

( the First Victorian Policeman killed ‘ on duty ” )

Victoria Police Force

Sergeant

Murdered – shot

Born  1826

Died  16 October 1856

30 old

 

McNally, John (1826–1856)

Intelligence was received on Saturday morning last, at the Detective Office, that on the preceding Thursday, the 16th inst., two of the mounted police force, Sergeant [John] McNally and Constable Moore, proceeded at seven o’clock on the night in question to a tent believed to be occupied by the notorious William Turner, alias Gipsy Smith, who stands charged with various acts of highway robbery, and with dismounting a constable from his horse near Castlemaine several months ago, and with escaping from custody.

On approaching the tent, the officers recognised Turner, who attempted to make his escape. The officers immediately closed with him, and, during the struggle, shots were fired from the tent, one of which entered the breast of Sergeant McNally, who fell dead on the spot. Several other shots were fired, and wounded the constable (Moore) severely in the face and other parts of the body.

As soon as the intelligence reached the Camp at Mount Ararat, the police went in search of the bushrangers, who, however, succeeded in eluding their vigilance. A woman was arrested in the tent. An active search is in progress, and it is thought the criminals cannot long escape detection. The gang, supposed to be under the leadership of Turner, is, without doubt, the same as that which committed the late daring acts of bushranging near Moliagul.

http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/mcnally-john-15338

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John McNally - VicPol - 1st VicPol to be murdered on duty - plaque 2Sgt John McNally

Sergeant John McNally became the first member of the Victoria Police to be feloniously slain in the line of duty when he was murdered at the Cathcart diggings on 16th October, 1856.

http://hotel-lima.com.au/wp-content/themes/clean-start-master/thumbnaillarge/VictoriaMap.png

Whilst trying to arrest a suspect (Gypsy Smith) over a string of armed robberies, an associate of the suspect intervened and fired his shotgun, killing Sergeant McNally and seriously injuring his partner, Constable John Moore. The two offenders then made their escape. Seven days later, the pair were arrested near Amherst and charged with the murder of McNally. One of the offenders was hanged in 1857 and the other received a sentence of fifteen years hard labour.

The offender, William Smith (Gypsy Smith) was transported to Botany Bay at the age of 15 for stealing a handkerchief. He went on to become a hardened bush ranger who, between the years of 1852 and 1856, became the notorious ‘Gypsy Smith’, a subject of fascination for the newspapers and police as he and his gang of desperate convicts created fear among the gold diggings of Victoria.

Sergeant McNally is buried in Cathcart Cemetery on a hill known as McNally’ Hill. The Cemetery is in a natural bushland setting and is very well maintained.

The emergency department at Ararat Hospital is known as the John McNally Emergency Department.

Cathcart is approx. 4.6 km from Ararat and is approx. 345 m above sea level. There is no town at Cathcart, it is only an area. It was a large attraction for Gold Miners in the early 1800′s.  People from England, Ireland, Scotland, America, Switzerland, Germany, France, Russia and China descended on Cathcart to look for gold. Also many other from Australia took their families there as well.

There were many stories about horse thieves and murderers in the old days and these were dealt with tough justice by a self-established vigilante committee.
After the first rush the lead was lost and most miners moved on to other diggings except one of the original party J. P. Rodd who was in partnership with an American Negro Richard Davis (alias Black Harry). They traced the gold deeper and hit another lead calling it Blackman Lead. This attracted 3,000 diggers to the area, other leads were discovered each causing a new rush of miners.
The general area became known as Cathcart and with time the name was given to the Township where stores, school, hall and hotels had sprung up. There were many tents and lean-to shanties.
Today there is little evidence of the hustle and bustle of the frenzied gold diggers and their lively community of dreamers. Except maybe the Cemetery, which is on the Ararat- Pomonal Rd.

 

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http://www.npm.org.au/honour-roll/mcnally

Sergeant John McNally:  The system of registered number for police hadn’t been introduced when Sergeant John McNally was murdered on the Mt Ararat goldfield in 1856.  He had joined the Victoria Police Force the previous year after service with the Royal Irish Constabulary.

On October 16, 1856 Sergeant McNally and Constable John Moore where told that William Turner, a wanted robber was staying in a tent in a camp about two miles away.  Turner tired to flee but the police wrestled him to the ground.  Turner called for help from his associate, William Twigham.  Also known as Cockney Bill, Twigham came out of the tent armed with a double-barrelled shotgun.  He fired, killing Sergeant McNally and wounding Constable Moore.

Turner and Twigham escaped and a reward of  £400 was offered for their arrest.  They were arrested a week later at the Adelaide diggings after being recognised by a shopkeeper.

After a trial held at Castlemaine, Twigham was convicted of murder and sentenced to death.  he was hanged at the Melbourne Gaol on March 11, 1857.

Turner pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of manslaughter and was sentenced to 15 years hard labour on the roads and other public works.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Life of Sergeant John McNally’s murderer subject of new book

ARARAT – A book chronicling the life and times of the man responsible for the murder of police sergeant John McNally in 1856 is nearing completion.

The text, which is yet to be titled, tells the story of William Sydenham Smith and how his life of crime led to him crossing paths with Sergeant McNally.

Sergeant McNally was the first member of the Victorian Police force to be slain in the line of duty.

The research team of Marion McAdie, Greg Vivian, and Ian Batty along with author Laurie Moore have spent over 12 months on the book.

Mrs McAdie said she along with the genealogical society wanted to find the facts surrounding the murder of Sergeant McNally.

“Unfortunately, after much research we still know little about McNally or his partner Constable John Moore, who was wounded in the same incident,” she said.

The book uses Smith’s history to provide a broader context to the death of McNally.

“Like the public perception of most Australian bush rangers, Smith comes across in most accounts as a one-dimensional person,” Mrs McAdie said.

“His origins from England as a transported convict at the age of fifteen, his brutal treatment for minor misdemeanours at the hands of a ruthless system, his heroism in saving lives during his imprisonment, and his eventual participation as a free man in colonial New South Wales and Victoria, have never been mentioned before.

“As in many cases of murder by bush rangers, the victim hardly rates a mention and we hope that this book may help recognise the heroism and positive contributions made by the early police on the goldfields.”

Mrs McAdie said she believes it is an important story because it tells of how a young William Smith was transported to Botany Bay at the age of 15 for stealing a handkerchief.

“It traces his experiences as a convict around Sydney, Norfolk Island and Tasmania before he escaped in a whale boat from Tasmania,” she said.

The book goes on to show how the young boy became a hardened bush ranger who, between the years of 1852 and 1856, became the notorious ‘Gypsey Smith’, a subject of fascination for the newspapers and police as he and his gang of desperate convicts created fear among the gold diggings of Victoria.

The story culminates in the events at Cathcart diggings on October 16, 1856 when the bush rangers were confronted by Sergeant McNally and Constable Moore, leaving one dead and the other wounded.

“After the eventual capture of the bush rangers near Maryborough, Smith’s mate was hanged but a strange fate awaited Smith, and this is detailed in the forthcoming book,” Mrs McAdie said.

Although the story revolves around a bush ranger, it is set among the goldfields of 1850s’ Victoria.

It touches on the lives of many ordinary people, the legal system, the squatters, and the impacts of convicts who came in large numbers to look for gold and rob and terrorise the infant community.

“It is a good read and one that is set in Sydney, Norfolk Island, Tasmania, Melbourne, Yackandandah, Moliagul, Maryborough, Amherst, Beaufort, Ararat, Cathcart and Hay in New South Wales,” Mrs McAdie said.

The book’s author, Laurie Moore retired from Sydney to live in Western Victoria thirteen years ago.

Mr Moore’s first book involved nearly ten years of research by Mr Moore and his wife Dianne.

It told the story of the last declared outlaw in Australia, Jimmy Governor, who was the fictional character, Jimmie Blacksmith, in the book written by Thomas Keneally.

Since then he has written ‘Shot for Gold’, a bush ranging story that happened near Smythesdale, a draft for a book on the Clark Gang of Braidwood, and has now put together the history of the killing of the policeman, Sergeant John McNally, and the convict and bush ranging events that led to his death in October 1856 at Cathcart.

Mrs McAdie said despite all the hours of research the team still can’t place an exact location of the burial site of sergeant McNally.

“We would love to hear from people about the exact location,” she said.

“We think the site is located in the north west corner of the now Cathcart cemetery.”

The team hope to have the book finished by the 157th anniversary of the event on October 16 this year.

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Sergeant John McNallyPrint Page Print this page

Plaque at gravesite commemorates Police Sergeant John Mc Nally who was murdered whilst on duty in October 1854.

Sergeant John McNally became the first member of Victoria Police to be feloniously slain in the line of duty when he was murdered at the Mt Ararat goldfields on 16th October, 1856. Whilst trying to arrest a suspect over a string of armed robberies an associate of the suspect intervened and fired his shotgun, killing Sergeant McNally and seriously injuring his partner, Constable John Moore. The two offenders then made their escape. Seven days later, the pair were arrested near Amherst and charged with the murder of McNally. One of the offenders was hanged in 1857 and the other received a sentence of fifteen years hard labour.

Location

Address: Phillips Flat Road, Cathcart Cemetery, Cathcart, 3377
State: VIC
Area: AUS
GPS Coordinates: Lat: -37.319616
Long: 142.888729
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.

View Google Map

Details

Monument Type: Plaque
Monument Theme: People
Sub-Theme: Crime
Actual Event STart Date: 16-October-1854
Actual Event End Date: 16-October-1854

Dedication

Approx. Monument Dedication Date: 1974
Front Inscription
In memory Sgt. John McNally who was murdered whilst in the execution of his duty 16-10-1854. Erected by Victoria Police Department 1974.

Source: MA,RHSV

Monument details supplied by Monument Australia – www.monumentaustralia.org.au
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The John McNally Medical Imaging Unit at Ararat Hospital

With substantial donations from the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation the Ararat Hospital was able to purchase an image intensifier for its surgical department and new X-Ray equipment for the Medical Imaging Unit. This was a joint project between the Blue Ribbon Foundation and the local community through the Ararat Branch and was dedicated as a Police Memorial in memory of Sergeant John McNally who was murdered at the Mt Ararat Goldfields in 1856.

http://www.remember.org.au/Memorials/Hospitals/The-John-McNally-Medical-Imaging-Unit-at-Ararat-Ho

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The John McNally Emergency Department at Ararat Hospital

 

In 2003 works commenced on a complete redevelopment of the Ararat Hospital and the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation was able to contribute to the re-building of the emergency department. This was completed as a joint project in partnership with the local community through the Ararat Barnch of the Blue Ribbon Foundation. Today the Ararat Hospital Emergency Department can provide state of the art emergency & trauma care to the people of Ararat and surrounding districts. This project, commissioned as a Police Memorial in May 2004, was the first stage in a continuing relationship with the community of Ararat and their public hospital.

Sergeant John McNally became the first member of Victoria Police to be feloniously slain in the line of duty when he was murdered at the Mt Ararat goldfields on 16th October, 1856. Whilst trying to arrest a suspect over a string of armed robberies an associate of the suspect intervened and fired his shotgun, killing Sergeant McNally and seriously injuring his partner, Constable John Moore. Sergeant McNally’s sacrifice is acknowledged through this an other projects installed at the Ararat Hospital.

http://www.remember.org.au/Memorials/Hospitals/The-John-McNally-Emergency-Department-at-Ararat-Ho

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Chief Constable Charles FOX

Chief Constable Charles FOX

New South Wales Police Force

Illness –  Suicide

Muswellbrook

25 August, 1856

 

Charles Fox was Chief Constable of Muswellbrook when he took his own life on Monday 25 August, 1856. The following paragraph appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald of 29 August, 1856.

 

On Monday, the 25th, an enquiry was held at the courthouse, Muswellbrook, before the coroner, Mr J.B.West, and a jury of twelve, touching on the death of Mr Charles Fox, chief constable, who, on the same morning, had committed suicide, by shooting himself with a pistol. It appeared on evidence that the deceased was latterly under medical treatment for general debility and depression of the mental faculties and had been for some time past labouring under hypochondria. It seemed on a view of the body, which presented a shocking spectacle that he had placed the muzzle of the weapon in his mouth, which dreadfully shattered… A finding of ‘Destroyed himself while labouring under temporary insanity’ was accordingly made. The deceased was much respected as a steady inoffensive man, and has left a widow and one son.

 

At the time of his death the chief constable was stationed at Muswellbrook.