John WOODS

John WOODS

AKA  ?

Late of Woodenbong Police Stn, NSW 

 

New South Wales Police Force

Uniform #  51

Regd. #  4370

 

Rank:  Commenced Training on ? ? ?

Probationary Constable- appointed ? ? 1883

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ? 

Final Rank =  Constable 1st Class

 

Stations?, Woodenbong – Death

Service:  From 13 February 1883   to   21 February 1893  =  9+ years Service

 

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours system

 

Born? ? c1862 in NSW

Died on:  Tuesday  21 February 1893

Age:  30 

Cause:   Rheumatic fever

Event location:  Woodenbong Police residence

Event date ?

 

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location? 

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: Private Property.  Old Police Paddock, Roseberry St – just off Dalmorton St, Woodenbong, NSW

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: Nil – at this time ( September 2020 )

 

 JOHN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/

Australian Police YouTube Channel


 

 

Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. : 1867 – 1919),

Saturday 4 March 1893, page 2

Death. WOODS. — On the 21st February, at the Police Barracks, Woodenbong, N.S.Wales, of rheumatic fever, Constable John Woods, aged 30 years.

Goulburn, N.S.W., newspapers please copy.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/82221093

 

 


 

   2019  NSW Fallen Police FB Group
The headstone for Constable John Woods is at the top end of the Old Police paddock, (don’t know who might own it now), which faces Roseberry Street, just off the junction of Dalmorton Street ( Woodenbong, NSW ).
His listed cause of death was Rheumatic Fever at age 29 on 21-2-1893. (The Warwick Argus, Tuesday 28-Feb. 1893)
He was the first Constable appointed to Woodenbong in 1887.
He married Sarah Margaret Fletcher at Killarney, Qld on the 22-Nov. 1892.
His Parents were John & Eliza Woods.

Described as being born in 1862, 5′ 10″ tall, grey eyes and light brown hair with a ‘fresh’ complexion.

A native of N.S.W., was single when he joined the Police and was previously employed as a farmer.


 

Woodenbong Police Station

Woodenbong Police Station was in existence by 1888 as recorded in the NSW Legislative Assembly Distribution of Police Force on 31st December 1888.

In 2006 the Woodenbong Police Station was located in the Richmond Local Area Command in the Northern Region. Its address was Unumgar Street, Woodenbong. (1)Endnotes(1) NSW Police Website http://www.police.nsw.gov.au/about_us/structure/operations_command/local_area_commands/northern_region/richmond (accessed 30 October 2006).

Identifiers

 


John WOODS   Inscription:  In Loving remembrance of John Woods Died 21 February 1895 aged 30 years A precious one from us is gone. A voice we loved is stilled. A place is vacant in our home Which never can be filled.
Inscription: In Loving remembrance of John Woods Died 21 February 1895 aged 30 years A precious one from us is gone. A voice we loved is stilled. A place is vacant in our home Which never can be filled.

John WOODS

John WOODS


 

 




Gordon Charles FARNHAM

 Gordon Charles FARNHAM – DCM, MM

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations:  Broken Hill, Wagga Wagga,

Service 1:  From  ? ? ?  to  ? ? pre 1914 – Broken Hill

Service 2:  From  15 April 1919  to  10 March 1920 – Wagga Wagga – Resigned

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Australian Imperial Force

Regiment 1:  3rd Field Ambulance, B Squadron

Regiment 2: 3rd Light Trench Mortar Battery

Enlisted:  24 August 1914, Morphetville, South Australia

Service #  151 & 176

Rank 1:  Corporal # 151

Rank 2:  Lance Corporal # 176

Embarkation 1:  3rd Field Ambulance, B Squadron – Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board Transport A12 ” Saldanah ” on 21 October 1914

Embarkation 2:  3rd Light Trench Motar Battery – Unit embarked from

Age:  26

Next of kin:  Father:  Thomas Farnham, Cessnock, NSW

Religion:  C of E

Single / Married:  Single

War Service:  Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front

21 October 1914:  Lance Corporal, 3rd Field Ambulance

21 October 1914:  Embarked HMAT Saldanha, Adelaide

1 March 1917:        Corporal, 3rd Light Trench Mortar Battery

Returned to Australia:  4 December 1918

[/blockquote]

AwardsDistinguished Conduct Medal – granted 6 September 1915 – ‘For great gallantry on the 25th April, 1915, and throughout the landing operations near Gaba Tepe (Dardanelles). In attending to the wounded under a heavy fire, he showed the greatest zeal and disregard of danger, and at all times gave a fine exhibition of coolness and devotion to duty.’
Source: ‘London Gazette’ No. 8844
Date: 6 September 1915

Military Medal – granted on 7 October 1918 – ‘In the operations against the enemy positions at MONT DE MERRIS near STRAZEELE on night 2nd/3rd June, 1918 Corporal FARNHAM displayed great gallantry and initiative. When a gun close by which was firing on a very strong enemy machine gun position on the flank was put out of action, Corporal FARNHAM, regardless of his personal safety, carried the ammunition through the enemy’s barrage to his own gun position and expended both his own and the disabled gun crews’ quota. By great skill he was able to fire alternate shots at his own and the disabled gun crews’ targets, thereby saving casualties from flanking machine gun fire. He set a splendid example of gallantry and initiative.’
Source: ‘Commonwealth Gazette’ No.

1914 – 15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Born18 June 1888 at Cessnock, NSW

Died on:  Friday  28 January 1921

Place of death:  Wagga Wagga, NSW

Cause:  Food poisoning

Age:  32

Funeral date:  Friday  28 January 1921

Funeral location:  Wagga Wagga

Buried at:  Methodist portion of the Cessnock cemetery

Memorial at?

Gordon Charles FARNHAM
Gordon Charles FARNHAM

[alert_blue]GORDON is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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The Cessnock Eagle & South Maitland Recorder     Friday  28 January 1921     page 5 of 6

DEATH OF MR. GORDON FARNHAM A CESSNOCK DISTINGUISHED SOLDIER.

The relatives of Mr. Gordon Farnham D.C.M., M.M. were shocked to receive word this morning of his death at Wagga Wagga. The sad information came as a great shock as it was not even known by his relatives that he was ill. The deceased was a native of Cessnock, being born in the premises now occupied by Mr. Dennis Kenny, in Main Street. The deceased was 30 years of age and was an Anzac, being one of the first Australians to enlist. He enlisted from Broken Hill, where he was a member of the police force.

The late Mr Farnham secured the Distinguished Conduct medal at Gallipoli and the Military medal in France.

He returned on furlough in the early part of 1919 and during his stay at his home town the Armistice was signed.

His remains will be brought to Cessnock and will be interred in the Church of England cemetery on Sunday afternoon.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/99448638

 

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 Daily Advertiser ( Wagga Wagga )                   Saturday  29 January 1921              page 6 of 8

OBITUARY.

MR. GORDON C. FARNHAM.

The death of Mr. Gordon C. Farnham, licensee of the Club House Hotel, Wagga, caused great regret, as the deceased was well-known throughout the district. Mr. Farnham was present at the boxing contests in the Riverina Hall on Wednesday night, and after returning to his hotel ate a supper which included cucumber, and had an iced drink. Later not feeling too well he had a glass of brandy, but during the night he suffered considerably from internal pains. In the morning his condition was such that Dr. Martin was called in, and he diagnosed the case as one of gastritis and enteritis. The sufferer was removed to a private hospital, but although everything possible was done for him he passed away about 3 o’clock on Friday morning. Dr. Martin certified that death was due to food     poisoning, and this was endorsed by the deputy coroner after a formal inquiry.

The deceased, who was an   ‘Anzac,’ rose to the rank of sergeant-major in the 1st Divisional Engineers, and earned the coveted awards of the D.C.M. and the M.M. At the time of his death he was on the committee of the Returned Soldiers’ League.

Prior to enlisting he was a member of the police force, attached to the Wagga station, and he rejoined the force on April 15, 1919, on his return from the front, and resigned on March 10, 1920, to take over the Club House Hotel.

He leaves a wife, five brothers, and two sisters.

The funeral left Traill-street for the Wagga railway station at 4.30pm on Friday, from where the remains were conveyed by rail to Cessnock for interment in the Methodist portion of the Cessnock cemetery.   The chief mourners were the wife of the deceased, Mrs. W. Ball, and Messrs. D. Harris and N. J. Richards. A large number of members of the Returned Soldiers’ League marched behind the hearse, including the president, Ald. Gissing, the pall bearers being Messrs. V. Charker, T. A. Plummer, J. S. Wild, L. H. Shaw, T. A. Smith, and A. Stephenson. Sister Proctor, and members of the Red Cross League were also present, while Senior-sergeant Gallaher, Sergeant O’Brien, Senior-constable Cooper, Constables Brownlee and Waugh, and Tracker McLean represented the Wagga police. There were many beautiful floral tributes.

The funeral arrangements were entrusted to Messrs. McIntosh Bros.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/142355550

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Service Number listed as 176 and 151

AN ADELAIDE D.C.M.

Lance-Corporal Farnham, who came to Adelaide from Broken Hill to enlist, has won the Distinguished Conduct Medal for “showing the greatest zeal and disregard for danger during the landing at Gabi Tepe.” Lance-Corporal Farnham is a native of Cessnock (N.S.W.), and is 27 years of age. Like all the country recruits from the Cessnock district, he had a varied experience in rural pursuits in his native State, and was also for a time in New Zealand, and for 18 months prior to enlisting had been in the New South Wales police force, being stationed at Broken Hill. At the historic landing on April 25 he was for 10 hours under fire, “during which time,” says the official report, “he attended the wounded continuously, and made a fine exhibition of coolness and devotion to duty.” Lance-Corporal Farnham   was in the trenches from April to the end of August, and is now on police patrol duty guarding prisoners. His parents are very old residents of Cessnock.”from the Adelaide Advertiser 06 Oct 1915 (trove.nla.gov.au)

 

D.C.M. FOR CESSNOCK.

The distinguished conduct medal has been won by Lance-corporal Gordon Farnham, a former resident of Cessnock, for “showing the greatest zeal and disregard for danger during the landing at Gaba Tepe.” The D.C.M. hero, who is a native of Cessnock, is 27 years of age, and previously was employed at the Aberdare Colliery and blacksmith. He is a fine example of Australian manhood, and has many friends in Cessnock who are naturally proud of him. His parents also live in Cessnock. After leaving his native town, Farnham journeyed to New Zealand, from whence he went to Broken Hill, where for eighteen months previous to his enlistment he was a member of the police force. The call of war was too strong, however, and he enlisted in Adelaide with the Third Field Ambulance Corps. He subsequently took part in the famous landing of the 25th April, and was for ten hours under fire, “during which time,” says the official report, “he attended the wounded continuously, and made a fine exhibition of coolness and devotion to duty.”from the Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate 08 Oct 1915 (nla.gov.au)

 

OBITUARY. MR. GORDON C. FARNHAM.

The death of Mr. Gordon C. Farnham, licensee of the Club House Hotel, Wagga, caused great regret, as the deceased was well-known through out the district. Mr. Farnham was present at the boxing contests in the Riverina Hall on Wednesday night, and after returning to his hotel ate a supper which included cucumber, and had an iced drink. Later not feeling too well he had a glass of brandy, but during the night he suffered considerably from intenial pains. In the morning his condition was such that Dr. Martin was called in, and he diagnosed the case as one of gastritis and enteritis. The sufferer was removed to a private hospital, but although everything possible was done for him he passed away about 3 o’clock on Friday morning. Dr. Martin certified that death was due to food poisoning, and this was endorsed by the deputy coroner after a formal inquiry.

The deceased, who was an ‘Anzac,’ rose to the rank of sergeant-major in the 1st Divisional Engineers, and earned the coveted awards of the D.C.M. and the M.M. At the time of his death he was on the committee of the Returned Soldiers’ League. Prior to enlisting he was a member of the police force, attached to the Wagga station, and he rejoined the force on April 15, 1919, on his return from the front, and resigned on March 10, 1920, to take over the Club House Hotel. He leaves a wife, five brothers, and two sisters. The funeral left Traill-street for the Wagga railway station at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, from where the remains were conveyed by rail to Cessnock for interment in the Methodist portion of the Cessnock cemetery. The chief mourners were the wife of the deceased, Mrs. W. Ball, and Messrs. D. Harris and N. J. Richards. A large number of members of the Returned Soldiers’ League marched behind the hearse, including the president, Ald. Gissing, the pall bearers being Messrs. V. Charker, T. A. Plummer, J. S. Wild, L. H. Shaw, T. A. Smith, and A. Stephenson. Sister Proctor, and members of the Red Cross League were also present, while Senior-sergeant Gallaher, Sergeant O’Brien, Senior-constable Cooper, Constables Brownlee and Waugh, and Tracker McLean represented the Wagga police. There were many beautiful floral tributes. The funeral arrangements were entrusted to Messrs. McIntosh Bros.”from the Wagga Daily Advertiser 29 Jan 1921 (nla.gov.au)

https://rslvirtualwarmemorial.org.au/explore/people/137462

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NSW Births, Deaths & Marriages

Death:  4551/1921  Father:  Thomas  Mother:  Susan   Wagga Wagga District

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F. C. Derry

F. C. Derry

Victoria Police

Sergeant

Suicide – Firearm

Died  7 October 1893

38 old

 

The Argus ( Melbourne, Vic. )  Monday  9 October 1893  page 6 of 8

SUICIDE AT THE RUSSELL STREET BARRACKS.

SERGEANT DERRY SHOOTS HIMSELF.

On Saturday morning Sergeant F. C. Derry, who acted as clerk to Superintendent Sadlier, committed suicide by shooting himself at the Russell street barracks. No reason can be assigned for his act. He was happy in his domestic relations was well advanced in grade in the force, held a comfortable position as clerk to the inspecting superintendent, and was almost, if not quite, a total abstainer from intoxicants. In these circumstances and the additional favourable features of good health and a happy temperament, the members of the force have been compelled to the opinion that his act was the result of some sudden impulse which cannot be explained. Derry was 38 years of age, and a married man with a wife and two  children. He entered the Permanent Artillery in 1874, and a year later joined the police force. In May, 1887, he was promoted to the rank of senior constable, and in February, 1892, to a  second class sergeant. His clerical ability which in 1884 carried him with honours through the officers examination, marked him as specially suitable for a position on the office staff, and when Sergeant Crampton was promoted to the rank of sub- inspector and left the office of the inspecting superintendent, Derry was appointed to take his place as chief clerk. In his new position Derry worked untiringly and with much success, and having a talent for organisation he devoted himself to the task of making a success of the police brass band, of the committee of which he was chairman. His efforts and the efforts of those associated with him were an unqualified success as the record of two years, during which £5OO or so has been raised by the band for charities testifies. On Saturday morning Derry seemed in his usual health and spirits, but soon after he had entered his office Constable McGuinness heard a pistol shot, and upon running into Derry’s room he found him lying on the floor with a smoking pistol in his hand. Sergeant Byrne was called, and though he saw that the pistol bullet having entered the sergeants mouth, was still embedded in his brain, and had undoubtedly caused instant death, he ordered the body to be at once removed to the Melbourne Hospital. This was done, and Dr Desailly examined the patient but his examination confirmed the opinion of Sergent Byrne. The bullet had evidently been fired while the pistol was held in the mouth, and it had caused immediate death. Mr Sadleir examined the sergeants papers and found them correct in every particular, and he then communicated the fact of his death to the chief commissioner. An inquest will be held to day at noon.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/8699349?searchTerm=sergeant%20crampton&searchLimits=l-australian=y|||l-category=Article|||sortby#pstart313778