Edmund LAWLESS

Edmund LAWLESS

Late of “Fishburton”, Balaclava-road, Marsfield

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ????

Rank:  Constable – 1866,

Senior Constable – appointed ? April 1870,

Senior Sergeant – pre 10 January 1883,

Sub Inspector – January 1883,

Inspector – 1 April 1893,

Inspector – Retirement – 1899

Stations: London Metropolitan Police – Bow St Station, E. Division ‘Sergeant’ ( England ) – Resigned – moved to Victoria, Australia.

Victoria Police Force – ( about 1852 ) Sergeant – Resigned.

NSW Police ( from 1866 ), Parramatta St Station ( April 1870 ),

Regent St ( 2 Division ) Constable to Sub Inspector,

Christchurch Police Station ( Jan 1890 ),

Redfern ( Sub-Division of 2 Division at the time )( 7 Division ) – OIC as Sub Inspector 1891,  Inspector – 18 August 1893.  Left Redfern in 1899

ServiceFrom  ? ? 1866  to  31 January 1899 = 33+ years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born? ? 1828, Salisbury, England

Died on:  Wednesday  1 January 1902

Age:  74

Cause:  heart disease and dropsy

Event location:  ‘The Fisherton’, Balaclava Rd, Marsfield

Event date:  Wednesday  1 January 1902

Funeral date:  Thursday  2 January 1902 about 3pm at ‘The Fisherton’

Funeral location?

Funeral performed byRev. Charles Baber of Church of England, Epping

Buried at:  Field of Mars Cemetery, Quarry Rd, Ryde

Church of England  Section B  1016

FOM – CENG -B – 601 – 1016

 Memorial located at?

Edmund LAWLESS

INSCRIPTION:<br /> In Loving Memory of my Dear Husband Edmund LAWLESS who died 1st January 1902 aged 74 years.<br /> For ever with the Lord.<br /> also Marion LAWLESS wife of above.<br /> Born 18th Dec. 1846, Died 30th Jan 1948<br /> in her 100th year.<br /> The Lord is my Shepherd.<br /> also Letitia Charlotte LAWLESS<br /> Daughter of above<br /> Died 7th Dec. 1949<br />
INSCRIPTION:
In Loving Memory of my Dear Husband Edmund LAWLESS who died 1st January 1902 aged 74 years.
For ever with the Lord.
also Marion LAWLESS wife of above.
Born 18th Dec. 1846, Died 30th Jan 1948
in her 100th year.
The Lord is my Shepherd.
also Letitia Charlotte LAWLESS
Daughter of above
Died 7th Dec. 1949

 

[alert_yellow]EDMUND is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 [divider_dotted]

Approximate location of grave

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

 There is a Marriage, in Victoria, Australia, in 1855 in the Victoria Marriage Index with “Might” be him – but I can’t access those records.
“POSSIBLY” GOT MARRIED ON 16 September 1869 to Marian ROBERTSON from Wollongong.  See article.
NSWBDM – MARRIAGE
Registration number      7627/1895
Groom’s Family Name    LAWLESS
Groom’s Given Name(s)  EDMUND
Bride’s Family Name(s)  COLLIER
Bride’s Given Name(s)    MARGARET M
District  REDFERN
NSWBDM – DEATH
Registration number  2915/1902
Father’s Given Name(s)  EDMUND C
Mother’s Given Name(s)  SUSAN
District  RYDE
 [divider_dotted]

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1923),

Friday 3 January 1902, page 3


THE LATE INSPECTOR LAWLESS.

The funeral of ex-PoIice-inspector Lawless, who died on Wednesday, aged 74, took place yesterday at the Field of Mars Cemetery. The cortege moved from the deceased’s Into residence, “The Fisherton,” Marsfield, about 3 o’clock, and was followed by a large concourse of mourners in vehicles and on foot.

A short service was held at the residence by the Rev. Charles Baber (Church of England), who also officiated at the grave.

The chief mourners were Mr. Edmund Lawless, Mr. Frank Lawless, Miss Letitia Lawless, and Miss Marion Lawless.

Among those present were: Inspector Potter (representing the Inspector-General of Police). Inspector Bell, and Sub-Inspector Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Crandon, Mrs. Bell, Mr. and Mrs. Robertson, Mrs. Pettitt, and Messrs. Crabbe, Aitken, W. Chaffer, Nicolls, Beverley, Puckren, Kincott, Sparrow, Scott, G. Pettitt, Morrison, senr., A. Morrison, and others.

The late Inspector Lawless for some nine years before his retirement from the police force of New South Wales, was in command of the Redfern Division, now known as No. 7, in the charge of which he was succeeded by Inspector Garland.

Inspector Lawless retired some two years ago on pension, and removed to Marsfield. Up to that time he was one of the oldest police officers In the State.

Originally he joined the London police, in which he attained the rank of sergeant.

About 1852 he came to Victoria, where he also held a sergeant‘s rank in the Victorian police force.

In 1866 he joined the New South Wales police as a constable, and gradually rose in rank until, in 1883, he became an acting sub-inspector.

In April, 1893, he was made an Inspector.

Altogether, the deceased was connected with No. 2 Police Station for 25 years, in addition to nine years’ service in the Redfern district.

He leaves a widow and seven daughters and two sons.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/237346941
[divider_dotted]

Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950),

Saturday 4 January 1902, page 10


MARSFIELD.

DEATH.— Mr. Edmund Lawless, of Balaclava-road, Marsfield, died at his residence on the afternoon of New Year’s Day, and was buried on Thursday afternoon at the Field of Mars General Cemetery. The cause of death was heart disease and dropsy from which the deceased who was 74 years of age had been suffering for some time past. He leaves a widow and large family.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/86201137

[divider_dotted]

Inspector Edmund Lawless
Born: 1828 England
Died :1 January 1902
Resting Place: Field of Mars Cemetery, Ryde NSW

This is a transcript from the Sydney Morning Herald dated 3 January 1902

DEATH OF INSPECTOR LAWLESS.

A VETERAN POLICE OFFICER.

Inspector Lawless, who had been connected with the New South Wales police force for over 30 years, but retired two years ago owing to ill-health, died at his residence, The Fisherton, Balaclava-road, Marsfield, on Wednesday, at the age of 74 years.

Before coming to the colonies Mr. Lawless was attached to the London Metropolitan Police, and was stationed at Bow-street station, E. division. He held the rank of sergeant, in which capacity he was on duty at the International Exhibition 1851. The following year Mr. Lawless resigned from the London police and went to Victoria, where he joined the local force.
He was afterwards appointed as a sergeant, and retained that position until the gold rush broke out, when he resigned and interested himself in mining matters.

About two years later Mr.Lawless joined the New South Wales police force, and was attached to No.2 division, where he rose from the lowest rank to that of sub-inspector. During the year 1891 he was placed in charge of Redfern division, which was then a subdivision of No.2, but which subsequently became a division in itself.

In April, 1893, he was appointed an inspector, but remained at Redfern until 1899, when he retired. Since that time he has resided at Marsfield. The late Inspector Lawless was a man who was highly respected, and who gained the confidence of the public and the men who
served under him.

The deceased gentleman leaves a widow, two sons, and seven daughters.
The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, when the remains were interred in the Field of Mars Cemetery, Ryde. The Rev. Charles Baber, of the Church of England, Epping, held a short service at the house and also conducted the service at the grave side. The remains were followed to their last resting place by a large number of personal friends and police officials.

The chief mourners were Mr. Edmund Lawless, Mr. Frank Lawless, Miss Letitia Lawless, and Miss Marion Lawless.

Among others who attended were Inspector Potter (representing the Inspector-General of Police), Inspector Bell, Sub-inspector Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Crandon, Mr. and Mrs.Robertson. Mrs Pettitt, Mrs.Bell, and Messrs. Nicolls, Chaffer, W. Chaffer, Aitken, Crabbe, Puckren, Kincott, Scott, George Pettitt, Morrison, sen , Andrew Morrison, and Aldermen Beverley and Sparrow.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14446884

[divider_dotted]

 

Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), Wednesday 17 August 1898, page 2


SUNDAY TRADING.

Inspector Edmund Lawless proceeded against Thomas Oates at the Redfern Police Court yesterday, before Mr. Smithers, S.M., for selling liquor on Sunday, at his premises, Man of Kent Hotel, Redfern and Morehead streets. Accused was ordered to pay a fine of £2, and 5s 6d costs, half of which is to go to the Police Reward Fund.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/228451629

[divider_dotted]

 

Miss Edith LAWLESS – Daughter

John CONNAUGHTON – Son-in-Law

 

Further reading:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/28354502

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/227562774

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/227086627

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13317027

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/238488966

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/71518800

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/236905497

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14462469

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/235714872

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/113872782

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/162079734

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/236172899

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/107128601

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13939922

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/111317069

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/70995010

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/237615574

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/238890491

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/117019973

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/127877687

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/163819663

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13921615

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13199999

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/16085890

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/126799569

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/122860982

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/60893223

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13193150

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14462469

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/17950818

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/166816777

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/18059382

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/29762623

 

 

 

 




Joseph William GILHOLM

Joseph William GILHOLM

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   ‘ Q ‘ 5869

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1 March 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank:  Constable

 

Stations?, Camden Haven, Kerrabee, Gloucester, Forster O.I.C. – Death

 

ServiceFrom 26 September 1889  to  22 February 1902 = 12+ years Service

 

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

 

Born? ? about April – June 1866 of Rothbury, England

Died on:  Saturday  22 February 1902

Age:  36

CauseInjuries received when thrown from horse returning from the Taree races on Duty.  5 broken right ribs, rupture of lower lobe of left lung, laceration to right kidney.

Event date:  Saturday  15 February 1902

Event location:  Brown’s Creek hill – between Racecourse & Taree, NSW

Death date:  Saturday  22 February 1902

Death location:  Manning River District Hospital, Taree @ 10.30am

 

Inquest date:  Taree Court on Saturday 22 February 1902

 

Funeral date:  Sunday 23 February 1902 @  ?pm

Funeral location:  Dawson River Cemetery, Lansdowne Rd, Cundletown, NSW

Buried at:  Dawson River Cemetery

Unmarked Grave, Exact Location Unknown.
31°53’19.6″S 152°30’08.8″E

Memorial at?

 

( 2016 ) JOSEPH is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  * BUT SHOULD BE

In 2017, Joseph’s name was added to the National Police Wall of Remembrance


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


THIS MAN WAS KILLED ‘ON DUTY’ BUT IS NOT MENTIONED ON THE POLICE WALL OR REMEMBRANCE

 

 

Manning River Times and Advocate for the Northern Coast Districts of New South Wales (Taree, NSW : 1898 – 1954),

Wednesday 26 February 1902, page 3

 

Death of Constable Gilholm.

MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY.

A Magisterial Inquiry was held at the Court House, Taree, on Saturday afternoon last, by the District Coroner, Mr. W. N. Dove, P.M., concerning the death, in the M. R. D. Hospital at 10.30 that morning, of Constable J. W. Gilholm, of Forster, who received injuries while returning from duty at the Taree races on the previous Saturday afternoon.

Sergeant Hogan deposed: I am a Sergeant of Police, stationed at Taree. I have seen the body of Joseph William Gilholm, now lying dead at the Taree Hospital this day. He was 36 years of age, and was a native of Rothbury, England. He has been a member of the N. S. W. police force for over 12 years, and was till the time of his death in charge of Forster police station.

On the evening of the 12th instant he arrived at Taree station, for special duty at the Taree Show. On the morning of the 15th. about 8 a.m., I gave him instructions to attend the Taree races that day, with other mounted men.

About 8 p.m. on the 18th I saw deceased in the Taree Hospital. He was then conscious, and lying in bed. He complained of great pain in his chest and body, pointing more particularly to his left side. I asked him how the accident occurred. He said he and Constable Stein were riding home to Taree after the races were over, and that as they were coming near Brown’s Creek a man named McInherney joined them. After crossing Brown’s bridge slowly, he and McInherney started off in a canter ; and after going a short distance, his horse shied off the road. He said a little further on something struck him on the head and knocked him on to the back of the saddle; and that was the last he remembered. I said to him : ” Were you and McInherney racing ? ” He said ” No ; McInherney was on the road, and I was on the side..”

I have seen deceased from three to five times a day since, and was present when he died. He made no complaints against any person. He was quite conscious up to within half-an-hour of his death. The only complaints he made were of great pain, and he could not get his breath. I have known him about 10 years, and have always found him a sober man. He has left a wife and three children. He is possessed of no property, and no banking account. He owns one horse, and some furniture at the police station. His life was insured, but the premiums have not been paid for the last four years, in the Widows’ Fund.

John William Gormley deposed: I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, and am Government Medical Officer residing at Taree. I have seen the body of Constable Gilholm, and have held a post mortem examination thereon.

On Saturday, 15th. instant, on returning from the races, I found the constable doubled up upon the side of the road. I asked Constable Stein and McInherney, who were with him, to take him to the Hospital at once. This, was done. I saw him put into a sulky, and went on to the Hospital to get everything ready for, his reception.

I received him into the Hospital that evening and at once directed Dr. Curtayne to be sent for. We had a consultation then the next morning we had a farther consultation, with Dr. MacQueen. I was then in attendance on the man till to-day, when he died.

The post-mortem disclosed that five ribs on the right side were fractured, and had penetrated the lung. On the left side there was a rupture of the lower lobe of the lung. The right kidney was also lacerated as to be almost divided at the upper third. I consider that death was due to the resulting shock. During the time that deceased was in the Hospital he received every attention. The man was too ill from the first – to enable a diagnosis to he made. He could not be moved about. Deceased was a splendidly built man. The injuries disclosed by the post-mortem, were necessarily fatal. There was no sign of drink on the deceased, and I had seen him a few minutes before leaving the race-course, and he was then quite sober.

When approaching Brown’s’ Creek bridge on the evening of the 15th, I saw deceased’s horse shy off the road to the left, and a moment after I saw deceased all doubled up on the ground. I did not see what he struck, but I hurried on, and when I got to where he was I saw it must have been the stay of the telegraph post. He seemed to duck to getaway from the obstruction. I am of opinion, from what I saw, that he was compressed between the stay and the saddle. The injuries I discovered at the post-mortem could have been thus brought about.

Frederick Ernest Stein deposed ; I am a constable, and reside at Cundletown. On the 15th inst. I was on duty at Taree races, with the deceased ( Constable Gilholm ) and other constables. Deceased and I left the course to return to Taree a little after 6 p.m. We were riding our troop horses. When near Brown’s Creek hill, John McInherney joined us. McInherney was talking to deceased, and we rode along at a walking pace to the bridge. It was then raining sharply, and when we got on to the bridge McInherney and deceased cantered on. Neither had waterproof coats. I stopped behind, keeping my horse at a walking pace, soon after they left me, when they had gone 20 or 30 yards, deceased’s horse left the road, and swerved towards the fence on the left hand side, and dashed under the strut of the telegraph pole. Deceased struck the strut, and fell backwards over the horse’s rump. I was at that time about 70 yards behind them. McInherney kept on up the main road. I went to Gilholm‘s assistance, and found him unconscious on the ground ; He was lying on his face, with deep cut over the right eye. This was bleeding freely.

McInherney came back and at the same time Dr. Gormley drove up, and I asked him to see the deceased. Constables McKenna and Dowsett also rode up. Deceased was taken to the Hospital, and was admitted not more than 15 minutes after the accident, and was at once attended by Dr.Gormley. I saw Gilholm on the course often during the day. I saw no sign of drink on him. I have known him about 10 years. The horse deceased was riding seemed to be quiet. He was in the procession with the Premier, and so far as I know was quietly, ”

John Joseph McInherney deposed : I am a farmer, and reside at the Lansdowne River. On Saturday, 15th inst., I was at the Taree races. I left the course about 6 p.m. and rode towards Taree. On my way in I overtook Constables Stein and Gilholm. I joined them, and rode with them to the foot of the hill at Brown’s bridge. When we crossed the bridge Gilholm and I started at a canter. He was on my left hand. We went about 60 yards, when his horse galloped past me riderless. I looked around and saw Gilholm lying on the ground ; I went back. Stein was with Gilholm, and Dr. Gormley arrived immediately afterwards.

We put Gilholm into a sulky, and took him to the Hospital. I have not seen Gilholm since. We were not racing. Nothing was said about our racing. It had just started to rain, and that is why we cantered. I was a bit ahead of Gilholm, and saw nothing of how be fell, Gilholm was perfectly sober. I did not in any way jostle Gilholm, or force him out off the road. The accident occurred close to the end of the bridge fence.

The Coroner found ” That the deceased, Joseph William Gilholm died at the Manning River District Hospital on Saturday, 22nd February, 1902, of shock arising from injuries to the lungs, ribs, and kidneys, caused by his being accidentally thrown from his horse while on duty. ”

The funeral took place at the Dawson Cemetery on Sunday afternoon, when the cortege was a very large and representative one, The Rev. R. H. Phillips conducted the service.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/172468922


 

NSW Government Gazette – Event date – 1 February 1899 – Event place: Kerrabee

 

 

Joseph William Gilholm – Constable – Gloucester Station – Port Stephens Police District

Inspector of Slaughter-Houses as of 15 January 1900

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/221012009


 

NSWBDM – Death – 3219/1902 – Father = Edward.  Mother = Elizabeth

NSWBDM – Marriage – 5447/1884    ‘possibly’ married Mary L MOORE at Inverell in 1884


 

 




Richard JOHNSTON

 Richard JOHNSTON

Victoria Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations?

ServiceFrom  to  ?

Awards?

Born? ? 1866

Died on:  Sunday  12 October 1902

Cause:  Murdered – shot

Event location:  Milton St, Elwood

Age?

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at?

 Memorial at?

 

Richard JOHNSTON - VICPOL photo - Murdered 12 Oct 1902

[alert_green]RICHARD IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]


 [divider_dotted]

 Funeral location ?

[divider_dotted]

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

Details of Death:

About 11 a.m. Sunday 12 October 1902 Constable Johnston was off duty at his home at Elwood. He responded to a complaint that a man had tried to abduct a neighbour’s 8 year old daughter. Johnston immediately set off in pursuit and located the man in Milton Street Elwood. The suspect George Shaw had a lengthy criminal record. Unbeknown to Johnston Shaw was also the prime suspect for the murder of Constable Guilfoyle in Redfern New South Wales some months previously. When Johnston approached him Shaw produced a revolver and fired. Fatally wounded Johnston died within minutes. Shaw committed suicide at the intersection of Chapel Street and Rosamond Street a short time later.

[divider_dotted]

 Richard JOHNSTON - VICPOL - Murdered 12 Oct 1902

[divider]

About 11am on 12 October, 1902 Constable Richard Johnston was off duty at his home at Elwood (Victoria) when a neighbour informed him that a man had attempted to abduct her eight year-old daughter. The constable quickly set off on his bicycle after the suspect and located him a short distance away. When the suspect saw the approaching policeman the offender drew a revolver and shot Constable Johnston, inflicting fatal wounds. The offender then left the scene, only to commit suicide a short time later when confronted by other police.

It was later found that the man who had murdered Constable Johnson was the same offender (Shaw) who had murdered Constable Guilfoyle at Redfern (NSW) three months earlier.

Constable Guilfoyle was shot by an offender named Shaw at Redfern whilst attempting to arrest him and another man for passing counterfeit coins. Following an incident involving a storekeeper, Constable Guilfoyle had sought the assistance of an off-duty member, Constable Michael Maher, and after checking several shops the offenders had been in they located them in Shepherd Street. As the two constables approached the offenders, one produced a revolver and shot Constable Maher three times. Shaw then also produced a pistol and shot Constable Guilfoyle twice. Constable Maher later recovered, however Constable Guilfoyle’s wounds proved to be fatal. Shaw then made good his escape, making his way to Victoria.

[divider_dotted]

 

A MURDERED CONSTABLE.

THE JOHNSTON MEMORIAL.   “PAMPERED CRIMINALS” AND PENAL REFORM.

At the St. Kilda Cemetery on Sunday afternoon the Chief Commissioner of Police (Mr O’Callaghan) performed the ceremony of unveiling a marble monument erected by members of the police force over the grave of Constable Richard Johnston, who on 12th October last was shot dead by a notorious criminal named Shaw. The mayor of St. Kilda (Cr O’Donnell) presided, and amongst those present were Mr. McCutcheon, M.L.A. ; Inspector Hillard (officer in ohargd of the district), Inspector Crampton, Sergeant Davidson, the widow, with her children and her mother, many members of the force and a large gathering of the public.

Mr O’Callaghan retold the story of Constable Johnston’s death. On Sunday morning, when off duty, he was told that a ruffian had just been tampering with a child. He mounted his bicycle, and rode after the man who, when overtaken, turned and shot him through the heart. Remaining erect on his machine he rode nearly 100 yards, then his muscles relaxed, and he dropped dead. No more tragic   occurrence saddened the records of the Victorian police force. Constable Johnston had upheld the best traditions of the force and taught a lesson that every member should lay to his heart. The event gave rise to the question why the State should go on feeding and pampering human tigers like the murderer of Constable Johnston, and letting them free again to prey upon the public. Why had a penal system been tolerated for so many years, under which such brutes,   instead of being kept in confinement, were allowed to march at large to the detriment of all respectable people? In 1881 he had arrested the murderer of Constable Johnston. He was then known as a   man who would “shoot at sight,” and though taken by surprise, had found time to grasp a pistol. A few years later he was set at large in the community. It was high time the public raised a protest against the liberation of such blood thirsty brutes. Drastic legislation should be introduced, and introduced quickly, to amend our penal system. Through the action of a generous public and a just Government the widow and children have had their material wants provided for.

Mr McCutcheon said he quite agreed with the remarks that had been made as to the manner in which criminals were pampered by the State. It was time some change was made in the law. The Government permitted criminals to multiply, and placed them in comfortable buildings, where they were well fed and well kept, and lacked only the company of their former friends to make them happy. He considered that every member of the force in both town and country should be armed with a revolver.

Inspector Hillard said that as far as he had been able to ascertain not a single instance could be recalled in which a member of the Victorian police force had played the part of a coward.

Several hymns, including one specially written for the occasion, were sung before and after the ceremony. – “Age”

Geelong Advertiser ( Vic. )  Tuesday  24 March 1903  page 4 of 4

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/150723337?searchTerm=constable%20crampton&searchLimits=l-category=Article|||l-australian=y#pstart17952461

 




Denis GUILFOYLE

Denis GUILFOYLE

New South Wales Police Force

Constable 1st Class

Shot – Murdered

Redfern

19 July, 1902

 

The constable was shot by an offender named Shaw at Redfern whilst attempting to arrest him and another man for passing counterfeit coins. Following an incident involving a storekeeper, Constable Guilfoyle had sought the assistance of an off-duty member, Constable Michael Maher, and after checking several shops the offenders had been in they located them in Shepherd Street. As the two constables approached the offenders, one produced a revolver and shot Constable Maher three times. Shaw then also produced a pistol and shot Constable Guilfoyle twice. Constable Maher later recovered, however Constable Guilfoyle’s wounds proved to be fatal. Shaw then made good his escape, making his way to Victoria.

 

Constable Guilfoyle was a native of Ireland, having been born at Scariff in County Clare. He arrived in Sydney in 1885 and joined the New South Wales Police Force in November of that year. He did his initial training at the old Belmore Barracks and was first sent to Bathurst, where he remained for about two years. He was then transferred to Redfern in 1887, and was destined to remain attached to that station until his death. He was described as a very powerful, muscular man of nearly 17 stone. Prior to his death the constable had recently been severely injured in an accident and after a spell in hospital had been incapacitated for five or six weeks. He also had the misfortune to recently lose three of his children, one of them being a girl 12 years old. Although he could have retired from the police force on half pay, he apparently preferred to continue to work, and had continued working ‘street duty’ at Redfern and Darlington.

 

(About 11am on 12 October, 1902 Constable Richard Johnston was off duty at his home at Elwood (Victoria) when a neighbour informed him that a man had attempted to abduct her eight year-old daughter. The constable quickly set off on his bicycle after the suspect and located him a short distance away. When he saw the approaching policeman the offender drew a revolver and shot Constable Johnston, inflicting fatal wounds. The offender then left the scene, only to commit suicide a short time later when confronted by other police. It was later found that the man who had murdered Constable Johnson was the same offender (Shaw) who had murdered Constable Guilfoyle at Redfern (NSW) three months earlier.)

 

Constable Guilfoyle was born in 1859 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 7 November, 1885. At the time of his death he was stationed at Redfern.