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Robert John RODGERS

Robert John RODGERS

Late of 1 Ashburner St, Manly

The last Mounted Policeman attached to the Metropolitan Force

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ‘ Q ‘ 4667

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank: Mounted Constable – appointed 20 March 1884

Mounted Sergeant

Mounted Senior Sergeant – appointed February 1909

Stations?, ‘possibly’ Kogarah ( SenCon ), Manly ( Sgt )

ServiceFrom  20 March 1884  to  ? ? ? = 30 years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   ? ? 1860, England

Died on:   Tuesday  5 January 1915

Age:  54

Cause:   ?

Event location:  Manly

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   Manly Cemetery, Harland St, Manly

Grave locationSection U, Plot # 299

GPS of Grave:   -33.7919622858797,  151.271380220762

Memorial location?

 


Inscription: In Loving Memory of Robert John - beloved Husband of E. E. ( Emily Elizabeth ) Rodgers . Died 5th Jan. 1915, aged 54 years. Also his wife Emily Elizabeth RODGERS, 20th Oct. 1946, aged 85 years. Resting. and devoted daughter Edit, died 9th Feb. 1979, aged 82 years.

 

[alert_yellow]ROBERT is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Tamworth Daily Observer (NSW : 1910 – 1916), Friday 8 January 1915, page 1


The death occurred at Manly of ex Sergeant Robert John Rodgers, who recently retired from the police force owing to ill-health.

He bad been in the service 30 years, and was the last mounted man attached to the Metropolitan Force.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/107468305
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Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), Wednesday 20 January 1909, page 7


POLICE PROMOTIONS.

The following promotions for the metropolitan police district have been approved by the Inspector-General of Police, to take effect from 1st proximo:- Sergeant Robert J. Rodgers, to be Senior-Sergeant : Senior-constable Thomas Mankey to be Sergeant : Constable Robert Reed to be senior-constable.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/113344480

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NSW Government Gazette ( Sydney )     Tuesday  25 October 1898     page 8441

Diseased Animals and Meat Act, 1892
Senior-constable Robert John Rodgers – Inspector of Slaughter-houses, Kogarah, Metropolitan District.
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/220980064
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/222851471
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Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), Saturday 30 April 1898, page 12


GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.

The following notifications appear in the “Government Gazette” issued yesterday: —

Senior-constable Robert John Rodgers, of Kogarah, to be sub-Inspector under the Licensing Acts, 1882 – 83, for the metropolitan licensing district, to take effect from the date of commencing duty.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/238363884

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David Christopher BOURKE

David Christopher BOURKE

Queensland Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations?

ServiceFrom  ?  to  ?

 

[blockquote]

David Christopher BOURKE - QPol - Died 2 May 1915

David Christopher BOURKE

 

Regimental number 1310
Place of birth Irvinestown, Ireland
Place of birth Fermanagh, Ireland
Religion Roman Catholic
Occupation Labourer
Address Police Station, South Brisbane, Queensland
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 26
Height 5′ 10.5″
Weight 175 lbs
Next of kin Mother, Mrs K Bourke, 90 Coventry Drive, Dennistown, Glasgow, Scotland
Previous military service Served for 5 years in the Royal Irish Constabulary.
Enlistment date 13 January 1915
Place of enlistment Brisbane, Queensland
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 15th Battalion, 2nd Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/32/2
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Brisbane, Queensland, on board HMAT A48 Seang Bee on 13 February 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 15th Battalion
Other details from Roll of Honour Circular Enlisted 13 January 1915 – 15th Bn, 2nd Reinforcements. Taken on strength, 15th Bn, 12 April 1915. Mortally wounded, 2 May 1915.
Fate Died of wounds 2 May 1915
Place of death or wounding Gallipoli, Turkey
Date of death 2 May 1915
Age at death 26
Place of burial Chatby War Memorial Cemetery (Row E, Grave No. 83), Egypt
Panel number, Roll of Honour,
Australian War Memorial
75
Other details War service: Egypt, Gallipoli

Embarked Brisbane o HMAT ‘Seang Bee’, 13 February 1915.

Proceeded to join Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 12 April 1915.

Wounded in action, Gallipoli, April 1915; admitted to Egyptian Government Hospital, 1 May 1915.

Died of wounds, 2 May 1915.

Buried at Chatby Military Cemetery, Alexandria, 3 May 1915.

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Sources NAA: B2455, BOURKE David Christopher

 

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Awards?

Born? ? 1888 in Irvinestown, Ireland

Died on:  Sunday  2 May 1915

Place of death:  Gallipoli, Turkey

Cause:  Died of wounds

Age:  26

Funeral date:  Monday  3 May 1915

Funeral location:  Chatby Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, Egypt

Buried at:  Chatby War Memorial Cemetery (Row E, Grave No. 83), Egypt

Memorial at?

[alert_green]DAVID is mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green] * CONSIDERED POLICE JOB RELATED

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal@AustralianPolice.com.au

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Scottish Military History Website

Hi, I am trying to find is a David Christopher BOURKE who immigrated to Australia and was a Queensland Police Service Officer. He took leave from the police to join the Australia Army during WWI. He died on 2 May 1915. His NOK was his mother, Mrs K Bourke, 90 Coventry Drive, Dennistown, Glasgow. I am looking to see if his name appears somewhere on a local war memorial or cenotaph where his family is from. Mel

Comment by: Melanie Wilkins

26 January 2015 – 12:17:29

http://www.scottishmilitaryresearch.org.uk/letters-to-the-guest-book

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Frank Walter MATTHEWS

Frank Walter MATTHEWS

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Mounted Constable

Stations?, Barmedman Police Stn

Service:  From  ?  to  ?

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Australian Imperial Force

Regiment:  2nd Light Horse Brigade, A Squadron, 6th Light Horse Regiment

Enlisted:  18 September 1914 ( Rank: Private ) ( 26yrs 6mths old )

Service #  153

Rank:  Lance Corporal

Embarkation:  21 December 1914 aboard HMAT Suevic A29

Next of kin:  Mrs. Elizabeth. Kearney, mother, Tullamore, NSW & Sarah Gertrude MATTHEWS – wife, Church St, Gloucester.

Religion:  C of E

Single / Married:  Single

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Awards:  1914/15 Star,  British Ware Medal, Victoria Medal

Born? ? 1888 at Barmedman, NSW

Died on:  17 September 1915

Place of death:  ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli Peninsular

Cause:  Killed in Action

Age?

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at:  No.1 Shell Green Cemetery, Plot 1, Row B, Grave 9, Gallipoli Peninsular.

Memorial at?

Frank Walter MATTHEWS ANZAC
Frank Walter MATTHEWS
ANZAC

[alert_blue]FRANK is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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Funeral location:

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2nd Lieutenant Alexander Frank BUSKIN, 6th LHR. Killed in action at Bolton’s Ridge, 17/09/1915.
Trooper William Bradley INGRAM, 6th LHR. Killed in action 17/09/1915.
Trooper Frank Walter MATTHEWS, 6th LHR. Killed in action 17/09/1915.
Trooper Lyle Hugh Florian O’NEILL, 6th LHR. Killed in action 17/09/1915.
Captain Rupert Noel RICHARDSON, 6th LHR. Killed in action 17/09/1915.
Trooper David Matthew JACOMBS, 7th LHR. Killed in action 17/09/1915.
Trooper Ernest Ambrose ROBERTS, 7th LHR. Killed in action 17/09/1915.

http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/64423/20090520-1059/www.lighthorse.org.au/forum/postfaa8.html

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Just as an aside, his wife applied for a pension in 1918 and was granted a pension for herself and their son, also named Frank Walter Mathews. Frank (Jr) was born in 1915 in the East Maitland District (NSW BDM). At this stage there is no death record of Frank (Jr).

Frank (Sr) enlisted 18/09/1914, killed 17/09/1915 – 364 days. Without getting a birth certificate for Frank (Jr) it is not known whether he was born just before or after Frank (Sr) was killed.

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NSW Government Employees Granted Military Leave, 1914-1918

The below link, from the NSW Government Employees Granted Military Leave, 1914 – 1918 has F. W. MATTHEWS, Ordinary Constable of Gloucester; North Eastern District, Gloucester Station, being KILLED in Action at Gallipoli on the 6 September 1915 – being a conflicting date of death from that of the Light Horse.org.au website.

The below Citation comes from NRS 4481 Glass negatives ( NRS4481_ST6724P ), plus NRS 10946 Police salary registers [3/2995], SR Reel 1974, plus Police Department Annual Report for the year 1915, in Parliamentary Papers 1915-16, Vol.4, p.635, plus Police Department Annual Report for the year 1918, in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1919, Vol.3, p.603, plus Police Department Annual Report for the year ended 1917, in NSW Parliamentary Papers 1918, Vol.3, p.665.

http://srwww.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/searchhits_nocopy.aspx?table=NSW+Government+Employees+Granted+Military+Leave%2c+1914-1918&id=82&frm=1&query=Department%3apolice

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Henry CHADBAN

 Henry CHADBAN

( late of Stroud, NSW )

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations:  Newcastle

Service:  From  ? January 1912  to  ?

[blockquote]

Australian Imperial Force:

Regiment:  13th Battalion, Australian Infantry.

Enlisted:  30 April 1915

Service #  2129

Rank:  Private

Embarkation:  14 June 1915 from Sydney aboard HMAT Wandilla A62

Next of kin:  Son of Henry & Mary Jane Chadban

Religion:  C of E

Single / Married:  Single

Australian Ware Memorial Panel number:  68

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Henry CHADBAN - NSWPF - KIA - 13 August 1915 - memorial

Awards: Memorial Scroll & King’s Message – received by his father on 29 August 1921

Memorial Plaque & King’s Message received by his father on 3 April 1922

Victory Medal – posthumously received by his father on 25 December 1922

Born? ? 1887

Event date:  Saturday  7 August 1915

Event location:  Hill 971, Sari Bair, Gallipoli Peninsular

Died on:  Friday  13 August 1915

Place of death:  Military Hospital, Malta

Cause:  Died of wounds – WW I

Age:  28

Funeral date:  14 August 1915

Funeral location?

Buried at:  Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta.  Row 6B grave 3

Memorial at?

Harry CHADBAN aka Henry
Harry CHADBAN aka Henry

[alert_blue]HENRY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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Funeral location: 

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Newcastle Morning Herald & Miner’s Advocate               Friday  14 March 1913            page 7 of 8

A Violent Customer. Olaf Anderson (21), seaman, was charged with maliciously damaging one door and two windows, the property of Cenuto Gabriel Anderson. Accused said he pleaded guilty to breaking one window, but to nothing else.

Prosecutor stated that the accused came to the Blue Bell Hotel, of which witness was lessee, somewhat the worse for liquor, shortly before eleven o’clock on the previous evening. He smashed in the panel of the door, but whether he kicked it in or struck it with a stone he did not know. He also broke two of the windows with a stone.

Constable Chadban deposed to arresting the accused, and corroborated the extent of the damage done. Accused was fined £1, and ordered to pay £3, the amount of the damage done, in default, one month’s imprisonment.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/136826421

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Newcastle Morning Herald & Miner’s Advocate                  Thursday  6 November 1913            page 7 of 8

William Craig was charged with having been drunk and disorderly in a railway carriage on October 26. Defendant, who was represented by Mr. A. H. James, pleaded not guilty.

Constable Chadban said he was a passenger on the train which left Toronto for Newcastle at 6p.m. on October 26. Defendant got in the train at Cockle Creek. He was very much under the influence of drink, and went into the guard’s compartment. He sat on the guard’s seat, and when asked to go into the other part of the compartment refused to do so. He stopped arguing with the guard for five minutes. Witness told the defendant he was a constable, and took his name and address.

To Mr. James: The guard’s compartment was the end portion of a long American car.  Defendant could walk straight, and board the train. Defendant denied that he was drunk, or in any way disorderly. He was not aware that the compartment was reserved for the guard. He had been to Speers’ Point to see some friends, and had spent an hour and a half watching White law training. He had five medium-sized glasses of beer, but was by no means drunk. He put his foot on the guard’s tucker tin, and apologised for doing so. He had not travelled in such carriages before.

Thomas Gould said that the defendant was not drank. There were other people drinking beer out of bottles in the carriage, and they were pretty jolly. Neither defendant nor witness took any part with them. Evidence was given by E. Hunter, and the case was dismissed.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/137024704

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Henry is described as being 5′ 10 3/4″ tall, 165 lbs, with a 34″ chest, brown eyes and dark hair and is 4th born of 15 children.

When he died, Henry’s possessions consisted of:  Purse, two coins, key, tobacco, razor, fountain pen, note book & tin of thymenthol.

7 August 1915 – wounded at Gallipoli

12 August 1915 – Head wound

14 August 1915 – Fractured skull – Abscess on brain – died of wounds

On the 7 October 1916, Henry’s father received his meager belongings.

http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3223612

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https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=49499

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The Sydney Morning Herald           Saturday  18 September 1915         page 20 of 26

PRIVATE H. CHADBAN.  

Private Henry Chadban (died of wounds) was 28 years of age, and a son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Chadban, of Stroud. He was educated at the Stroud Public School and afterwards worked in the Gloucester and Bellinger River districts as a timber-getter gaining a reputation as a wood chopper.

Deceased was a prominent member of the East Raleigh Football Club and was also a good cyclist, and the holder of several gold medals won at those sports. In 1912 he joined the police force and was stationed at Newcastle until war broke out when he enlisted with the 13th Battalion. Private Chadban was in 1913 awarded the Royal Humane Society’s certificate for life saving.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/15614381

 

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The Gloucester Advocate ( NSW )                          Saturday  18 September 1915                       page 2 of 4

PRIVATE HENRY CHADBAN

The late Private Henry Chadban, reported killed at the Dardanelles, was 28 years of age, and a son of Mr. and Mars. H. Chadban, of Stroud. In his youthful days, Private Chadban was working about Gloucester, and afterwards went to the Belinger River, where he was engaged in the timber industry.

In January, 1912, he joined the Police force in Sydney, and later went to Newcastle. He was a prominent footballer and sportsman generally, and held the certificate of the Royal Live Saving Society. Private Herbert Chadban, a brother, is in hospital in Malta.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/158595188

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Newcastle Morning Herald & Miners’ Advocate (NSW)         Saturday  2 October 1915           page 5 of 16

A.N.A. SOLDIERS

Constable Harry Chadban, who, enlisted from Newcastle, where he was stationed for some months, died on August 13th of wounds received at the Dardanelles. His parents live at Stroud, and he was the first member of the Newcastle branch of the Australian Natives Association to be killed, although about thirty members have enlisted, a great many of whom are already at the front. At a meeting of the branch this week a special minute was passed appreciatively recording Mr. Chadban’s services, and the mortuary allowance of £20 was passed for payment to his next-of-kin.

Mr. C. H. Tonkin, the secretary of the branch, has formulated a scheme, which is to be considered at next meeting, whereby the members who are remaining at home will by special contribution keep those who have gone to the front financially good on the books during their absence. This scheme, which appears to be generally approved, will have the twofold effect of avoiding the need for the branch calling upon the ‘headquarters’ funds for the purpose, and of ensuring to members’ relatives the mortuary allowance of £20 in the event of them being killed or ensuring to members, in the event of injury, the full benefit of £1 1s per week for 52 weeks, and 5s per week for life should they be permanently incapacitated.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/137966556

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 Dungong Chronicle ( NSW )                            Tuesday  2 May 1916              page 2 of 6

Whilst in Newcastle last week, the writer observed opposite the post office, in Hunter Street, a marble monument, erected in memory of the fallen of Newcastle. On ‘ Anzac Day ‘ the stone was covered with most beautiful wreaths; on looking over them, I discovered a magnificent wreath from the police of Newcastle to the late Pte. Chadban, of Stroud, who was in the police force at Newcastle at the time of enlisting. I was pleased to note that the police of Newcastle did not forget their comrade on that memorable day, who was so brave to give his life for King and country.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/136009502

 

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The Newcastle Sun ( NSW )                 Thursday  18 July 1918                page 5 of 6

POLICE HONOR ROLL

Unveiling Next Wednesday

A beautiful marble honor roll, one of the finest of its kind, will be unveiled at the city police station on Wednesday night. The names are inscribed in gold lettering on a black marble scroll, and this is set on a white marble tablet. The roll faces the public entrance to the station, and at present it is draped with the Southern Cross. The words: ” Our Heroes, ” surrounded by a wreath of laurel in bas-relief, with the words ” Newcastle District Police Roll of Honor ” beneath the wreath, are chiselled into the head of the white tablet. At the bottom of the same tablet is chiselled the inscription, ” The Great War, 1914-19. ” So the police apparently believe that the war will conclude next year.

Eight constables‘ names appear on the scroll: — H. Chadban ( of Newcastle, killed ), F. M. Doonan ( of Lambton, killed ), H. W. Hancock ( of Newcastle Water Police, killed ), T. Connell ( of Minmi, killed ), C. W. J. Grant ( of Newcastle Water Police, returned wounded ), D. J. Long ( of Newcastle, still on active service ), V. Digre ( of Newcastle, who served with the naval bridging train and is now in the artillery ) and S. Pender ( who has re-enlisted ). Constable Connell served with the Imperial Forces, being called up as an Irish Reservist.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/159096387

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Newcastle Morning Herald & Miners’ Advocate       Thursday  25 July 1918    page 5 of 8

NEWCASTLE POLICE. ROLL OF HONOUR UNVEILED. A roll of honour to the members of the Newcastle police who have gone to the war was unveiled at the police station last night, in the presence of a very large muster of members of the force.

The officers present were: Superintendent Goulder, who has entered on leave of absence prior to retirement; Superintendent Childs, his successor; Inspectors Cook, Buzacott, Hood, and Hojel.  There were more than 40 police present.

Alderman Kilgour, the Mayor of Newcastle, Mr. C. F. Butler, S.M., and Mr. W. G. Chiplin, chamber magistrate at Newcastle, were also present.

There are eight names on the roll– H. Chadban, F.M. Doonan, H. W. Hancock, T. Connell, C. W. J. Grant, D. J Long, V Digre, and S Pender. The first four have made the supreme sacrifice. The last mentioned, as Superintendent Childs said, was mentioned in despatches for meritorious work at the Dardanelles.  ( S. Pender )

On his return he rejoined the force, but had felt the call so strong that he had again resigned and enlisted. The names are inscribed on a scroll of black marble, which is mounted on a white polished panel, and surmounted with a white marble pediment richly carved, with a laurel wreath and the flags of the Empire and Australia. At the top is inscribed ” Our Heroes, ” and immediately below ” Newcastle District Police. ” Below the names are the words, ” For King and Country, ” and lower down, ” The Great War, 1914-19, ” space being left to fill in the year in which the war ends.

Superintendent Childs. who unveiled the roll, said it was with feelings of pleasure mingled with regret that he performed that function, pleasure because he felt proud of belonging to the same force as the men whose names were inscribed on the roll, and regret that four of them had laid down their lives, two in Gallipoli and two in France. When the Empire was in danger these men did not hesitate, but freely and voluntarily gave their services to their King and country. They had the satisfaction of knowing that the Empire was fighting for a righteous and just cause. He took that opportunity of mentioning that since the war began 158 members of the police force had enlisted, 40 had died on active service, 32 had returned, and 81 were still on military service. In addition, six clerks, who were attached to the Inspector-General’s Office, had enlisted. One of them died on the way to the front, another was invalided home, and the four others were still on active service. The Mayor briefly supported the remarks of Superintendent Childs, and paid a warm tribute to the patriotism of the men who had enlisted. He expressed his appreciation at being invited to take part in the function.

Superintendent Goulder said he felt it a great privilege to say a few words regarding their honoured comrades who had offered their lives on the altar of duty and patriotism. He always felt a thrill when he saw two or three soldiers who were voluntarily prepared to give their lives without any advantage whatever to themselves, apart from the satisfaction of knowing they had done their duty in the highest and fullest degree. ” I have always said ” added Superintendent Goulder, ” that military offenders who are going to the war, or have been, should not be treated in the same category as civilians guilty of similar minor offences. I would ask, as a special personal favour, if you have occasion to interfere with soldiers, do it as kindly and as charitably as you can, remembering the sacrifices they have made and the hardships they have suffered “.

In unveiling the roll, Superintendent Childs said he would apply words used by the Governor-General recently in unveiling a roll of honour, ” I unveil this roll to the honour of those connected with the Newcastle Police Force. I dedicate it to the glory of God, to the memory of those who have fallen, who have been wounded, who are returning to us, and who are about to serve in our renowned Australian Divisions. ” Inspector Cook paid a tribute to Constable J. Chandler, from whom the idea of having the memorial emanted, and who, once the superintendent’s permission was obtained, pushed the matter ahead with great energy. Constable Chandler expressed his pleasure at seeing such a large muster, and said when the movement was started the money was rapidly subscribed.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/140973599

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Dungong Chronicle                             Tuesday  22 August 1916                  page 2 of 6

ROLL OF HONOR. CHADBAN. —

In loving memory of our dear Son and Brother, Private Henry Chadban, No. 1292,   6th of 13 Batt., 4th Aus. Inf. Brigade, who died of wounds at Malta, on 13th Aug., received at Lone Pine Aug. 7th, 1915. Aged 29

He rose responsive to his country’s Call

And gave for her his best, his life, his all.

He fell a hero in the deadly strife,

For, King and Country he laid down his life.

Inserted by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

M. and H. Chadban.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/136008568

 

 

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Dungong Chronicle                             Tuesday  13 August 1918                  page 2 of 6

ROLL OF’ HONOR CHADBAN. —

Private Henry Chadban, 13th Batt., wounded in the Lone Pine raid on 7 th August, and died on 13th, 1915, at Malta, aged 28 years.

He bravely answered duty’s call,

He gave his life for one and all.

Inserted by his loving father, mother, brothers and sisters.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/134141291

 

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The Newcastle Sun ( NSW)                          Friday  10 January 1919                page 3 of 6

POLICE HONOR ROLL

From ‘The Sydney Sun”

Newcastle Police Honour Roll
Newcastle Police Honour Roll

The names on the roll are H. Chadban, F. M. Doonan, H. W. Hancock, T.  Connell, all of whom have made the supreme sacrifice, and C. W. J. Grant, D. J. Long, V. Dicre and S. Pender.   Many other Newcastle policemen volunteered for active service, but were rejected.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/159368377

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Herbert CHADBAN
Herbert CHADBAN

Private Herbert CHADBAN, Service # 1926, with the 2nd Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Army, died on 4 May 1917, in France, aged 26.

Herbert is mentioned / buried at: Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, Villers-Bretonneux, Picardie, France

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Henry HODDER

 Henry HODDER

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations?, Broken Hill

Service:  From 1911 to 24/08/1914. 3 years

[blockquote]

Regimental Serial #  502

Private,

Headquarters 3rd Battalion AIF

Killed In Action at Lone Pine

ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli Peninsular

[/blockquote]

Awards:  1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Born: Orange, NSW, 1888

Died on:  9 August 1915

Cause:  Battle wounds in the Battle of Lone Pine WW I

Age: 26

Funeral date:  NIL

Funeral location:  NIL

Buried at:  K.I.A. & M.I.A.

Henry HODDER - R.I.P.
Henry HODDER – R.I.P.

 

[alert_blue]HENRY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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 Funeral location:  NO FUNERAL.  K.I.A. & M.I.A.

Cemetery or memorial details: Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli Peninsula, Canakkale Province, Turkey

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Henry HODDER

Regimental number 502
Religion Church of England
Occupation Police constable
Address Police Barracks, Broken Hill, New South Wales
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 26
Next of kin W Hodder, Wottomandara, via Cowra, New South Wales
Enlistment date 24 August 1914
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 10th Battalion, H Company
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/27/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board Transport A11 Ascanius on 20 October 1914
Rank from Nominal Roll Driver
Unit from Nominal Roll 3rd Brigade Headquarters
Fate Killed in Action 9 August 1915
Other details War service: Egypt, Gallipoli

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=139450

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Hodder was attached to the Brigade Head Quarters and was hit about the end of June by a shell when in his dug out which blew off both his legs.  His mate, Gordon Farnham, dressed his wounds and passed him on to the Dressing Station.

Informant heard that he was in Egypt and still alive.

Ref. Pte. G. A.     Sergent, 1064,

10 A.I.F.

1st A. G. Hospital, Heliopolis, Cairo  ( 6. 12. 15 )

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Informant says he was told that Hodder had his leg blown off.  He cannot say who told him nor can he fix the date.  Hodder was a policeman at Broken Hill and he and several policemen came down with informant to Adelaide to enlist.  Hodder was at one time in the 3rd Bgde. Transport.

Ref:  Pte. A. R. Perry, 525,

10 A.I.F.  C. Co.  Gezira Hospital, CAIRO   5.1.16

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Informant received the following information from Bgde. H.Q.:-

Whilst Hodder was doing police duty on the beach at Anzac during July, a shell exploded in the dug-out almost severing both legs and arms from body.  Was sent back to Egypt and believed to have died in Alexandria.

Ref:  Pte. Tanner, 25,

3rd Bgde. H. Q.  Al liayat Convalescent Home, Helouan, Cairo.  3.12.15

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He and Pte D. Fisher were in Police Duty at Brigade headquarters on August 6 and were each hit by same shell.  Hodder had one or both legs blown off and Fisher lost one or more limbs.  Witness did not see this happen but heard it from mates and regarded it as absolutely ture, but could never find out what became of either of them subsequently.

About 5ft 10 or 11, fair, clean shave, enlisted in South Australia, stout build, about 12 or 13 stone.

Pte. A. A. Smith 1040  A Coy, 10, A.I.F.,  Malta  6.1.16

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Both legs were blown off by a shell explosion whilst in his dug-out behind the trenches to the right of Lone Pine.

He died in the dressing station on the beach.  Informant received the above account of Hodder’s death from J. Thomas, Stretcher-bearer, 10 A.I.F.

Ref:  Sgt. Neave, 131,  Sporting Club Hospital, Heliopolis, Cairo    10.1.16

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Court of Inquiry held in France 7.9.17 found this soldier K. in A. on or about 9.8.15.  No hospital admission nor place of burial available.

H.Q.  11.12.17

London 13.12.17

 

http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1047376–1-.pdf

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Aust Red Cross Enquiry pdf

The above pd[divider_dotted]f document is a ‘broader’ copy of the above text.

 

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William James HARRIS

William James HARRIS

Queensland Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations?

Service:  From  to  ?

Awards?

Born?

Died on:  24 August 1915

Cause:  Injuries received riding a Police horse

Age:  28

Funeral date:  Friday  27 August 1915

Funeral location:  Rockhampton Cemetery, Qld

Buried at: Rockhampton Cemetery, Qld

RC    Section 15X   Burial # 4002d

[alert_green]WILLIAM IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green ]


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The Capricornian  ( Rockhampton, Qld )        Saturday  28 August 1915            page 31 of 52

The funeral of Constable James William Harris, who met his death as the result of an accident on the Scrubby Creek Bridge, took place yesterday afternoon. A large body of officers and men of the Rockhampton police force, as well as others from outside stations, assembled at the police barracks, and, in charge of Senior sergeant M J. Carmody, marched in royal blue uniforms and white helmets to the late residence of the deceased in Arnold street and afterwards followed his remains to the Rockhampton cemetery, three marching on either ride of the hearse and the others immediately in the rear. Among those present at the funeral were the Police Magistrate, Mr. H. L Archdall, and the Clerk of Petty Sessions, Mr. W. G. Moran. The Rev. Father T. Grogan officiated at the graveside.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/69402310

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Morning Bulletin ( Rockhampton, Qld )       Friday  3 September 1915                   page 10 of 12

MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY.

A magisterial inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of Constable William James Harris, at the Rockhampton General Hospital on the night of the 24th of August last, as the result of an accident on the Scrubby Creek Bridge the same night, was held before the Police Magistrate, Mr. H. L. Archdall,  yesterday.

Senior-sergeant M. J. Carmody, conducted the examination of witnesses.

Senior-sergeant Carmody deposed that he instructed the deceased on the morning of the 24th of August last to go to Kabra to make some official inquiries and expected his return that night unless something occurred to delay him. About eight o’clock, that night he was advised by telephone from Gracemere that the deceased had met with an accident on the Scrubby Creek Bridge and that the ambulance was taking him to the Hospital.

After stating his course of action immediately before the deceased’s death and subsequently, witness added that the horse ridden by the deceased was quiet. The   deceased was twenty-eight years of age and had a wife and a child fifteen months old. He was an excellent horseman and a most reliable and trustworthy constable.

Robert McKim, labourer, living at Gracemere, deposed that when on horseback within 100 yards of Scrubby Creek Bridge, about seven o’clock on the night of the 24th of August last he saw a horseman on the bridge. The horse shied and bounded about 4 ft. into the air. Both horse and rider fell on the off side ( right side ). Witness hurried to the scene as quickly as possible, and as be got on to the bridge the horse came towards him. Having tied up both horses, witness went towards the man, and recognised him as a constable, as he was in police uniform. He could get no reply from the constable as to whether he was hurt. Through the slabs he could see a fire underneath the bridge at a man’s camp, though he did not see a man there until shortly afterwards. The horse was just about over the spot where the fire was when it bounded. Rain had fallen in the afternoon, and, in consequence, the bridge was slippery. If a horse with shoes on slipped on a board, it would fall very heavily. The reflection from the light, he thought, caused the horse to shy and bound. He was satisfied that the horse was only walking on to the bridge when the accident occurred. If the horse had been cantering witness would have heard it. Witness telephoned to the Ambulance Office from the Gracemere railway station, a mile from the bridge.

In reply to the Police Magistrate, witness said that he could not say whether the horse fell on the deceased or whether the deceased struck the slabs independently of the horse.

W. G. Daniel, Superintendent of the Ambulance Brigade, gave evidence to the effect that, when summoned, he went in the ambulance motor car to the Scrubby Creek Bridge, five miles distant from Rockhampton, and on the bridge saw Constable Harris, who was quite unconscious.   There was a contused wound, with effusion of blood, on the forehead over the right eye. The deceased, who was in a serious condition, was conveyed in the car to the Hospital.

Alexander MacDonald, butcher, Gracemere, testified that he had known Constable Harris as a steady and reliable and a good horseman, and adding that, after inspecting the bridge with Constable Cullen on the following morning, he had formed the opinion that the horse bounded just after it got on to the bridge, jumped to get over the reflection of the fire, and then fell owing to the bridge being slippery from the rain. The horse was marked on the off shoulder.

The inquiry was then adjourned to a date to be fixed.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/53369843

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Morning Bulletin ( Rockhampton, Qld )          Thursday  9 September 1915       page 6 of 12

THE DEATH OF CONSTABLE HARRIS.

The inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of Constable James William Harris, as the result of an accident on the Scrubby Creek Bridge, was continued before the Police Magistrate, Mr. H. L. Archdall, yesterday.

Senior sergeant M. J. Carmody conducted the examination of the witness, Constable Robert Lindsay Cullen, who, in the course of his evidence, stated that his examination showed that the deceased’s horse was going at a walking pace to the bridge and afterwards slipped about 9 ft. on the bridge when attempting to bound, and then skidded about 15 ft. before it started to scramble to get on its feet.

It appeared to him that the horse bounded over the reflection of the fire underneath the bridge.

Judging by marks, the horse fell on the off side ( right ).

The deceased was a good horseman and a very careful man with horses, while he was most sober and reliable.

The bridge was very slippery on the night of the accident, and it was a dangerous bridge at any time. The inquiry was further adjourned.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/53378874

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James HOME

James HOME

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  Q 9372

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank:  Constable

Stations:   Coonamble, Dubbo

ServiceFrom  23 February 1912  to  13 May 1915 = 3+ years Service

[blockquote]

Australian Imperial Force

Regiment:  4th Battalion F Company

Enlisted: 18/08/1914, Sydney. Due to his previous military service he was sworn in as Colour Sergeant

Service #  245

Rank:  2nd Lieutenant

Embarkation: on board Transport A14 Euripides on 20 October 1914

Next of kin: Father George Home, Harwick, Scotland

Religion?

Single / Married?

[/blockquote]

Awards: Queens South Africa Medal. Served 7 years with 1st Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders.

1914/15 Star.

British War Medal.

Victory Medal

Born: c 1884, Scotland

Died on:  13 May 1915

Place of death:  # 17 General hospital, Alexandria

Cause:  died of wounds received on 3 May 1915 at Gallipoli Peninsular. Gun shot wound to the left leg

Age: 31

Funeral date: Buried same date 13/05/1915

Funeral location:  Graveside

Buried at: Chatby Military Cemetery, Alexandria, Eqypt. Plot F, Grave 48

From his Father – “Came of a Border fighting clan, the Homes of HOME, very many of whom fell in Scotland’s wars, notably around their king at FLODDEN – vide Scott’s “Marmion.”” Details from Father.

Memorial at:

James HOME 1 - NSWPF

 James HOME - NSWPF - KIA 13 May 1915

[alert_blue]JAMES is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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ANZAC




Allan Hugh McMASTER

 Allan Hugh McMASTER

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Constable

Stations:  Albury

Service:  From  to  ?

[blockquote]

Australian Imperial Force

1st Australian Light Horse Regiment

Enlisted: 25 August 1914

Service # 464

Rank:  Private

Embarkation:  20 October 1914 from Sydney aboard HMAT Star of Victoria A16

Cemetery or memorial details: Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli Peninsula, Canakkale Province, Turkey

was Single, son of Peter McMaster of Shavebrage, Glen Innes, NSW

Link:  https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=203353

[/blockquote]

Awards:  1914 – 15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal.

Born? ? 1891

Died on:  26 May 1915

Place of death: Lone Pine, Turkey – WWI

Cause:  injuries received in battle – bullet wound to the stomach

Age:  24

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at:  NO KNOWN GRAVE

Was a member of the Manchester Unity I.O.O.F.

Memorial Wall - Lone Pine for Allan Hugh McMaster.
Memorial Wall – Lone Pine for Allan Hugh McMaster.

 

[alert_blue]ALLAN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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 Funeral location:

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Australian War Memorial, Canberra

Roll of Honour name projection

Allan Hugh McMaster’s name will be projected onto the exterior of the Hall of Memory on:

  • Tue 2 June, 2015 at 8:12 pm
  • Tue 14 July, 2015 at 6:23 pm
  • Fri 28 August, 2015 at 3:11 am
  • Tue 20 October, 2015 at 8:47 pm
  • Wed 23 December, 2015 at 12:57 am
  • Thu 18 February, 2016 at 4:53 am
  • Tue 12 April, 2016 at 8:08 pm
  • Fri 27 May, 2016 at 10:29 pm
  • Fri 8 July, 2016 at 7:48 pm

https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1649443/

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Truth ( Sydney )          Sunday  9 February 1913   page 12 of 12

STEAKA-DA-STOUT.

Jaeger, Jerry, and the Juice.

SLICK COPPEROS AT NICK COMINO’S

The Lady, the Lash, and the limb of the Law.

Nick and Jerry Fined £30 Apiece.

Those persons who used to find it rather convenient to visit an oyster saloon, when in search of a reviver, will probably find it rather difficult to do so now that the police have bagged one of the offending saloon keepers, who supply their customers with liquid refreshment, as well as meals on Sunday night, for most likely other saloon keepers will take warning, and drop the practice. The case referred to was one in which Nicholas Comino was proceeded against, at the Water Police Court, on Tuesday last, for selling liquor without a license, while a waiter in the saloon, named Jerry Rizos, was proceeded against for aiding and abetting in the sale of the liquor.

Mr. Young (Instructed by K. C. Rexburgh ) appeared for both defendants, who Pleaded not guilty.

Sub-Inspector Stephen said that at about 9.40 p.m.. on the 26th ultimo, in company with Sen.-Sergeant Stewart and Constable Thornley, he went to Comino’s oyster saloon, Alfred -street, City. In an upstairs room, he saw Constable Jaeger sitting at a table WITH SOME STEAK before him, also a bottle and glass. Rizos was called up to the table, and Stephen told him that Jaeger was a constable. ” He says you served him with this bottle of stout, and he paid you 2s for it, ” went on Stephen Rizos said, ” I no sell it ; he gave me tip and I gave it to him. ” Later on, when Comino was called up, and told about it, he said, ” We don’t sell liquor, we give it to our customers. At least a man may pay for it on Saturday night, and we get it in, and keep it for him. ” Stephen told him that that was not so in this case, and Comino said, ” He was here last night, ” meaning Jaeger. Cominos asked Rizos if he sold Jaeger the stout, and he replied, ” No, he gave me tip, 2s. and I gave it to him. ” A search was then made, but no liquor found, although both in a closet at the top of the stairs and in the room in which they were standing, there were about two dozen dead marines about the floor.

In answer to Mr. Young, witness said he did not mention marked money at all. He did say the man has the money on him now. When Comino spoke to Rizos, he pulled out a handful of 2s pieces and half-crowns. He knew it was customary for customers to give money to the waiters to go and get liquor. The place was well conducted. Constable Albert Adam Jaeger said, on Sunday the 26th, he received certain instructions, and went to Comino’s oyster saloon upstairs, and said to Rizos, who came to the table, ” I’ll have some steak, can you pet us A BOTTLE OF PORTER ” Rizos went away and returned with the perk. Jaeger gave him 2s telling him it was for the porter, and he nodded his head, but did not hand over any change. Witness then corroborated Stephen as to the conversation that took place. He then went on to say that, after the conversation, Rizos gave him a ticket for 1s for the meal, but, on handing Comino 2s 6d at the counter in payment, the latter said he would not take it, as it might be marked. He had been to the shop on four previous occasions, and each time had had stout, but did not give a tip. In answer to Mr. Young, Jaeger said he never gave Rizos 1/ tip on the Saturday night, or at any time. He went into the shop with a woman, but did not know her name, nor what her character was. He did not pick her up in the street, and go with her. She sat at the table, and he ordered a meal for her. She left the room, and was not present when he had the conversation with Rizos about the stout. He did hot know the woman took a message out to the other constables. Thornley gave her her instructions.

Constable Allan Hugh McMaster said on Sunday, the 26th ult., he received certain instructions, in consequence of which he went to Comino’s oyster   saloon, and sat at a table close to Jaeger, who asked for a bottle of porter, which was brought, and for which he paid Jaeger.

WAS WITH A LADY.

Constable Harold Percy Lowther gave corroborative evidence.

Mr. Young submitted that there was no case against Comino, as it had not been shown he knew of the transaction between Rizos and Jaeger, and cited cases in support of his contention ; but the magistrate held that there was a case to answer against each defendant. Nicholas Comino, proprietor of the oyster saloon, said he did not in any way assist or take part in the transaction, and he did not authorise Rizos to sell liquor to customers. When called up by the constable, he denied that he kept liquor on the premises. Stephen then said, ” Your man sold a bottle to a constable here, and he has a marked 2/ in his pocket new. ” He received 1/ in payment for the steak, but did not get 2/ from Rizos.

In answer to Mr. Stephen, witness said the value of the bottle of stout was 1/, and large bottles 1/6. He saw a woman came out of the shop while he was on the footpath. On week days, people imbide a considerable quantity of liquor at his saloon. There was no place where his employees could conceal liquor. Jerry Rizos, a waiter, living at 88 Palmer-street, said on Saturday night Jaeger was in the saloon, and had some oysters. He gave witness two single shillings to get him a small bottle of stout, and was handed 1/ back, but said, ” You can have that for yourself. ” On the Sunday night he ordered a plain steak and a cup of coffee for the lady he was with. Then he said, ” You can give me a small bottle of stout. ” Rizos had a small bottle of stout on the Saturday night, and he gave his to Jaeger.   He went to walk away, when Jaeger said, ” Here is SOMETHING FOR YOU. ” at the same time handing over 2/, which witness put ” down south.”

The money was given to him as a tip, and not in payment for the stout.

In answer to Mr. Stephen, Rizos said he had not made a present to any of the other customers. He gave the constable the stout for the shilling he gave him the previous night. Some of the customers have bottles of stout on Saturday night with their names on, and drink it on Sunday night. This bottle of stout had no name on it.

Mr. Love decided to convict, and both Nick and Jerry were fined £30, with- 6/ costs, in default three months’ Imprisonment with hard labor ; 24 hours was allowed to pay.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/168751769

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Glen Innes Examiner ( NSW )         Thursday  1 July 1915     page 7 of 10

OFF TO THE FRONT.

The following volunteers are leaving Glen Innes on Sunday night to go into camp at Liverpool prior to leaving for the front :— Hector Wm. McMaster (brother of the late Constable Allan McMaster who lost his life at the Dardanelles), Cyril John Roche, Cecil Stanley Avis, Alfred Ernest Jones, and Alfred Jones, the two latter being father and son. Private Norman and Jack Floyd, who have been on the sick list for the past couple of weeks, are also returning to camp on Sunday night.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/184189126

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Sydney Stevenson COOKE

Sydney Stevenson COOKE

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 8871

Rank?

Stations?, Taree

Service with NSW Police Force:  From  12 August 1908  to  9 May 1915


[blockquote]

Service with Australian Imperial Force ( A.I.F.):  ( Volunteered ) From  18 August 1914 – 9 May 1915

Regiment attached to:  First Infantry, Brigade Headquarters

Rank:  Private

Regd. #  9

[/blockquote]

Awards:  British War Medal issued, 1914 /15 Star issued 14 February 1965, Victory Medal issued

Born? ? 1882 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England

Died on:  9 May 1915

Cause:  KIA on 9 May 1915

Death location:  Dardanelles, Gallipoli peninsula

Age:  35

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried atIsolated Graves ANZAC.  Inland from Bridges Rd, around McLaurins Hill, about 1/2 mile east of ANZAC Cover, Gallipoli   Grave # 1

Memorial stone:  Row B,  Grave 9

Sydney Stevenson COOKE - KIA 9 May 1915

S S COOKE 1 - NSWP - KIA

S S COOKE 6 - NSWP - KIA

S S COOKE 2 - NSWP - KIA

S S COOKE 3 - NSWP - KIA

S S COOKE 4 - NSWP - KIA

S S COOKE 5 - NSWP - KIA

[alert_blue]SYDNEY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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Constable Sydney Stevenson COOKE was a Constable with the NSW Police Force when he voluntarily enlisted on the 18 August 1914, aged 32, to join the Australian Imperial Forces for the War.  He gave his address, at enlistment, as the Police Depot, Sydney.

He sailed from Sydney aboard the ‘Euripides’ on the 20 October 1914 with the Rank of ‘Private’




Norman ROBERTS

Norman ROBERTS

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #

Rank?

Stations?, North Sydney Police Station

Service:  From  to  ?

Joined the ? and went to war.  Further information to come.

Awards?

Born?

Died on:  25 April 1915

Location:   Quinns Post, Gallipoli

Cause?

Age:  27

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at:  “Believed to be buried in” ?

Grave of Corporal Norman Roberts
Grave of Corporal Norman Roberts

Norman ROBERTS 2 - NSWPF - KIA - Gallipoli - 25 April 1915

[alert_blue]NORMAN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

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 Funeral location?

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