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Angela Rose TAYLOR

Angela Rose TAYLOR

Victoria Police Force

[blockquote]The FIRST female Police Officer, in Australia, to be killed ‘ On Duty ‘[/blockquote]

Regd. #  24274

Rank:  Constable

Stations?, Melbourne City Watch-House

ServiceFrom  to  20 April 1986

Awards:  National Police Service medal – granted 2016 & handed to her parents on the 30th anniversary of the Event date ( 27 March 2016 )

Born? ? 1964

Died on:  20 April 1986

Cause:  Car bomb explosion – Murdered

Event date:  Thursday  27 March 1986

Event Location:  Outside of 336 Russell Street, Police Station, Melbourne.  Known as the

‘ Russell Street Bombing ‘

Age:  21

Funeral date?

Funeral location:  Springvale Botanical Cemetery

Buried at:  Cremated

 Memorial at1/  Royal Melbourne Hospital – Angie Rose Taylor Ward – dedicated to Angie

2/   Angela Taylor Memorial Foundation – presented to the Dux of each Police Academy Squad

3/   Angela Taylor Fun Run

Angela Rose Taylor

[alert_green]ANGELA IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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Front Inscription In memory of Constable Angela Rose Taylor 24274, aged 21 years, City Watch-house, who died on 20th April 1986, as a result of injuries received when a car bomb exploded outside the Russell Street Police Complex on the 27th March, 1986.
Front Inscription In memory of Constable Angela Rose Taylor 24274, aged 21 years, City Watch-house, who died on 20th April 1986, as a result of injuries received when a car bomb exploded outside the Russell Street Police Complex on the 27th March, 1986.

 

The 1986 Russell Street bombing which tragically killed Constable Angela Rose Taylor and seriously injured 21 others.

The explosion was caused by a car bomb hidden in a stolen 1979 Holden Commodore, parked deliberately on the busy city street.

Twenty-one-year-old Const Taylor was crossing the road on a staff lunch run and only a metre away from the car bomb when it exploded. She died in hospital a month later. Const Taylor was the first policewoman to die in the line of duty.

This was Victoria’s first encounter with terrorism. Three men were convicted and two sentenced to life imprisonment.

May you forever Rest In Peace.

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On March 27 1986, shortly before midday, Constable Taylor left the Russell Street Police Complex to collect lunches for her colleagues. As she stepped on to Russell Street, she passed within 1 metre of a car packed with gelignite. At this time, the gelignite was detonated and the car exploded, showering the area with shrapnel. Angela suffered severe burns to 70% of her body and was hospitalised as a result. However, she died on 20 April 1986.

Stanley Taylor and Craig Minogue were convicted and imprisoned over the bombing which was motivated by an intense hatred of police.

 

 

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Victoria Police Association Journal   March 2006  p 10 & 11

It is 20 years since a car bomb exploded outside the Russell Street Police Complex – two decades since Constable Angela Taylor was mortally wounded as she crossed over Russell Street from the City Watchhouse.  The Police Association Journal editor Shirley Hardy-Rix spoke to Angela’s parents, Marilyn and Arthur Taylor to mark the anniversary of Angela’s death.

Arthur & Marilyn Taylor
Arthur & Marilyn Taylor

“It can seem like yesterday or it can seem like 20 years. But missing Angie is still as strong today as it was then; it’s just not accompanied with the pain.”

These are the words of a mother talking about a loved daughter 20 years after the criminal act that shocked the country and changed the Taylor family forever. Marilyn and Arthur Taylor admit that not a day goes by when they don’t think of their only daughter “not in a morbid way but in a joyful way”.

“We’ve made it a pleasant experience. Ange was always so full of joy and life it would be wrong of us to have a negative attitude.  She has left us with so many lovely, lovely memories. It was so lovely to have had her for those 21 years – I’ve got to be glad about that,” says Marilyn.
“Something will trigger a memory and you think of some of the things that Angela did,” adds Arthur. “She fitted so much into those 21 years. She didn’t leave any gaping holes, she filled them all in.”
Sitting in their comfortable suburban home , Marilyn and Arthur remember their Ange, the protector of her brothers Michael and Byron. Arthur is usually a man of few words but when it comes to talking about his daughter the stories flow.
“From an early age she had a sense of what was right and what was wrong,” recalls Arthur. “When Mike was young he was knock-kneed and wore leg callipers. One day some of the boys pushed him over and started to laugh because he couldn’t get up.  Angela was about four. She went inside and got the broom and chased them up the street, laying into them. When I asked her why she did that, Angie said what they did wasn’t right. It wasn’t fair. From an early age she had a sense of fair play and right and wrong.”
Marilyn remembers the good student who was a keen participant in school plays, was on the school debating team and the school council. But Angela left school at the end of Year 10 which was a disappointment to her parents. Then when the family moved to Melbourne from Canberra in 1982 Angela decided she wanted to join the police force. She didn’t want to join in Canberra because she didn’t want to spend her life guarding parliament house.
Angela wanted to do police work. Her determination saw her finish years 11 and 12 in one year. Angela Taylor went on to be the dux of her squad at the Police Academy in November 1984.

“That made me very proud.  Her graduation day was the part in my life when I was at the pinnacle, the top of the mountain. I’ve never been right up there since. I was so proud that she had helped others in her squad get through. She didn’t just do it for herself,” says Marilyn. She and Arthur were the proud parents on graduation day and happy participants in the celebrations that marked the beginning of what should have been a long and successful career.

In March 1986, Angela Taylor had just finished her probation and was working at the City Watchhouse. On March 27 – Easter Thursday – just on one o’clock, an explosion rocked Russell Street. A car bomb was detonated by a team of criminals. Angela was walking across Russell Street at that instant. Her injuries were horrendous and she would never recover. On April 20, after a long and courageous battle, Angela Taylor died.
“It is almost like we lost Angie twice. From the time of the bombing she never spoke to us again. Each of those dates is intermixed,” says Marilyn.
That day Marilyn Taylor was working at a small shop in South Melbourne. She heard on the radio that a bomb had exploded and a woman had been injured.
“I thought, ‘thank God it’s not my Ange’. I didn’t think of her as a woman, just as my Ange, my girl.”
When Marilyn Taylor walked down to the bank she saw a police car and just knew. It might have been a mother’s intuition. Marilyn wasn’t surprised to see the two police who came to tell her the news.
Arthur was also working that day and was later than usual getting home because he’d stopped to get some hot cross buns on the way. He was listening to the radio and heard the news that a policewoman was injured. He thought his daughter was safe because she was in the watchhouse.
“There was a car in the driveway and a couple of senior police. The penny dropped. I’m not a talkative person but I couldn’t shut up. I didn’t want to hear what they had to say so I just kept on talking. My worst fear was that she was dead – that’s what I didn’t want to hear.”
What followed was a rollercoaster. Marilyn and Arthur say they were carried on by events. They had no control. Their whole motivation was to be at the hospital. Each day they would get up and drive to the hospital. At the end of the day they would drive home and collapse into bed.
In 1986 Marilyn and Arthur weren’t offered any counselling to help cope with their grief.  “I thought if I saw a counsellor they would make it better – make me better but that is not what it does.”
Since Angela’s death many of those who knew their daughter have drifted out of their lives. “It is such a painful thing for so many people. Even the ones who loved Angie sometimes find it difficult to talk to Arthur and me.  And it is not that they don’t care about us, it is just too painful.”
The Police family haven’t forgotten Angela Taylor and this is a great comfort to her family. The Angela Taylor Memorial Foundation was established and the dux of every graduating squad receives the Angela Taylor Award.
These initiatives have all been part of the healing process.
Every year there is the Angela Taylor Fun Run. Marilyn and Arthur are always there to welcome the winners over the finish line and present trophies. It is an important day for them.  Marilyn admits in the early years she only went along because she had to but now she wouldn’t miss it.
“At first I did it because I had to – now I do it because I want to and I don’t know when that page turned.  Everyone who comes along – they are all special.  It gives us a lot of pleasure.”
Marilyn and Arthur receive great comfort out of the services held on National Police Remembrance Day. It is a special day in their calendar. In recent years they have become close to the Senior Police Chaplain, Jim Pilmer.
“We love Jim. He’s a special man. He is one of God’s chosen. He is a genuine man who gives great comfort to those people in the greatest pain. I love his services and we love going along to the Remembrance Day evening service. I like to hear the list of names read out and pray with the families and then go to the little chapel for private prayer. It is a closure for the day.”
Today Marilyn and Arthur are doting grandparents and spend time with their five grand-daughters. Four of these girls bear Angela’s name – Brooke Angela, Laura Angela, Alyssa Rose and Alex Jasmine Rose.
“They give another dimension, but nothing fills the hole of Angie,” says Marilyn.

In their garden are three Angela Taylor roses. They would love to see the rose named in honour of their daughter at the Police Academy and in each police station garden across the state.

Marilyn & Arthur Taylor with the Angela Taylor Rose
Marilyn & Arthur Taylor with the Angela Taylor Rose

The men responsible for the Russell Street Bombing were brought to justice. Marilyn and Arthur did attend the final day of the committal hearing at the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court across the road from the scene of the bombing.
Marilyn refused to look at the faces of the men who killed her daughter. Arthur attended the sentencing at the conclusion of the Supreme Court trial. Marilyn couldn’t face it.
“That’s how we keep a positive attitude. We don’t want these people to have any other part of my life. They’ve taken away more than is almost possible to cope with. They are not going to get in because I am not going to hate them because that would be soul destroying for me and those I love,” says Marilyn.
“We’ve avoided getting angry. Sometimes it is very hard to avoid getting angry and hating. It is such a negative emotion it would take over our lives and that wasn’t going to happen,” adds Arthur.
Marilyn and Arthur Taylor are wonderful people. They are filled with love when they could be torn apart by hate. They look at all that has been done in their daughter’s memory and are filled with pride.
“We are very proud and very humbled by the legacy of having the unit at the Royal Melbourne Hospital dedicated to Angie and all the other memorials they have put up in her name. I know there are a lot of people who do a lot of work and put in a lot of time and effort into not letting Victorians forget these wonderful people who get up in the morning and put on the blue uniform because they love to do it.”

 

http://www.tpav.org.au/_documents/Journals/2006/March/2811e12e-ba48-45cd-b211-65339f4f374b/Jnl_2006_Mar_P10_11.pdf

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The Angela Taylor rose

Release date: Fri 31 March 2006

Angela Taylor Rose_main

Just like its namesake, the Angela Taylor Rose is vibrant, feminine and distinctive.

Clusters of deep cream and pink buds unfurl slowly to reveal sweetly scented, creamy-white flowers with a distinctive pink edging and prominent golden-yellow stamens.

Named in honour of Constable Angela Rose Taylor, who died as a result of the 1986 Russell Street police complex bombing, this rose is available by special arrangement with rose breeder John Nieuwesteeg.

The distributor, Garden Express, donates $2 from each rose sold to the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation. The foundation perpetuates the memory of police killed in the line of duty through the support of community projects across the state.

To order the rose, visit www.gardenexpress.com.au on the Internet or telephone 1800 677 437.

http://www.police.vic.gov.au/content.asp?Document_ID=4619

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Shortly after 1.00 pm Thursday, 27 March 1986, a massive explosion occurred near the southern entrance to the Russell Street Police Complex when a car bomb was detonated. As a result of this act three people were injured, damage was caused to the façade of the police building and the central business district was thrown into confusion for hours as emergency workers struggled to cope with the disaster. Later Forensic tests showed the bomb had consisted of 50 sticks of gelignite packed into a motor car and surrounded by small pieces of metal which were meant to act as “shrapnel”. The investigation into the setting of the bomb began at once and continued for months. During that time two of the injured – Magistrate Ian West and Constable Carl Donadio recovered from their wounds. However Constable Angela Taylor who had suffered extensive burns to her body died at the Royal Melbourne Hospital 20 April 1986.

The Russell Street Bombing refers to the 27 March 1986 bombing of the Russell Street Police Headquarters complex in Russell Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The explosion was caused by a car bomb hidden in a stolen 1979 Holden Commodore.

The blast seriously injured 21-year-old Constable Angela Taylor, who died on 20 April, becoming the first Australian policewoman to be killed in the line of duty. A further 22 people were injured. The explosion caused massive amounts of damage to the police HQ and surrounding buildings, estimated at more than A$1 million.

The Age newspaper reported that the blast had such an impact because of the open-floor design of the offices acted like a claymore mine, sending more shrapnel as the blast ripped through the floors, seemingly adding more pressure to the blast as it followed its path. The station has closed down and been converted into apartments.

In the course of the investigation, a group of people including Stan Taylor, Peter Reed, Craig Minogue and Rodney Minogue were apprehended. The motive for the bombing seems to have been revenge against the police, as the bombers had previously been arrested and still resented their jail terms. In court, Taylor, Reed and Craig Minogue were convicted; Rodney Minogue was eventually acquitted on appeal.

On 7 October 1985, gelignite and detonators were stolen from the Tryconnel Mine at Blackwood. On 25 March 1986, a Holden Commodore was stolen. Both crimes were later found to provide equipment needed for the construction of the bomb.

On 25 April 1986, ten Victoria Police officers raided the Kallista home of Peter Michael Reed at 5.45 am. It was alleged that upon attempting to enforce the arrest by forcing entry to the premises, Reed produced a .455 Smith and Wesson revolver and fired at police, seriously injuring Det Sgt Wylie. Reed was then fired upon by Det Sgt Quinsee and arrested. Reed was charged with attempted murder, recklessly causing serious injury, using a firearm to prevent apprehension and possessing explosives in suspicious circumstances in addition to charges related to the Russell Street bombing. Reed later stated at his trial in unsworn evidence that:

“the police started the shooting and I only used his firearm in self defence.”

On 30 May 1986, police arrested Stanley Brian Taylor during a 2 am raid on his Birchip home. Brothers Craig and Rodney Minogue were arrested in a Swan Hill motel at 5.15 am later that day.

The crown did not allege that any person played any particular role in the bombing, but that each of them were members of a team which planned the bombing and caused the bomb to explode. Evidence against the accused was as follows:

Gelignite and detonators used in the construction of the bomb were of the same type as those stolen from Tryconnel Mine.

Gelignite was found at Reed’s house wrapped in newspaper containing fingerprints belonging to Rodney Minogue.

Craig Minogue owned a pair of side cutters which produced cuts similar to those found on detonator wires.

A file with traces of brass deposits matched with brass deposits found at the bomb site.
a block of wood from which a wooden part of the bomb had been sawn was found at Craig Minogue’s premises.
tinned copper wire, similar to that used with detonators found at the bomb site, was found at Craig Minogue’s premises.
residue of gelignite matched residue found at a previous address of Craig Minogue in Lower Templestowe.
evidence from a witness that Craig Minogue called around Easter 1986, to ask about the use of detonators.
a witness testified that Craig Minogue was seen driving a 1979 Holden Commodore around the CBD prior to the explosion.

– wiki

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=92297987

 

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Young police constable, 21, killed in the Russell Street car bombing is awarded with a service medal 30 years after the tragedy

  • Constable Angela Rose Taylor, 21, was killed when car bomb exploded
  • She died of her injuries 24 days after Russell Street police station bombing
  • Young policewoman has been remembered 30 years after the tragedy
  • She was posthumously awarded the National Police Service Medal 

 

The young policewoman killed after a car bomb exploded in front of the force headquarters in Melbourne has been remembered 30 years after the tragedy – and awarded a service medal.

Constable Angela Rose Taylor, 21, died from her injuries 24 days after the bombing of Russell Street police headquarters on Easter Thursday, 27 March 1986.

She was the first policewoman to be murdered in the line of duty in Australia.

Her brother Michael Taylor paid tribute to the young officer at a memorial service on Thursday opposite the old Russell Street station, saying that she always had ‘a disdain for injustice’.

He recalled how as a three-year-old she fended off bullies by swinging a broom because they were teasing him over his leg calipers.

‘She had a strong belief we should all be treated equally,’ Mr Taylor said.

Constable Taylor was posthumously awarded the National Police Service Medal at the memorial which was attended by officers, family and friends wearing pink roses in her memory.

It was given to her parents Marilyn and Arthur by Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton on behalf of Governor General Sir Peter Cosgrove.

Two men were convicted of the horrific crime which left Constable Taylor dead and 22 others injured.

One of the bombers, Craig Minogue, could soon apply for bail as his 28-year non-parole period comes to an end this year.

His co-accused, Stanley Brian Taylor, 59, was jailed for life with no minimum set.

An arrangement of pink roses was seen at the memorial service to honour the young policewoman
An arrangement of pink roses was seen at the memorial service to honour the young policewoman

 

Constable Taylor was was posthumously awarded the National Police Service Medal and it was given to her parents Marilyn and Arthur by Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton
Constable Taylor was was posthumously awarded the National Police Service Medal and it was given to her parents Marilyn and Arthur by Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton

 

Former police member Carl Donadio ( centre )who was injured in the blast looks on during a memorial service to honour Constable Taylor
Former police member Carl Donadio ( centre )who was injured in the blast looks on during a memorial service to honour Constable Taylor

 

Mr Ashton said while any parole decision is up to the parole board, he hoped Minogue ‘stays behind bars’.

Minogue, who was almost illiterate at the time of his arrest has gone on to complete a bachelor of arts degree, and has also obtained his Masters and PHD behind bars.

He also runs a website, on which he apologises for his behaviour in 1986.

‘I understand the pain and suffering that I have caused. I am very sorry for the crimes of my past, and I regret those actions very much and wish that I had not done them,’ he wrote on the site.

‘Thirty years is a very long time in prison, I was 23 when I came in and I will be 53 when I am eligible for release.

‘I hope to be able to somehow pass on to others the value that I have found in education and learning during that time.

‘That contribution I can make depends to a large extent upon others, and whether or not I am going to be given a chance to make a positive contribution,’ he said.

Lawyer tearfully recalls Russell street bombing 30 years ago
Lawyer tearfully recalls Russell street bombing 30 years ago

 

Constable Taylor's parents unveil a plaque in her honour in the RMIT Alumni Courtyard in Russell Street in Melbourne
Constable Taylor’s parents unveil a plaque in her honour in the RMIT Alumni Courtyard in Russell Street in Melbourne

 

A rose could be seen on a poster at the memorial service to honour Constable Angela Taylor
A rose could be seen on a poster at the memorial service to honour Constable Angela Taylor

 

 

But Detective Inspector Bernie Rankin does not believe Minogue is reformed.

‘I am not convinced that he is the reformed Craig Minogue he is making himself out to be,’ he told 60 Minutes recently.

He went on to explain how Minogue murdered a man not long after being sent to prison for his part in the Russell Street bomb case.

‘Now if Craig Minogue is released tomorrow who’s to say it is not the old Craig Minogue who gets released.

‘What if you take his parking spot, you know, what if you bump into him in a bar?

 

http://video.dailymail.co.uk/video/mol/2016/03/24/5731756171013765268/640x360_5731756171013765268.mp4

‘He is trying to get parole and he is trying to demonstrate to a parole board he is no longer a risk,’ he said.

Mr Rankin held back tears when remembering the death of Ms Taylor three weeks after she was injured in the bomb blast.

He helped put out some of the fire on the 21-year-old officer’s clothes and hair.

‘She was thrown across street dreadfully burnt,’ he said.

‘She was a fine young woman that lost her life,’ he said choking back tears after remembering the day, April 20, he found out she had passed away in hospital.

The police officer remembers the bombers had ‘a strong desire to kill as many people and injure as many people as possible’ with their contraption.

In fact the blast could have been a lot worse, a police investigation at the time found not all of the explosives found set into the car went off as was planned because the detonator was used wrong.

At 15 seconds past one on Easter Thursday afternoon in 1986 Russell Street, Melbourne best resembled a warzone
At 15 seconds past one on Easter Thursday afternoon in 1986 Russell Street, Melbourne best resembled a warzone

 

The car bomb did not explode as planned, and could have been a lot more devastating, police say
One of the bombers, Craig Minogue (pictured both), could soon apply for bail as his 28-year non-parole period comes to an end this year

 

One of the bombers, Craig Minogue (pictured both), could soon apply for bail as his 28-year non-parole period comes to an end this year
One of the bombers, Craig Minogue (pictured both), could soon apply for bail as his 28-year non-parole period comes to an end this year

One of the bombers, Craig Minogue (pictured both), could soon apply for bail as his 28-year non-parole period comes to an end this year

Archive footage from the ABC of the devastating aftermath of 1986 Russell Street bombing
‘He is trying to get parole and he is trying to demonstrate to a parole board he is no longer a risk,’ he said.
Mr Rankin held back tears when remembering the death of Ms Taylor three weeks after she was injured in the bomb blast.
He helped put out some of the fire on the 21-year-old officer’s clothes and hair.
‘She was thrown across street dreadfully burnt,’ he said.
‘She was a fine young woman that lost her life,’ he said choking back tears after remembering the day, April 20, he found out she had passed away in hospital.
The police officer remembers the bombers had ‘a strong desire to kill as many people and injure as many people as possible’ with their contraption.
In fact the blast could have been a lot worse, a police investigation at the time found not all of the explosives found set into the car went off as was planned because the detonator was used wrong.

Constable Taylor's parents pose with an Infinity Rose which was presented to them by former police member Carl Donadio who was injured in the blast
Constable Taylor’s parents pose with an Infinity Rose which was presented to them by former police member Carl Donadio who was injured in the blast.

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Angela Rose Taylor 17 - VICPOL- Murdered - Died 27 Mar 1986 - Fun Walk

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Man jailed thirty years ago for a Melbourne car bomb which killed a young policewoman is up for parole – but one officer who was there doesn’t think he’s reformed

  • Convicted killer Craig Minogue may be eligible for parole this year 
  • Minogue was jailed for his part in the Russell Street bombing in 1986
  • A car bomb exploded near a police station killing a female officer
  • He also killed a fellow inmate once he was put behind bars
  • He has used his time behind bars to obtain a PHD 

A killer who has served thirty years behind bars for his part in the detonation of a bomb outside a metro police station may soon be eligible for parole.

Two men were convicted of the crime, Stan Taylor was sentenced to life without parole, and Craig Minogue was given 28 years without parole, which has now been served.

At 15 seconds past one on Easter Thursday afternoon in 1986 Russell Street, Melbourne best resembled a warzone.

Convicted killer, Craig Minogue, pictured, may be eligible for parole this year after serving 30 years behind bars
Convicted killer, Craig Minogue, pictured, may be eligible for parole this year after serving 30 years behind bars

 

Minogue was sentenced to 28 years without parole for his part in the notorious Russell Street car bombing on Easter Thursday in 1986 (wreckage from the explosion)
Minogue was sentenced to 28 years without parole for his part in the notorious Russell Street car bombing on Easter Thursday in 1986 (wreckage from the explosion)

A car bomb parked strategically outside the police complex exploded killing 21-year-old police woman Angela Taylor and 22 officers and civilians.

Minogue, who was almost illiterate at the time of his arrest has gone on to complete a bachelor of arts degree, and has also obtained his Masters and PHD behind bars.

He also runs a website, on which he apologises for his behaviour in 1986.

‘I understand the pain and suffering that I have caused. I am very sorry for the crimes of my past, and I regret those actions very much and wish that I had not done them,’ he wrote on the site.

‘Thirty years is a very long time in prison, I was 23 when I came in and I will be 53 when I am eligible for release.

‘I hope to be able to somehow pass on to others the value that I have found in education and learning during that time.

‘That contribution I can make depends to a large extent upon others, and whether or not I am going to be given a chance to make a positive contribution,’ he said.

Detective Inspector Bernie Raking, pictured, was at the police station when the bomb went off. He does not believe Minogue is reformed
Detective Inspector Bernie Raking, pictured, was at the police station when the bomb went off. He does not believe Minogue is reformed

But Detective Inspector Bernie Rankin does not believe Minogue is reformed.

‘I am not convinced that he is the reformed Craig Minogue he is making himself out to be,’ he told 60 Minutes recently.

He went on to explain how Minogue murdered a man not long after being sent to prison for his part in the Russell Street bomb case.

‘Now if Craig Minogue is released tomorrow who’s to say it is not the old Craig Minogue who gets released.

‘What if you take his parking spot, you know, what if you bump into him in a bar?

‘He is trying to get parole and he is trying to demonstrate to a parole board he is no longer a risk,’ he said.

 

Minogue - pictured- only admitted to his part in the Russell Street bombing for the first time in 2012, Rankin believes that was a move to prove he had reformed
Minogue – pictured- only admitted to his part in the Russell Street bombing for the first time in 2012, Rankin believes that was a move to prove he had reformed

The car bomb did not explode as planned, and could have been a lot more devastating, police say
The car bomb did not explode as planned, and could have been a lot more devastating, police say

Mr Rankin held back tears when remembering the death of Ms Taylor three weeks after she was injured in the bomb blast.

He helped put out some of the fire on the 21-year-old officer’s clothes and hair.

‘She was thrown across street dreadfully burnt,’ he said.

‘She was a fine young woman that lost her life,’ he said choking back tears after remembering the day, April 20, he found out she had passed away in hospital.

The police officer remembers the bombers had ‘a strong desire to kill as many people and injure as many people as possible’ with their contraption.

In fact the blast could have been a lot worse, a police investigation at the time found not all of the explosives found set into the car went off as was planned because the detonator was used wrong.

Minogue killed fellow inmate and convicted killer Alex Tsakmakis shortly after going to prison but was not given any additional sentencing
Minogue killed fellow inmate and convicted killer Alex Tsakmakis shortly after going to prison but was not given any additional sentencing

In 1992 Prue Bird (pictured), the grandaughter of Paul and Julie (pictured) Hetzel known accomplices of Minogue went missing, child killer Leslie Camilleri came forward 17 years later
In 1992 Prue Bird (pictured), the grandaughter of Paul and Julie (pictured) Hetzel known accomplices of Minogue went missing, child killer Leslie Camilleri came forward 17 years later

Paul Hetzel was a member of Taylor and Minogue’s gang, he helped police gain convictions, but in 1992 his partner’s granddaughter vanished.

Seventeen years later convicted child killer Leslie Camilleri came forward claiming to have killed Prue Bird of his own accord. Mr Hetzel believes she was taken from them in revenge.

‘I thought this is pay back just felt sick in the guts.’

Mr Hetzel said Minogue had threatened shortly after the explosion.

‘He was saying about that any bastard ever spoke about it and that, you know, they will be killed.

‘And that’s when he said wouldn’t it be a shame if anything happened to your little Prue.’

Mrs Hetzel (pictured left) and her husband Paul (pictured right) believe Prue was killed in an act of revenge as Mr Hetzel had given evidence against his fellow gang members in the bomb investigation
Mrs Hetzel (pictured left) and her husband Paul (pictured right) believe Prue was killed in an act of revenge as Mr Hetzel had given evidence against his fellow gang members in the bomb investigation

Angela Rose Taylor 27 - VICPOL- Murdered - Died 27 Mar 1986

Minogue denies any involvement in the girl’s disappearance and murder. But police are not convinced.

‘There is no doubt in my mind Camilleri commit crime with others and that this crime is a payback for the Russell Street bombing,’ Detective Senior Sergeant Brent Fisher told 60 minutes.

Minogue has said he intends to repay the community for his crimes by accepting the sentence, admitting his guilt and apologising, by making an effort to rehabilitate himself and by not re-offending upon release.

Minogue was not handed down extra time for the murder of his fellow inmate Tsakmakis in prison.

He is currently being held in a medium-security prison in Victoria.

The deadly bomb blast shattered precinct windows and shook up the policing community sparking a wide search for those responsible
The deadly bomb blast shattered precinct windows and shook up the policing community sparking a wide search for those responsible

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Angela Rose Taylor 29 VICPOL- Murdered - Died 27 Mar 1986
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Remembering Constable Angela Taylor

https://youtu.be/ktopk7Ff_iQ

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Floribunda Rose 'Angela Rose Taylor' (Rosa)
Floribunda Rose ‘Angela Rose Taylor’ (Rosa)

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Russell Street bomber dies in custody

Helen Velissaris  Australian Associated Press

Russell Street bomber, Stanley Taylor, has died in custody aged 79.

He was sentenced to life in prison for the 1986 car bomb explosion that killed a female police officer and injured 21 others outside the Melbourne police office on Russell Street.

Corrections Victoria confirmed a prisoner of that age died of natural causes at St Vincents Hospital on Wednesday.

Taylor had been ill for at least a year, according to numerous media reports.

A career criminal, Taylor was known for having a hatred for authority.

Before the bombing, he had served 17 years in prison for numerous bank robberies.

Eight years after getting out, he would commit one of the most brutal acts of terror in Victoria.

The car bomb was set up to explode at 1pm, precisely the time most people would be heading out to get their lunch.

It was stuffed with almost 60 sticks of gelignite and timed for maximum destruction.

Constable Angela Taylor, 21, was on her way to pick up lunch for her office when she was in the direct firing line.

She died of her injuries 24 days after the bombing, becoming the first Australian police woman to die in the line of duty.

The explosion was so large that debris was found three blocks away.

Police were led to Taylor and his accomplices when they were able to rebuild the car used in the attack, and found it had been stolen.

Alongside Taylor in 1988, Craig Minogue received life with a minimum of 28 years and Rodney Minogue was jailed for eight years with a minimum of six in 1988.

Another man, Peter Reed, was found not guilty but was later jailed for 13 years, with a minimum of 11, of the attempted murder of police during the investigation of the bombing.

Craig Minogue will be up for parole by the end of this year.

As with all deaths in custody, Taylor’s death will be referred to the coroner.

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Warren Keith JAMES

Warren Keith JAMES

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  16313[/alert_yellow]

Redfern Police Academy Class 139

Rank:

Probationary Constable – appointed 8 April 1974

Constable – appointed 8 April 1975

Senior Constable – death

Stations:

?, Murwillumbah, Tweed Heads

ServiceFrom  pre February 1974  to 10 September 1986 = 12+ years Service

Awards:

No find on It’s An Honour

Born:

13 February 1952

Died on:

10 September 1986

Cause:

Motor Vehicle Accident – front seat passenger

Event location

Tweed Heads

Age: 34

Funeral date:

12/09/1986 

Funeral location:

St. James Anglican Church, Kingscliff 

Buried at:

Cremated 

Memorial location:

Tweed Heads Memorial Gardens and Crematorium – Peace Wall 

Located in the station area of Tweed Heads Police Station.
Located in the station area of Tweed Heads Police Station.

 

Senior Constable Warren Keith James Born 13th February 1952 Trafically killed 10th September 1986 Presented by Murwillumbah Jaycees in memory of their beloved member
Located in the station area of Murwillumbah Police Station.

 

[alert_green]Warren IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

About 7.30pm on 10 September, 1986 Senior Constable James was a passenger in a police vehicle returning to Tweed Heads Police Station after attending Lismore Court, when the vehicle left the roadway and collided with a tree. The constable was killed instantly.

 

The constable was born in 1952 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 26 February, 1974. At the time of his death he was stationed at Tweed Heads.

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NSWBDM – Death Registration  107402/1986    Father = Keith    Mother = Gloria

 

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TIMELINES      The Quarterly Newsletter of Murwillumbah Historical Society Inc.     April 2016       Vol. 4 No. 4

Murwillumbah Police Station

Thanks to Nick Gouliaev for another excellent installment in his series on our historic buildings. This is the final part (2) of the story of this Main Street icon.
The Police Station is in the Federation style, in complete architectural and visual harmony with the rest of the precinct; an architectural delight. The roof is high pitched with gable roof ends, framed and clad with corrugated metal roof sheets matching the other precinct buildings, although the roof cladding now needs replacement due to the metal sheets showing visible degradation with rust. Facing the main street is a main entry to the Detectives’ part of the building, with a roofed entry porch with double doors entry to the actual building, although today this is hardly ever used.
The porch roof is supported by timber posts decorated with Federation fretwork and brackets, as in the police station entry porch. All windows are original timber framed, clear glazed, of double – hung style and fitted with metal security grilles.
The brickwork is original, as used throughout all the precinct buildings. It is in first class condition and fitted with original terracotta air vents laid in stretcher bond with flush struck joints.
The main entry to the police station has been altered to be facing the main street instead of facing Police Lane. Today a concrete pedestrian access ramp with stainless steel handrails leads from the police entry porch to the entry gate at the Main Street boundary. The original main entry door has been replaced with a contemporary glass sliding door, electronically operated and CCTV monitored for a high level of security.
The internal walls are brickwork finished with smooth cement render, painted, and fitted with wide 150mm grooved Federation style skirtings at floor level. The air vents are original metal, adjustable and with a Federation floral decorative motif and are fitted to all external walls. The doors and windows are fitted with wide Federation grooved jambs and wide architraves. The doors are still in original Federation style; multi – paneled with glazed ventilation window above. The secure
areas have been upgraded with new generation doors and high security locks. The other areas however still retain their original brass locks and latches, retaining the charming originality and authenticity of the internal atmosphere of 1909. The corridors have decorated arched openings and terminating with beautiful arch brackets, in harmony with the wide plaster cornices throughout the building.
The ceilings are a combination of plaster lined ceilings and tongue and groove timber ceiling linings with recent alterations to some areas now lined with flat plaster boards. Wide plaster cornices with flower and leaf imprints decorate the edges of the ceilings throughout. The ceiling heights in the original areas of the building are 4800mm but in altered areas are lower, to 4500mm or less.
Various rooms have an original fireplace but the hearths of all the fireplaces are now closed off with a thin panel of white – painted Masonite. There are a total of four fireplaces in the building, but all would require careful refurbishment to re – awaken their 1909 architectural beauty, not only of the hearth and mantle shelves but also of the rooms.
The floors are of timber construction with timber floor boards, carpeted to some areas and covered with vinyl in others.
The Police lock up area consists of four cells, although only two are in use with the others used as storage rooms. The floors are concrete and all windows are fitted with heavy duty security grill/bars. Tweed Regional Museum Murwillumbah has an original steel cell door complete with “scratched surface graffiti” compliments of past prisoners in its collection. The cell door is solid sheet steel, approximately 25mm thick x 820mm wide x 2040mm high, hung on very heavy duty hinges,
with a rectangular inspection hatch. These days the delivery of individuals in police custody is at the rear of building to a secured area close to the lock up cells.
The Police Officers have use of a recreational area with a BBQ and seating under a timber pergola at the rear of the building. This area is called “The Mango Bar” and was opened Friday 15 Feb 1985 by Hon. W.[Bill] Bugden. The patron is His Honor Judge K.F.E. Torrington. One of the pergola posts has another plaque affixed to it with the wording “SWOS RAIL” in honour of Patrol Officer Warren James.
A third plaque is inside the Police Station, on the wall in one of the corridors, dedicated to “Senior Constable Warren Keith James”, born 13 Feb 1952, died 10 Sep 1980. The plaque was presented by Murwillumbah Jaycees.
Research and Acknowledgements
Murwillumbah Historical Society research team: Nick Gouliaev, Tony Clark , Max Boyd , Joan Cuthel , Judy Keane (TRM)
Police Officers; Dean Wilson and others
Tales of our Times, Ron Johansen
Red Sunday, Kath Pritchard, Murwillumbah Historical Society 2nd Edition 2015
Northern Star (1876 – 1954) 8 Jan 1908 Page 2
Municipal Murwillumbah 24 Oct 1907 (Reprint of municipal announcements)
Georgian Architecture in Australia; Uri Smith in association of the National Trust of Australia
The Federation House, Ian Evans, The Flannel Flower press.
Australia’s Yesterdays, Reader’s Digest Pty. Ltd.
Australia – The First Hundred Years, Being a Facsimile of Volumes 1 and 2 of The Picturesque Atlas of Australia, edited by Hon. Andrew Garran, M.A., L.L.D.,M.L.C.

http://www.murwillumbahhistoricalsociety.org.au/timelines/201604%20Final.pdf

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Ross Francis JENNINGS

Ross Francis JENNINGS

Late of  ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  11335

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 22 February 1965

Constable – appointed 22 February 1966

Senior Constable – appointed 22 February 1974

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed ???

Sergeant 3/Class – Death

Stations:  Western District,  – Death

ServiceFrom  ? ? Pre Feb. 1965  to  1 September 1986 = 21+  years Service

Awards:   National Medal – granted 15 April 1981

Born:   Monday  18 September 1944

Died on:   Monday 1 September 1986

Age:  41

Cause:   Heart attack

Event location:   West Wallsend Police Station grounds

Event date:   Monday 1 September 1986

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Funeral Parlour?

Buried at:   Belmont Cemetery, 2 Green St, Belmont St, NSW

 Memorial located at?

Treasured Memory of Sgt 3/C Ross Francis JENNINGS Passed away 1st Sept. 1986 - aged 41 years. Dedicated officer of N.S.W. Police Force. Beloved husband of Carole and dearly loved father of Katherine.

ROSS IS mentioned on the Police Wall of

 Grave location ( approx )



FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


On 1 September, 1986 Sergeant Jennings was at home at the police residence attached to the West Wallsend Police Station. While he was mowing the lawns (one of his duties) he suffered a fatal heart attack.

 

The sergeant was born in 18 September 1944 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 22 February, 1965. At the time of his death he was stationed at West Wallsend.


 

National Police Remembrance Day ceremony in Lake Macquarie

Ross Francis JENNINGS


 




Paul Mitchell QUINN

Paul Mitchell QUINN

New South Wales Police Force

Redfern Police Academy Class # started with 156 – may have ended with 163

Cadet #:  3358

Regd. #  18605

 

Rank:  NSW Police Cadet – commenced Training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 4 July 1977 ( aged 17 years, 1 months, 28 day )

Probationary Constable – appointed 29 May 1979 ( aged 19 years )

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed 29 May 1984

Final Rank:  Constable 1st Class – posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class

Stations:  Casino & Bathurst – Death

ServiceFrom 4 July 1977 to 30 March 1986 = 8 years, 8 months, 26 days

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born:  Sunday  29 May 1960

Died on:  Wednesday 30 March 1986

Cause:  Murdered.  Shot through neck during arrest

Event location:  , Perthville, NSW

Age:  25 years, 10 months, 1 day

Funeral Date?

Funeral Location?

Buried at?

Grave locationMaranatha, Sec: Mar2, Row: A, Grave: 112

 

Memorials1/  Chifley LAC has the ‘ Paul Quinn Award ‘ for the most outstanding Officer each year.  Paul is Remembered within the Chifley LAC.

2/  Paul Mitchell Quinn – stone monument near the murder scene

3/  Mt Panorama ( Bathurst ) Police Compound – dedicated to Sgt Paul Quinn

 

 PAUL is mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Paul Mitchell QUINN
Paul Mitchell QUINN

Paul Mitchell Quinn - grave plate. Inscription (In loving memory Paul Mitchell Quinn, born 29 May 1960 killed 30 March 1986 aged 25 yrs. Sadly missed by his children Christopher, Rebeca, parents Brian, Barbara and family.)
Paul Mitchell Quinn – grave plate

 

This memorial was erected by the Central Tablelands branch of the Retired Police Association of NSW Inc. to the memory of Sergeant 3/c Paul Mitchell Quinn who was fatally shot in the execution of his duty near this location on 30th March 1986.
Paul Mitchell Quinn – monument near the murder scene

 

Paul Mitchell Quinn - murder scene
Paul Mitchell Quinn – murder scene

 

Police Wall of Remembrance - touch plate for Paul Mitchell QUINN
Police Wall of Remembrance – touch plate for Paul Mitchell QUINN – Canberra

 

Paul Mitchell Quinn, Paul Quinn, Mt Panorama, Paul Quinn Police Compound
Dubbo Photo News, page 3, Oct 6 – 12, 2016

 

 

Late in the afternoon of 30 March, 1986 Constable 1st Class Quinn was involved in the high speed pursuit of a vehicle from South Bathurst towards Perthville.

At Perthville the offender lost control of the vehicle and collided with a bridge railing at the intersection of Bridge Street.

The offender then leapt from the vehicle with a .303 rifle and began to fire at the police who had been chasing him.

Constable Quinn was hit in the neck and killed instantly and Constable Ian Borland was seriously wounded.

The offender, Horan, was shot several times by police before being arrested and charged.

Fortunately Constable Borland recovered from his injuries. Constable Quinn was posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class.

 

The sergeant was born in 1960 and joined the New South Wales Police Force as a Cadet on 4 July, 1977.  At the time of his death he was stationed at Bathurst.

 

Other Police who assisted with this incident at the time of the shots being fired were Senior Constable John Andrew BYERS  BM.

 


 

Chifley LAC has the ‘ Paul Quinn Award ‘ for the most outstanding Officer each year.  Paul is Remembered within the Chifley LAC.

 


Childhood pain relived as policeman’s killer poised for release

January 14, 2004

The day Constable First Class Paul Quinn was buried with full police honours, his daughter Rebecca turned four. After a funeral that closed streets in the policeman’s home town of Bathurst, his five-year-old son, Chris, was still asking relatives when Daddy would be coming home.

Lost innocence . . . Chris and Rebecca Quinn aged five and four.
Lost innocence . . . Chris and Rebecca Quinn aged five and four.

Yesterday the siblings sat together in distress again as the man who killed their sole-parent father was declared ready to return to the community after serving almost 18 years in jail.

Chris has had trouble with the law, but has shown talent as a lightweight boxer. Rebecca runs a coffee shop and turns 22 in a couple of months.

Supporting them was Inspector Ian Borland, who was seriously wounded the day Constable Quinn was killed and still works in Bathurst near where the pair encountered Patrick Francis Horan on Easter Sunday 1986.

The policeman and the Quinn siblings had been told Horan would be granted parole at his third attempt, but the decision moved Chris to climb over the public gallery and storm out the Hospital Road courtroom door.

Weeping outside, he was embraced by Inspector Borland, who still has bullet fragments in his body.

Inspector Borland, the Quinns and the NSW Police Association wanted to keep Horan, 63, locked up until he was dead.

John Watts, for Inspector Borland and the Quinns, had argued that Horan‘s lack of insight into his psychiatric problems and his refusal to acknowledge he had been the aggressor when Constable Quinn was killed made a “potent mix”.

But the Parole Board found Horan, a paranoid schizophrenic, was unlikely to pose a risk to others if he took his medication and that “the jail system is not a substitute for the treatment of people suffering from mental illness”.

Horan‘s prison behaviour had been exemplary and he successfully completed unsupervised work release. He had the family support of a brother and was engaged in “the admirable hobby of bee-keeping”, the board found.

Horan had not been taking his medication when his mother called police about his erratic and violent behaviour on the afternoon of March 30, 1986. One of the officers to respond to the call was Constable Quinn, then 25 and on duty at Bathurst for only his fifth shift since being transferred from Casino, to be near his parents.

After a pursuit that ended 10 kilometres south of Bathurst at Perthville, Constable Quinn got out of his car and ran towards Horan, who shot him in the left clavicle with a .303-calibre rifle.

The officer’s colleagues returned fire as Horan adopted what he described as a Rambo position and emptied the 10-round magazine in his .303.

Constable Borland, then 36, was shot in both legs and a hand, while Horan, who was hit by at least seven of 18 shots fired by police, continued shooting at five other officers.

Constable Quinn was posthumously promoted to sergeant.

In the Supreme Court sitting at Bathurst, Horan pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility due to mental illness.

Justice Kep Enderby sentenced him to life, with separate terms for wounding with intent to murder Constable Borland and shooting with intent to murder other police.

In March 1998 Justice Peter Hidden set a minimum term of 16 years, which expired in 2002, and a maximum of 22. The crown did not appeal.

Horan will be released next Wednesday, under conditions that include his accepting psychiatric treatment and not entering Chifley Local Area Command, where Inspector Borland works.

http://www.smh.com.au/…/2004/01/13/1073877830354.html…



Officer’s death hits local police hard

By BRENDAN ARROW

ANOTHER LIFE LOST: Chifley Local Area Command Acting Inspector Lionel White said police in Bathurst have been personally affected by the death of Constable William Crews in Sydney on Wednesday night. Photo: BRENDAN ARROW 091010
ANOTHER LIFE LOST: Chifley Local Area Command Acting Inspector Lionel White ( # 24873 ) said police in Bathurst have been personally affected by the death of Constable William Crews in Sydney on Wednesday night. Photo: BRENDAN ARROW 091010

POLICE in the Chifley Local Area Command have been personally affected by the death of trainee detective William Crews.

The 26-year-old died in a Sydney hospital after he was shot while carrying out a drug operation on Wednesday night with seven other officers from the Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad in Bankstown, in Sydney’s south-west.

The officers were fired upon outside the targeted property in Cairds Avenue about 9pm. Constable Crews was hit in the head and neck.

Philip Nguyen, 55, has since been charged with shooting with intent to murder and discharging a firearm with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.

Geehad Ghazi, 27, has been charged with possession of an unauthorised firearm.

Yesterday, Acting Inspector Lionel White said the tragic situation in Sydney had personally impacted on a number of officers who knew Constable Crews.

“It is a very shocking situation, a couple of the officers here at the Bathurst Police Station knew him and have been left very upset by the situation,” he said.

“Some of the officers worked with him and trained with him before he became a detective.

“For those officers, we are offering them support and counselling during this tough time.”

Reminding people of those officers who lost their lives in the Bathurst area in the line of duty is a memorial board naming the 13 policemen who have died in the line of duty.

Since Trooper Robert Lovell McDougall died in 1853 near Sofala, 12 officers have fallen in the line of duty in Bathurst area with Sergeant Paul Mitchell Quinn the last, on the March 30, 1986.

Acting Inspector White said the latest death in Sydney brought to the forefront the difficult circumstances that police can find themselves in daily.

“On top of the very mundane things we do every day this is a stark reminder of the dangers police officers can face while in the front line,” he said. “This very much reminded us of the risk officers sometimes have to take while in the line of duty.

“It is a great tragedy.”

http://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/911623/officers-death-hits-local-police-hard/


 

The State government has logged objections to Patrick Horan a NSW prisoner’s planned release, convicted of the manslaughter of a police officer and seriously wounding another. Justice Minister John Hatzistergos says the NSW Parole Board intends to grant parole to Patrick Francis Horan, who committed the crimes near Bathurst in NSW’s central west in 1986.

 

Horan‘s 22-year sentence expires on March the 29th, 2008 but his 16-year non-parole period lapsed on March the 29th last year. Hatzistergos says he’s discussed the matter with Police Minister John Watkins, who he says is also shocked at the board’s intention to release Horan.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/publik15/3815467017/


Parliament of New South Wales
0818—PATRICK FRANCIS HORAN

Question asked on 19 September 2003

Mr Peter Debnam to the Minister for Police—

In relation to convicted offenders:
(1) What is the status of attempts by Patrick Francis Horan, who killed one police officer and wounded another, to obtain parole?
(2) What action have you taken to ensure that Patrick Francis Horan remains in jail?

Answer—

(1) I am advised by NSW Police that the review hearing on Mr Horan‘s application for parole has been adjourned by the Parole Board until 13 November 2003 pending reports from Corrective Services Health and the Serious Offender’s Review Board.
(2) I have expressed my concerns in writing to the Parole Board in relation to the release of Mr Horan.

http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/la/qala.nsf/ad22cc96ba50555dca257051007aa5c8/ca25708400173f67ca25704a000925dd?OpenDocument


 

Free… but banned from Bathurst
By Brooke Newstead
Jan. 14, 2004, 6:38 a.m.

POLICE killer Patrick Francis Horan will walk free next week.
However, he will not be allowed to return to Bathurst for at least five years.

The NSW Parole Board yesterday granted Horan full parole with the condition that he is not to enter the Chifley Local Area Command district.

His release date is set for January 21 and he will remain on parole for five years.

Horan was originally sentenced to life plus 125 years after shooting dead Bathurst police officer Sergeant Paul Quinn and injuring then Senior Constable Ian Borland at Perthville in 1986.

On November 13, 2003, he was granted day release and after being released for just seven day-release days since that date, he will now be allowed to fully integrate back into the community.

Subsequent conditions imposed by the Parole Board state Horan must undergo regular psychiatric assessment and counselling.

He is also never to approach any of the victims of the fateful night during which he shot dead Sergeant Quinn.

http://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/892648/free-but-banned-from-bathurst/


 

 

Prisoner group welcomes police killer’s release

Posted

A prisoner advocacy group has welcomed news convicted police killer Patrick Francis Horan will walk free in a week.

Horan, who suffers from paranoid schizophrenia, has served the minimum 16-years sentence for the manslaughter of Bathurst police officer Sergeant Paul Quinn and the wounding of his partner, Inspector Ian Borland.

The New South Wales Government has criticised the granting of parole and promised to reform the composition of the parole board.

But a spokesman for Justice Action, Brett Collins, says it was obvious 17 years ago the man had mental health problems and his case needed special treatment.

“Instead we have a tragic situation where we have a policeman killed and another one disabled,” he said.

“Now for the police to actually present themselves at this stage as vengeful, as angry … when it’s clearly a mental health issue, one which requires compassion and requires understanding, it’s a shame.

“It’s not what we should expect from the police force and we certainly should expect better than that from the State Government.”

Mr Collins says it is important in this case to listen to the experts.

“So if you don’t listen to them and if in fact you still at the end of it as a government or as a police association are still saying at the end of it we are still angry, we still have hate, we want vengeance then that’s a misleading situation,” he said.

“We should accept the fact that the institution is there for the purpose of making a decision and accept the judgment of the umpire and give support to them.”

Horan is to be released next Wednesday on the condition he does not enter the Chifley local area command where Inspector Ian Borland works, for the next five years.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2004-01-14/prisoner-group-welcomes-police-killers-release/119636


 

Police killer to make statement on release

Posted

It is expected convicted police killer Patrick Francis Horan will issue a statement this afternoon after being released from Sydney’s Long Bay Jail.

Horan shot and killed Sergeant Paul Quinn during an incident in the State’s central west 17 years ago.

He served his minimum of 16 years in jail for killing Sergeant Quinn and injuring then Senior Constable Ian Borland outside of Bathurst in 1986.

Horan fired at police with a rifle after a high-speed car chase.

Corrective Services says Horan will read a statement to the media at the jail’s boomgate, just after his release at 3:00pm AEDT today.

The department cannot say where Horan will be moving, or what possible security arrangements have been made on his behalf.

The parole board has ruled that Horan will not be able to return to the Chifley local area command, where surviving officer Inspector Boland is still serving.

The board says Horan is not a danger to the public, provided he takes regular medication to treat his paranoid schizophrenia.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2004-01-21/police-killer-to-make-statement-on-release/122720


 

Officer’s memory will live on in award

Wednesday 21 September 2016
Hi Greg, just a quick note on the great work that you and your pages do, and that of the Wall to Wall Ride.
You keep the memories of those we have lost, very much alive.
On the Wall ride, all the individual groups and sometimes the whole ride, travel to places where our kin have lost their lives, and stop or salute to remember them.
Kudos to NSW for the great job they do on the memorials on the highway, and congratulations to ACT for the best procession on record.
Even a far away place like Perthville near Bathurst was visited and a token of remembrance 30 years on, was placed and left.
Remembrance is not a burden, its an obligation you can choose to carry… Lest we forget!