1

Harley Gerard DONOHUE

Harley Gerard DONOHUE

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 12918

Rank:  Sergeant

Stations?, Traffic Branch, Part time diver with Water Police, Hurstville – death

Service:  From  11 December 1967  to  ?

Awards:  National Medal – granted 29 November 1983

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 16 September 1993

Born:  23 May 1945

Died on:  27 January 1996

Cause:  Cancer

Age:  50

Funeral date? ? 1996

Funeral location:  Woronora Crematorium

Buried at:  Cremated

Memorial plaque at Woronora Cemetery

Location Section Position
DD REMEMBRANCE PLAQUE MEMORIAL 7 0015 MEMORIAL
 

 

 

 

Harley Gerard DONOHUE
Harley Gerard DONOHUE

Harley Gerard DONOHUE
Harley Gerard DONOHUE

 

HARLEY GERARD DONOHUE
HARLEY GERARD DONOHUE

 

JOHN DUNCAN, KAREN BRANFIELD, HARLEY DONOHUE
JOHN DUNCAN, KAREN BRANFIELD, HARLEY DONOHUE


[alert_yellow]HARLEY is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 

[divider_dotted]




John Stafford GOOD

John Stafford GOOD

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  13503

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 9 December 1968

Senior Constable – appointed 9 December 1977

Sergeant – deceased

Stations:  Central Fingerprint Bureau, Police Armoury ( in the old Hat Factory 1973 ), Cumnock, Robertson ( 1980 ), Narooma, Dapto, Warilla, Albion Park

ServiceFrom  ?pre 9 December 1968  to  28 February 1996 = 27+ years

AwardsNational Medal – granted 13 November 1984

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 2 February 1995

National Police Service Medal – presented to his wife, Susan, at Lake Illawarra on Thursday  8 September 2016

Born:  30 November 1946

Died on:  28 February 1996

CauseMotor Neurone disease

Age:  49

Funeral date:  2 March 1996

Funeral location:  Anglican Church, Jamberoo

Buried at:  Jamberoo General Cemetery, Drualla Rd, Jamberoo.  Row K

 

JOHN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

* NOT JOB RELATED

 [divider_dotted]

John Stafford GOOD - Grave
John Stafford GOOD – Grave

Sergeant John Good, formerly of Albion Park Police Station, had his funeral service at the Anglican Church, Jamberoo on the 2 March 1996.

John died from Motor Neurone Disease and is buried at Jamberoo Cemetery.

At the time of his death, he was stationed at Dapto Police Station.

John was also a member of the Illawarra Police Football club over the years, was a nice solid bloke with black hair.

May John forever Rest In Peace.

Husband of Susan.

Location of Funeral Service

Goody was a top bloke and also a member of the Illawarra Police Football team in the 1980’s.

May you forever Rest In Peace mate.


 

 

 




Dennis Warren STEPHENSON

 Dennis Warren STEPHENSON

aka  Stevo

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 12235

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 16 September 1966

Senior Constable – appointed 29 August 1976

Sergeant – appointed 31 August 1984

Stations:  Bike Course participant at St Ives 1969 / 70, North Sydney STP / HWP, Waverley,  Rose Bay, Daceyville HWP, Maroubra HWP ( around 1977 – 78 ), Paddington ( 10 Division ) – ( around 1977 – 80 )

& G.D’s for 10 years at 10 Division, 15 Division – Death

Service:  From  16 September 1966  to 20 February 1996 = 29+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted on 18 November 1982 ( SenCon )

1st Clasp to the National Medal – granted on 22 January 1993 ( Sgt )

Born:  Tuesday  2 January 1945

Died on: Sunday  20 February 1996

Cause?

Age: 51 yrs  1 mth  18 days

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at?

Started at the old STP on the same day with Stevo and Peter Moore. Worked with him there, Waverley, Daceyville and Maroubra an unforgettable character and a kind hearted soul...Unless you were a hoon, of course. Dennis at left with John Murphy and Billy White at Maroubra HWP around 1979. I'm sure that he and Wayne are stirring things up together up there with the boss. R.I.P.
Started at the old STP on the same day with Stevo and Peter Moore. Worked with him there, Waverley, Daceyville and Maroubra an unforgettable character and a kind hearted soul…Unless you were a hoon, of course. Dennis at left with John Murphy and Billy White at Maroubra HWP around 1979. I’m sure that he and Wayne are stirring things up together up there with the boss. R.I.P.

 

Dave Morris<br /> September 21, 2019 NSW Fallen Police<br /> 1972 and to mark our one year at Waverley STP, Stevo (right side standing) baked a cake. He was a really good cook, the baked dinners were legendary!
Dave Morris
September 21, 2019 NSW Fallen Police
1972 and to mark our one year at Waverley STP, Stevo (right side standing) baked a cake. He was a really good cook, the baked dinners were legendary!

 

 

 

 

DENNIS  is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED


Nothing further is currently known about this man and further information is requested and required.

Cal


 

 

 

 




Serge DeSOUZA

Serge DeSOUZA

New South Wales Police Force

From Academy Class 245

Regd. # 27???

Plain Clothes Senior Constable

Stations:  Seven Hills, Central Detectives, K District SOG

Awards:  ?

Born:  ?

Died:  1996

Age:  ?

Cause:  Committed suicide after night shift

Funeral date:  ?

Funeral location:  ?

Grave location:  ?

 FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS MAN AND INCIDENT.

[alert_red]Serge is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]




Roy Francis De Coque

Roy Francis De Coque

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  18403[/alert_yellow]

[alert_yellow]Academy # 92534[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 11 December 1978

Sergeant – suicide

Stations:  Police Mounted Unit, Redfern

Service:   From  ? ? ? pre 11 December 1978   to   9 October 1996 = approximately 17+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 2 February 1995

Born 3 October 1952  ( http://www.interment.net/data/aus/qld/cooloola/cooloola_coast/cooloola.htm )

Died9 October 1996 ( https://www.heavenaddress.com/restingplace/castlebrookmemorialpark/roy-francis-de-coque/21605 )

Age 44

Cause:  Illness – Suicide by firearm ( Service Revolver ) in Change Room of Mounted Unit, Redfern

On Duty / Off Duty?

Funeral? date

Funeral location: Castlebrook Lawn Cemetery,

Old Windsor Rd, Rouse Hill, NSW.

Grave site: Cremated at Castlebrook and Ashes collected by family.

Memorial location:   Cooloola Coast Cemetery, Rainbow Beach Road, Cooloola Cove, Qld.

 

 [divider_dotted]

FURTHER INFORMATION IS SOUGHT ABOUT THIS DEATH.

[alert_red]Roy is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]

[divider_dotted]

Roy on an ANZAC Day. He was walking with the lead horse
Roy on an ANZAC Day. He was walking with the lead horse

Roy at Beef Week in Casino.
Roy ( centre ) at Beef Week in Casino, NSW.

 

Cooloola Coast Cemetery, Rainbow Beach Road, Cooloola Cove, Qld.
Cooloola Coast Cemetery, Rainbow Beach Road, Cooloola Cove, Qld.

 

 

[divider_dotted]

A Day to Remember ( 1983 )

48 minute documentary Written by Michael Daley, Produced by Bruce Buchanan and Production company is ABC.

SYNOPSIS:

Anzac Day, 1983, from dawn to dusk. The coverage includes the Women Against Rape demonstration, and personalities involved are Sir James Rowland, Governor of NSW; the men of the Australian Army’s 8th Division; Gallipoli survivor Charles Bingham; Paul Smith, RSL Chief Marshall of the march; a Legacy family; and Roy de Coque of the NSW Police Academy, with his horse, Dandy.

GENRE:

Cultures – Australian, War

http://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/find-a-film/detail.aspx?tid=9733

[divider_dotted]

 

Roy liked Triumph motorcycle and he also enjoyed Blues Music.

 

[divider_dotted]




Scott Andrew NICHOLSON

Scott Andrew NICHOLSON

New South Wales Police Force – Resigned

Regd. #  20237

Redfern Police Academy Class 182 B

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 28 May 1982

Constable 1st Class – appointed 28 May 1987

Detectives Training Course 28/ 20 May – 28 June 1991

Senior Constable – level 9 upon Resignation

“possibly” Acting Detective Sergeant – Resigned

After resignation ( due to PTSD ) Scott was a Ranger with Liverpool Council until his death

Stations:  Campbelltown ( 1980’s ), Camden,

Bulga, Fraud Squad, Child Mistreatment Unit

Service:  From ? February 1982 to ? ? 1996 = 13 years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Illness: – PTSD – Suicide – carbon monoxide gassing in vehicle

Born:  4 April 1959

Died:  14 November 1996

Age:  37 old

Funeral:  Leppington Lawn Cemetery

Funeral date? ? ?

Buried at:  Cremated & Resting in the Fountain Garden, Nicholson plot,

Location: Beside Cafe Pagona Area

Section: Gazebo 3 bed 3

Lot:

Lat/Lng: -33.95538, 150.83279

 

"I should be on the Wall." I was once a Policeman, I served you for years, I saw so much pain, It reduced me to tears. I saved many lives, Did the best I could do, I served with distinction, All to protect you. Year after year, Without self regard, I lived for the job, No matter how hard. The toll it was taking, Eventually broke through, My brain now was broken, I did not know what to do. I keep telling myself, It will get better in time, Just keep pushing yourself, All will be fine. But it did not get better, It only got worse, The trauma I suffered, Became my own curse. It brought to an end, The job that I live, I can't do this anymore, No more I could give. The pain did not stop, In fact it just grew, The demons took over, I did not know what to do. I was empty inside, Lost and in pain, I tried to fight on, But I could no longer remain. The trauma had won, I saw no other way, So I took my own life, On a cool summer day. It was because of Policing, You all know it's true, It destroyed who I was, From the things I went through. The trauma of death, Seen hundreds of times, The witnessing of evil, The wickedest of crimes. Yet now I'm forgotten, By the job I died for, Even though I gave my all, After everything I saw. If I had died on duty, Answering the same call, You would all see my name, My name on the wall. I was still on duty, I just could not let go, I was still a Policeman, My brain made it so..... Written 12.2.15.
“I should be on the Wall.”
I was once a Policeman,
I served you for years,
I saw so much pain,
It reduced me to tears.
I saved many lives,
Did the best I could do,
I served with distinction,
All to protect you.
Year after year,
Without self regard,
I lived for the job,
No matter how hard.
The toll it was taking,
Eventually broke through,
My brain now was broken,
I did not know what to do.
I keep telling myself,
It will get better in time,
Just keep pushing yourself,
All will be fine.
But it did not get better,
It only got worse,
The trauma I suffered,
Became my own curse.
It brought to an end,
The job that I live,
I can’t do this anymore,
No more I could give.
The pain did not stop,
In fact it just grew,
The demons took over,
I did not know what to do.
I was empty inside,
Lost and in pain,
I tried to fight on,
But I could no longer remain.
The trauma had won,
I saw no other way,
So I took my own life,
On a cool summer day.
It was because of Policing,
You all know it’s true,
It destroyed who I was,
From the things I went through.
The trauma of death,
Seen hundreds of times,
The witnessing of evil,
The wickedest of crimes.
Yet now I’m forgotten,
By the job I died for,
Even though I gave my all,
After everything I saw.
If I had died on duty,
Answering the same call,
You would all see my name,
My name on the wall.
I was still on duty,
I just could not let go,
I was still a Policeman,
My brain made it so…..
Written 12.2.15.

 

Scott Andrew NICHOLSON
Scott Andrew NICHOLSON

 

Scott Andrew NICHOLSON - Class photo taken at Redfern Police Academy. Class 182 'B'
Scott Andrew NICHOLSON – Class photo taken at Redfern Police Academy. Class 182 ‘B’

 

Scott Andrew NICHOLSON - Memorial
Scott Andrew NICHOLSON – Memorial

[alert_red]Scott is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]  * BUT SHOULD BE

SCOTT ( as of 2017 ) IS mentioned on the NSW Police Wall of Remembrance

 SCOTT ( as of March 2019 ) IS NOT mentioned on the NATIONAL Police Wall of Remembrance – Canberra * BUT SHOULD BE


* Stemming from the continued work of the wives & parents of four Fallen NSW Police to Suicide – those four names will now be included in the newly refurbished NSW Police Wall of Remembrance, Sydney, as of 2017

Congratulations to those family members who fought the fight to right this wrong.

*

Commissioner Scipione has telephoned each of us today to advise that our loved ones names are being added to the replacement NSW Police Force Wall of Remembrance, to be unveiled in the next few weeks.

We would like to thank everyone who has offered support over a long and difficult journey and truly hope this sets a precedent for all police departments, not only in Australia but the global policing community.

It is so very important to remember that policing can and often does have a detrimental effect on those who serve.

We believe that the inclusion of suicide deaths, stemming from a work related psychological injury, is the most compassionate way of showing that the police hierarchy truly cares.

The following names will be added:

Detective Sergeant Ashley Bryant

Sergeant Tom Galvin

Senior Constable Scott Nicholson

Constable Morgan Hill

#OneWallForAll


 

Scott was a member of the New South Wales Police Force for 13 years and, suffering from the effects of PTSD ( Post Traumatic Stress Disorder ) took his own life on the 14 November 1996 by gassing himself in a car and leaving behind two children, aged 6 & 9 ( at the time ) and a wife.

Scott worked at various stations such as Campbelltown in the 1980’s, Camden and the One Man station at Bulga before leaving the Police Force and gaining employment as a Ranger with Liverpool Council.


Dimmy Nicholson Hi, my late husbands name is Scott Andrew Nicholson reg number 20237 who died by gassing himself on 14th November 1996 shortly after he resigned from the job when he could no longer cope with his PTSD, worked at Campbelltown police, Camden, one Man Bulga Police Station, Fraud Squad both in uniform & D’s, Child Mistreatment & others. Hope that’s enough info & thank you for all u do
Wife = Sharon
Dimmy Nicholson

Scott Nicholson - NSW Police Force PTSI / Suicide

PLEASE EVERYONE I ASK THAT YOU TAKE THE TIME OUT OF YOUR LIVES TO READ MY STORY. I’M LISA NICHOLSON AND MY FATHER WAS SCOTT NICHOLSON.

PLEASE JUST READ LIKE AND SHARE!!!!!!!!

 

[blockquote]Hi my name’s Lisa Nicholson and my father is Scott Nicholson. They say we are one big police family and we look after our own yet they don’t even care to see the damage there doing. My dad suicided when I was just 6 years old he was my world my life my everything. The day he died my world fell apart and the older I got the harder it hit me. I suffered and battled countless years of depression, I was raped and beat as a child and teenager and I had the balls to follow this through with court. But, tragically, all of this led to many suicide attempts.

Thankfully my dad had my back though I actually believed the world was so awful and painful that I belonged with my dad. I had a very hard time seeing other officers thinking that’s my dad he is as good a officer as you, yet why is he not remembered!??

He was so proud to be an officer and truly lived through his work right to the end! The end that the line of work he did helped drive him too!!! He worked his ass off to get the respect and acknowledgement that he gained and I’ve always been so proud to say that my daddy was a police officer!! Yet here these ass wipes are claiming that everything my father worked for his whole life everything he believed in and followed isn’t recognised. They claim that we’re one big family and in truth it has felt like that thanks to police legacy but then there’s the fact that I’ve got to, every single day, deal with the emotional grief that I will never see my daddy again and then there’s the fact that the man I love so much and am so proud to say he was an officer will never meet my daughter and my daughter will never meet her grandfather and that, in itself, has me pretty low but on top of all that these guys wanna destroy me; even more, give me no choice and take whatever is left in me to fight to have my daddy’s name on the police Remembrance wall; a wall that all our fallen officers are on, all except the ones who took things into there own hands. We’re one big family yet not only has their line of work taken my father and my daughters grandfather but they wanna take everything that I’ve left because they won’t respect what they’d say “one of our own” my dad deserves that respect and so do so many others and again they say we’re one big family but can they even see that their own choices, actions are killing us even more!!!!

I know I’m not the only one but I can only speak on behalf of myself. I wanna know why?? my daddy, the man that the only image I can recall is of him in his uniform, the man who tragically lost his life, the man who they claim death is not tragic enough to be remembered. Why??? I wanna know why?? my dad’s dead the same as officers who’ve died in the line of duty. Dead not coming back; he died from the pain and suffering from his job and they die in the line of duty but they’re telling me my dad’s death isn’t good enough or tragic enough.

No wonder half the population have lost faith in these guys. I will continue to support and stand tall and for as long as I can with everyone else and I won’t ever stop speaking out.

Your secret is no longer!

He will be remembered.

Thank you for reading my story. Please like and share this around. The more this gets around the more I hope will get in their face and finally remember all our lost men and women.

[/blockquote]

Thank you for sharing such a deeply personal and heart wrenching story of your journey Lisa! This is so courageous of you. The impact that your father’s death had on you and your family is something that the Police force haven’t been around to witness, acknowledge or support and sadly have contributed to your grief in doing so!
Glad to have you on this journey with us Lisa! Xx
Like · Reply · 3 · 2 hrs
  • Sharona Sione Tylern Orlando Aweee hunni so heartbreaking thinking of you sweetie. X x x
    Like · Reply · 2 · 1 hr
  • Lisa Nicholson No thank you for allowing me to share this!!! It is such a raw painful subject but I’ve had enough of holding it in and I can only hope that others have the courage to do the same. Will be on this journey till the end!!!!
    Like · Reply · 1 · 1 hr
    Resting place of Scott

     

    When Sharan’s happy-go-lucky husband became a monster

    By CYDONEE MARDON

    Sharan Nicholson-Rogers has a plea for the minister: "Don't let any more families lose their husband, wife or parent by not making changes that you know will make a difference.'' Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN
    Sharan Nicholson-Rogers has a plea for the minister: “Don’t let any more families lose their husband, wife or parent by not making changes that you know will make a difference.” Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

    Sharan Nicholson-Rogers watched her husband change from a happy-go-lucky police officer into an unpredictable man prone to violent and emotional outbursts.

    The gentle bloke she loved grabbed hold of her one day and shoved his gun down her throat, telling her he couldn’t live any more because of what he was doing to their family.

    Eighteen months later, Detective Sergeant Scott Andrew Nicholson took his own life.

    That was 19 years ago.

    Today Mrs Nicholson-Rogers is as determined as she was the day her husband died to bring about change.

    [blockquote]” There is complete contempt for anyone who falls. They will kick you to the kerb. “[/blockquote]

    She is calling for the establishment of a centre of excellence – a place where police officers can go for respite, support and treatment from mental health professionals.

    “I know guys in the job right now who are crippled with PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder],” Mrs Nicholson-Rogers said.

    “They’re still working, doing their best to stay in the job, but they need help.

    “So many have gone through poor management and there is complete contempt for anyone who falls. They will kick you to the kerb.

    “[Sufferers] need a place where they can go, feel safe, be honest about the fact they need help to cope and a place where they can get the best available support from experts in the field.”

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers sought help for her husband when she saw the signs he was losing control.

    “He became this monster, he couldn’t help it, everything triggered him,” Mrs Nicholson-Rogers recalls.

    “I’d find him curled up in the foetal position, crying and crying.

    “One night we had a bunch of friends over, we cooked lamb on the Weber and I brought it in for him to cut up and he just lost it. He started smashing the kitchen up and screaming.”

    Later he revealed the charred lamb reminded him of two children he’d seen burnt to death in a caravan.

    Detective Sergeant Scott Andrew Nicholson with his family.
    Detective Sergeant Scott Andrew Nicholson with his family.

    “The kids were the same ages as ours,” Mrs Nicholson-Rogers said.

    She urged her husband to talk to his boss about his emotional well-being and asked him to contact police welfare.

    “He said to me ‘Are you serious? They’ll say go to the pub and have a drink, get over it’.

    “He didn’t drink much then but he soon learnt to so he wouldn’t be labelled a ‘sheila’.

    “They get this sick sense of humour, that’s the way they get through it. Down at the pub or the bowlo for a debrief then the wives are left to pick up the mess at the end.”

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers and her two children have been to hell and back since her husband’s 1996 suicide.

    It was only through counselling that Mrs Nicholson-Rogers, a health promotions officer with NSW Health, realised the true impact on her children.

    “The day Scott had the gun down my throat, my seven-year-old son witnessed that. I didn’t know at the time. It’s impacted on them terribly. As they got older they realised the enormity of what had happened. It’s been a really rough road for us.”

    Scott spent 13 years in the job, with stints in Camden, Campbelltown and a one-man station in the country.

    He died aged 37.

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers reached out for help when things got really bad.

    “I contacted police welfare the day after he went off his head about the barbecue, I told them he wasn’t well. He had his gun taken off him [temporarily]. They suggested maybe he should stay home, play housewife more, take more holidays, go for walks at night, debrief with his mates, that’s it.

    “He was suffering PTSD and he was told the best thing he could do is exercise.”

    Then one night Detective Sergeant Nicholson came home and told his wife he had resigned. Six months later he was dead.

    “We had been asking for help for a while, through his bosses. I tried senior management,” she said.

    “At one point when he got violent with me I said I’d had enough and I would have him charged if something didn’t change.

    “They said ‘Please don’t because we will have to take his gun off him’. I told them he needed help, he was a loose cannon, he will hurt someone.”

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers said suggestions he and other struggling officers were simply not right for the job was a cop-out.

    “I hear the same thing today, young guys now being told maybe they’re not right for the job, maybe they should get out. Well no-one is right for a job where day in, day out, they deal with trauma. Layer on layer it consumes them and no-one can take that without the proper support.”

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers with her children.
    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers with her children.

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers, a nurse familiar with the trauma of frontline emergency, is one of several police wives willing to work with government and police officials to create the centre of excellence.

    “We can give a family perspective to help them set up a place where police can go in the short term and stay if they need to and feel safe, where they are not going to feel compromised or spied on by insurance companies.

    “We need change. The attitude of senior management has got to change.

    “Right now, if you say you’ve got a problem, you’re not coping, the bosses think ‘Oh great there’s another one off sick. That means a man down, overtime, it’s the cost.”

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers and a group of police wives believe they have a solution and are urging NSW Police Minister Stuart Ayres to work with them.

    "We need change. The attitude of senior management has got to change.''
    “We need change. The attitude of senior management has got to change.”

    “We need change. The attitude of senior management has got to change.”

    “I’m one of the lucky ones who have healed to a degree and married again to a man who totally supports my fight for change,” she said.

    “I would like to see him meet with us, it’s not about us canning him, it’s about working together collectively with all our experience as families, to pick our brains on what they can do to make a change. Hiding from it is not the answer.

    “They can’t keep turning their back. There are more and more suicides and experienced cops are dropping out. They are losing an experienced workforce that can be real value.”

    Mrs Nicholson-Rogers has a plea for the minister: “Don’t let any more families lose their husband, wife or parent by not making changes that you know will make a difference.

    “Just take a minute or two of your time to listen to my children if you can’t talk to me, see the pain and grief in their eyes and I assure you it will change your mind and you will work to make positive changes.”

    The NSW Police Minister was contacted by the Mercury but so far has not responded.

    The NSW Police Force has provided details of the programs and initiatives already in place for preventing PTSD and supporting its officers.

     

    For help and counselling: Lifeline 131114; Suicide Call Back Service 1300 65946 

    [divider_dotted]

     

  • Please keep running these stories, there needs to be a ground swell of public contempt for this culture within the policing system. Only that way will there be some light at the end of the tunnel for these men and women, and their families, who are having their lives ruined whilst serving and protecting the public.

    So proud of you sharon !!! Step by step change is coming !!!
    We cant change the past but we can change the future and prevent other families feeling the same pain . Much love to you and the girls so proud ox

    Not everyone is mentally able to absorb the rigours of the Military or Emergency services.
    I note that the Police “spokesman” has declared that they have in place procedures to help if PTSD becomes a factor.
    Having some knowledge of this issue Why are the recruits not adequately assessed during training rather than waiting for the nightmare to begin?
    It may not catch all , but may help some before their life is destroyed.
    The military at least have programs to assess their recruits and place them in areas of higher or lower degrees of capability to absorb stress. it cannot be that difficult.
    I thank God my daughter changed her decision and followed nursing.

    Im not sure that you can 100% assess how a person will handle situations. I see myself as pretty resilient but that may all change if i saw the aftermath of a bunch of children stabbed to death.
    I guess u just never know.

    You are a strong woman Sharon for campaigning for this and no doubt keeping the wounds raw for you. It is horrible that your husband was not given the support he needed, and I’m sure there are many others suffering in silence like a ticking time bomb.

    There used to be government run places people could go but they had a few issues that the media beat up and politicians could see a few bucks in selling off the real estate to themselves so……………………………………………………………………thank the dumb Aussie people.

    http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/2807747/when-sharans-happy-go-lucky-husband-became-a-monster/?cs=4401


 

Scott Andrew NICHOLSON - Detectives Course # 28/1991
Scott Andrew NICHOLSON – Detectives Course # 28/1991 – Memorial Port

 


 

13 January 2015

She said that they develop a “Sick Sense Of Humour” her husband put a gun in her mouth in front of her children, he took his own life some time after. She said they turn into monsters , and they lose track of reality and develop this “sick sense of humour” Black humour I know cops call it.. but those of us with a sense of balance and compassion, would call it “sick”.. Because it is “sick” Its as sick as the criminals they chase and lock up for doing “sick’ things, they themselves have a “sick” way after a while.. And it gets worse not better over time ..

“Sharan Nicholson-Rogers watched her husband change from a happy-go-lucky police officer into an unpredictable man prone to violent and emotional outbursts.

The gentle bloke she loved grabbed hold of her one day and shoved his gun down her throat, telling her he couldn’t live any more because of what he was doing to their family.

Eighteen months later, Detective Sergeant Scott Andrew Nicholson took his own life.

That was 19 years ago.

Today Mrs Nicholson-Rogers is as determined as she was the day her husband died to bring about change.

“There is complete contempt for anyone who falls. They will kick you to the kerb.”

She is calling for the establishment of a centre of excellence – a place where police officers can go for respite, support and treatment from mental health professionals.

“I know guys in the job right now who are crippled with PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder],” Mrs Nicholson-Rogers said.

“They’re still working, doing their best to stay in the job, but they need help.

“So many have gone through poor management and there is complete contempt for anyone who falls. They will kick you to the kerb.

Mrs Nicholson-Rogers sought help for her husband when she saw the signs he was losing control.

“He became this monster, he couldn’t help it, everything triggered him,” Mrs Nicholson-Rogers recalls.

“I’d find him curled up in the foetal position, crying and crying.
She urged her husband to talk to his boss about his emotional well-being and asked him to contact police welfare.

“He said to me ‘Are you serious? They’ll say go to the pub and have a drink, get over it’.

“He didn’t drink much then but he soon learnt to so he wouldn’t be labelled a ‘sheila’.

“They get this sick sense of humour, that’s the way they get through it. Down at the pub or the bowlo for a debrief then the wives are left to pick up the mess at the end.”

Mrs Nicholson-Rogers and her two children have been to hell and back since her husband’s 1996 suicide.

It was only through counselling that Mrs Nicholson-Rogers, a health promotions officer with NSW Health, realised the true impact on her children.

“The day Scott had the gun down my throat, my seven-year-old son witnessed that. I didn’t know at the time. It’s impacted on them terribly. As they got older they realised the enormity of what had happened. It’s been a really rough road for us.”

Scott spent 13 years in the job, with stints in Camden, Campbelltown and a one-man station in the country.

He died aged 37.

Mrs Nicholson-Rogers reached out for help when things got really bad.

“I contacted police welfare the day after he went off his head about the barbecue, I told them he wasn’t well. He had his gun taken off him [temporarily]. They suggested maybe he should stay home, play housewife more, take more holidays, go for walks at night, debrief with his mates, that’s it.

“He was suffering PTSD and he was told the best thing he could do is exercise.”

Then one night Detective Sergeant Nicholson came home and told his wife he had resigned. Six months later he was dead.

“We had been asking for help for a while, through his bosses. I tried senior management,” she said.

“At one point when he got violent with me I said I’d had enough and I would have him charged if something didn’t change.

“They said ‘Please don’t because we will have to take his gun off him’. I told them he needed help, he was a loose cannon, he will hurt someone.”

Mrs Nicholson-Rogers said suggestions he and other struggling officers were simply not right for the job was a cop-out.

“I hear the same thing today, young guys now being told maybe they’re not right for the job, maybe they should get out. Well no-one is right for a job where day in, day out, they deal with trauma. Layer on layer it consumes them and no-one can take that without the proper support.”

 

Tom Rigby PTSD is a terrible burden for anyone to wear, unfortunately though societies answer is exactly as written in the article ” Go to the pub and have a drink!”

 

Alan Hardy If you carnt handle the heat get out of the kitchen

 

Stephen Evelyn Wall Just wondering Alan what job do you do??
These ppl do a wonderful job but doing that job they see and experience terrible things we can’t imagine. All the training in the world doesn’t prepare you for what they have to face.

 

N.S.W Police Watch You need to do some more research Evelyn, many are not doing a wonderful job at all and then many above them cover for it..

 

N.S.W Police Watch http://books.google.com.au/…/Enemies_of_the_State.html…

Tim Priest is a former police detective who was on the front line in the war against crime and drugs in…
books.google.com.au

 

Alan Hardy You are right Evelyn wall ,but if you can not handle your job ,what ever that job is quit and get another job. It’s a job not your life

 

Alan Medhurst Revell Well, well, well…. Looky ere…

 

N.S.W Police Watch Have edited Jeff, apologies for that.

For more read on below

http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/…/when-sharans-happy-go…/


 

 




George William SLADE

George Walter SLADE

NSW Police Training Centre, Redfern – Class # 068

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  8591

Rank:  Commenced Training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 4 February 1957 ( aged 25 years, 4 months, 15 days )( spent 1 month, 28 days at Academy )

Probationary Constable – appointed 1 April 1957 ( aged 25 years, 6 months, 12 days )

Constable – appointed 1 April 1968

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Detective – appointed ? ? ? ( YES )

Senior Constable – appointed 1 April 1968

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 6 May 1973

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed ? ? ?

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

 

Final Rank:  Detective Sergeant

George does NOT appear in the 1979 Stud Book despite appearing to be a Detective in the 1980s with BCI

Stations? , Liverpool, Fairfield ( 34 Division ) Detectives – late 1970’s – 1980’s, ?

Bureau of Crime Intelligence ( BCI ) – 1980’s – 1982 – retirement

ServiceFrom 4 February 1957  to  ? ? 1982 = 24+ years Service

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours system

Born:  Sunday  20 September 1931

Died:  Wednesday  7 August 1996

Cause:  Illness – Cancer

Age:  64 years, 10 months, 18 days old

 

Funeral date:  Monday  12 August 1996

Funeral location:  All Saints Church, Victoria Rd, Parramatta

Grave location?


 

There was also a K. SLADE # 7236 – Born August 1927 – who was a Sgt 3/c on 1 Jan 1968 at the same time George was a Senior Constable.

There was also R.G. SLADE # 16273 – Born 1954 who was a Constable on 8 April 1975.

It is not known if they were related.

 


Colin Winchester And The Calabrian Connection

Sydney Morning Herald
Friday August 18, 1989
Evan Whitton

THE Winchester inquest will be conducted by the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Chief Magistrate, Ronald Cahill, assisted by the Deputy Federal Director of Public Prosecutions, John Dee, QC, in the AMP Building, Hobart Place, Canberra.

Winchester, 55, third in seniority in the Federal Police, and said to be nicknamed The Dog because of his dogged tracking of criminals, drove in his unmarked police car to his home in Lawley Street, Deakin, after work on Tuesday, January 10, 1989.

He had a drink with his wife, Gwen, and then drove to Queanbeyan to discuss a proposed hunting trip with his brother Ken. He returned about 9.10pm and parked his car in the driveway of their next-door neighbour’s house. He was wearing a track suit, no socks, and Adidas running shoes.

Winchester turned off the lights and engine, opened the door, and put one foot on the ground. His head framed by the interior light, he was a perfect target. A person stepped forward in the dark to within two or three metres of the car and shot Winchester twice, on either side of the right ear, with a silenced .22 self-loading 10/22 Ruger rifle. Winchester died instantly. He slumped back in the seat, still holding the car keys and with his right foot still on the ground.

Unlike NSW, where an inquest is held into every homicide, an inquest is held in the ACT only if police are not able to lay charges. However, if sufficient evidence emerges, Mr Cahill has the power to turn the inquest into a committal hearing. He can also imprison witnesses who refuse to answer questions.

The first leg of the inquest is scheduled to run for five weeks, until September 22. There will then be a break of two weeks, and the inquest will then run until it is finished. This is currently expected to take between a week and three weeks.

The inquest will examine material relating to various possible scenarios. Dee has stated that the inquest will proceed in three parts: formal matters; evidence on investigations in which Winchester had been involved; and information on people who might have held a grudge against him. Within that framework, the material will be subdivided into separate blocks.

THERE is political and media speculation that the Winchester killing, like the 1977 assassination of Donald Bruce Mackay, may turn on marijuana and the profits to be made there from by elements of organised crime, including what may be termed the Calabrian Mob and corrupt police.

From the following data, and the comparative brevity of the inquest, it may be thought that what is required is not so much an inquest as a full-scale commission of inquiry, with terms of reference and powers as wide as those lately enjoyed by Fitzgerald, QC, in Queensland, to examine the operations of the Calabrians and the possible nexus between them and law enforcement authorities and politicians.

Calabria is a province in the toe of Italy. A Calabrian village, Plati (pop. 3,000), is the headquarters of a secret society, L’Onorata Societa (The Honoured Society) or N’Dranghita. This is not to be confused with other Italian secret societies, the Mafia proper from Sicily, or the Camorra from Naples. Migrants from Calabria began arriving in Australia in 1928. Many went to Griffith, 600 kilometres south-west of Sydney. More Calabrians arrived after the war.

Marijuana, one of many names given to the treated form of the cannabis or Indian hemp plant, became, as a legacy of the Vietnam War, a recreational drug in Australia in the mid-1960s. Cannabis will grow anywhere there is heat and water. Seedlings are planted around August and the crop taken off in January or February.

Justice Woodward reported in 1979 that people born in Plati were involved between 1974 and 1978 in at least 20 cannabis plantations in all mainland States except Victoria. The Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence, established in 1981, adopted as its first project, codenamed Alpha, the collection of data on the activities of Italian-oriented cannabis operations.

One cannabis plant was estimated in 1986 to produce $1,100 worth of manufactured marijuana at street level. It has been suggested that Australian marijuana is now being exported, and profits used to finance importation of heroin, cocaine and crack.

It is convenient to examine the Griffith/Calabrian matter in three overlapping sections: Robert Trimbole 1970-87; Joe Verduci 1980-89; Luigi Pochi 1975-89.

THE CHARMED LIFE OF ROBERT TRIMBOLE

IT is said that the Calabrians prefer to co-operate with police rather than shoot them. Gianfranco Tizzoni was an informer for Melbourne police, Customs and narcotics agents. He and another Calabrian informant, Giuseppi (Joe)Verduci, afford useful examples of the ambiguity inherent in the relationship

The informer is assumed to be working for the authorities, but he may be able to arrange matters so that the police are actually working to protect his interests, and to disrupt the activities of his criminal competitors.

Robert Trimbole was a leading member of a Griffith element of N’Dranghita called The Family (La Famiglia). Tizzoni later said Trimbole asked him in 1971 to arrange distribution in Melbourne of unlimited supplies of cannabis from Griffith. Justice Woodward later found that Griffith cannabis growers were protected by local detectives John Ellis, Brian Borthwick and John Robbins. All three were eventually imprisoned for perverting the course of justice.

Bob Bottom discloses in his book Shadow of Shame, sub-titled How the Mafia Got away with the Murder of Donald Mackay, that Mackay, a Griffith businessman and Liberal politician, sent John Maddison, then Minister for Police in the Liberal NSW Government, a confidential dossier on Calabrian involvement in drugs in July 1975. Mackay invented the term “grass castles” to describe ornate homes built in Griffith for former peasant farmers, and said that Trimbole, recently a bankrupt, was thought to provide the Sydney outlet for cannabis.

Maddison took no action, but Sydney police, acting on a tipoff from Mackay, raided an $80-million plantation at Coleambally in November 1985. A number of people were charged and convicted, including Luigi Pochi, of Canberra, who was sentenced to two years in prison in March 1977.

Tizzoni later stated that Trimbole told him to get someone from Melbourne to eliminate Mackay. He said he arranged through a gunsmith, George Joseph, for James Frederick Bazley to execute Mackay. He said Bazley asked for and got no more than $10,000, and that Joseph asked for 10 per cent of the fee, $1,000, for the introduction. Mackay was assassinated in Griffith on July 15, 1977. Bazley, who was eventually convicted of the crime, claims that the killer was actually former NSW detective Fred Krahe.

Bottom records that false rumours to the effect that Mackay had decamped with a woman were floated by two press secretaries in the Wran Government, by a senior Cabinet minister, by a senior police officer, and by Krahe in Griffith. NSW police, led by Sergeant Joe Parrington, were baffled.

Justice Philip Woodward began a royal commission on drug trafficking in August 1977. Observing the Griffith “grass castles” from outside, Woodward, who had fewer powers of entry than the fruit fly inspector, sought an extension of his powers to give him ingress. This was refused by Premier Neville Wran on civil liberties grounds.

Tizzoni later said that Trimbole, who bought into the Mr Asia heroin syndicate in 1979, arranged through Tizzoni, Joseph and Bazley to dispose of drug couriers Douglas and Isabel Wilson, who had informed on syndicate head Terence Clark to Brisbane police and narcotics agents in June 1978. The Wilsons were murdered near Melbourne in April 1979.

Woodward reported to the NSW Government in November 1979 that he was satisfied that Calabrians in Griffith directed a cannabis-growing and distribution network, and that “this organisation was responsible for the disappearance and murder of Donald Mackay”. He recommended that a task force be set up to monitor the activities of Trimbole and his associates. No such task force was set up. Trimbole told The Sydney Morning Herald in November 1979: “That commission can’t touch me or charge me in any way.”

Under subpoena, Trimbole was to appear at the Wilsons’ inquest on August 12, 1980. An inquiry by John Nagle, QC, later found that shortly before that date former Labor parliamentarian Albert Jaime Grassby unsuccessfully sought to have tabled under privilege in the NSW and South Australian parliaments a document falsely suggesting that Mackay’s widow, her son, and her solicitor, had conspired to murder Mackay. Grassby later apologised and agreed to pay$5,000 to cover Mrs Mackay’s court costs to end a defamation action she initiated against Grassby.

Trimbole did not give evidence at the Wilsons’ inquest on the ground that his answers might tend to incriminate him. The coroner recommended an inquiry be held into the Mr Asia syndicate. Trimbole fled the country in May 1981 to avoid giving evidence at Justice Stewart’s inquiry, and apparently worked at organising drug and arms running from bases in France, Italy, Switzerland and Ireland.

The Australian Government had been negotiating in desultory fashion with the Irish Government for an extradition treaty since 1977. Bottom notes that on April 1, 1982, the day Trimbole’s stepdaughter took up residence at an exclusive girls’ school in Ireland, some unknown person removed the file on the treaty from an active tray; marked it “no further action required”; and buried it in the Federal Attorney-General’s storage vault.

Justice Stewart recommended to the Federal and NSW governments in August 1982 that Trimbole be found and extradited, but Australia still had no extradition treaty with Ireland when Irish police arrested Trimbole in Dublin in October 1984.

The arrest was tainted, and an Irish court ruled in February 1985 that Trimbole should be released. He retired to Spain and lived there, untroubled by Spanish or Australian authorities, for a further two years before dying, no doubt to the relief of many in Australia, of a heart attack on May 13, 1987. A Catholic priest with a sense of humour, Father John Massore, later conducted a funeral service for Trimbole in Smithfield, Sydney. He took as one of his themes: all human life is as grass.

JOE VERDUCI AND OPERATION SEVILLE

COLIN Winchester, a former miner then 29, joined the ACT police force in 1962. Some of the ACT police were said to act like country cousins of Sydney police, and rather looked up to some of the more flashy, if dubious, detectives therein. It has been asserted that Winchester was corrupt, at least at any earlier period when he is said to have handled bribes relating to a Canberra illegal casino. However, an audit of his financial affairs after his murder revealed nothing untoward.

The ACT Police and Commonwealth Police were merged in 1979 to form the Australian Federal Police (AFP). Channel 10 reporter Christopher Masters says that factional infighting deriving from the original divisions remain, and have impeded the Winchester investigation.

Giuseppi (Joe) Verduci offered in late 1980 to supply AFP Detective Sergeant Brian Lockwood with information on members of the Canberra Italian community allegedly involved in organised crime. Lockwood says that in August 1981 Verduci said he had been approached by Luigi Pochi and another man about growing marijuana on his property at Bungendore, in NSW, just outside the ACT

Bottom notes in Shadow of Shame that Lockwood advised his superior, Winchester, and that Winchester and Bob Blissett, then head of the NSW Bureau of Criminal Intelligence (BCI), agreed to allow the plantation to run as a joint “controlled” operation code-named Operation Seville. The approval of NSW Commissioner of Police, Cecil Abbott, was subsequently obtained, and the operation was placed under the direct control of Winchester and Detective Sergeant * George Slade of the NSW BCI.

The theory was that surveillance would enable police to establish distribution routes and to identify distributors and financiers, and thus, perhaps, get evidence against the Calabrians. Bungendore I was planted in August 1981. Independent NSW MLA John Hatton later asserted that, including Bungendore, there had been 14 drug crops in southern NSW, at Braidwood, Dalton, Michelago and in the Brindabella ranges, of which at least 13 had been grown with the supervision or knowledge of NSW police.

Bungendore I was harvested in February 1982. Some 50 kilograms were sent to Sydney on March 18. The shipment was kept under surveillance and photographed ; no arrests were made. Lockwood said he handed on to Winchester $23,500 given him by Verduci as a result of the operation in March 1982. Winchester paid the money into Consolidated Revenue in September 1982.

At a later court hearing, Verduci declined to answer, on the ground that it might incriminate him, a suggestion that Verduci had paid Winchester large cash amounts that had not gone into Consolidated Revenue.

Robert Trimbole’s old friend, Gianfranco Tizzoni, and two others took the rest of the crop to Victoria. Alerted by NSW police, Victorian police arrested them on March 31 and charged them with possession and supply of marijuana and unlawful possession of firearms.

Tizzoni began to negotiate with Victorian detectives and eventually supplied information that led to the convictions of himself, George Joseph and James Bazley in connection with the murders of Donald Mackay and the Wilsons. So to that extent Operation Seville was a success.

Bungendore II was seeded as part of Operation Seville, of which Winchester was no longer part, in August 1982. Armed assaults were made on the plantation in January 1983 by criminals, possibly at the behest of corrupt NSW police. After these debacles, police destroyed the remainder of the crop in February 1983, and closed down Operation Seville.

AFP Detective Sergeant John Best took over Verduci as an informant from Lockwood in mid-1984. In August, Verduci, apparently without AFP or NSW police authority, became involved in seeding 44,000 hemp plants, worth $50 million on the street, on a plantation at Guyra on the New England tablelands.

Detective Sergeant Bob Small of Armidale police arrested Verduci and five labourers on the Guyra plantation on November 15, 1984. Verduci claimed he had immunity from the AFP. Small checked with Best, who said he had no immunity at Guyra. Best recommended that Verduci be dropped as an AFP informant.

Four of the Guyra labourers pleaded guilty and were each sentenced to 5 1/2 years, with a minimum of three years, on July 1, 1986. A fifth, Carmelo Micalizzi, pleaded not guilty and was tried separately.

At one stage, NSW Crown Law authorities were of a mind to charge Verduci and everyone else, Calabrians and police alike, involved in the Bungendore operation, but this was seen as too much of a problem, and the whole thing was handed over to the National Crime Authority (NCA) for evaluation in 1987.

In July 1987, Winchester was formally warned and interrogated by NCA Chief Inspector Robert McDonald about his role in the Bungendore affair. The NCA concluded that Winchester had done nothing illegal.

The NCA used the trial of Micalizzi in November 1987 as a sort of dry run to see how Verduci might perform as an indemnified Crown witness against Calabrians allegedly involved in the Bungendore operation. Micalizzi was found guilty and got 5 1/2 years with a minimum of three. Thus encouraged, the NCA charged 11 people, including Luigi Pochi, in April 1988 in connection with the Bungendore matters.

The Bungendore committal hearing was to start in Queanbeyan on February 6, 1989. Winchester might have been a witness, but not as important a witness as Verduci, who did not appear to feel that he was at any sort of risk ; he had declined to continue to accept police protection.

When Winchester was executed on January 10,Lockwood, now a Canberra service station proprietor,was given police protection. AFP Commander Lloyd Worthy, a former member of the ACT Police, was in charge of the investigation.

More than 25 police, led by Chief Superintendent Richard Ninness, raided the flat of a former Treasury official, said to have held a grudge against Winchester, on January 18, but Worthy said there was no suggestion the man would be charged in connection with the murder.

Verduci refused to give evidence in the Bungendore case, and most of the charges were withdrawn on March 1 ; NSW Attorney-General John Dowd dropped the remaining charges against the Calabrians in May.

THE CHARMED LIFE OF LUIGI POCHI

AS noted, Luigi Pochi was sentenced to two years in prison in March 1977 in connection with a cannabis plantation at Coleambally. Pochi, who had come to Australia in 1959, was eligible for deportation because he had not, through an administrative bungle, become an Australian citizen.

Michael Mackellar, Federal Immigration Minister, ordered Pochi’s deportation in 1978 on the ground of his conviction and alleged involvement in “commerce in marijuana”. Pochi appealed.

Mr Justice Gerard Brennan, president of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT), recommended in 1979 that Pochi not be deported. He said there were ample grounds for suspecting that Pochi was involved in marijuana, but the evidence did not prove it ; such conduct “must be proved,not merely suspected”

Justice Woodward found in November 1979 that he was satisfied that Pochi was a Canberra principal of the Griffith cannabis organisation ; that the growing of cannabis was principally supervised from Griffith by Pochi’s brother-in-law and business partner, Antonio Sergi ; and that distribution and marketing was supervised principally by Pochi’s other business partner, Robert Trimbole. Sergi has never been charged with any crime.

The Federal Court upheld Justice Brennan’s recommendation against deporting Pochi in July 1980. The Government appealed to the High Court. The High Court refused leave to appeal in August 1981, a time when Pochi was later alleged to have been involved in Joe Verduci’s Bungendore plantation.

Pochi had received support from elements of the Labor Party. It has been reported that in 1981 Verduci was said to have gone to the home of a Labor Party figure to warn him that the party should not be seen to be supporting Pochi and that he even produced marijuana from the Bungendore crop “to show the ALP man that Pochi was involved in drugs”.

Ian MacPhee, then Liberal Immigration Minister, who might have had access to current intelligence not available to others, overruled the AAT recommendations on February 23, 1982, and had a deportation order served on Pochi giving him 72 hours to leave the country.

Pochi issued a statement asserting: “I have always denied and still deny that I had any association with any illegal criminal organisation.” He obtained a temporary High Court injunction to stay his departure.

The High Court unanimously upheld the validity of the Pochi order on October 22, 1982, but Justice Lionel Murphy added it would be a misuse of power to deport Pochi in circumstances that might break up his family.

Three days later, the then Immigration Minister John Hodges, who had replaced MacPhee in May, revoked the order “on strong humanitarian and compassionate grounds”. On October 27, 1982, the Taxation Commissioner’s annual report showed that Pochi, 43, had been fined $16,000 for underestimating his income by $57,671 in the period between 1973-74 and 1975-76.

Pochi was among 11 charged in April 1988 in connection with the Bungendore plantation. He and three associates were members of the Belconnen branch of the Australian Labor Party at the time of the Winchester murder on January 10, 1989. It was later reported that police had sought the records of a branch meeting held on that night.

As noted, the case against Pochi and others collapsed in March 1989 when Verduci refused to give evidence.

© 1989 Sydney Morning Herald
* It is unknown if the person mentioned in this article is the same George Slade who passed away on 7 August 1996.




Graham Mark HILDER

Graham Mark HILDER

New South Wales Police Force

Senior Constable

Regd. # 28153

Stationed at Granville Police Station

Awards: ?

Served:  From  to  ?

Born  3 March 1961

Died 9 December 1996

35 old

Late of Wentworthville

Suicide

Funeral date:  ?

Funeral location:  ?

Memorial Touch Stone plaque:

Castlebrook Memorial Park
Location: Gazebo 2
Section/Lot: Gumnut 1/
Lat/Lng: -33.695540, 150.920088

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS REQUIRED ABOUT THIS PERSON

 

 

Death notice published in Daily Telegraph (Sydney) 12DEC1996

 

Memorial plaque location

 

Graham Mark HILDER - NSWPF - Suicide - 091296 - Grave
Graham Mark HILDER – NSWPF – Suicide – 091296 – Grave

Graham Mark HILDER - NSWPF - Suicide - 091296 - Grave
Graham Mark HILDER – NSWPF – Suicide – 091296 – Grave

 




Robert Wayne TAIT

Robert Wayne TAIT

aka  Bob

New South Wales Police Force

Joined via the NSW Police Cadets on 24 February 1964

Cadet # 1927

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  11786[/alert_yellow]

Rank: NSW Police Cadet – commenced 24 February 1964

Probationary Constable – appointed 19 March 1965

Senior Constable – appointed 19 March 1975

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 27 March 1982

Inspector – death

Stations:  Narrabri – Patrol Commander

Awards:  National Medal – granted 23 October 1981

1st Clasp to the National Medal – granted 28 May 1992

ServiceFrom  24 February 1964  to  29 March 1996 = 31+ years

Born:  19 March 1947

Died:  29 March 1996

Age:  49

Cause: Illness – Suicide – Service revolver

Event location: Narrabri Police Station

Funeral: Narrabri Lawn Cemetery. Portion A2, row Q

Cremated: ?

 

[alert_red]Robert is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red] * BUT SHOULD BE

 

Inspector Robert Wayne TAIT - Illness - 290396

Robert Wayne TAIT headstone - Narrabri Lawn Cemetery. Portion A2, row Q
Robert Wayne TAIT headstone – Narrabri Lawn Cemetery. Portion A2, row Q

Robert Wayne TAIT - Grave
Robert Wayne TAIT – Grave

Robert Wayne TAIT - Memorial Stone outside of Narrabri Police Station. Rob's mother also planted an Olive Tree there at the same time. 29 September 2002
Robert Wayne TAIT – Memorial Stone outside of Narrabri Police Station. Rob’s mother also planted an Olive Tree there at the same time. 29 September 2002

 

In 1996 Inspector Bob Tait was the officer in charge of police at Narrabri. On the morning of Friday 29 March of that year he ended his own life at the Narrabri Police Station.

 

The Northern Daily Leader of 30 March, 1996 reported the death.

Stunned colleagues and the Narrabri community are this morning trying to come to terms with why such a respected policeman would kill himself. Inspector Robert Tait, 49, went to work yesterday morning, where he had been serving as the patrol commander, walked into an unoccupied office, took his service revolver and ended his life.

 

The inspector joined the New South Wales Police Force on 24 February, 1964 as a cadet, and was sworn in on 19 March, 1966. At the time of his death he was stationed at Narrabri, where he was the patrol commander.

[divider_dotted]

 

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/holding-judgement/2007/06/08/1181089328815.html?page=fullpage

June 9, 2007

It took up 451 hearing days, heard from 902 public witnesses and cost an estimated $64 million. Malcolm Brown reports on the Wood royal commission, 10 years on.

 

It began on June 15, 1995, when an unnamed Annandale detective jumped to his death from the seventh floor of a building, apparently through fear of the Wood royal commission. The detective’s suicide was followed by those of Ray Jenkins, a dog trainer (July 10), and Inspector Robert Tait, the acting patrol commander at Narrabri ( March 29, 1996 ). Nineteen days later a former Wollongong alderman, Brian Tobin, gassed himself.

On May 8 the same year, Peter Foretic gassed himself the day after giving evidence about pedophilia. On September 23, Detective Senior Constable Wayne Johnson shot himself and his estranged wife after being adversely named in the royal commission. On November 4, David Yeldham, a retired judge about to face the royal commission on questions of sexual impropriety, killed himself. A month later Danny Caines, a plumber and police confidant, committed suicide at Forster, on the North Coast.

Altogether, 12 people enmeshed in the Wood royal commission took their own lives. Scores of others were so profoundly affected by proceedings that their supporters and families believe it shortened their lives. A former detective, Greg Jensen, suffered a recurrence of the stomach cancer that ultimately ended his life, while another former detective, Ray McDougall, who faced the threat that commission investigators might expose his extramarital affair if he did not co-operate, succumbed to motor neurone disease.

There is no doubt that the Royal Commission into the NSW Police Service, headed by the Supreme Court judge James Wood, purged the force of a rollcall of rotters. A total of 284 police officers were adversely named, 46 briefs of evidence were sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions and by 2001 nine officers had pleaded guilty to corruption offences and three not guilty. Seven police officers received jail sentences, including the former Gosford drug squad chief Wayne Eade and a former chief of detectives, Graham “Chook” Fowler.

Several high-profile police ended their careers in disgrace, including Ray Donaldson, an assistant commissioner, whose contract was not renewed, and Bob Lysaught, the commissioner’s chief of staff, whose contract was torn up. Charges against 14 officers were dismissed because of irregularities in search warrants and their execution.

That left the question of what to do with police who were on the nose but who could not be brought to account by normal means. The solution was the creation of section 181B of the Police Service Act, under which the police commissioner could dismiss an officer on the basis of what had come out of the royal commission. Section 181D allowed the police commissioner to serve an officer with a notice indicating that he “does not have confidence in the police officer’s suitability to continue as a police officer”. The officer could show cause as to why he should be retained, and if dismissed could appeal to the Industrial Relations Tribunal.

In the wake of the two legislative changes, 380 officers were targeted for dismissal or internal investigation. By March 1998, 19 police officers had been dismissed under section 181B and three under 181D. Another had been dismissed under a separate provision of the act, 14 had resigned, four had been medically discharged and 15 had been given performance warning notices. Others were under consideration, and as the Police Integrity Commission – a legacy of the royal commission which became a permanent watchdog – has demonstrated, even officers who had been corrupt many years before were not necessarily in the clear.The former independent MP John Hatton, who was instrumental in setting up the royal commission, said he thought the Police Integrity Commission was the royal commission’s “greatest achievement”. The Child Protection Enforcement Agency, which launched a purge of sex offenders, is another positive legacy of the royal commission.But 10 years on, was the exercise worth it?To some there were considerable benefits. Some appalling malpractice – known as “process” or “noble cause” corruption – prompted Wood to wonder at one point about the quality of a lot of police evidence he had accepted over the years.Despite this, many officers still believe the royal commission was too puritanical. They claim the investigators, not able to grapple with the really big issues, jumped on anything they could: “They had to have runs on the board,” says Michael McGann, who as a policeman in 1984 participated in the so-called Kareela Cat Burglar case, in which police used mace on an unco-operative thief and sex offender. To some critics this treatment did no serious harm and only required a word of caution. But under the spotlight of the royal commission 12 years later, it ended the careers of high-flying police such as John Garvey, Brian Harding and Steve York.A decade later, Harding works in corporate security but insists that the real sting was that the investigators had fabricated evidence. When that finally came out, he says, the group received a confidential settlement, but it did little to redress the feelings of outrage.

Another former policeman, Dr Michael Kennedy, says the commission was a political response to the police commissioner, Tony Lauer, bringing about the downfall of the then police minister, Ted Pickering.

The attorney-general, ministry and judiciary took little responsibility for the state of the force, Kennedy says, while the responsibility of the police rank-and-file grew to “the size of a Pacific driftnet”. “I don’t think the royal commission contributed anything to the reform process except to provide a template for double standards,” he says.

Chook Fowler put $200 into his pocket from Louis Bayeh. Chook was a lazy, good-for-nothing drunk. But he was put into the same category as Ray Williams and HIH.”McGann says that against the string of petty corrupt activities uncovered, “you have to look at what the government did and did not do with gambling and vice, over the decades. There have been direct links to Parliament for 50 or 60 years. That is hypocrisy.”The critics’ view is that the royal commission has left a demoralised police force, tarnished and rudderless, with limited operational effectiveness and the problem of corruption unsolved. Seven police officers have taken their lives since 2001, including two this year.”It highlights the fact that the structure no longer takes in the needs of the NSW police force,” says Mike Gallacher, the Opposition police spokesman, and a former internal affairs police officer.Gallacher believes, as does the NSW Police Commissioner, Ken Moroney, that the tentacles of corruption no longer spread to embrace entire squads or larger units. But it does not prevent low-level incidents of corruption and there are continuing nests of corruption.In its most recent report, the Police Integrity Commission said it had undertaken 21 major investigations in 2005-06. These dealt with extortion, theft, unauthorised disclosure of confidential government information and perverting the course of justice, police brutality and the handling of $250,000 stolen from automatic teller machines. The then police integrity commissioner, Terry Griffin, said there had been 51 investigations in the 12 months, compared with 44 in 2004-05, and the 1141 written complaints represented a 15 per cent increase.Moroney says all these reports are disappointing, but one of the significant statistics was the number of police who were reporting on other police. “You go back a decade and the number of informants who were police was 5 to 10 per cent,” he says. “In the Ombudsman’s last report, that figure was 49 per cent.”The mechanism for dealing with internal complaints has been expedited: “I have not been afraid to use a section 181D notice,” Moroney says.He believes there is a different mentality in the force. A video of the royal commission had been shown at a recent reunion dinner of the old criminal investigation branch. “It is part of our history. But the interesting thing is that when Chookie came onto the screen, everyone booed. That was a signal to the Fowlers and the Eades that those found to have acted corruptly would not be accepted.”
However, Moroney accepts that corruption is not a thing of the past. “In the contemporary period, there are huge monies to be made from the illicit drug environment. You are talking in some cases of millions of dollars. It is the greatest menace in society today. And the greatest menace to officers is drug money. That is why rotation of officers out of specialist squads on a regular basis is important.”Taking over as commissioner five years ago, he had brought a low-key “Uncle Ken” influence, sorely needed, and had had to balance the principles of police accountability against the public demand for law and order, and the task has been awkward.A senior counsel told the Herald this week that the focus on integrity, scrutiny of professional standards and attacks by defence lawyers meant that talented police prepared to do the dirty work were deterred. “In the old days the best and the brightest went into plain-clothes,” he said. “But when the police perceive that when they have to go the extra yard [to get convictions], they are crucified – ‘Why should I go to plain-clothes when I can just get some uniform job with a 12-hour shift, and a second job?”‘Clive Small, a former assistant commissioner who set up crime agencies and established the child protection unit, says that after so many detectives were disgraced in the royal commission, the police force sought to take the spotlight off detectives and put more of the onus of responsibility for crime control onto local area commands. Crime agencies had a continual battle to keep up to strength. Regionalising responsibility for crime control reflected a lack of understanding. “A lot of crime spreads through the metropolitan area, across the state and across the nation,” he says.Kennedy, now a university lecturer, says the “business model” approach is incompatible with good police work. “We cannot expect police to behave like they are in the private sector, where competence is measured in terms of productivity,” he says.Kennedy attended the recent CIB reunion dinner and sat at a table with former drug squad detectives who remained friends of Wayne Eade. He takes issue with Moroney‘s claim that people at the dinner made catcalls when Fowler came on screen. “No one supported Chook,” he says. “But the animosity of the crowd was directed straight at Justice Wood and his commission.”Clive Small, who was also at the dinner, says: “I think it is really a matter of interpretation who they were booing. There were things the royal commission did not take care about. There was a lot of collateral damage. And the implementation [of its recommendations] has been pretty ordinary.”

CRUSADER WHO MADE THE CALL

JOHN HATTON well remembers the audience on May 11, 1994, when he made his speech calling for a royal commission into the NSW Police Service. MPs were listening, of course, but it was a gallery above him, packed with the “top brass of the police force – the commissioner himself, the deputy commissioner, superintendents – they were an intimidating force on the Parliament”.

“They thought they could stare down the Labor Party support for my motion,” Hatton, now retired, says. “It was probably the best indicator of the way in which the police force thought they could control the agenda.”

Hatton won the day, putting paid to a claim by then police commissioner, Tony Lauer, that “systemic corruption” was “a figment of the political imagination”. Hearings started on November 24, 1994, and Justice James Wood delivered his final report on August 26, 1997.

Ten years later, Hatton believes he was vindicated. He says Wood was “the right man” to head the commission and the recruitment of interstate police was crucial, along with the decision to use phone taps and surveillance.

The 11 volumes of material Hatton gave the royal commission had been accumulated over 14 years, he says, from the time he had first spoken up. He had received information on illegal gambling, drug trafficking and police involvement with the mafia.

There had been earlier moves to address police corruption, including inquiries by the Independent Commission Against Corruption, but these had only scratched the surface. “I can remember on one occasion I reported a death threat which had to do with the McKay murder in Griffith and 48 hours later the bloke who had given the information was threatened by a shotgun at his door in Queensland,” Hatton says.

The royal commission came into being because Hatton and other independent MPs held the balance of power in Parliament. The Labor Party may have had high public motives, but also saw a chance to attack the Fahey government. Labor stipulated that an inquiry into police protection of pedophiles, previously in the hands of the ICAC, become part of the royal commission.

The process of gathering information was helped greatly by Trevor Haken, a detective who became an informer and covert investigator as part of a deal to avoid being prosecuted himself.

Hatton says Haken‘s entry was “out of the blue”. Though useful, in the long term it had had a detrimental effect on the fight against corruption. Living in fear and watching his back, Haken had provided “the greatest disincentive for someone coming forward to finger corruption in the system”.

Malcolm Brown

 

 

[divider_dotted]

 

i. ROBERT TAIT

Inspector Tait was a member stationed at Narrabri in 1996. Tait received a letter from the Royal Commission, which set out:

This is to notify you that evidence will be adduced shortly from a witness who is to be called to give evidence before the Royal Commission into the NSW Police Service to the effect that you did fail to report or investigate complaints of criminal conduct.

There is ample evidence to support the change in TAIT ‘s demeanour and behaviour following receipt of this letter. He was seen by the Police Psychologist and his own Doctor but on the 26-3-96 he shot himself in his office with his service revolver. He left a note clearly indicating how tortured he had become as a result of being named.

http://unionsafe.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/NileInquirySubmission.doc

[divider_dotted]