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Alan Keith ANDERSON

Alan Keith ANDERSON

AKA Ando 

Late of Avalon Beach, NSW  

Is Uncle to Stephen John ROWE, formerly of Liverpool Police Stn, NSWPF # 24729

 

NSW Police Training Centre – Redfern – Class #  119A

 

New South Wales Police Force

 

Uniform # 4356

Regd. #  13759 

 

Service:  From 12 May 1969   to   11 August 1994  =  25 years 2 Months, 30 days Service 

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 12 May 1969 ( aged 18 years, 11 months, 14 days )

Probationary Constable- appointed Monday 23 June 1969 ( aged 19 years, 0 months, 26 days )

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed 23 July 1974  

Detective – appointed ? ? ? ( NO )

Senior Constable – appointed 23 July 1978 

Leading Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? ( N/A )

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 7 July 1985

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed ? ? ?

 

Final Rank =  Sergeant 2nd Class – Retired Physically Unfit on 11 August 1994

 

Stations: Central GDs ( 1 Division )( 1969 ), Inner City Cycles ( 1 Division ), 21 Division, Water Police ( part time ), Water Police ( Broken Bay )( Full Time ) – Retirement – 11 August 1994

 

Retirement / Leaving age: = 44 years, 2 months, 14 days

Time in Retirement from Police: 4 years, 5 months, 5 days

 

Awards:  National Medal – granted 3 September 1985 ( Sgt )

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 16 June 1993 ( Former Sgt )

2nd Clasp to National Medal – granted 3 October 1995 ( Sgt )

 

 Born:  Sunday 28 May 1950

Died on:  Saturday 16 January 1999

Age:  48 years, 7 months, 19 days 

 

Cause:  Myocardial Infarction, had other issues over an 8 year period.

Event location:  at Home with family

Event date:  Illness since around 1991

 

Funeral date:  19 January 1999 @ 10am

Funeral location:  Crematorium, North Ryde, NSW 

Funeral Parlour: William Lee & Son, NSW

Buried at: Cremated

22 January 1999 @ noon:  Ashes spread at Pittwater – facing south into Pittwater off Lion Island ( where he and Deb met ) from a Police Launch.

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at:

Police Centre, Surry Hills, Wall of Remembrance:  Left Wall, Portion D13

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: 2019

 

 

ALAN is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED

 ALAN is mentioned on the Sydney Police Centre Wall of Remembrance ( Left Wall D13 )


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/ 

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/ 

Australian Police YouTube Channel 


 

Memorial Wall Touch Plate

https://www.australianpolice.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPC-Memorial-Wall-list-2020.pdf


 

Lion Island, off Pittwater, NSW where Alan ANDERSON met his wife - Deb ANDERSON. Alan's Ashes are scattered here.
Lion Island, off Pittwater, NSW where Alan ANDERSON met his wife – Deb ANDERSON. Alan’s Ashes are scattered here.

 

Alan Keith ANDERSON, Alan ANDERSON, Allan ANDERSON

Alan Keith ANDERSON, Alan ANDERSON, Allan ANDERSON
11 August 1994 – Last Shift

Alan Keith ANDERSON, Alan ANDERSON, Allan ANDERSON
23 June 1969. A fresh Probationary Constable.

 

Touch Plate at the Sydney Police Centre, Goulburn St, Sydney, for Sgt Alan Keith ANDERSON. Unfortunately Protocol got his Registered number wrong.
Touch Plate at the Sydney Police Centre, Goulburn St, Sydney, for Sgt Alan Keith ANDERSON. Unfortunately his Registered number is incorrect.  It is NOT 13579 which belongs to R.G. BOWN.
Alan Keith ANDERSON, NSWPF 13759

 

 

 


Nothing further, than what is recorded above, is known about this person at the time of publication and further information and photos would be appreciated.

 

Condolences to Deb and family.

 

 

Cal
5 December 2021


 

 

 




Shane David MURPHY

Shane David MURPHY

AKA SPUD

Late of  Lismore Heights, NSW

 

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  145

New South Wales Police Force

 

Regd. #  16737

 

Rank:  Commenced Academy Training – Tuesday 5 November 1974 ( aged 19 years, 8 months, 13 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed  16 December 1974 ( aged 19 years, 9 months, 23 days )

Constable – appointed 16 December 1975

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed 16 December 1983

?

Final Rank?

 

StationsWaverley ( 10 Division ) – ( mid 1970s ),  Bourke ( early 1980s ), Armidale ( 1990’s )

 

Service:  From 4 November 1974  to  3 November 199925 years Service

 

AwardsNational Medal – granted 15 November 1991  ( SenCon )

 

Born:  Wednesday  23 February 1955

Died on:  Wednesday  3 November 1999

Age44 yrs  8 mths  11 days

Cause?

Event location:   ?

Event date ? ? ?

 

Funeral date? ? 1999

Funeral location?

Wake location?

Funeral Parlour: ?

 

Buried at:  Bangalow Cemetery, Granuaille Cres, Bangalow, NSW

Lawn Section.  Grave number ???

Memorial located at: ?

 

Grave of Shane David MURPHY

SPUD is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Shane was injured in a helicopter accident and never fully recovered from those injuries. He was living in Lismore when he passed. His funeral was at Bangalow and he was a skilled artist.

 

Members of Class 145 who Trained at Redfern Police Station between 5 November 1974 – 16 December 1974 but this list does NOT contain the names of the Cadets who were in this Class.


 

Posted 30 March 2020

Updated 5 February 2024 with Class names

 




John Douglas HARDAKER

John Douglas HARDAKER

AKA  ‘ Hard Arse Hardaker ‘

Late of Moonbi, Armidale & Macksville, NSW

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  “possibly” 149

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  17125

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 25 August 1975

Constable – appointed 25 August 1976

Senior Constable – appointed 25 August 1984

?

Final Rank = ?

Stations?, Lakemba ( 13 Division ), Ashford, Gunnedah HWP, Cootamundra, Broken Hill, Armidale,

Service:  From ? ? pre Aug 1975?  to ? ? ?? years Service

Awards: National Medal – granted 17 March 1992 ( SenCon )

Born: Saturday  26 May 1956

Died on: Tuesday  22 June 1999

Age: 43yrs  27days

Cause: Motor Vehicle Collision – Upper Hunter region

Event location: ?

Event date: ?

Funeral date: Saturday  26? June 1999

Funeral location: ?

Wake location: ?

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

Memorial located at: ?

This is another picture of John Hardaker . He is the one on the right of the picture walking. Location - Broken Hill. i presume during the mad max filming also. Courtesy of his son Mitch Hardaker . John Hardaker passed away in 1999.
This is a picture of John Hardaker. He is the one on the right of the picture walking. Location – Broken Hill. I presume during the Mad Max 3 filming. Courtesy of his son Mitch Hardaker. John Hardaker passed away in 1999.

 

This picture is of John Hardaker and other officers. Location - Broken Hill, Mitch Hardaker, Johns son, was told that this was taken whilst Mad Max 3 was being filmed out there. You can see the old bus on the left of the picture.
Location – Broken Hill, Mitch Hardaker, John Hardakers son, was told that this was taken whilst Mad Max 3 was being filmed out there. You can see the old bus on the left of the picture. This picture is of John Hardaker and other officers.  Most probably Don BRATTAN with his back to camera and the large Crown ( Sgt 1/c ) on the left sleeve.

 

John is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


May they forever Rest In Peace


 

Nothing further is known, or can be found, about this man at the time of publication.

 

Cal

110919

 


 

 

 




Vincent GISSANE

 Vincent GISSANE

AKA  ?

Late of  ?

NSW Penrith Police Academy Class #  ? ? ?

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  7179

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 21 January 1952

Detective Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 1 January 1968

Detective Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 11 August 1975 ( Seniority date = 12 April 1975 – lost 4 months )

Does appear in the 1979 ‘Stud Book’ but NOT the 1879 – 1979 CIB Centenary book

Does NOT appear in the 1988 ‘Stud Book’

Final Rank = ?

Stations?, Phillip St ( 4 Division – 1970’s ), ‘possibly’ the Motor Squad ( C.I.B. )

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre Jan 1952?  to  ? ? 1982? =  30 years Service

Awards:   No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   Monday  14 May 1928, NSW

Died on:  Saturday  3 July 1999, NSW

Age:  71 yrs 1 mth 19 days

Cause:   Stroke

Event location:   ?

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Wake location:  ?

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:  Woronora Cemetery, Linden St, Sutherland, NSW

General Monumental Lawn, Jacaranda Monumental Lawn, 130

Lat:  -34.031662 Long:  151.047867

 

Vincent GISSANE

 

Vincent GISSANE

 

Vincent GISSANE

Vincent GISSANE
Vincent GISSANE being presented with a gift at his Send Off

Vincent GISSANE

Grave Location

 Memorial located at:   ?

[alert_yellow] VINCENT is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

May they forever Rest In Peace

 

Family Tree:  https://ancestors.familysearch.org/en/K2YJ-63L/sheila-agnes-t-gissane-1924-2001

Nothing further, at the time of publication, can be found on this man, his life or career.
Cal
9 Aug 2019




Edward Francis DOHERTY

 Edward Francis DOHERTY

aka Ted

( late of Corrimal )

NSW Police Cadet # 1365

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  9446

Rank: NSW Police Cadet – commenced 18 June 1957

Probationary Constable – appointed 30 October 1959

Constable 1st Class – appointed 30 October 1965

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 15 January 1975

Senior Sergeant – appointed 29 March 1985

Chief Inspector – retired

Stations?, Western District, Corrimal, Wollongong

ServiceFrom  18 June 1957  to 12 January 1996 = 39 years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 15 September 1980

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 10 September 1986

2nd Clasp to National Medal – granted 16 September 1993

Born:  30 October 1940

Died on:  13 July 1999

Cause:  Lung Cancer

Age:  58

Funeral date:  16 July 1999

Funeral location?

Buried at?

 

TED is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance * NOT JOB RELATED


 Funeral location?


 

A/O K. PEARCE A/PARAMEDIC J. WOODS CST 1/C GARY THOMPSON, SGT TED DOHERTY (WHITE OVERALLS), S/C RON FOX ?, SGT PETER LINCOLN (FAR RIGHT) 1984 ALBUM THREE - BULLI
A/O K. PEARCE A/PARAMEDIC J. WOODS
CST 1/C GARY THOMPSON, SGT TED DOHERTY (WHITE OVERALLS), S/C RON FOX ?, SGT PETER LINCOLN (FAR RIGHT)
1984
ALBUM THREE – BULLI

RESCUE SERVICES FIELD DAY. MT KEIRA EARLY 1983 ALBUM THREE - BULLI
RESCUE SERVICES FIELD DAY.
MT KEIRA
EARLY 1983
ALBUM THREE – BULLI

RESCUE AT WOLLONGONG LIGHT HOUSE A/O BOB LEWIS, CST MARK MULREADY, SENSGT TED DOHERTY, SENCON GARY THOMPSON, PARAMEDIC STEVE POLLARD, CST TONY FERRIS, A/O KEVIN DENT (POINTING), PARAMEDIC TERRY MORROW, A/O ANDREW GROVES (PARTIALLY HIDDEN ON LOWER RIGHT) 1988
RESCUE AT WOLLONGONG LIGHT HOUSE
A/O BOB LEWIS, CST MARK MULREADY, SENSGT TED DOHERTY, SENCON GARY THOMPSON, PARAMEDIC STEVE POLLARD, CST TONY FERRIS, A/O KEVIN DENT (POINTING), PARAMEDIC TERRY MORROW, A/O ANDREW GROVES (PARTIALLY HIDDEN ON LOWER RIGHT)
1988

BACK TO 60's NIGHT FUND RAISER FOR THE 20th AMBULANCE CONVENTION S/O BOB SMITH (BLACK SHIRT) WITH SENSGT TED DOHERTY 1988
BACK TO 60’s NIGHT FUND RAISER FOR THE 20th AMBULANCE CONVENTION
S/O BOB SMITH (BLACK SHIRT) WITH SENSGT TED DOHERTY
1988

6 MARCH 1982 SGT TED DOHERTY
6 MARCH 1982
SGT TED DOHERTY

6 MARCH 1982 SGT TED DOHERTY
6 MARCH 1982
SGT TED DOHERTY

 

Wollongong Police Rescue Squad leader, Sergeant Ted Doherty, 6 March 1982.
Wollongong Police Rescue Squad leader, Sergeant Ted Doherty, 6 March 1982.


Police And Community Youth Clubs Restructure

Hansard                         24 October 2002

POLICE AND COMMUNITY YOUTH CLUBS RESTRUCTURE
Mr MARTIN

    • (Bathurst) [12.31 p.m.]: As honourable members would be aware, the Minister for Police, the Hon. Michael Costa, recently restructured the police and community youth club [PCYC] organisation to decentralise it and make it more community based. The Government provided a $8 million package, $5 million of which was to boost capital upgrades and a trial of civilian support to free police from police work. I have two police and community youth clubs in my electorate, one in Lithgow and one in Bathurst. When I was a child I used the facilities of the club at Lithgow and later I was a member of its management board. Senior Constable Jeff Doherty was recently named Policeman of the Year for his work with the Bathurst Police and Community Youth Club. An article in the

Western Advocate

    • states:
    • Bathurst Police officer Jeff Doherty has been named “Policeman of the Year”.
    Senior Constable Doherty received the prestigious award from Police Commissioner Ken Moroney.
    • Senior Constable Doherty is the son of the late Ted Doherty, who was one of the police officers in charge of the police boys club in Lithgow when I was a child. He went on to be a very senior police officer, reaching the rank of inspector. Unfortunately, he died last year just after he retired. Jeff is carrying on the great Doherty tradition. The article continues:
      • Senior Constable Doherty has been working at Bathurst PCYC, working to help disadvantaged young people and change their attitudes towards the police service.
      • He joined the police force in what he likes to call “a family business”, his father and brother both being in the service.
      • In a little over 18 months, Senior Constable Doherty has made the PCYC Breakfast and Domestic Violence Programs into “a labour of love”.
    • Senior Constable Doherty has always been interested in kids and youth-related issues. It is great that he has been able to make the program a success. He has three young boys. He is not only passionate about his job, but he is extremely modest about his achievements. He was a bit embarrassed about winning this prestigious award. But those around him in the community know that it has been well earned. The article continues:
      • Senior Constable Doherty’s involvement in the PCYC is a valuable service to the police force, the kids involved and the greater community.
      • The PCYC’s breakfast program is for kids who either don’t attend or have trouble getting to school, while the domestic violence program targets children who either have experienced some kind of domestic abuse at home, or have been the direct victims of domestic attacks.
      • The breakfast program gives kids who may not receive breakfast normally a good meal to start the day and at least three days of school a week.
      • The domestic violence program offers counselling and support services as well as a place where the kids can have fun and forget about the trauma in their lives.
      • “The programs also give the kids the chance to actually interact with police officers when they aren’t in trouble,” Senior Constable Doherty said.
      • “Changing attitudes is very important.”
      • However, at the same time, Senior Constable Doherty believes that the PCYC is not as visible as it could be and that this could be limiting its effectiveness.
    Senior Constable Doherty is marketing the services of the Bathurst PCYC to the wider community. He believes, and I do not disagree with him, that it should be the top youth service in a country town. He has plans to open a youth drop-in centre next year where local kids can hang out in a safe and drug-free environment. This is critically important to keep kids away from an element that might lead them into trouble. It is this interaction by committed police officers such as Senior Constable Doherty through police and community youth clubs that are having an important impact on young lives in Bathurst. It underpins what a great and valuable assets PCYCs are to our communities and how they are benefiting from the restructure by the Minister. I am sure all members in this House join in congratulating Senior Constable Doherty on his prestigious award.

http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LA20021024025


Golfing Link To Departed Dad

Illawarra Mercury

Wednesday October 24, 2007

By COURTNEY TRENWITH

BARRY Doherty has found the ultimate way to remember his late dad each year – with a round of their favourite game, golf.

And while he’s swinging his sticks through the 18-hole course at Illawarra Country Golf Club, he’s also raising money to find a cure for the disease that killed his father -cancer.

Mr Doherty has participated in the annual Doherty and Doherti Memorial Golf Day since it started five years ago in memory of Ted Doherty and Joe Doherty, both police officers who died from cancer.

Ted Doherty was just 58 years old and barely into his retirement when he died from lung cancer in 1999.

Barry Doherty, from Mt Ousley, said the memorial golf day was a fitting way to remember his dad, who was a keen golfer before he died.

Ted Doherty had been a member of a group of police officers who played golf on the first Monday of each month, which they dubbed Destress Golf Day.

“It’s good memories because I used to play with dad in the Destress Day,” said Mr Doherty, who is also a police officer.

“It’s good that we can go as a memorial for dad and Joe, but it’s also sad too because it brings back memories.”

Ted Doherty’s grandsons Craig, 18, and Brad, 15, also get involved in the memorial day as caddies.

The event has so far raised more than $30,000 towards cancer research and Mr Doherty expected this year to be the biggest yet. Tee-off is at 7am on Monday following a barbecue breakfast.

Play costs $50 per person.

http://www.golfcaddies.com.au/golf-caddies-articles/2007/10/24/golfing-link-to-departed-dad/


 

Rare light-hearted moment for rescue squad mates

Author: By MICHELLE WEBSTER
Date: 11/11/2010
Illawarra Mercury
Section: News
Page: 6

IT takes a certain kind of strength to cope with the unique demands of being in the Illawarra’s police rescue unit.Often first on the scene at devastating accidents and horrific tragedies, no-one could argue that the men and women of rescue have one of the toughest jobs in the force.

Yesterday around 40 past and present Illawarra police rescue officers gathered at Wollongong’s Flagstaff Hill for a rare reunion to compare notes and take a walk down memory lane.

A member of the original 10-man Illawarra squad formed in the early ’70s, retired Sergeant John Byers was thrilled to catch up with former colleagues.

A 28-year rescue veteran, Mr Byers said the lifelong bonds formed between squad members helped the officers cope with the often heavy emotional burdens.

“It’s a job where you form very close associations with your mates because you’re in some interesting situations. A lot of times it’s dangerous but there’s also a lot of times where you see things which are unpalatable,” he said.

“It’s something you need to put your heart and soul into really.”

Taking the reins from Mr Byers in 1996, Illawarra Police Rescue Unit commander Sgt Manni Verzosa has held the top job for more than 14 years.

“It’s a passion, none of these people would be here if they didn’t have that passion,” he said.

The absence of rescue squad founding boss Chief Inspector Ted Doherty weighed heavily on his former colleagues, who spoke fondly of a man passionate about saving the lives of others.

Chief Insp Doherty lost a two-year battle with cancer in 1999, at the age of 58.

Squad co-founder, retired Senior Sergeant E.J. ‘Ted’ Beaver, who travelled from Maitland to reminisce and meet newer members, said the job had changed little since his time.

The group ended the reunion with a barbecue and a tour of the new police Lake Illawarra command headquarters at Oak Flats.

http://newsstore.smh.com.au/apps/viewDocument.ac;jsessionid=B52A5D6F3AFBA1067EDB4B667E5CA090?sy=afr&pb=all_ffx&dt=selectRange&dr=1month&so=relevance&sf=text&sf=headline&rc=10&rm=200&sp=brs&cls=1958&clsPage=1&docID=ILL1011119R6AI6L5SQL


Subiaco Football Club

HORSLEY WINS 2011 OUTRIDGE MEDAL

…….

Rounding out the top five vote getters were Michael Rix in 3rdposition on 93 votes (Ted Doherty Memorial Trophy), Danny Hughes in 4thposition on 75 votes (Colin Williams Trophy) and Rhett Kerr was 5thwith 60 votes (Neil Taylor Trophy).

……

http://www.sfclions.com.au/component/content/article.html?id=1158


 

 




Glen Anthony HUITSON

Glen Anthony HUITSON, BM VA

aka  Japalyi

Northern Territory Police Force

Regd. # 1520

Rank:  Brevet Sergeant

Stations?, O.I.C. – Adelaide River Police Stn

ServiceFrom  ? January 1987 to  3 August 2000 = 13+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 6 August 1999

Bravery Medal – BM – granted 14 February 2000

Valour Award & bar – VA for act performed in February 1999

Born:  20 November 1961, Bridgetown, W.A.

Died on:  3 August 2000

Cause:  Murdered – shot

Location:  Stuart Hwy & Old Bynoe Rd, Livingstone, N.T.

Age:  37

Funeral date:  Saturday  7 August 1999

Funeral location:  St Mary’s Cathedral, Darwin

Buried at:  Cremated.  Ashes scattered at Daly River Crossing, N.T.

Memorial Service:  Saturday  3 August 2019 ( 20th Anniversary ) 10.30am –

Glen Huitson Memorial, cnr Stuart Hwy & Old Bynoe Rd, Livingstone, N.T.

Glen HUITSON - NTPolice

 

Brevet Sergeant Glen HUITSON
Brevet Sergeant Glen HUITSON

[alert_green]GLEN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

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Brevet Sergeant Glen Huitson memorial, 3 August 2015

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???? GLEN HUITSON MEMORIAL ????

TWENTY YEAR REMEMBRANCE SERVICE

Saturday 3rd August 2019 will mark the 20th anniversary of the death of Brevet Sergeant Glen Huitson who was killed in the line of duty in 1999 whilst stationed at Adelaide River.

We will honour Glen with a gathering on Saturday 3rd August 2019 from 10.30am at the Glen Huitson Memorial, located at the corner of the Stuart Highway and Old Bynoe Road, Livingstone, N.T.

All current and former members are invited to join Glen’s family in remembering a husband, father, son, and workmate who was tragically taken from his family 20 years ago.

 

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Glen Anthony HUITSON – Inquest document

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Glen HUITSON joined the Northern Territory in January 1987.  He served in both Southern and Northern districts of the Northern Territory.

During his service in the Northern Territory Police, Glen Huitson received a Commendation from the Commissioner of Police on 17 March 1994 when he attended a disturbance at a Community near Alice Springs.  He disarmed a drunken person who was armed with a knife star picket and was threatening another person with a billy of boiling water.

In February of 1999 in Litchfield Park, Glen Huitson disarmed an armed man who was threatening the driver and passengers of a bus.  He received a Valour Award over this incident.

On 3 August 1999 Glen Huitson was on duty at a road block on the Stuart Highway, 60 kms south of Darwin, in bushland.

There were on watch for an armed offender who had already shot and wounded two other persons several kilometres away during the previous night.

The armed offender had managed to come through bush on one side of the road block where he opened fire with a .30/30 calibre rifle.  He fired the first round into the back of a civilian then a second shot at Huitson which struck him and was fatal.

For this incident he received the Australian Bravery Medal and a bar to his Valour Medal.

http://www.npm.org.au/huitson

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Glen Huitson Park

Front Inscription Glen Huitson Park This park was named in memory of the late Sgt. Glen Anthony Huitson BM,VA, Service No. 1520 on 3 August 2000. Sgt. Huitson was the officer in charge of the Adelaide River Police Station. He died on 3rd August 1999 as a result of gun shot wounds received in the execution of his duties whilst manning a roadblock on the corner of the Stuart Highway and Old Bynoe Road. Twice Decorated as a serving Police Officer, Glen Huitson lived his personal life with the same intensity, and was an integral part of community life in Adelaide River. His untimely death has a left a gap in this community which will never be filled. Glen is survived by his Widow Lisa and children Joey & Ruby. Citizens of the Coomalie Region joined with serving Members of the Northern Territory Police Force at this site on 3rd August 2001 to dedicate this memorial stone on the occasion of the second anniversary of Sgt. Huitson`s death. We honour the life and the achievements of a remarkable citizen. May He Rest In Peace
Glen HUITSON park – memorial plaque

This park was named in memory of the late Sgt. Glen Anthony Huitson BM, VA, Service No. 1520 on 3 August 2000.

Sgt. Huitson was the officer in charge of the Adelaide River Police Station.  He died on 3rd August 1999 as a result of gun shot wounds received in the execution of his duties whilst manning a roadblock on the corner of the Stuart Highway and Old Bynoe Road.

Twice Decorated as a serving Police Officer, Glen Huitson lived his personal life with the same intensity, and was an integral part of community life in Adelaide River.  His untimely death has left a gap in this community which will never be filled.  Glen is survived by his Widow Lisa and children Joey & Ruby.

Citizens of the Coomalie Region joined with serving Members of the Northern Territory Police Force at this site on 3rd August 2001 to dedicate this memorial stone on the occasion of the second anniversary of Sgt. Huitson’s death.

We honour the life and the achievements of a remarkable citizen.

May He Rest In Peace

http://www.gdaustralia.com/july2015photos.html/content/IMG_8914_large.html

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Huitson Shooting

“On 3rd August 1999, at about 10:45 am, there was a shooting incident on the Stuart Highway at the corner of Old Bynoe Road in the Darwin rural district. In the course of the incident, two persons were shot dead. One, Glen Anthony Huitson, was a Sergeant of police on duty at the time he was killed.” (Coroner’s Findings)

Glen was performing duties on a roadblock with his partner in Livingstone at the Old Bynoe Road Turn off on the Stuart Highway, 55 Kilometres south of Darwin. They were stopping traffic entering the police cordon following a shooting incident the previous evening when the offender Rodney Ansell ambushed the roadblock shooting Huitson fataly and wounding a civilian in the back with his 30/30 rifle. For this incident he received the Australia Bravery Medal and a bar to his Valour Medal posthumously.

On the night of the 2nd of August 1999 Rodney William Ansell and Cherrie Ann Hewson went to a property on Kentish Road. Ansell fired 6 shots at a caravan occupied by Stephen Robertson and Lee-Anne Musgrave who were minding the property. A neighbour, David Hobden, drove his truck over to see what was happening and Ansell fired through the windscreen blinding him. He ran to his residence and another occupant, Brian Williams, ran over to stop Ansell who was trying to steal Hobden’s truck. Ansell shot Williams in the hand. He lost an index finger and shots were fired at his house. Ansell appeared to be yelling about child abduction which was a delusion that had manifested itself during his amphetamine addiction. He fled into scrubland with a 30/30 rifle and Hobden’s shotgun.

Police responded and set up a forward command post in the area. Roadblocks were set up on the Stuart Highway and other roads. Sergeant Glen Huitson and Senior Constable James O’Brien manned the roadblock on the corner of Old Bynoe Road and the Stuart Highway armed with their Glock Pistols a shotgun and a .308 rifle. It appears that during the night Ansell had escaped the cordon but for some reason chose to sneak up on the roadblock at Old Bynoe Road. Hewson had left the area.

At about 10.45 am on the 3rd of August 1999 the roadblock at Old Bynoe Road was still in place. A local man had approached the road block to talk to the police members and was leaning on the police vehicle when suddenly he was shot in the pelvis from behind a large water pipe in nearby scrub. Huitson used the shotgun from the police car and O’Brien returned fire with his Glock pistol. Huitson was hit by a 30/30 round and fell to the ground. O’Brien reloaded the shotgun and returned fire. He called on Ansell to put his weapons down but he called back “Your all dead”.

In response to the gun battle two Territory Response Group vehicles raced to the scene. Just prior to the roadblock the first vehicle swerved and braked and was struck by the second vehicle causing it to roll over. As police exited both vehicles and began to take up positions Ansell got up on one knee to position himself to fire at the arriving police members. This left him exposed to fire from O’Brien and the shotgun fire finally stopped him. As the Coroner, Mr Wallace, said “There is little doubt his (O’Brien’s) bravery prevented further loss of life”.

It was later determined that there were seven entry wounds on his body from return fire from Huitson and O’Brien and numerous grazes. His covered position behind the water pipe and a small tree had protected Ansell from more serious injury until he was forced to change position.

Background – Glen Huitson

Glen Huitson joined the Northern Territory Police in January 1987, served in both Southern and Northern districts and was stationed at Adelaide River Police Station.

He received a Commendation from the Commissioner of Police on 17 March 1944 when he attended a disturbance at a Community near Alice Springs. He disarmed a drunken person who was armed with a knife star picket and was threatening another person with a billy of boiling water.

In February of 1999 in Litchfield Park Glen Huitson disarmed an armed man who was threatening the driver and passengers of a bus. He received a Valour Award over this incident.

Glen was survived by his wife Lisa and young children Joseph (2) and Ruby (6 months).

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HUITSON, Glen

This page only contains a eulogy.  If you have material that can be added contact the webmaster.
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR SERGEANT GLEN ANTHONY HUITSON
ST MARY’S CATHEDRAL, DARWIN, NORTHERN TERRITORY
SATURDAY 7 AUGUST 1999
EULOGY GIVEN BY COMMISSIONER BRIAN BATESSERGEANT GLEN HUITSON WAS A DEVOTED AND LOVING HUSBAND AND FATHER OF LISA, JOSEPH AND RUBY. I CAN ONLY CONVEY THE HEARTFELT CONDOLENCES AND SYMPATHY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE FORCE AND INDEED THE COMMUNITY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY TO GLEN’S WIFE, CHILDREN AND BOTH THEIR FAMILIES. WE WILL DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO HELP THEM, NOT ONLY THROUGH THIS TIME BUT IN THE TIME TO COME.IN HIS LETTER OF APPLICATION TO JOIN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE FORCE, SERGEANT GLEN HUITSON SAID, AND I QUOTE:“I WAS BORN ON 20 NOVEMBER 1961 IN BRIDGETOWN, WESTERN AUSTRALIA, THE OLDEST SON IN A FAMILY OF THREE. MY PARENTS OWNED AND OPERATED A SMALL TIN MINE ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF GREENBUSHES WHERE I LIVED FOR 12 YEARS. GREEN BUSHES WAS A GREAT ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH TO GROW UP AS A CHILD, BEING A SMALL TOWN SURROUNDED BY BUSH. WE SPENT MANY HOURS EXPLORING AND DISCOVERING NATURE.LOOKING BACK ON MY CHILDHOOD I AM GRATEFUL TO MY PARENTS FOR THE STRICT BUT FAIR METHOD OF INSTILLING IN ME A SET OF MORAL STANDARDS AND PRINCIPLES IN KEEPING WITH COMMUNITY IDEALS. THIS GUIDANCE WAS TO BENEFIT ME LATER IN LIFE.”

GLEN GOES ON TO TALK ABOUT HIS GROWING UP YEARS AND HIS EARLY EMPLOYMENT, PARTICULARLY WHEN THE FAMILY MOVED IN 1978 TO BUSSLETON WHERE HE WAS INVOLVED IN THE LOCAL FOOTBALL CLUB AS A PLAYER AND AN ADMINISTRATOR, AS A COACH AND UMPIRE AND FOR THREE YEARS AS A FIREMAN IN THE VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE AND WITH THE LOCAL ROSTRUM CLUB. TOWARDS THE END OF THIS LETTER OF APPLICATION GLEN SAYS, AND I AGAIN QUOTE:

“APPROXIMATELY FIVE YEARS AGO I DECIDED THAT IF AT THE AGE OF 25 I WAS STILL DISAPPOINTED WITH THE WAY MY CAREER WAS HEADING, THIS WOULD BE THE TIME TO MAKE A START IN A POSITION IN LIFE THAT I WOULD ENJOY. THE MOST HONEST WAY I FOUND TO FIND A CAREER I WANTED WAS TO SIT DOWN WITH A PEN AND PAPER AND WRITE DOWN JOBS IN WHICH I WOULD WORK FOR NO FINANCIAL REWARD. MY LIST CONTAINED THE FOLLOWING: FISHERIES INSPECTOR, CUSTOMS OFFICER, AMBULANCE OFFICER, WELFARE WORKER AND A POLICE OFFICER.

SINCE WRITING DOWN THAT LIST I HAVE WORKED TOWARDS EQUIPPING MYSELF FOR ONE OF THOSE POSITIONS. THIS HAS INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: BEING A FIREMAN WITH OUR LOCAL VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE, ACHIEVING A FIRST AID CERTIFICATE WITH A ST JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE, INVOLVING MYSELF HEAVILY IN COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, MAINLY THROUGH SPORT, AND INVOLVING MYSELF IN PUBLIC SPEAKING. AFTER READING ABOUT THE POSITION OF POLICE OFFICER FOR THE NORTHERN TERRITORY I DECIDED THAT THIS WOULD INDEED OFFER ME THE CAREER I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR. AS A POLICE OFFICER IN THE NORTHERN TERRITORY I WOULD BE ABLE TO MAKE A SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTION IN MAKING THE NORTHERN TERRITORY A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE IN, THEREBY ACHIEVING MY GOAL OF JOB SATISFACTION.”

ALL OF US WITHIN THE POLICE FORCE AND INDEED THE DEPARTMENT OF POLICE, FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES, ARE EXTREMELY SHOCKED BY THE DEATH OF SERGEANT GLEN HUITSON. HIS LOSS IS A TRAGEDY FOR THE POLICE SERVICE AND THERE ARE SIMPLY NO WORDS TO DESCRIBE THAT SENSE OF LOSS, THE WASTE AND THE TRAGEDY THAT THE WHOLE POLICE FAMILY FEELS TODAY.

I WOULD ALSO ACKNOWLEDGE THE PRESENCE HERE TODAY OF SERVING POLICE OFFICERS FROM ALL STATES AND TERRITORIES OF AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND.

IT IS TRITE TO SAY THAT ALL POLICE FAMILIES KNOW THE DANGERS OF POLICE WORK, BUT NOTHING CAN EVER PREPARE US FOR SOMETHING LIKE GLEN’S DEATH.

NO POLICE FORCE COULD BE MORE PROUD THAN TO HAVE IN ITS RANKS AN OFFICER OF THE CALIBRE OF GLEN HUITSON. HE TOUCHED AND AFFECTED SO MANY PEOPLE’S LIVES, NOT ONLY WITHIN THE POLICE FORCE BUT WITHIN THE COMMUNITY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY THAT HE SWORE TO SERVE AND PROTECT.

AND HE DID MORE THAN THAT – BECAUSE ON NO LESS THAN THREE OCCASIONS, THE THIRD TRAGICALLY RESULTING IN HIS DEATH, HE WAS CONFRONTED WITH LIFE-THREATENING SITUATIONS.

GLEN RECEIVED MY COMMENDATION FOR AN INCIDENT ON 17 MARCH 1994 WHEN HE ATTENDED A DISTURBANCE AT A COMMUNITY NEAR ALICE SPRINGS.

HE DISARMED A DRUNKEN PERSON WHO WAS ARMED WITH A KNIFE, STEEL BAR, NULLA NULLA AND A STAR PICKET. THE PERSON WAS THREATENING ANOTHER COMMUNITY MEMBER WITH A BILLY OF BOILING WATER. WITHOUT REGARD FOR HIS OWN SAFETY SERGEANT HUITSON PREVENTED THIS PERSON THROWING THE BOILING WATER BUT IN FACT WAS STRUCK AND COVERED IN BOILING WATER HIMSELF OVER HIS UPPER BACK, RIGHT UPPER ARM AND LEFT FOREARM. HIS QUICK ACTIONS ALLOWED OTHER POLICE OFFICERS TO RESTRAIN THE OFFENDER AND REMOVE HIM AS A THREAT TO THE COMMUNITY. THE BURNS GLEN RECEIVED CAUSED HIM CONSIDERABLE PAIN AND SUFFERING AND HE REQUIRED HOSPITAL TREATMENT.

AND THEN THERE WAS THE INCIDENT IN FEBRUARY THIS YEAR WHEN SERGEANT HUITSON DISARMED AN ARMED MAN WHO HAD JUMPED ON THE BULLBAR OF A TOURIST BUS IN LITCHFIELD PARK.

THE MAN WAS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS AND ARMED WITH A LOADED .22 RIFLE AND WAS THREATENING THE DRIVER AND PASSENGERS OF THE BUS ON BATCHELOR ROAD.

GLEN KNEW THAT HELP WAS ABOUT 15 MINUTES AWAY AND WAS DEEPLY CONCERNED FOR THE SAFETY OF THE DRIVER, PASSENGERS AND PASSING MOTORISTS. HE SINGLE-HANDEDLY ATTEMPTED TO DIRECT TRAFFIC, ENGAGE THE MAN IN CONVERSATION AND KEEP POLICE COMMUNICATIONS ADVISED OF THE SITUATION. HE THEN APPROACHED THE MAN TO DISTRACT HIS ATTENTION FROM THE BUS AND PASSENGERS, PLACING HIMSELF AT CONSIDERABLE RISK.

GLEN ENGAGED THE MAN IN CONVERSATION FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES AND EVENTUALLY CONVINCED HIM TO PLACE THE FIREARM ON THE BULLBAR OF THE BUS AND WALK A SHORT DISTANCE AWAY WHERE GLEN TACKLED HIM TO THE GROUND AND WAS THEN HELPED BY OTHER POLICE WHO HAD JUST ARRIVED. THIS WAS WITHOUT DOUBT AN OUTSTANDING EXAMPLE OF PERSONAL COURAGE, AND SERGEANT HUITSON WAS IN FACT DUE TO RECEIVE A VALOUR AWARD OVER THAT INCIDENT.

IN SERGEANT GLEN HUITSON THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE HAD A TRUE BUSH COPPER AND AN IDEAL ROLE MODEL FOR OTHER POLICE.

HE WAS A TOTAL PROFESSIONAL WHO GOT ALONG WITH COLLEAGUES AND THE PUBLIC ALIKE AND WAS EXTREMELY POPULAR WITH ABORIGINAL PEOPLE HE WORKED WITH, IN THE COMMUNITIES ACROSS THE TERRITORY. WHAT A TREMENDOUS LOSS HE IS, NOT ONLY TO THIS POLICE FORCE BUT TO THE TERRITORY.

IN CLOSING THERE IS PERHAPS NO BETTER WAY TO TALK ABOUT THIS OUTSTANDING AND COMPASSIONATE POLICE OFFICER THAN BY TELLING YOU ABOUT A REPORT HE RECENTLY SUBMITTED, AND I THINK IT IS IMPORTANT I SHARE THIS WITH YOU ALL.

GLEN HAD RESEARCHED THE HISTORY OF THE NORTHERN TERRITORY POLICE SERVICE AND HE FOUND MANY EXAMPLES OF UNRECOGNISED SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY BY FORMER MEMBERS, AND PARTICULARLY POLICE TRACKERS. HE SAID IN HIS MEMO THAT THIS UNRECOGNISED WORK WAS, AT THE TIME, NO DOUBT CONSIDERED TO BE JUST PART OF THE JOB, AND UNLESS YOU HAPPENED TO DIE ON DUTY OR REACHED A HIGH RANK, VERY LITTLE WAS DONE TO PRESERVE THE MEMORY OF THOSE MANY FORMER MEMBERS.

GLEN APPRECIATED THE SERENITY AND BEAUTY OF THE ADELAIDE RIVER WAR CEMETERY WHERE HE ALSO NOTICED SEVERAL PLAQUES DEDICATED TO MILITARY MEMBERS. HE HAD SEVERAL IDEAS TO HONOUR THE MEMORY OF POLICE MEMBERS, INCLUDING PLANTING TREES WITH PLAQUES DEDICATED TO MEMBERS AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A MEMORIAL AVENUE IN OUR POLICE COMPLEX, THE PETER McAULAY CENTRE. HE SUGGESTED NEW PLAQUES COULD BE DEDICATED ANNUALLY ON A SIGNIFICANT DAY, FOR EXAMPLE, POLICE REMEMBRANCE DAY. THERE TOO, HE EMPHASISED THE WHOLE COMMUNITY SHOULD BE INVITED AND INVOLVED.

IT IS MY INTENTION TO HONOUR GLEN’S SUGGESTIONS IN THAT REPORT, AND ALSO PAY TRIBUTE TO HIM, IN A WAY I FEEL SURE HE AND YOU WOULD APPROVE OF.

FINALLY, IN THE WORDS OF THE 13TH CHAPTER OF CORINTHIANS:

“THERE REMAINS THEN, FAITH, HOPE, LOVE, THESE THREE; BUT THE GREATEST OF THESE IS LOVE.”

 

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ABC News: Aboriginal communities to send reps to police officer’s funeral

Trudy and Rod Bray Fri, 6 Aug 1999 00:26:27 -0700

Fri, 6 Aug 1999 11:41 AEST
Aboriginal communities to send reps to police officer's
funeral.

The Gurindji Aboriginal people, from two communities south-west of Darwin, are sending
representatives to the funeral of a Northern Territory police officer.

Sergeant Glen Huitson was killed by Rodney William Ansell on Tuesday.

The sergeant's partner, Constable Jamie O'Brien, returned the fire, killing Ansell.

A Gurindji representative, Roslyn Frith, says the sergeant was given the skin name, Japalyi,
because of the community's respect and love for him.

She says he will be missed greatly.

"To the community he wasn't just a policeman, he was just another person who belonged to
the community," Ms Frith said.

"He got involved - like if there were ceremonies he'd go down and make sure everything was
alright.

"With the younger generation, he took them out. Like he was with the emergency services out
here, he went out fishing and hunting with them," she said.

� 1999 Australian Broadcasting Corporation

https://www.mail-archive.com/recoznet2@paradigm4.com.au/msg01295.html

 

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NT: Aborigines planning funeral for Ansell in Arnhem Land

AAP General News (Australia)
08-09-1999
NT: Aborigines planning funeral for Ansell in Arnhem Land

By Catharine Munro

DARWIN, Aug 9 AAP – Rod Ansell, the original Crocodile Dundee who shot dead a policeman last week, is expected be given an Aboriginal funeral in Arnhem Land.

Ansell, 44, was killed in a shootout with police after fatally wounding Sergeant Glen Huitson, 37, about 50km south of Darwin last Tuesday.

The violent deaths followed a 12-hour search for Ansell, who had shot at two houses in the area the previous night.

His motives remain a mystery and the case is being investigated by the coroner.

The events shocked Darwin, where Ansell was known as a buffalo hunter and a bushman who had been living on an Aboriginal-owned property in Arnhem Land, about 600km south-east of Darwin.

Ansell’s two sons, Shaun and Callum, are believed to have requested that an Aboriginal community at Mt Catt, near Bulman in central Arnhem Land, allow a funeral to be held on their grounds.

“The two boys said they want to have the funeral at Mt Catt,” said Lorna Martin, who works at the clinic at Bulman.

Ansell spent some time in the area in the 1980s as a buffalo catcher and continued to make frequent visits.

The service will interrupt an important ceremony being held at Mt Catt but arrangements were being made for the proceedings to be halted for one day for the funeral on Thursday, Mrs Martin said.

“Everybody said it’s okay,” she said.

Ansell’s parents, George and Eva, both in their 70s, are understood to have journeyed to the Northern Territory from their home in Murgon, 260km north-west of Brisbane, to say goodbye to their son.

Meanwhile, the widow of the slain policeman, Lisa, said she had just returned from Daly River Crossing, where she had scattered her husband’s ashes.

Mrs Huitson told reporters she had spent three happy years there with Sgt Huitson and they had taken their son, Joseph, two and Ruby, six months, back there to be baptised.

“It was just a special place for us,” Mrs Huitson said.

Sgt Huitson‘s brother Bevan, sister Julie and parents Carole and John attended a press conference to thank the police and the people of the NT for their support.

“We are absolutely amazed at your generosity, the funds raised, the flowers sent and the well wishes and toys for Joseph and Ruby,” Bevan Huitson said.
http://crownfd.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/nt-aborigines-planning-funeral-for.html

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Rod Ansell - The inspiration behind Crocodile Dundee
Rod Ansell – The inspiration behind Crocodile Dundee

 

 

 

The day the real Crocodile Dundee Rod Ansell was shot dead

Rod Ansell in the Outback in 1987.
Rod Ansell in the Outback in 1987.

ROD Ansell’s amazing story of Outback survival is one many Australians know – although they’ve probably never heard of his name.

As strong as an ox and as brave as a lion, the blond haired, barefoot bushman survived for more than seven weeks on a small island at the mouth of a crocodile-infested river in the remote Northern Territory, sleeping up a tree with a brown snake at night to avoid the salties lurking below.

His story was the inspiration for the 1986 film Crocodile Dundee. But the film only tells part of the story of Ansell’s wild life.

More than a decade after his tale of survival brought fame and fortune to actor Paul Hogan, the real Crocodile Dundee was shot dead by police after a drug-crazed rampage that saw a police officer killed and three other men wounded.

***

STRONG men in uniform broke down on the side of the Stuart Highway the day Territory police officer Glen Huitson was shot dead in a gun battle with Rod Ansell.

It was like a scene from a cops and robbers movie.

But nobody won.

Sergeant Huitson was gunned down at a roadblock in bushland 60km south of Darwin by Ansell, who had been on the run from police.

Ansell was shot in the chest as Senior Constable James O’Brien returned fire.

“The only verbal communication I had with the gunman was when I was reloading the shotgun for the first time,” the surviving officer, who has never spoken openly about the ordeal, said in a statement almost 15 years ago.

“I called out to him to put his weapons down. He called back, ‘You’re all dead‘.”

Ansell was deranged and wired on speed, more than 20 years after he emerged from the wild, a handsome young hunter armed only with a knife, a gun and a story to tell, his boat having capsized on the remote Victoria River.

His crazed life came to an end on August 3, 1999, but not before he had gunned down a police officer, leaving two young children to grow up without a father.

Northern Territory police say they lost “an all-round good bloke” that day.

Sgt Huitson’s family was robbed of much more.

In 1994, Sgt Huitson had been commended for bravery after arresting a knife-wielding drunk man – who was also armed with a star picket and a billy of boiling water in a bid to harm another person – at a community near Alice Springs.

He received a Valour Award after he talked delusional man Wayne Costan – who had tried to hijack a tourist coach with a sawn-off .22 rifle – into dropping the weapon, before tackling him to the ground at Litchfield Park in February 1999.

Six months later Sgt Huitson was killed, aged 37.

His then-infant daughter, Ruby, and five-year-old son, Joseph, grew up without their dad.

His widow, Lisa, took home her husband’s posthumous Australia Bravery Medal and a broken heart.

Former NT Police assistant commissioner John Daulby was among those who raced out to the double killing.

“Everyone was stunned,” he said. “It was just a tragedy.”

 Darwin police officer Glen Huitson was one of two policemen shot by gunman Rod Ansell.

“The grief at the scene is something that sticks with me – grown men in tears.”

Ansell had wounded two men on a shooting spree in Darwin and fled into the bush, raving mad, on the night of August 2, 1999.

He was convinced members of the Freemasons had kidnapped his sons – Callum, then aged 20, and Shawn, 18.

His girlfriend, Cherie Ann Hewson, had told him that as a child she had witnessed the sacrifice of young girls that her family – members of the secret medieval fraternity – “brought out of the woods”. They were bound, raped and slaughtered, she said.

The shared paranoia came to a head when Ms Hewson claimed she spotted three bow hunters, dressed in camouflage with night vision goggles, near their bush camp.

NT Coroner Dick Wallace would later say the “wretched drivel” was at the root of Ansell‘s madness, after the couple visited mates Steven Robinson and his partner, Lee-Anne Musgrave, on a property at Noonamah, about 50km south of Darwin.

Ansell fired six shots at their caravan on Kentish Rd.

Resident David Hobden jumped in his truck, armed with his double-barrel shotty, and went to investigate the shootings. He lost an eye when Ansell put a bullet through the windscreen of his truck.

He ran to alert his neighbour, Brian Williams, who “waxed wrath” at the state of his mate’s face and grabbed a baseball bat.

He charged at Ansell, who was trying to steal Mr Hobden’s truck.

 “I smacked him straight down the forehead, and that’s when he blew my hand off,” Mr Williams told police.

“He was going on about stealing his children, and Freemasons, and being a baby killer … oh, just, he was mad, mate.”

Ansell fired shots at the Williams‘ house.

Then he ran away, his rifle in one hand and Mr Hobden‘s shotgun in the other.

Ms Hewson disappeared before the police shootout. Some feared she had committed suicide.

About 11pm, Territory Response Group sent two troop carriers with six cops in each to set up a command post. They manned the north roadblock.

Adelaide River police station boss Sgt Huitson and his second-in-charge, Sen-Const O’Brien, guarded the south cordon – at the corner of Old Bynoe Rd – with a pistol each, a 12-gauge shotgun and standard police issue .308 rifle.

About 10.30am the next day, a removals worker named Jonathan Anthonysz was leaning on the cop car, chatting to the officers when a bullet blew a hole “the size of a baseball” in his pelvis.

He was flung forward, screaming, on to the ground.

Mr Anthonysz’s colleague – David Hobden‘s brother, Anthony – dragged him out of view as Snr-Const. O’Brien covered them.

The shots were coming from light scrub behind a roadside water pipe.

The cunning fugitive had sneaked through the bush and was hidden by dappled tree shadows.

In his statement, Snr-Const O’Brien said: “I heard Glen shout out, ‘Get on the ground’.

I swung round to look over the boot of the car with my Glock drawn …

“I saw my shots hit the ground close to where (Ansell) was,” he said.

Sgt Huitson called TRG for help and grabbed a 12-gauge shotgun.

He fired a shot through the windows of the police car and two shots over the roof.

But a bullet from Ansell‘s .30-30 lever-action rifle ricocheted off the top of the metal door and struck him in the abdomen.

His bulletproof vest hadn’t been properly fastened. The bullet tore through a velcro strap that should have been covered by a Kevlar panel.

Sgt Huitson fell, landing on top of the shotgun.

Snr-Const O’Brien, who wasn’t wearing a vest, dodged a bullet and rolled his bleeding colleague off the shotgun, reloaded it and returned fire.

“I realised unless TRG arrived I could run out of ammunition, in which case I would have to retreat with the others,” he said.

“I loaded two more rounds, looked up and saw the gunman wriggling forward.

“I heard a sound like a match being struck just past the right side of my head.”

Then the TRG troop carriers came hurtling down the highway.

The first driver hit the brakes and swerved as he heard gun fire – the 4WD rolled when the second car crashed into it, unable to stop in time.

Ansell got up on one knee and began lining up the cops, who were crawling out of the vehicle.

Snr-Const O’Brien got a clear shot.

The autopsy showed 33 bullet wounds and grazes to Ansell‘s body.

Two were fatal. One shot had ripped through his aorta.

He fell face down in the dirt.

Sgt Huitson was declared dead after being rushed to Royal Darwin Hospital.

Snr-Const O’Brien was scrutinised and cleared of any wrongdoing after a rigorous police investigation.

His actions were praised as “simply outstanding” when Magistrate Wallace handed down his coronial findings in September 2000.

“If he felt any fear, it seems to have been submerged by his concern for his wounded colleague and others,” he said. “There can be little doubt his bravery prevented further loss of life.”

Ms Hewson handed herself in to Queensland police four days later.

Evidence that Ansell clung to the back of a road train and escaped the roadblocks fuelled a question that would never be answered – why would a skilled bushman give up his ticket to freedom and return to gun down police when he could have slipped away?

IT was no secret the 44-year-old buffalo hunter and grazier was bitter.

Writer Robert Milliken, who spent time with Ansell while working on projects in the NT, said Ansell never saw a penny for the myth surrounding his tangled life, despite being the inspiration for the main character in Crocodile Dundee, which propelled actor Paul Hogan to fame in 1986.

Ansell blamed his troubles on a Federal Government program to wipe out wild buffalo, his livelihood, to eradicate tuberculosis from the cattle industry. He had told reporters he was living on unemployment benefits and “bush tucker”.

Magistrate Wallace heard Ansell believed police and the government were against him.

He had moved to the Territory aged 15 from the small town of Murgon, 270km north of Brisbane, in country Queensland.

The ordeal that brought him fame happened when he took a fishing trip in a motorboat on the Victoria River in May 1977.

When the boat sank, he jumped in a dinghy and salvaged his two eight-week-old bull terriers, a rifle, a knife, some canned food and bedding. The tinny drifted out to sea, washing up on a small island at the mouth of the Fitzmaurice River.

He slept in the fork of a tree, out of reach of crocodiles, at night, but shared the branches with a brown tree snake.

Ansell never counted on being rescued. He roamed for seven weeks before stumbling on two Aboriginal stockmen and their boss.

But he kept the adventure under his hat – fearing his recklessness would upset his mother – until media got hold of the yarn.

Dubbed the “modern day Robinson Crusoe”, Ansell said: “I think if you come through in one piece, then nothing else really matters.

“It’s like going out to shoot a kangaroo.

“You don’t come back and say you missed by half an inch – you either got him or you didn’t.”

Mr Milliken described Ansell as “strikingly handsome with blond hair, blue eyes and bare feet” when he met him in 1988. It was the year Ansell was named Territorian of the Year for his role in putting the Top End on the map.

At the time, he lived with his wife, Joanne van Os, and their two small sons on their buffalo farm at Melaleuca, between Darwin and Kakadu.

“He was charming,” Mr Milliken said.

“He seems never to have worn shoes, even when travelling on aircraft and staying in city hotels at the height of his fame.

“The press went mad over his story and no one seemed to mind if the details grew ever more incredible.

“A hero had been born.”

He said Ansell once told British TV personality Michael Parkinson he preferred to sleep on the floor of his five-star Sydney hotel in his swag rather than in the kingsize bed.

Ansell’s Parkinson interview sparked the interest of Hogan and led to the creation of Mick “Crocodile” Dundee.

But the fame took its toll on Ansell’s personal life. His marriage disintegrated.

In 1992, he was convicted of cattle rustling and assaulting the owner of a cattle station in Arnhem Land.

Police raided Melaleuca. He eventually lost the property.

For more than a year before his death, Ansell had been living with Ms Hewson, a former tour guide, on a billabong at the Aboriginal outstation Urapunga, on the Roper River, about 480km south of Darwin.

He was initiated as a white member of local Aboriginal clan and got on well with the Ngukkur community. But the spiral into a drug-induced psychosis continued as Ansell smoked cannabis and injected amphetamines with vengeance.

“I didn’t know Ansell really well, but I’d met him a few times,” long-time Territorian and former reporter Chips Mackinolty said.

“He was tough as nails, the sort of person that could do what he said he did, and did do it when he was working as a stockman, as a wrangler and that stuff.

“He was an extraordinary person at that level, but it ended up in tears.”

Mr Mackinolty was heading to Katherine and had been allowed through the roadblock earlier on the day the killing happened.

“It was one of those ‘goose steps on your own grave’ sort of feelings – you were very close to what ended up being a very awful thing.

“It’s always sad when the threat of poverty and frustrated ambition get mixed up and send people off the edge, big time,” Mr Mackinolty said.

“I was completely shocked, as were a lot of people who knew him in the earlier years.”

In his coronial ruling, Magistrate Wallace said the contrast between the “original Crocodile Dundee who appeared on television” and the emaciated drug addict – who weighed just 53kg when he opened fire on police – could hardly be more marked.

“His drug abuse rendered his mind so addled he believed fantasies that a child would dismiss with contempt,” he said.

“His pointless and destructive actions caused immediate agony and suffering to the men he wounded.”

The infamous rampage means Ansell is remembered in Darwin not as a knockabout bushman, but as the man who murdered a heroic cop.

 

 

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Sergeant Glen Huitson

Glen Huitson - roadside crossAlong the side of the Stuart Highway, heading to Batchelor and points south, there’s a turnoff at Old Bynoe Road. On this corner there’s a simple cross like far too many you see on Australian roads.  This one is the same in that it marks the point where a loved one lost his or her life. The ever-present, neatly-arrayed booze bottles testify to the fact that his friends have not forgotten him.

However this site is also different. It doesn’t mark a road fatality, but rather the death of a police officer on duty, Sergeant Glen Anthony Huitson, killed protecting the community from a man who had gone on an overnight shooting spree.  The further tragedy is that this death, left a young widow and two little children who will never know their father: the risks that police face daily in doing their duty.

The Policeman from the bush
The Policeman from the bush

By all accounts Glen Huitson was a quietly impressive young man and an excellent policeman who was soon to receive the Police Valour medal, given posthumously to his wife, Lisa. Huitson had worked out bush and was well respected by the communities he’d worked in. Stationed at Adelaide River at the time of the shooting, Huitson is also remembered by a memorial there.

Across the new railway track on the Old Bynoe Road, there’s a different kind of memorial from the simple cross with beer bottles. It’s the official memorial in Glen Huitson Park. It has an impressively large stone brought from a distance and plaques to honour the man and the police officer.

Roadside memorial stone
Roadside memorial stone

I recognise that another family lost a person they’d loved that day. No doubt as they pass Huitson’s memorial they think of their own loved one. However for me this is about the loss of a man doing his duty. As you go about your routines today, please remember all those police officers who daily risk their lives to protect us.

I leave you with Glen Huitson’s eulogy, testifying to his concern for others and his true community spirit. Rest in Peace, Sergeant Glen Huitson, you did your duty well.

 

On the Darwin Esplanade, near the Cenotaph, there’s is a memorial to all Northern Territory Police and Emergency Services workers who gave their lives in service to the community.
On the Darwin Esplanade, near the Cenotaph, there’s is a memorial to all Northern Territory Police and Emergency Services workers who gave their lives in service to the community.

4 thoughts on “Sergeant Glen Huitson”

  1. What a wonderful tribute …thank you for bringing us this introduction to a man without whom the world is a poorer place.

    • Thanks Chris. It happened a couple of years after we got here and was a great tragedy. I really feel for his family and the loss of a good man.

  2. I stumbled across this post today… For some reason Glen came to my mind, and I did a search. Maybe this all came about as I saw a photo of his gorgeous sister and his 2 beautiful children.
    Glen was a friend and I know his family well. He was a great man and it was an extremely sad day the day he left this life.

    • hi Vicki, sorry I hadn’t realised I’d omitted to reply. Thanks for sharing…it was indeed a tragic day for all concerned…we have a connection through the other officer that day though we didn’t know him at the time.

https://troppont.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/sergeant-glen-huitson/

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Family and friends pay tribute to brave officer

IT was 15 years on Sunday since one of NT Police’s darkest days.

On August 3, 1999 Brevet Sergeant Glen Anthony Huitson was manning a roadblock on the Stuart Highway at Livingstone when he was shot and killed by “Crocodile Dundee” Rod Ansell.

Ansell was then hit with fatal return fire by Sgt Huitson’s partner, Senior Constable Jamie O’Brien.

He was the first policeman to be murdered on duty in the Territory for 47 years, and to this date he remains the last.

Sgt Huitson’s wife Lisa said the anniversary was always emotional.

“But he’s always with us and it’s good to see his colleagues and friends return,” she said.

“It’s nice to come back.”

The couple’s children Joe and Ruby were just 2 and 10 months old when their father was killed.

Police Commissioner John McRoberts said the memorial was a sobering reminder of the dangers of policing.

“It’s really good to pay our respects to a man who died doing what he loved and wanted to do – which was serve and protect,” he said.

Sgt Huitson joined the NT Police in January 1987. He served in both Southern and Northern districts.

During his service, he received a Commendation from the Commissioner of Police in March 1994 when he attended a disturbance at a community near Alice Springs. He disarmed a drunk armed with a knife and star picket, and was threatening another person with a billy of boiling water.

Then in February of 1999 in Litchfield Park, he disarmed an armed man who was threatening the driver and passengers of a bus. He received a Valour Award over this incident.

For the incident which cost him his life, he was awarded the Australia Bravery Medal, and a bar to his Valour Medal.

http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/family-and-friends-pay-tribute-to-brave-officer/story-fnk0b1zt-1227012766662

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David BELL

David BELL

aka  Dave

 Redfern Police Academy Class # 132

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 15502

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at Redfern Police Academy on Monday 31 July 1972

Probationary Constable – appointed 11 September 1972

Constable – appointed 11 September 1973

Constable 1st Class – appointed 11 September 1977

Senior Constable – appointed 11 September 1981

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 31 December 1987

Senior Sergeant – appointed 28 August 1996

 

Final Rank:  Senior Sergeant

 

Stations?, 24 Division ( Sutherland ), Miranda,

28 July 1974 transferred to the metropolitan special traffic patrol car crew until 30 September 1975,

East Maitland ( G.D’s ),

Maitland ( G.D’s from 25 June 1988 ),

Patrol Tactician – Cessnock ( 28 August 1996 – ),

Sector Supervisor – Cessnock

 

ServiceFrom  31 July 1972  to 25 October 1999 = 27 years, 2 months, 24 days Service

Awards:   National Medal – granted 14 December 1988

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 28 May 1999

1989 commendation for his devoted duty during the Newcastle earthquake.

 

Born:  Sunday  13 March 1949

Died on:  Monday  25 October 1999

Cause:  Fatal heart attack in the meal room of Cessnock Police Station

Age:  50 years, 7 months, 12 days

 

Funeral date:  Thursday  28 October 1999

Funeral location:  the church his father helped build in Mayfield.

 

Buried at:  Cremated at Beresfield Crematorium, NSW

Memorial location:

Unknown with David Bell
Unknown with David Bell

 

David Bell

Memorial stone for David Bell at Beresfield Crematorium
Memorial stone for David Bell at Beresfield Crematorium

DAVE is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  * BUT SHOULD BE

As of May 2021, Dave Bell is still NOT Mentioned on the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.


 

 

Senior Sergeant Dave Bell was the Sector Supervisor at Cessnock Police Station.

On Monday 25 October 1999 he suffered a fatal heart attack in the meal room while he, Senior Constable Mick Wood & Constable Tracey Ward were having morning tea together.

Dave is still not on the list for remembrance day, despite numerous requests/inquiries with Northern Region.


Handshake At End Of Long Arm Of The Law

Newcastle Herald

Thursday April 6, 2000

Andrew Kelly

FIFTY Lower Hunter police and community members were honoured yesterday in a ceremony at Maitland Town Hall.

Awards were presented to several officers for bravery and outstanding policing, and to members of the community who have given up their time to help the police.

Hunter Region police commander Terry Collins presented six officers with the first clasp to the National Medal, recognising 25 years service, including a posthumous honour to Senior Sergeant Dave Bell, who died on duty at Cessnock last October.


 

Parliament of New South Wales

About this Item
Speakers Hickey Mr Kerry; Whelan Mr Paul
Business Private Members Statements, Condolence

28 October 1999

DEATH OF SENIOR SERGEANT DAVID BELL

Mr HICKEY (Cessnock) [11.45 a.m.]: I bring to the attention of honourable members the death of Senior Sergeant Dave Bell at Cessnock police station on Monday 25 October. I extend my sincere sympathies to his wife, Noelene, and their four daughters. The Cessnock community has lost a truly remarkable police officer who was extremely dedicated to his position as team co-ordinator and worked very hard building up the morale of the men around him. I first met Dave Bell at the Cessnock police station in early April and was impressed by his positive attitude to his team and his devotion to the community. He was quick to point out that if any problems existed with manning levels, as had been constantly heralded by the former Mayor of Cessnock, Merv Pine, those problems lay with District Inspector Phelps for not allocating the necessary manpower to Cessnock.

Merv Pine’s continued concern in itself had placed pressure upon those at the Cessnock police station to perform above and beyond the normal benchmark, first to appease the mayor and, second, to avoid pressure being applied to the men at the station. Dave Bell raised the issues that I had referred to him: the manning of the station and police carrying out the duties of corrective services officers during court sitting days. He suggested that it would be more beneficial for front-line policing if those duties were returned to corrective services officers.

While being shown around the station by Dave I asked him about the job of escorting prisoners from the holding bays to the court, which I considered left the police in a dangerous situation. Dave was concerned about the safety of the officers but suggested that I should raise the matter with the Minister and the department. Dave Bell’s record shows clearly what the community knew already: that he was a dedicated officer.

Senior Sergeant David Bell joined the New South Wales Police Service on 31 July 1972. After attending the Redfern academy he was stationed at No. 24 division and later worked at Miranda, where he performed highway patrol and general duties. He was promoted to the rank of constable on 11 September 1973. On 28 July 1974 Senior Sergeant Bell was transferred to duty on the metropolitan special traffic patrol car crew, and performed duties in that role until 30 September 1975, when he accepted a transfer to Maitland highway patrol. In 1977 he was promoted to the rank of constable first-class, and he devoted 11 years to this specialist class of duty. In 1981 he was promoted to the rank of senior constable.

Senior Sergeant Bell transferred to East Maitland police station in a general duties role, and in the same year achieved the rank of sergeant third-class. On 25 June 1988 he was transferred to Maitland station, where he served the community for eight years. On 14 December 1988 he received the National Medal, which rewarded him for 15 years of police service. The following year he received a commendation for his devoted duty during the Newcastle earthquake. On 28 August 1996 Sergeant Bell was promoted to the rank of senior sergeant when he took up the position of patrol tactician at Cessnock police station. He later performed general duties.

At the time of his passing Senior Sergeant David Bell was stationed at Cessnock station as the team co-ordinator for all staff at Cessnock and outlying stations. Affectionately referred to by police and colleagues as “Dave“, Senior Sergeant Bell had a unique form of respect from police of all ranks. He was a great believer in preserving the traditional ideals, attitudes and respect instilled in police during their early police days. He shared a concern for each and every person at the station, as well as the community in general. His workmates have described him as a true gentleman and scholar.

In the short time I knew Dave, I realised that was completely true. He expected from his troops a high standard of professionalism but showed equal fairness in his discipline. Nothing was a problem to him, especially when it came to his men. His door was open at all times to anyone with a concern or problem, and his confidentiality was always assured to all. I believe that, because of Dave Bell’s service to the Cessnock community, his memory should be highlighted.

Mr WHELAN (Strathfield – Minister for Police) [11.50 a.m.]: The untimely passing of Sergeant David Bell at the age of 50 is tragic. It is, indeed, a great tragedy for his wife, Noelene, and his four daughters and granddaughter. David was much loved, not only by his family but by everyone who serves in the Police Service in the area in which he worked. He was a great and strong member of the community. Yesterday I spoke to his widow and expressed sympathy for the untimely loss of such a dedicated officer. It appears to be true that the harder one works the more dedicated one becomes and that often leads to an early and untimely death. That seems to be what happened in this case.

Dave worked very hard in both the community and the Police Service. He was well respected and revered by other police for the work he did. This is a sad time. Such is the depth of feeling in the community about the untimely passing of such a wonderful police officer who was dedicated to law enforcement in New South Wales and spent so much time looking after the community that I have asked the Deputy-Speaker to represent me at Dave’s funeral today. He will be sadly missed by everyone in the New South Wales Police Service.

http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LA19991028014




Jonathan PATON

Jonathan PATON

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  ?     – Resigned

Stations:  Queanbeyan

Service:  From  to  ? 1999

Awards:  ?

Born:  ?

Died:  15 December 1999

Cause:  Suicide – drowning – Queanbeyan River

Age: ?

Funeral date:  24 December 1999

Funeral location:  ?

Buried at:  ?

 

[alert_yellow]Johnathon is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]

Jonathan Paton worked at Queanbeyan Police Station and resigned from the police about six weeks before he died.
He was deeply disturbed ( emotionally ) and started hearing voices. 

He committed suicide by drowning himself in the Queanbeyan River on the 15 December 1999.
His funeral was held on Christmas Eve that year.
FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS MAN.



Rachael Gai WILSON

Rachael Gai Wilson

Constable

New South Wales Police Force

Class 266

Registered #:  ?????

Died at Rydalmere, NSW,

Service:  From ? ? 1996 to 22 September 1999 = 3 years Service

24 old

Suicide – shot – Service Pistol to chest

Stationed:  Mt Druitt, Quaker’s Hill, Seven Hills, Penrith, Ermington Police Station – Plain clothes – Anti Theft Squad – Death

Funeral:  Winston Hills on 28 September 1999

Rachael Gail WILSON, Rachael WILSON

Rachael was a plain clothes constable performing proactive duties at Ermington, NSW.


Rachael suffered psychological injuries which were later declined by the insurer.

She slipped into a greater depression and subsequently died from a self inflicted gun shot wound from her own Service weapon, whilst On Duty, after she drove to Eric Primrose Reserve, Rydalmere.

 

A beautiful smile no longer shines, but her light lives on in the hearts of her loved ones and friends.

May Rachael forever Rest In Peace.