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Graeme Andrew ADAMS

Graeme Andrew ADAMS

Late of Leichardt

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  21746[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 7 December 1984

Constable – appointed 8 December 1985

Final Rank = ?

Stations?, Prosecutors – Resigned

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre December 1984?  to  ? ? 1991 7 years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born:   10 February 1963

Disappeared:   6 June 2000

Body recovered:   12 July 2000

Died on:  6 or 7 June 2000

Age:  37

Cause:   Murdered – shot

Event location:  Hawkesbury River near Dangar Island

Event date:   ?

Funeral date:   ? ? ?

Funeral location:   ?

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   ?

 Memorial located at:   ?

 

 

[alert_blue]GRAEME is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

 

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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 Strike Force Sari headed up the investigation into this murder.
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AAP General News (Australia)
08-30-2000
NSW: Man charged with murder of former police officer.

A court’s been told a former Sydney policeman whose body was found dumped in a river was killed to stop him earning a share of a lucrative Olympic-related security contract.

GRAEME ADAMS’ business partner, 29-year-old SIMON CHRISTOPHER CROWTHER-WILKINSON, was charged with his murder this morning.

According to police facts tendered to Manly Court, Mr ADAMS was a silent stakeholder in CROWTHER-WILKINSON’S firm Excell Security Pty Ltd.

The company had recently won a $1.6 million contract to supply staff to security giant and Olympic sub-contractor Chubb Security Australia.

But police allege that rather than share the proceeds, CROWTHER-WILKINSON and another associate shot and killed Mr ADAMS, wrapped him in chains and dumped him in the Hawkesbury River, north of Sydney, on June 6 or 7.

The accused man has been refused bail and will appear in Central Local Court on September 6.

http://leafagecom.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/nsw-man-charged-with-murder-of-former.html

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08-30-2000
NSW: Ex policeman murdered over Oly security contract, court told

By John Kidman, Crime Reporter

SYDNEY, Aug 30 AAP – A former Sydney policeman whose chained body was found dumped in a river had been shot in cold blood over a lucrative Olympic-related security contract,
a court was told today.

Detectives allege the two men charged with the slaying stood to gain his share of a $1.6 million personnel deal struck with industry giant and Olympic sub-contractor Chubb Security Australia.

The killing had “all the hallmarks of an execution-style murder”, according to a statement of police facts tendered in Sydney’s Manly Local Court.

“There is evidence of premeditated and deliberate planning well prior to the event,” the document read.

Mr Adams’ business partner, Simon Crowther-Wilkinson and another of his associates, private security agent James Cowie, were arrested by strike force police early today following a high-profile investigation.

Mr Adams, a one-time police prosecutor who left the force to start his own company nine years ago, was pulled out of the Hawkesbury River off Dangar Island, to Sydney’s
north, by a local fisherman on July 12.

An autopsy revealed he ad been shot in the back of the head from close range.

He was also wrapped in a 135 kilogram length of chain.

It was initially believed Mr Adams had last been seen alive by Crowther-Wilkinson at 10pm on June 6 after they dined at Antos Pizzeria and Pasta in suburban Chatswood.

However, it is now alleged that the version of events was a smokescreen to divert suspicion.

According to receipt records, the accused man bought cigarettes and drinks at a Chatswood service station at 9.25pm the same night.

Neither the owner nor staff of the pizza parlour were able to place the men at the eatery, police allege.

According to the fact sheet, mobile phone checks also revealed both Crowther-Wilkinson and Cowie made or received calls near Dangar island on the night of the murder.

Crowther-Wilkinson denied ever having been to the area or having access to or owning a boat, it said.

Despite this, detectives alleged evidence would show he was in possession of an aluminium runabout at the time of the homicide.

It was also claimed Crowther-Wilkinson bought 15m of chain and a number of metal clamps like those found on Mr Adams’ body at a Brookvale hardware shop a week before the murder.

“Direct lies and inconsistencies exist in the versions of (both) Wilkinson and Cowie,”the facts stated.

Mr Adams had been a silent 51 per cent partner in Excell Security with Crowther-Wilkinson until his death but took little part in the company’s day-to-day business.

In the weeks before his death, he allegedly tried to gain financial records which showed he may not have been receiving his due profit share.

Police allege he expressed concerns over the matter to his accountant.

By contrast, Crowther-Wilkinson is said to have told an Excell employee that “he did not want to give up any profits made through his Olympic contract”.

Both accused men were today refused bail and will appear in Central Local Court next month.

https://myinformationview.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/nsw-ex-policem-murdered-over-oly.html

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Victim feared colleagues, court told

By Malcolm Brown
May 10 2002

 

A week before his disappearance in 2000, murder victim Graeme Adams told his accountant he was afraid of former associates in the security company Blue Falcon Agency and thought he was being followed, the Supreme Court heard yesterday.

Accountant Eric de Haarte said Mr Adams had formed another company, Excell Security, after leaving Blue Falcon and had told him he had ”sort of tricked” Blue Falcon by taking their database of contacts for security guards.

Mr Adams had expressed apprehension about two principals in Blue Falcon, Peter Murrant ( # 22195 ) and Andrew King.

Mr Murrant, who had been a serving police officer at the time he was a principal of Blue Falcon, had been investigated by the Police Integrity Commission and had later been convicted of a criminal offence and sentenced to periodic detention.

”He told me he thought his former partners [Mr Murrant and Mr King] considered him a snitch,” Mr de Haarte said.

Mr Adams disappeared on June 6, 2000. His body was recovered, weighed down by chains, in the Hawkesbury River near Dangar Island on July 12 that year.

A partner of Mr Adams in Excell Security, Simon Christopher Crowther-Wilkinson (referred to in court as Wilkinson), was later charged with Mr Adams‘s murder. Wilkinson is now on trial before Justice Virginia Bell.

Questioned by Paul Byrne, SC, for Wilkinson, Mr de Haarte said Mr Adams had indicated that he wanted his involvement in Excell Security to be kept ”more or less secret” so that he was ”essentially invisible”.

Mr Adams had a 51 per cent shareholding in Excell Security but Wilkinson, with 49 per cent, did the day-to-day work.

Janelle Johnson, a girlfriend of Mr Adams at the time of his disappearance, said in evidence that according to what Mr Adams had told her, Blue Falcon went broke in June 1999 and Mr Adams himself was in debt as a result. He had blamed Mr Murrant and Mr King for ”taking money on the side”.

Ms Johnson said that four or five weeks before he disappeared, Mr Adams had made no attempt to discover the financial position of Excell Security though he had concerns about it.

The trial resumes today.

https://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/05/09/1020914033849.html

 

 

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Regina v Simon Crowther-Wilkinson

On 28 March 2003 the appellant, Simon Crowther-Wilkinson, was sentenced to imprisonment for 20 years with a non-parole period of 15 years for murder. His co-accused, James Cowie was found not guilty. He appeals against this conviction but not against the sentence.

The appellant had been a silent partner in a partnership with the deceased in a security company, Excell Security Pty Limited (“Excell”). The deceased’s body was found floating in the Hawkesbury River wrapped in plastic, metal 3/8 inch steel galvanised chains and 12 mm D-shackles. The Crown case was that he had been shot once in the back of the head, consistent with a .22 calibre bullet having been fired by either the appellant or James Cowie, with the other present and assisting or encouraging the killer. The deceased’s body had then been transported to the Hawkesbury River and dumped from a small aluminium boat.

https://www.caselaw.nsw.gov.au/decision/549faf773004262463b77099

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SIMON CHRISTOPHER CROWTHER-WILKINSON was Sentenced to 20 years gaol – non parole of 15 years. Co-accused, James COWIE, was found not guilty.
He Appealed to the Court of Criminal Appeal, which was Heard  on 12 July 2004, and that Appeal was dismissed.
https://www.caselaw.nsw.gov.au/decision/549f6d3c3004262463a5e4ab
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Caution.  Possible PTSD triggers. 

this pdf link Contains Description of Murder to Court
Administrative Decisions Tribunal
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Wallace Vivian BAILEY

Wallace Vivian BAILEY

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   ?

Rank: Detective Constable ( 1950’s )

Detective Sergeant

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed ?

Inspector 3rd Class – appointed 16 July 1972

Stations?, Central ( 1 Division ) – 1950’s, Clarence St Police Stn – ( 1950’s ), C.I.B., 

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?  to  ? ? ? = ? years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born:  13 October 1914

Died on:  Monday  25 September 2000

Cause?

Age:  85

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Buried at:  Tuncurry Lawn Cemetery, 188 The Lakes Way

Grave:  L30

 Memorial at?

[alert_yellow]WALLACE is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May you forever Rest In Peace.

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Married:  Iris May ANSCOMBE

BDM Registration #  9832/1942

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Truth (Sydney, NSW)    Sunday 30 April 1950     page 8

A Little Elderly Lady Was Very Embarrassed

Miss Elizabeth Elvin (73) was awarded £300 damages for alleged wrongful arrest by Selfridges (Aust.) Ltd.

CITY FIRM HAS TO PAY WOMAN £300

Purchase of even a couple of pairs of pink swami bloomers can be fraught with all sorts of adventures and perils besides consequences that may well dismay the stout of heart.

Little and old Miss Elizabeth Elvin — she admits to 73 years — went to a city chain store on March 9.

Miss Elvin bought a couple of pairs of O.S. pink bloomers — to the ignorant male, Out size.

She found she needed X.O.S. — to the same ignorant male, Extra Outsize — and in seeking to make the change, landed herself into a pretty kettle of bother.

The purchase was made from Selfridges (Aust.) Ltd., in Pitt St.

Miss Elvin, who lives at 116 Forbes St., East Sydney, ended up being charged with stealing before Magistrate Denton at Central Court.

The sequel was her appearance in the Supreme Court this week — on Wednesday and Thursday— suing Selfridges for wrongful arrest and false imprisonment, and asking for £5000 damages.

Wanted To Swap

Well, whatever woe those bloomers brought to Miss Elvin was soon wiped away by the four jurymen — they gave her £300 damages.

As Mr. Justice Herron and a Jury were told, Miss Elvin decided that she needed X.O.S. and on March 11 went in with the two pairs to make the swap.

She discovered that the extra size was in length and not in width, and decided that the status quo should remain.

Miss Elvin left the counter, walked into Pitt St., and was overtaken by shop inspector Mrs. Isabel Crockford, taken to an office inside and later handed over to a police officer.

Next stop was the Central Police Station, with a charge of theft made against her.

Miss Elvin’s fingerprints were taken and then she was moved into court and asked how she pleaded.

She claimed this week that the arresting policeman, Det. Const. Wallace V. Bailey, advised her to plead guilty, which she did.

” Told Magistrate “

She also claimed that she told the magistrate she did not steal the bloomers, but when offered the chance to change her plea, did not take it.

The curtain was rung down when she was discharged because of her age and previous good character, and allowed to go her way.

Next move was hers. She sued.

Selfridges pleaded not guilty, and contended that Miss Elvin took the bloomers without paying or offering to pay for them, so that they had reasonable cause for suspicion that she had stolen them, and were justified in giving her into custody to be dealt with according to law.

The jury took an hour and 20 minutes to come to a verdict. Selfridges were given a stay of proceedings. Mr. J. H. McClemens K.C. and Mr. N. Nelson (by Mr. J. R. Thomas) for Miss Elvin; Mr. J. W. Shand K.C. and Mr. R. L. Taylor (by Messrs. R. C. Cathels and Co.) for Selfridges.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article167912131.txt

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Sun (Sydney, NSW)      Thursday 15 June 1950    page 17

Court told of £1000 bank grab

When he told a man he could not cash a Dutch five-guilder note, the man said, “This will do” and grabbed £1000, a bank teller said in Central Court today.

The teller, Alastair Shelley, was giving evidence against Neville Manson, 21, who was committed for trial on a charge of stealing £1000 from the Bank of NSW, corner of Liverpool and Castlereagh Streets, city, on December 8 last year.

Asking for bail, Manson said he suffered from a blood condition of the brain and would not be able to get proper treatment in gaol.

Refusing bail, Mr. Hawkins, SM, said: “It seems you are an impulsive man.”

Detective Wallace Bailey said when he saw Manson at Alexandria on June 5 Manson had said, “I know what you’re after.”

Manson then had admitted stealing the £1000.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article229612404.txt

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Sun ( Sydney)      Friday 14 July 1950      page 5

THEFT IS BLAMED ON INJURY TO BRAIN

A man who ran off with £1000 from the counter of the Bank of NSW, Liverpool St., City, on December 8, was suffering from a brain injury caused by boxing, Quarter Sessions was told today.

Neville Roger Manson, 21, laborer of Bronte Road, Bondi junction, who pleaded guilty to the theft of the bank’s money was remanded for medical observation.

Detective Wallace Bailey, of Clarence Street, said the £1000 had not been recovered.

He said Manson told him he had been receiving hospital treatment for an injury to the brain, caused by boxing.

At the request of Mr. Trevor Martin (for Manson), – Judge Lloyd remanded Manson for medical observation.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article229620267.txt

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Sydney Morning Herald ( NSW ) Saturday 2 February 1952     page 5

For Trial On Charge Of Bank Robbery

Mr. H. L. Sargeson, in Central Court of Petty Sessions yesterday, committed Allen John Charles O’Brien, 31, of Byron Street, Coogee, for trial on a charge of having stolen £1,000 from the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Ltd.

Detective W. V. Bailey said O’Brien told him he had snatched the money from a counter in the bank.

O’Brien had said: “It was a silly thing to do. I only ended up with £100.”

Detective Bailey said that on the way out of the bank O’Brien had collided with a man and dropped £695. In addition, £35 was found on the footpath outside the bank.

Detective Bailey said that O’Brien had said he had been building model trains and doing a few experiments to try to make a few shillings. His grandfather had been ill and he hoped to make money to get him medical assistance.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article18256324.txt

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The Age ( Newspaper ), Friday 22 August 1958 p9
The Age ( Newspaper ), Friday 22 August 1958      p9

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Canberra Times ( ACT )     Friday 3 July 1959     page 10

GIRL COMMITTED FOR TRIAL IN TAXI MURDER CASE

SYDNEY, Thursday.—The City Coroner, Mr. Carruthers, to-day committed a 20-year-old girl for trial on a charge of having murdered taxi driver Rodney William Woodgate.

Woodgate was found shot dead in his taxi on a Kurnell bush track on April 29.

The girl is Sandra Andrea Kane Willson, of Renny Street, Paddington. She will appear at Central Criminal Court on August 24.

In evidence to-day, Det.-Sgt. Wallace Bailey said Willson told him she killed Woodgate because she wanted his car to use in an armed hold-up.

Willson had said she had never seen the taxi driver before.

Det.-Sgt. Bailey said he was on duty at the C.I.B. on May 5 when Willson reported to police.

He said Willson told him, “I think you are looking for me. I shot the taxi driver at Cronulla.

“I have been worried about this and I want to clear the matter up.

“I hired the taxi in Paddington and asked the driver to take me to Cronulla.

“I shot him there while he was looking at a street directory.”

Asked why she shot the driver, Willson replied, “I wanted the motor car. I was going to do an armed robbery.”

Det.-Sgt. Bailey said Willson had with her a sawn-off .22 rifle, portion of a wooden stock and portion of a rifle barrel.

To Mr. A. Shand ( for Willson ) Det.-Sgt. Bailey said Willson appeared strangely unemotional while she gave him the details.

Det.-Sgt. A. Neal, who said he was present when Willson made her statement, said the girl appeared eager to give the statement and went into every detail.

Sgt. Neal said she did not appear to show any emotion.

He agreed that in the case of a balanced person, one would expect at least a show of sorrow in similar circumstances.

To a further question by Mr. Shand, he said he would not expect a person properly and mentally balanced to show the same sort of attitude as Willson had shown.

Albert Edward White, store-man, of Renny Street, Paddington, said that Willson was his wife’s daughter.

He had known the girl for six or seven years, during which she had received medical treatment for mental aberrations.

Mr. Carruthers, S.M., found that Woodgate died from the affects of a gunshot wound feloniously and maliciously inflicted by Willson, and that Willson had feloniously and maliciously murdered Woodgate.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.news-article114846292.txt

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Wallace was the husband of Iris May BAILEY.

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Mark Anthony BATEMAN

 Mark Anthony BATEMAN

Victoria Police Force

Regd. #   30810

Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations?, Northcote – death

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?  to  20 May 2000 = ? years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born? ? 1970

Died on:  Saturday 20 May 2000 @ 2.20am

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – killed instantly

Age:  30

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location?

Buried at?

 Memorial at:  Blue Ribbon Foundation Portland District Health Emergency Helipad

 

 Mark Bateman with his children, Jack and Daisy. Source: News Limited
Mark Bateman with his children, Jack and Daisy. Source: News Limited

 

Jack Bateman and his grandfather, Phil Bateman, place flowers at the memorial service
Jack Bateman and his grandfather, Phil Bateman, place flowers at the memorial service

 

Daisy Bateman (front, second from left), Jack Bateman, Tina Robinson and daughters.
Daisy Bateman (front, second from left), Jack Bateman, Tina Robinson and daughters.

 

Deb Bateman and Trevor Robinson
Deb Bateman and Trevor Robinson

 

James St, Northcote - Northcote Police Stn. Front Inscription Donated by the Northcote R.S.L. in memory of Senior Constable Mark Anthony Bateman 30810 and Senior Constable Fiona Frances Robinson 30507 tragically killed in the line of duty 20 May, 2000 Lest We Forget
James St, Northcote – Northcote Police Stn.
Front Inscription
Donated by the Northcote R.S.L. in memory of Senior Constable Mark Anthony Bateman 30810 and Senior Constable Fiona Frances Robinson 30507 tragically killed in the line of duty 20 May, 2000
Lest We Forget

[alert_green]MARK IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]


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 Funeral location ?

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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At approximately 2.20am on Saturday 20th May, 2000 Senior Constable Fiona Robinson and Senior Constable Mark Bateman were travelling along High Street, Northcote with emergency lights activated in response to an emergency call. At the intersection of Dennis & High Streets the divisional van they were driving collided with another vehicle before coming to rest against a traffic control signal and electricity pole. Both members were killed instantly. Fiona was 30 years of age.

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ELEVEN years ago, Debra Bateman’s police officer husband was killed on duty. She chose to be strong.

Debra Bateman is the face of Blue Ribbon Day … a wonderful choice, as I will explain, and a job well done by the organisers.

I say job, because Debra, sorry Dr Bateman, is not the sort of person who has ever sought the spotlight so I’m guessing they had to work hard to convince her.

It’s perhaps why she never aimed for the stars as a child. Dr Bateman says she begrudgingly finished high school before qualifying as a hairdresser.

Yet, she is now a senior lecturer in higher education research at Deakin University and recently has been honoured with two national teaching awards for excellence, the Pearson ATEA Australia Teacher Educator of the Year and the Australian Learning and Teaching Council award.

She has also been cited for her outstanding contribution to student learning.

“Who’d have thought!” Dr Bateman, 43, says with a laugh.

And, yet, just a little more 10 years ago, things were so different, so despairing.

At 32, Dr Bateman became a widow, but don’t call her that, especially if it makes you feel sorry for her or you are tempted to plant a consoling kiss on her cheek. Because people, Dr Bateman says, do that when you are a widow. You can see the pity work across their faces, she says. The assumptions registered.

Perhaps she is more conscious of the emotional baggage the name carries because of the sudden and shocking way Dr Bateman became a widow on a Saturday night in May 2000.

Her husband, Sen-Constable Mark Bateman, was on night patrol with newly married Sen-Constable Fiona Robinson.

They were answering a call to attend a reported holdup at a bakery in Northcote, when their van was clipped by another vehicle, became airborne and crashed into a power pole.

Both officers were killed.

Dr Bateman was at home with children, Jack, 17 months, and Daisy, who was nine weeks old.

She has never spoken publicly about her 29-year-old husband’s death until now and only because she is the face of the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Day. So why now?

“I feel it is appropriate for me to step up,” she told me.

“I have a few runs on the board, successes in my life.”

She also spoke to children Daisy, now 11, and Jack, who is 12, about going public and said the family agreed it was a privilege to do it and a positive thing to do and they all wanted to give something back.

Dr Bateman will feature in an advertising campaign promoting the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Day on September 29. It is a day when Victorians wear blue and white ribbons as a mark of respect for the sacrifice and memory of 157 police men and women who have lost their lives in the line of duty in Victoria.

Money raised – $5.5 million to date – goes to pay for new lifesaving equipment in Victoria’s public hospitals.

Mark Bateman was, his wife says, a very proud policeman who also loved his football club. He wasn’t a complicated bloke. They met when he was 16, she was 18, and they married eight years later, when Dr Bateman had completed a teaching diploma.

There were a few hurdles along the way. A kilometre from the site of the accident that would claim Mark’s life, the couple had a horrific car accident. Mark, then 19, suffered broken ribs, but Dr Bateman, 21, suffered a brain injury that would keep her in hospital and rehabilitation for a year.

She said the accident was a major transition for both of them.

Mark would emerge an incredibly committed person, Dr Bateman a young woman heading in a new direction.

She was a qualified hairdresser, but a vocational therapist told her she could not do that any more, because she wouldn’t be able to stand on her feet all day.

Dr Bateman was told she would make a great teacher. The therapist was spot on. She was a born teacher.

When Mark died, Dr Bateman became a single mother and was forced to think about what she wanted to do, “because I really had grown up”.

Juggling children, she completed a doctorate and now works in the Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Prof Jane Den Hollander. Previously, she worked in the School of Education.

Prof Den Hollander said Dr Bateman was a shining example of what could be achieved through dogged determination, perseverance and a love of lifelong learning. She doesn’t tell anyone she is a police widow, because Dr Bateman does not want to be defined by it and she wants her children to know they are special, but not because their father died.

It was also important to her to maintain her integrity and independence.

“I’m a very self-contained unit, that’s how I describe myself,” Dr Bateman said.

A good teacher is also a good learner. Four weeks after Mark’s death, Dr Bateman was invited to a lunch attended by several police widows. She said: “I was still very raw. (But) I could see women around the tables who had made choices. Some stuck with the very moment of losing their partners. Others were amazing women who were resilient and robust. They had incredible integrity and pride in who they were.”

Dr Bateman said her parents, Alan and Joy, had taught her to never give up and she had two babies who required her to make some serious choices.

“I chose to be strident and strong,” she said.

“I’ve proven that widows can do anything they want to do and I have proven to myself that stuff I never dared dream was possible.”

Like I said, she is a wonderful role model for us all, not just widows, and her story is a lesson in how to not be burdened by a catastrophic tragedy, but rather be inspired by it. It’s a story of a woman who stayed strong and a family which helped each other through the sadness and despair.

And for those who believe that Mark Bateman is looking down on them, well, he’d be looking down with pride.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/ipad/standing-up-for-widows/story-fn6bn88w-1226123536654

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12-11-2001
Vic: Police car type did not contribute to officers’ deaths

A coroner has found the deaths of two policemen in a car accident in Melbourne were not influenced by the van in which they were travelling.

Senior Constable MARK BATEMAN, aged 30, and 31-year-old Senior Constable FIONA ROBINSON died from multiple injuries after their divisional van rolled when it side-swiped another car in suburban Northcote on May 20 last year.

Coroner PHILLIP GOLDBERG said the two police officers were en route to a burglary in progress and were trying to overtake the slower moving car.

He said a subsequent police investigation revealed that the Holden Commodore in which they were travelling had a higher potential to roll over than the previous model Ford.

The Commodore divisional vans are no longer used by police.

But Mr GOLDBERG says the Commodore’s greater risk of rolling did not aggravate the circumstances of the two police officers deaths.

http://gmac-financce.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/vic-police-car-type-did-not-contribute.html

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Gone but not forgotten

Trevor Robinson stood before about 150 people and declared that for the rest of his life he would love the wife he lost in tragic circumstances 10 years earlier.
At the same time, he told of his love for Tina Robinson, whom he has since married, and the two daughters they have together.
The words were spoken at a memorial service where it was said that not only are Senior Constable Fiona Robinson, and the colleague who died with her, Senior
Constable Mark Bateman, loved and not forgotten, but also that life has moved on
in some positive ways.
The service was held 10 years to the day since the two Northcote police officers
were killed in a divisional van accident as they were heading to a reported holdup.
After being hit by another vehicle, the van partially overturned and crashed into an
electricity pole.

The deaths sparked a review of police van safety and led to the introduction of the

Crewman vehicle, which was designed to reduce the risk of rolling over. In September last year, the government announced that new vans, each featuring six airbags and an Electronic Stability Program, are being introduced in a phased rollout that will replace the Crewman vehicles.
Family, friends and representatives of the Victoria Police Force and The Police
Association attended the memorial, where Mark Bateman’s widow, Deb Bateman,
recalled the night she had “a visit from the police that a police family truly dreads”.
She had a two-year old son, Jack, and a baby daughter, Daisy. Trevor and Fiona Robinson had been married only three months.
Deb told how in 10 years, Jack has enjoyed school success, Daisy shines in basketball and she herself has completed a PhD. Life has gone on, she said, even as they continue to miss Mark.
An approach from Northcote Police, suggesting a commemoration of the 10th
anniversary of the tragedy, is an example of Deb’s assertion that the police community has never deserted her and her family.
Police Legacy organised a Perth holiday for the children last year. They have flown in a police helicopter with the Chief Commissioner thanks to the Blue Ribbon Foundation.
“Today is a very special day in the coming together of all those really important
police organisations that keep us connected,” said Deb.
“My children have a very strong sense that they belong somewhere within the police
community.”

https://tpav.org.au/_documents/Journals/2010/f0d5b0af-1455-4de1-98ca-46245a9ea86d/tpav_july_2010.pdf

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By DEBBIE CUTHBERTSON
Officers at the tightly knit Northcote police station in Melbourne’s inner north are today mourning the deaths of two of their colleagues in a road accident early yesterday. Senior Constable Mark Bateman, 30, and his 31-year-old friend and colleague Senior Constable Fiona Robinson who was married just 11 weeks ago were killed when their divisional van hit a pole after colliding with a car in High Street, Northcote, about 2.20am.
One of the- two officers was believed to have swapped a shift with a colleague and was not originally rostered to work on Friday night.
Acting Chief Commissioner Neil O’Loughlin said he was deeply saddened by the accident, which highlighted the dangers police faced. “It’s tragic that these members died whilst serving the community,” he said.
The officers were described by the officer-in-charge at Northcote, Senior Sergeant Rick McIntosh, as “happy-go-lucky characters”. “Fiona would always have a smile on her face, even when she was working under pressure,” he said. “She had only recently been married.”
Senior Constable Bateman was also married, with a two-year-old son, Jack, and a daughter, Daisy, three months. “Mark loved work and was dedicated to his family,” Senior Sergeant McIntosh said.
Police spokesman Kevin Loomes said the 40 officers stationed at Northcote were receiving counselling. He said some of them had arrived at work yesterday unaware their friends had been killed.
The assistant secretary of the Police Association, Senior Sergeant Paul Mullett, said the deaths of the two officers would be deeply felt among their colleagues and in the community. “
They certainly enjoyed a good reputation, a very good reputation,” he said. “They’re both renowned for their dedication . . . They are two respected members within their own workplace, and they had a reputation of respect among their local community.”
Yesterday, Northcote residents and police paid their respects by dropping flowers off at the police station. Bunches of flowers were also taped to a pole at the accident scene. Mr Loomes said the accident occurred while the two officers were driving north along High St.
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Opening of Emergency Helipad and Dedication of Mark Bateman Memorial

Mark Bateman Memorial helipad
Mark Bateman Memorial helipad

Late Mark Bateman's Children Jack & Daisy Bateman - Handprinting into Cement as part of Memorial at the Helipad.
Late Mark Bateman’s Children Jack & Daisy Bateman – Handprinting into Cement as part of Memorial at the Helipad.

 

 
Friday, December 11, 2015
The Portland district community celebrated the opening of the city’s new helipad on 8 December 2015.

The official opening of the Blue Ribbon Foundation Portland District Health Emergency Helipad marked the culmination of a long and dedicated campaign over the past 9 years.

PDH CEO Chris Giles said the helipad was a community facility that came about as a result of great local support. The community turned out in hundred to join in the celebrations of the opening of this potentially life-saving facility for our district.

The Chairman of the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation, Bill Noonan, OAM, the President of the Portland Branch, Peter Corbett and President of Portland District Health Board of Management Michelle Kearney lead the opening of the Emergency Helipad.

The ceremony also included the dedication of a permanent police memorial in memory of Senior Constable Mark Bateman who died with his partner Senior Constable Fiona Robinson on May 20, 2000 when their divisional van was involved in a crash while answering a priority one call at Northcote.

The dedication will also be a celebration of community spirit and determination as it acknowledges the many organisations, individuals, trades people, suppliers and sponsors who have donated their professional skills, materials and other resources for the building of the vital emergency facility.

We should acknowledge Neil SoullierVictorian Blue Ribbon Foundation CEO for his great support throughout the project, Peter Corbett – President of the Portland Blue Ribbon Foundation Branch and loyal committee, Peter Carr – Volunteer Project Manager, the many PDH staff previous and present who have lived and breathed helipad over the past 9 years, Carolyn Malseed for pulling together the opening with the Blue Ribbon committee and the many businesses and organisations who volunteered time and/or donated towards the project to make this happen. There are many other people that could be thanked, this list goes on and on and we are grateful for their support and assistance.

Business Donors to Assist Construct Helipad:

G.R CARR PTY LTD

Hanson Concrete

Fulton Hogan

PFM Engineering

Bob Menzel

Parfrey Plumbing Pty Ltd

Mibus Bros

Bluescope Distribution

Lawrence and Hansen

Portland Sign works

Lions Club Portland

Keppel Prince Cranes

Mick Wilson Plumbing

Lovell’s Group

Berry & Whyte Surveyors

Exile Concrete Pumping

Stickmans Contracting

Hammonds Paint

Peter Bell

Tutt Bryant

Blackwoods

K J Vic

Brent Jennings Concrete

Michael Hunter – Icon Investments

R & C Eather

A.T.S (Graham Robertson)

Tim Black

Parchem

http://swarh.com.au/pdh/news/opening-of-emergency-helipad-and-dedication-of-mark-bateman-memorial

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Blue Ribbon Day at Scotch

December 2011

WORDS: Mr Tim Shearer

National Police Remembrance Day, or Blue Ribbon Day as it is better known in Victoria, occurs every September, and this year’s Blue Ribbon Day was Thursday 29 September ( 2011 ).

This year Scotch ( Scotch College, Melbourne ) was nominated as the ambassador school for Blue Ribbon Day, and on Wednesday 14 September Mr Neil Soullier OAM, the CEO of the Blue Ribbon Foundation, attended assembly and presented a flag of remembrance to the Principal. The flag was flown at Scotch until Blue Ribbon Day, Thursday 29 September.

Principal Tom Batty, Mr Neil Soullier OAM and Jack Bateman (Year 7) with the Blue Ribbon flag of remembrance.
Principal Tom Batty, Mr Neil Soullier OAM and Jack Bateman (Year 7) with the Blue Ribbon flag of remembrance.

At the assembly, Jack Bateman (Year 7) addressed the school, speaking of his close identification with Blue Ribbon Day.‘My name is Jack Bateman. This morning I want to talk to all of you about something which is pretty close to my heart. The Blue Ribbon Foundation is a community organisation which ensures that the memories of police who have died in the line of duty live on as part of the community.

‘One of the police who have died on duty is my dad, Mark Anthony Bateman, Senior Constable, stationed at the Northcote Police Station, and this year my family have proudly agreed to represent the Blue Ribbon Foundation. The foundation was founded in 1998 and has a roll of honour which lists 157 police members who have died. My dad is part of history and the honour roll dates back to 1858.

‘The foundation is mainly run by volunteers who organise fundraising events throughout Victoria. All money goes to community projects that promote awareness, and for important projects like hospitals which are named in honour of fallen officers.

‘We can do nothing to bring them back, but as a grateful community we can take steps to honour their memory and ensure their sacrifice is acknowledged. I hope that we at Scotch College will be able to contribute to the Blue Ribbon Foundation’s mission – a good start is to wear a blue ribbon on Police Remembrance Day, 29 September.’

https://www.scotch.vic.edu.au/community/publications/great-scot/2011-december/blue-ribbon-day-at-scotch.aspx

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Fiona Frances ROBINSON

Fiona Frances ROBINSON – nee De LEUUW

Victoria Police Force

Regd. #   30507

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 17 February 1995

Senior Constable – appointed August 1999

Stations:  Mill Park ( 17 February 1995 ), Transit ( April 1977 ), Northcote ( March 1999 ) – death

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?pre 17 February 1995  to  20 May 2000 = 5+ years Service

Awardsposthumous Victoria Police Star – Awarded on 19 July 2005

Born? ? 1969

Died on:  Saturday 20 May 2000 @ 2.20am

Cause:  Motor Vehicle Accident – killed instantly

Age:  31

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location?

Buried at?

 Memorial at:  the Fiona Robinson Treatment Room, Children’s Ward, Geelong Hospital, Victoria

James St, Northcote - Northcote Police Stn. Front Inscription Donated by the Northcote R.S.L. in memory of Senior Constable Mark Anthony Bateman 30810 and Senior Constable Fiona Frances Robinson 30507 tragically killed in the line of duty 20 May, 2000 Lest We Forget
James St, Northcote – Northcote Police Stn.
Front Inscription
Donated by the Northcote R.S.L. in memory of Senior Constable Mark Anthony Bateman 30810 and Senior Constable Fiona Frances Robinson 30507 tragically killed in the line of duty 20 May, 2000
Lest We Forget

[alert_green]FIONA IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]


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 Funeral location ?

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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At approximately 2.20am on Saturday 20th May, 2000 Senior Constable Robinson and Senior Constable Mark Bateman were travelling along High Street, Northcote with emergency lights activated in response to an emergency call. At the intersection of Dennis & High Streets the divisional van they were driving collided with another vehicle before coming to rest against a traffic control signal and electricity pole. Both members were killed instantly.

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VICTORIA POLICE MEMBER TO BE HONOURED AT GEELONG HOSPITAL CHILDREN’S WARD

Today the Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation will dedicate a Police Memorial to honour Senior Constable Fiona ROBINSON at the Geelong Hospital.
The ceremony, to dedicate the Fiona Robinson Treatment Room in the Children’s Ward, is to be conducted in the presence of senior police, representatives from the hospital and the Blue Ribbon Foundation plus members of Senior Constable Robinson’s family. Many of S/C Robinson’s former colleagues, who were stationed at Northcote in May 2000, will also be attending.
The Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation has donated $250,000 for the specialised Treatment Room at Geelong Hospital with nearly half being raised in the Geelong community.
The Fiona Robinson Treatment Room forms part of the recently redeveloped children’s area of the Geelong Hospital where more than $8 million was raised to create the Cotton On Foundation Children’s Ward.
Fiona’s Treatment Room is specially equipped to give primary care and treatment to children as well as new-born babies and their mothers.
Fiona Robinson completed her training at the Police Academy and graduated as Constable Fiona De Leuuw (30507) on 17th February, 1995. Her initial posting was at Mill Park police station before transferring to Transit in April, 1997. In March 1999 she was posted to the Uniform Division at Northcote and earned her promotion to Senior Constable in August the same year.
In early 2000 Fiona married Trevor Robinson but this happy union was cut short by tragedy, just three months later.
At approximately 2.20am on Saturday 20th May, 2000 Senior Constable Robinson and Senior Constable Mark Bateman were travelling along High Street, Northcote with emergency lights activated in response to an emergency call. At the intersection of Dennis & High Streets the divisional van they were driving collided with another vehicle before coming to rest against a traffic control signal and electricity pole. Both members were killed instantly. Fiona was 30 years of age.
Fiona DeLeeuw was an energetic, happy young girl that spent much of her childhood living around the Romsey area with mother Shirley, father Ernie and her two brothers Andrew & Matthew. Ernie was a member of Victoria Police for 27 years and became the first Sergeant to be stationed at Wallan.
Fiona was a keen horse rider and excellent goal shooter in netball. After leaving school Fiona started her working career as a teller with the Commonwealth Bank but after serving at Lancefield, Kilmore and the Melbourne branches she opted to follow in her father’s footsteps and join Victoria Police
A posthumous Victoria Police Star was awarded to Constable Robinson’s family on 19th July, 2005.
The Victoria Police Blue Ribbon Foundation is a community-based organisation that perpetuates the memory of fallen police officers through the support of worthwhile community projects within Victoria.
The dedication of this latest facility will bring to 29 the number of hospital units funded by the Foundation in Victoria, mostly in the areas of emergency and trauma treatment.
Blue Ribbon Foundation CEO, Neil Soullier said;
“Senior Constable Robinson died while answering an emergency call from a member of the public and she paid the ultimate price. Our view is that members who have fallen in the line of duty shall forever remain on duty and now, through this specialised Treatment Room, Senior Constable Robinson is serving the people of Geelong”.
What:           Police Memorial Dedication
                        Fiona Robinson Treatment Room at Geelong Hospital
Where:         Geelong Clinical School – Deakin University & Barwon Health
                        285 Ryrie Street, Geelong – enter via Kitchener House
When:          Monday 20 May 2013 – 11am
12-11-2001
Vic: Police car type did not contribute to officers’ deaths

A coroner has found the deaths of two policemen in a car accident in Melbourne were not influenced by the van in which they were travelling.

Senior Constable MARK BATEMAN, aged 30, and 31-year-old Senior Constable FIONA ROBINSON died from multiple injuries after their divisional van rolled when it side-swiped another car in suburban Northcote on May 20 last year.

Coroner PHILLIP GOLDBERG said the two police officers were en route to a burglary in progress and were trying to overtake the slower moving car.

He said a subsequent police investigation revealed that the Holden Commodore in which they were travelling had a higher potential to roll over than the previous model Ford.

The Commodore divisional vans are no longer used by police.

But Mr GOLDBERG says the Commodore’s greater risk of rolling did not aggravate the circumstances of the two police officers deaths.

http://gmac-financce.blogspot.com.au/2012/03/vic-police-car-type-did-not-contribute.html

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Gone but not forgotten

Trevor Robinson stood before about 150 people and declared that for the rest of his life he would love the wife he lost in tragic circumstances 10 years earlier.
At the same time, he told of his love for Tina Robinson, whom he has since married, and the two daughters they have together.
The words were spoken at a memorial service where it was said that not only are Senior Constable Fiona Robinson, and the colleague who died with her, Senior
Constable Mark Bateman, loved and not forgotten, but also that life has moved on
in some positive ways.
The service was held 10 years to the day since the two Northcote police officers
were killed in a divisional van accident as they were heading to a reported holdup.
After being hit by another vehicle, the van partially overturned and crashed into an
electricity pole.

The deaths sparked a review of police van safety and led to the introduction of the

Crewman vehicle, which was designed to reduce the risk of rolling over. In September last year, the government announced that new vans, each featuring six airbags and an Electronic Stability Program, are being introduced in a phased rollout that will replace the Crewman vehicles.
Family, friends and representatives of the Victoria Police Force and The Police
Association attended the memorial, where Mark Bateman’s widow, Deb Bateman,
recalled the night she had “a visit from the police that a police family truly dreads”.
She had a two-year old son, Jack, and a baby daughter, Daisy. Trevor and Fiona Robinson had been married only three months.
Deb told how in 10 years, Jack has enjoyed school success, Daisy shines in basketball and she herself has completed a PhD. Life has gone on, she said, even as they continue to miss Mark.
An approach from Northcote Police, suggesting a commemoration of the 10th
anniversary of the tragedy, is an example of Deb’s assertion that the police community has never deserted her and her family.
Police Legacy organised a Perth holiday for the children last year. They have flown in a police helicopter with the Chief Commissioner thanks to the Blue Ribbon Foundation.
“Today is a very special day in the coming together of all those really important
police organisations that keep us connected,” said Deb.
“My children have a very strong sense that they belong somewhere within the police
community.”

https://tpav.org.au/_documents/Journals/2010/f0d5b0af-1455-4de1-98ca-46245a9ea86d/tpav_july_2010.pdf

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By DEBBIE CUTHBERTSON
Officers at the tightly knit Northcote police station in Melbourne’s inner north are today mourning the deaths of two of their colleagues in a road accident early yesterday. Senior Constable Mark Bateman, 30, and his 31-year-old friend and colleague Senior Constable Fiona Robinson who was married just 11 weeks ago were killed when their divisional van hit a pole after colliding with a car in High Street, Northcote, about 2.20am.
One of the- two officers was believed to have swapped a shift with a colleague and was not originally rostered to work on Friday night.
Acting Chief Commissioner Neil O’Loughlin said he was deeply saddened by the accident, which highlighted the dangers police faced. “It’s tragic that these members died whilst serving the community,” he said.
The officers were described by the officer-in-charge at Northcote, Senior Sergeant Rick McIntosh, as “happy-go-lucky characters”. “Fiona would always have a smile on her face, even when she was working under pressure,” he said. “She had only recently been married.”
Senior Constable Bateman was also married, with a two-year-old son, Jack, and a daughter, Daisy, three months. “Mark loved work and was dedicated to his family,” Senior Sergeant McIntosh said.
Police spokesman Kevin Loomes said the 40 officers stationed at Northcote were receiving counselling. He said some of them had arrived at work yesterday unaware their friends had been killed.
The assistant secretary of the Police Association, Senior Sergeant Paul Mullett, said the deaths of the two officers would be deeply felt among their colleagues and in the community. “
They certainly enjoyed a good reputation, a very good reputation,” he said. “They’re both renowned for their dedication . . . They are two respected members within their own workplace, and they had a reputation of respect among their local community.”
Yesterday, Northcote residents and police paid their respects by dropping flowers off at the police station. Bunches of flowers were also taped to a pole at the accident scene. Mr Loomes said the accident occurred while the two officers were driving north along High St.
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Keith Stanley HOLSTEIN

 Keith Stanley HOLSTEIN

Father of John HOLSTEIN – Regd # 16195
 ( late of Gloucester )

New South Wales Police Force

NSW Penrith Police Academy Class # 9

 [alert_yellow]Regd. #  7130[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 22 October 1951

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 6 October 1967

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 5 January 1975

Sergeant 1st Class – retired

StationsBathurst ( 1952 ), Euabalong ( 1956 ), Trundle ( 1958 – 1963 ), Clarencetown ( 1963 ), Nundle ( O.I.C. Sgt 3/c 1967 ),  Daceyville, Randwick, Maroubra, Paddington, Waverley & Blacktown. ( 1971 until 1984 )

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre October 1951  to  ? ? 1983 = 32 years Service

 Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born:  28 July 1932

Died on:  28 October 2000 @ Gloucester, NSW

Cause:  Cancer – Throat

Age:  68

Funeral date? October 2000

Funeral location?, Gloucester

Buried at:  Lawn cemetery, Gloucester Cemetery, Cemetery Rd, Gloucester, NSW

Approx GPS Location of Grave:  -32.027703,  151.964020

 

Epitaph Treasured A Dear Husband and Father Keith Stanley Holstein passed Away Oct 28 2000 Aged 68 Years God's Greatest.Memories of a Dear Wife and Mother Gloria Dawn Holstein passed away Dec. 19 1991 Aged 58 years Gift Remembrance.
Grave stone of Keith & Gloria HOLSTEIN

 

[alert_yellow]KEITH is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 

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Eighteen years ago Class 9 /1951 from the Penrith Police College held the final get together with my father Keith Holstein as he was too sick to travel to a reunion. The group changed their plans and visited dad at home. He passed away 18 years ago today. Sadly missed.

Keith HOLSTEIN: Class 9 /1951 from the Penrith College held the final get together with my father Keith Holstein as he was too sick to travel to a reunion. The group changed their plans and visited dad at home.
Keith HOLSTEIN: Class 9 /1951 from the Penrith College held the final get together with my father Keith Holstein as he was too sick to travel to a reunion. The group changed their plans and visited dad at home.

( L-R at rear ) ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, Eric MAURER # 7134

 

 

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Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 – 2001), Friday 21 June 1968 (No.76), page 2537


Department of Mines, Sydney, 21st June, 1968.

APPOINTMENT

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, and in pursuance of the provisions of section 6, Mining Act, 1906, as amended, has approved of the appointment of Sgt 3rd Class Keith Stanley Holstein, Officer-in-Charge of Police, Nundle, as Warden’s Clerk, Mining Registrar and Officer authorized to issue Miner’s Rights and Business Licenses at that place, such appointment to take effect on and from 12th February, 1968, vice Senior Constable Victor John Feltis.

(Ms 68-3984).

WAL. FIFE, Minister for Mines.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/220062637

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Ryan David WEAVER

Ryan David WEAVER

AKA ?

Late of Coffs Harbour, NSW

NSW Goulburn Police Academy Class # 259

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 29664

Rank:  Commenced at Goulburn Police Academy on Monday 22 August 1994

Probationary Constable – Friday 17 February 1995

?

Final Rank?

Stations:  Ermington, Granville until 1999 then transferred to Coffs Harbour – GDs & OSG

Service:  From  22 August 1994 to 17 January 2000 = 5+ years Service

Awards: No Find on Australian Honours

Born:  Wednesday  24 April 1974

Died  Monday  17 January 2000

Age:  25 yrs  8 mths

Cause:  Illness – Suicide – Hanging

Event location:  Home

Event date:  Monday  17 January 2000

Funeral date?

Funeral location?

Wake location?

Funeral Parlour?

Buried at:  Dawson River Cemetery, ( off Lansdowne Rd Taree ), Cundletown, NSW

Grave location:  Portion: Flower Garden, Row 1, In the flower garden in the roundabout at the end of the road in (Dawson River Cemetery Road)

 

Ryan is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

 

Ryan Weaver memorial stone, Taree Cemetery
Ryan Weaver memorial stone, Taree Cemetery

 

Ryan was due to commence day shift at Coffs Harbour Police Station on the 17 January 2000 but was late for his shift.

His house mate, another Policeman, was at Coffs Harbour waiting for Ryan to relieve him from his night shift.  His mate phoned Ryan to ask why he was late and Ryan told him that he was leaving now and would be at the station shortly.

When Ryan failed to turn up half hour after the conversation, his house mate went home to ascertain what the problem was, only to find Ryan had hung himself in the garage.

Ryan was 25 years of age.

May he forever Rest In Peace.

 


 




Norman James WATT

Norman James WATT

( grew up in Chinchilla )

Queensland Police Force

Joined Qld Police Force via Qld Police Cadet System 1986 – 1987

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations:  Dog Squad – death

ServiceFrom  ? ? 1986  to  21 July 2000 = ? years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born:  ? ? ?

Died on:  21 July 2000

Cause:  Shot – murdered – Alton Downs, Qld

Age:  33

Funeral date:  25 July 2000

Funeral location:

Buried at:  Nerimbera Memorial Cemetery, Rockhampton, Qld

Memorial location:

 

Norman James WATT - SenCon - Shot at siege - Qld - 21 July 2000
Norman James WATT – SenCon – Shot at siege – Qld – 21 July 2000.  Pictured with his dog – Zeus

[alert_green]NORM IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

At 9.22pm on Thursday 20 July 2000 Information was received at the Rockhampton communications room regarding a serious domestic dispute that was taking place on a property at Alton Downs 15kms north-west of Rockhampton.

An ex-serviceman named Royce William Cooper (58yrs) had fired three (3) shots at a friend during an argument at the property.

Senior Constable Norm Watt the dog squad officer on duty was one of a number of police directed to attend the scene. Officers arrived at the property and immediately placed a cordon around the residence.

In the darkness Cooper had exited his house and camouflaged himself amongst bushes in the yard.

At a little after midnight Senior Constable Watt and another officer went to view the house from another vantage point. As Senior Constable Watt moved toward the house a shot was heard and Senior Constable Watt fell to the ground. Fellow officers were unable to safely approach their fallen colleague to render assistance as they were unaware of Cooper’s exact location.

An armoured vehicle from the Rockhampton correctional Centre was summoned and recovered the body of Senior Constable Watt.

The officer was officially pronounced dead at 3.47am.

A post mortem examination revealed that the bullet had severed Senior Constable Watt’s femoral artery causing death within minutes of being hit.

After a seven hour siege Cooper surrendered to police. He was later charged and convicted of murder in the Rockhampton Supreme Court and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Senior Constable Norman James Watt is buried in the Nerimbera Memorial Cemetery Rockhampton.

 

Cemetery locationGrave location isSect. ROG  Row. 8  Grave 12

 

 

Police remember slain dog squad officer

Updated Wed 21 Jul 2010, 3:15pm AEST

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2010-07-21/police-remember-slain-dog-squad-officer/914086

A memorial service has been held at Rockhampton in central Queensland to honour a police officer killed in the line of duty.

Today marks 10 years since the shooting death of Senior Constable Norman James Watt.

The 33-year-old dog squad officer was killed while responding to a domestic disturbance on a property at Alton Downs, west of Rockhampton.

Queensland Police Service commissioner Bob Atkinson says Senior Constable Watt paid the ultimate sacrifice and died serving the community he had sworn to protect.

“Norm was many things – a husband, a brother, an uncle, a friend, a colleague, a fine police officer, and with his dog Zeus they were a fine team,” he said.

Mr Atkinson says the bond between dog squad officers and their animals is incredible, and dogs live with their handlers full-time.

“In most cases those officers work alone and most of the time they work through the night alone with their dog, and the bond they form is very close,” he said.

Zeus was retired immediately after the shooting and was cared for by Senior Constable Watt’s wife, until he died of kidney failure 18-months later.

Officer’s family joins march

Widow Anna Watt and her niece took part in this morning’s march from Rockhampton City Hall to the memorial garden at the Rockhampton Police Station.

She was flanked by two dog squad officers with pups-in-training, followed by a large number of Rockhampton police officers.

The Queensland Police Pipes and Drums led the procession.

During the ceremony, family, friends and former colleagues of Senior Constable Watt laid floral tributes under a plaque commemorating his death.

Senior Constable Watt’s brother, Greg Watt said it was an honour to witness the respect shown by colleagues and the community.

Commissioner Bob Atkinson says Senior Constable Watt was one of three Queensland police officers killed in the line of duty in the past ten years.

Police march for slain police officer Norm Watt, Rockhampton, July 21st 2010 - 10th anniversary
Police march for slain police officer Norm Watt, Rockhampton, July 21st 2010 – 10th anniversary

The Queensland Police Pipes and Drums led the march to remember Norm Watt.
The Queensland Police Pipes and Drums led the march to remember Norm Watt.

Floral tribute
Floral tribute

Touch Stone, National Police Memorial, ACT.
Touch Stone, National Police Memorial, ACT.

 

http://www.police.qld.gov.au/Resources/Internet/services/reportsPublications/annualReport/2001/documents/11_honoursAwards.pdf

Policing in Queensland has long been a respected and valued profession but it is also an inherently dangerous one. This fact was tragically highlighted with the deaths of
two serving officers this year. The untimely deaths of Senior Constable Norm Watt and Senior Constable Dave Shean brings to one hundred the number of serving Queensland police officers who have died in the performance of duty. A tribute has been included in this Annual Report as a mark of respect to these two officers and to acknowledge the terrible loss felt at their passing by the Service, their families and friends and by their police colleagues who supported them throughout their careers.
Senior Constable Norman James Watt
The newly built Dog Squad facility in Brisbane has been named the Norm Watt Complex as a tribute to Senior Constable Norman James Watt.
Senior Constable Norm Watt was shot and killed while attending a domestic violence incident near Rockhampton on 21 July 2000.
Senior Constable Watt’s operational career began in 1987 with a posting to Rockhampton. During his career, he proved himself to be an able and reliable officer serving in a variety of positions within the area including small stations, the CIB and the Rockhampton Traffic Branch. Senior Constable Watt was also commended by the then Central Region Assistant Commissioner for his work as an undercover operative during Operation Breaker in 1990.
He was commended on a number of other occasions for good police work and was the recipient of many letters of appreciation from politicians, fellow police officers and
members of the public. As the Adopt-a-Cop at Parkhurst State School, Senior Constable Watt earned the respect of the school community and his efforts were recognised by the then Police Minister, the Honourable Terry MacKenroth MP.
Norm was promoted to Senior Constable, Rockhampton Dog Squad, on 21 February 1994. Together with police dog Zeus, he attended a wide variety of operational matters including the incident that tragically ended his career. The dedicated service which Senior Constable Watt provided to the people of Queensland is well summed up in the words of the then Police Commissioner, Jim O’Sullivan, who, when dedicating the Norm Watt Complex, described Norm as “an officer who made the ultimate sacrifice in his role to serve and protect the community … and whose sacrifice will not be forgotten.”
Senior Constable Watt will be sorely missed by his family, friends and colleagues and by the community he so ably served.
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15 years may have passed, but Norm is still alive in our hearts

Senior Constable Norm Watt

Senior Constable Norm Watt with PD Zeus

Police across the State will take a moment today to remember Senior Constable Norman James Watt who died whilst on duty in Rockhampton fifteen years ago.

At 9.22pm on Thursday July 20 2000, officers were called to a hobby farm at Alton Downs, west of Rockhampton, after reports that a serious domestic dispute was taking place during which a man had fired three shots at a friend.

Senior Constable Norm Watt, a member of the Rockhampton Dog Squad, was also called to the scene with his dog, PD Zeus.

Officers arrived and began to put a cordon around the residence. It was just after midnight when a shot was heard and Senior Constable Watt was seen to fall to the ground.

Senior Constable Watt was pronounced dead on Friday July 21 at 3.47am. After a seven hour siege the offender surrendered to police and was later charged with murder and found guilty.

Senior Constable Watt was buried in the Nerimbera Memorial Cemetery Rockhampton and is remembered as a dear friend, a dedicated officer and a ‘stand up’ guy.

Fifteen years may have passed but to those who knew Norm, he is still alive in our hearts.

After Norm’s passing, Police Dog Zeus lived a happy retirement with Norm’s partner and passed away from old age a few years ago.

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Gary DUNNINGHAM

Gary DUNNINGHAM

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Constable 1st Class – Resigned

Stations:  Last Stationed at Warilla HWP

Service:  From  to  ?

Awards?

Born:  6 May 1959

Died:  21 March 2000

Age:  40

Cause:  Suicide – hanging – at home

 Funeral:  27 March 2000 – Unanderra Crematorium

 

Constable Gary Dunningham arresting Santa Claus
Constable Gary Dunningham arresting Santa Claus

Gary Dunningham & Greg Callander in Marine Drive, Wollongong, at a car show around 1998.
Gary Dunningham & Greg Callander in Marine Drive, Wollongong, at a car show around 1998.

 

Gary DUNNINGHAM memorial plaque
Gary DUNNINGHAM memorial plaque

 

A good bloke and always a “funny bastard”.

Old Gaz was bit of a ‘lad’ and joker, always wearing his thongs, shorts and ‘T’ shirts, he was the last person who I thought would have taken his own life.

May you forever Rest In Peace mate.

 

Cal




Glen Anthony CONNOR

Glen Anthony CONNOR

aka  CHUCK

NSW Police Academy Class 205

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  21608[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 26 October 1984

Constable – appointed 26 October 1985

Acting Sergeant – Death

Stations:  Wollongong G.D’s, Wollongong Rescue Squad, Sutherland, South Region Dog Squad, South Region Prosecutors

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre October 1984?  to  24 September 2000 = 16 years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 30 August 2000

Born:   5 March 1962

Died  Sunday  24 September 2000 about 11am

Age:  38 old

CauseHang gliding accident – Pilot

Event date:  Sunday  24 September 2000

Event locationBald Hill, Stanwell Tops, NSW

Funeral date:  ?

Funeral location:  ?

Buried at ?

Memorial:  the “Chuck Connor” trophy for “reteam on Course Dux”

Glenn Connor
Glenn Connor

24 September 2000
Acting Sgt Glen “Chuck” Connor, 38 old, who lived at Otford, died about 11am in a hang gliding collision at Stanwell Tops.

He had a female passenger from Albion Park Rail and collided with another paraglider, being piloted by Vitali Kouznetsov from Hurstville as the second glider took off from Bald Hill they became entangled. The woman and Vitali survived the crash.

Glen was also the owner / operator of “Skybound Hang Gliding School” and had been a qualified hang gliding instructor since 21 July 1983 with approximately 1850 hours hang gliding experience.

Glen’s wife, Sue and brother Adrian were on the hill and witnessed the accident.

Glen used to work at Wollongong G.D’s, South Region Dog Squad around 1992 & his dogs name was ‘Jet’ and, from memory, Wollongong Prosecutors.

At the time of his death he was stationed at Sutherland Prosecutors.

May Glen forever Rest In Peace.

 

Accident location 

 

 

Illawarra Mercury Page 11 Wednesday 21 March 2001
Illawarra Mercury
Page 11 Wednesday 21 March 2001

 

Armed hold up at service station. Illawarra Mercury page 9 Monday 10 February 1992 with police dog Jet
Armed hold up at service station.
Illawarra Mercury page 9
Monday 10 February 1992 with police dog Jet

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Hang-gliders hurt in Stanwell Park crash landing