1

Edward John O’DONNELL

Edward John O’DONNELL

( late of Oswald St, Guildford )

aka  Ted

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #   5043

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 4 February 1946

Detective Sergeant 2nd Class –

Inspector 3rd Class – appointed 19 October 1977

Stations?, Parkes, Pillage Squad, Newcastle, Merrylands 1968 ( 26 Division ), Fairfield ( 34 Division ), Campbelltown ( 35 Division ), “possibly” Liverpool ( 22 Division ) – retirement

 ServiceFrom  ? ? pre February 1946?  to  ? ? 1979? = ? years Service

[blockquote]

World War II

Australian Imperial Force

Regiment?

Enlisted:                  at Rowville, Victoria

Service #                 NX161851

Rank?

Embarkation?

Next of kin:           Jean O’DONNELL

Religion?

Single / Married?

Returned to Australia ?

[/blockquote]

Awards?

Born:  29 August 1919 @ West Wallsend, NSW

Died on:  23 June 2004

Age:  84

Cause?

Funeral date:  29 June 2004

Funeral location:  St Mark’s Anglican Church, Granville

Buried at:  Cremated at Rookwood

 Memorial at?

 

In the January 1979 Issue of the “Police Stud Book” the name of Edward John O’Donnell has been crossed out.

It would appear that he retired sometime during 1979.


[alert_yellow]EDWARD is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 

 [divider_dotted]

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

Email Rx on Friday 6 January 2017 via AustralianPolice.com.au

Hi Cal, going through some papers today and found the attached papers re the funeral of Ted O’Donnell. I then looked and could find no trace on “Australian Police”.  So if he’s not there  lets get started..

I first met him in June 68 on my arrival at Merrylands as a P/Cst.  He was a 2/c Sgt in charge of a relief. He was very knowledgeable, and had no difficulty sharing this with everyone else. He also took a great interest in his team, and had no difficulty in pulling on the bosses as required.

He was a Detective, and I know he was stationed at Parkes and also the Pillage Squad, Newcastle. He married later in life to Barbara, who now resides with daughter Cathryn in Bathurst. He also had a son.

 

As a Commissioned Officer I think he was at Fairfield, Campbelltown and possibly finished up at Liverpool.   He also served in WW2. I think he would have retired about 1984 and continued to live at his family home in Oswald St, Guildford until his death in 2004.

A great old style copper, and those who worked with him were proud to be referred to as “O’Donnell trained

 

I am in touch with his wife if you require any further specific info..  Scotty.

[divider_dotted]

 




Sonia Joy McKELL

Sonia Joy BISCOE nee McKELL

New South Wales Police Force

* First female Parade Sergeant

Redfern Police Academy Class 154

[alert_yellow]Regd. #   17523[/alert_yellow]

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 4 April 1977

Constable – appointed 4 April 1978

Senior Constable – appointed 4 April 1986

Sergeant – death

Stations?, School Lecturing ( based at Granville Police Stn ), Redfern Police Academy – chief Instructional staff, Liverpool, Police Academy – Goulburn – ( Parade Sergeant ), Canterbury, Marrickville

ServiceFrom  24 January 1977  to  18 March 2004 = 26+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 28 April 1993

Born:  12 July 1956

Died on18 March 2004

Age:  47

CauseBrain aneurysm

Funeral date:  24 March 2004

Funeral location:  Christ the King Catholic Church, Bass Hill

Buried at:  Bulli Cemetery, Carrington St, Bulli, NSW

SGn  Row C

 Memorial at:  A trophy, for Baton Twirling, has been dedicated in her name.

Sonia Joy McKELL

Sonia Joy McKELL

 

1989 Firing range instructors Snr Cst Sonia McKell (deceased), Toni McMahon, Kim Grosbe and Laura Lowe at the Police Academy in Goulburn. 2012 Cst Cody Brennan, Cst Kelly Robson, Sgt Suzie O'Leary and Snr Cst Nicole Lucaci Photo courtesy News Ltd
1989 Firing range instructors Snr Cst Sonia McKell (deceased), Toni McMahon, Kim Grosbe and Laura Lowe at the Police Academy in Goulburn. 2012 Cst Cody Brennan, Cst Kelly Robson, Sgt Suzie O’Leary and Snr Cst Nicole Lucaci Photo courtesy News Ltd

 

Sonia Joy McKell 12.7.1956 - 18.3.2004 Loving partner of John Devoted mother of Jarrad Beloved daughter of Jean & Graham Loved sister of Vicki

 

 

[alert_blue]SONIA is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue] * NOT JOB RELATED

 [divider_dotted]

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

McKELL, Sonia 18/3/2004
We miss you, John, Jarrad and Vicki.
In Memoriam
Published in The Daily Telegraph on 18/03/2014

http://tributes.dailytelegraph.com.au/notice/30112073/view

[divider_dotted]

Sonia Joy McKell married in October 1980 and changed her surname, departmentally, to BISCOE.

She served at the School Lecturing Section based at Granville Police Station;  then to the Redfern Police Academy – chief Instructional staff – as she was a champion ‘ Marching Girl ‘ before joining the job.;  a period at Liverpool Police Station; back to the Police Academy – as the Parade Sergeant. Here she was the first female parade sergeant when her sister (Vicki) was sworn in as a member of the NSW Police Force. ; also served a short period at Canterbury; and the only other location known is Marrickville Police Station.

Joe Ees

[divider_dotted]

Officers honour fallen police

Posted

Hundreds of police officers and their families will today gather at the Domain in Sydney for National Police Remembrance Day, to pay tribute to colleagues who have died in duty.

While officers across the country will remember those who have gone before them, Sydney police are heading to the Wall of Remembrance at the Domain for a wreath-laying ceremony.

Since 1803, 249 officers have been killed in the line of duty throughout New South Wales by stabbings, shootings or accidents while conducting vehicle checks.

Officers will also honour police whose careers have been cut short by illness.

One of those is Sergeant Sonia McKell, who died of a brain aneurism in 2004, leaving behind a three-year-old son Jarrod.

Jarrod, now six, will receive a $5,000 scholarship from the Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione as part of the commemorations.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2007-09-28/officers-honour-fallen-police/683274

[divider_dotted]

 

Sonia Joy McKell | World Baton Twirling Federation
first time Australia competed at the 1987 World Baton Twirling Championships. She was a member of that team and always said that competing on the world stage was a highlight of her twirling career. From that year onwards Sonia involved herself in encouraging Australian athletes to compete at the world level knowing that by doing this we, as a country, could only improve our skills by utilising the experience and knowledge our athletes brought back. Throughout her twirling career Sonia took on the responsibilities of State President, State Head Judge, National Head Judge, Technical Advisor and between the years 1993 – 1998 and 1999 – 2004 the job of President of the Australian Baton Twirling Association. She was responsible for contracting coaches from USA, Japan, Italy and France. This was an ongoing commitment to expose the members to as much diverse twirling knowledge as possible. Sonia was the coach of the Australian team who represented Australia in Holland 2000, France 2001 and this year 2004. Her athletes miss her terribly but know that she will be watching them in Osaka Japan. Sonia was a sergeant in the New South Wales police force and spent her working days at Marrickville Police Station.

At her funeral the Police Commissioner of New South Wales described Sonia as a caring compassionate colleague whose ethics and morals were above reproach. This was Sonia. Her partner John and beautiful son Jarrad survive Sonia. The birth of Jarrad in 2001 seemed to complete Sonia’s life, the joy and happiness he brought both her and John seemed to make the last 2 years all the more special. The suddenness of Sonia’s passing was a shock to all who knew and loved her. But her kindness, compassion, knowledge and skills she has left with us will ensure she will always be a part of the Australian Baton Twirling Association. Sonia will remain in our hearts forever.
Original URL path: http://www.wbtf.org/content/sonia-joy-mckell (2013-04-30)

http://archive-org.com/org/w/wbtf.org/2013-04-30_1979664_21/Athletes_World_Baton_Twirling_Federation/

[divider_dotted]

 

 

Sonia Joy McKell

AU Australia

12th July 1956 to 18th March 2004

Sonia was an integral part of the sport of baton twirling. She involved herself at the local club level, working up through to state, national and eventually the international level. She had a huge influence on the Australian Baton Twirling Association.

Sonia started her twirling career as most of us around her age did as a Drum Majorette, evolving through the years along with the sport into a baton twirler. Her club, Illawarra, (a suburb of Sydney) were the team representatives the first time Australia competed at the 1987 World Baton Twirling Championships. She was a member of that team and always said that competing on the world stage was a highlight of her twirling career.

From that year onwards, Sonia involved herself in encouraging Australian athletes to compete at the world level, knowing that by doing this, we as a country, could only improve our skills by utilising the experience and knowledge our athletes brought back.

Throughout her twirling career Sonia took on the responsibilities of State President, State Head Judge, National Head Judge, Technical Advisor and between the years 1993-1998 and 1999-2004 the job of President of the Australian Baton Twirling Association.

She was responsible for contracting coaches from USA, Japan, Italy and France. This was an ongoing commitment, to expose the members to as much diverse twirling knowledge as possible.

Sonia was the coach of the Australian team who represented Australia in Holland 2000, France 2001 and this year 2004. Her athletes miss her terribly but know that she will be watching them in Osaka, Japan. Sonia was a sergeant in the New South Wales police force and spent her working days at Marrickville Police Station. At her funeral, the Police Commissioner of New South Wales described Sonia as a caring, compassionate colleague whose ethics and morals were above reproach. This was Sonia.

Her partner John and beautiful son Jarrad survive Sonia. The birth of Jarrad in 2001 seemed to complete Sonia’s life, the joy and happiness he brought both her and John seemed to make the last 2 years all the more special. The suddenness of Sonia’s passing was a shock to all who knew and loved her. But her kindness, compassion, knowledge and skills she has left with us will ensure she will always be a part of the Australian Baton Twirling Association.

Sonia will remain in our hearts forever.

http://www.wbtf.org/memorial/sonia-joy-mckell

[divider_dotted]

 

 

 




Gregory Lewis PENN

Gregory Lewis PENN

New South Wales Police Force

Class 154 from Redfern Academy

[alert_yellow]Regd. #   17534[/alert_yellow]

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 4 April 1977

Constable – appointed 4 April 1978

Senior Constable – appointed 4 April 1986

Senior Sergeant – death

Stations?, VKG, Blue Light Disco Unit, Highway Patrol, PCYC – Police Citizens Youth Club, Rose Bay, Mascot, Corrimal, Lake Illawarra

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre April 1977?  to 4 April 2004 = 27 years, to the day, Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 28 April 1993

Born:  Friday  23 March 1956

Died on:  Sunday  4 April 2004

Age:  48

Cause:  Cancer – Brain, Kidney & Lung ( diagnosed late 2003 )

Funeral date:  Thursday  8 April 2004

Funeral location:  Eastern Suburbs Memorial Park, Randwick

Buried at:  Cremated ( Ashes collected by family )

 Memorial at:  Greg Penn Award for Program Excellence – Maitland PCYc

PENN system, in honour of one of the key architects of targeted programming – Greg PENN

 

Lauren PENN with her father Greg PENN
Lauren PENN with her father Greg PENN


gregory-lewis-penn-1-nswpf-died-4-april-2004

[alert_yellow]GREG is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 

 [divider_dotted]

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

[divider_dotted]

May they forever Rest In Peace

[divider_dotted]

Lauren’s page has now expired

901 days ago ( as of 28 November 2016 ), Lauren created this page in support of NSW Police Legacy.

With the help of NSW Police Legacy, Lauren gave everything:

  • Shared their page with everyone they could.
  • Received 6 donations from generous family and friends.
  • Raised $192.

My Story

Thank you for visiting my page. My name is Lauren Penn. To do city 2 surf has been on my to do list for over 10 years. As a young teenager my Dad would come in and wake me up at the crack of dawn to go for a walk with him, we talked about anything and everything on our walks and we would often talk about doing city 2 surf together.

Unfortunately we never were able to as my Dad pasted away from cancer when I was 15. My Dad, Senior Sergeant Greg Penn joined the NSW police force when he was only 21 and served 27 years. My Dad served in almost every duty as a police officer, from radio, blue light unit, highway patrol, PCYC. He worked at a number of stations, Rosebay, Mascot, Corrimal and Lake Illawarra.

Throughout his career he was highly commended and received a number of honors and medals. My Dad also created a computer program to track youths at the PCYC clubs and I remember visiting different clubs with him when he went to install the program.

Late 2003 we found out dad had cancer, brain cancer, lung cancer and kidney cancer. On the 4/4/04 my Dad passed away surrounded by our family at our home, he was 48.  2014 marks 10 years since losing Dad.

Every choice and decision I have my in the last ten years I would stop and ask myself “what would dad say”, “what you he do”. So being ten years, I wanted to do something with a lot of meaning; I choose to do city 2 surf, like we always talked about. At the time of registering, I hadn’t exercised properly for 3yrs, since registering I have started boot camp and eating correctly and have lost 10kgs so far, my goal is to be able to do city 2 surf in 2 hours and 20minutes.

After Dad passed away Police Legacy had a benefit night in my Dads honor which raised money for my sister and I to receive when we turned 25. With Police Legacies help I have been able to complete 4 TAFE certificates which have help me hugely in returning to work after having my daughter.

So as a small token of my appreciation towards Police Legacy, my goal is to raise $500.

https://city2surf2014.everydayhero.com/au/laurenpenn

[divider_dotted]

 

I also believe that Greg PENN did a lot of computer work in relation to the macro system in WordPerfect 5.1 in making shortcuts to the forms that were used in everyday police work – especially in relation to traffic matter and developed the system which was widely used throughout NSW Police Stations around the 1990’s.

[divider_dotted]

 

TARGETED PROGRAMMING: THE PENN SYSTEM

Real results in reducing juvenile crime

Police Officers working within PCYC tackle juvenile crime through what is known as “Targeted Programming”. The work of the Officers in 2004 was again instrumental in preventing and reducing youth crime.
Targeted Programming consists of three program areas:
1. Case Management of individual young offenders referred to PCYC Officers by a Police Local Area Command or local Magistrate, identified as Priority One work, or P1s;
2. High visibility policing in juvenile crime of anti-social behaviour locations or ‘hot-spots’, referred to as Priority Two work, or P2s;
3. Community Policing projects such as involvement in driver education or school visitation.
Targeted Programming is supported by a software planning and evaluation program developed within PCYC, and now known as the PENN system, in honour of one of the key architects of targeted programming, S/Sgt Greg Penn (see story page 35).
All 57 Clubs throughout NSW received Young Offender and Youth Crime ‘Hotspot’ referrals from Police Local Area Commands and the Crime Management Units throughout the year.
At the end of the 2004, PCYC Police had received 1951 young offender (Priority One) referrals since launching Targeted Programming in July 2001, of which 433 were Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) young people.
By the end of 2004, there were 575 Priority One young people being currently case managed by PCYC Police.

 

The Priority One results as at December 2004 were extremely positive with young offenders reducing their offending behaviour collectively by a staggering 68.9% over a nine month period.
In regards to Priority Two referrals and Youth Crime ‘Hotspots’, PCYC have received a total 336 referrals since July 2001, with 207 current Priority Two Referrals being targeted by PCYC Police in 2004.
There were a total of 24 807 ‘other’ young people involved in community policing conducted by PCYC Police.
PCYC’s work in crime prevention was recognised in 2004, through the Australian Violence and Crime Prevention Award Scheme.
During 2004, the PCYC Board funded a review of the PENN system to determine its validity and reliability. The evaluation focused on 861 referrals between 2001 and 2003, which were compared with a control group of all other young offenders not referred to PCYC Targeted Programming (92, 237 young offenders).
Some specific findings of the evaluation were:
8% of Targeted Programming participants reduced incidents by five or more in the three months immediately after referral;
29% of Targeted Programming participants reduced incidents by two or more.
Another interesting finding of the evaluation was that 9.9% of the non-PCYC group were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) young people, while ATSI young people made up 34.2% of the PENN referrals studied.
This shows that PCYC Targeted Programming has been particularly beneficial to many ATSI young people.

 

Other findings of the evaluation were:
That offence rates amongst those involved in the program drop significantly as reported;
That PCYC manages some of the State’s more difficult young offenders; and
The next stage in the evaluation of Targeted Programming could be a focus on long term behavioural change by persistence with young offenders.
PCYC looks forward to the further development of PENN in 2005 and congratulates the many dedicated Police Officers and their civilian colleagues in PCYC who, on a daily basis work with young people in their local community. The work they undertake is extremely important and challenging; their reward is the satisfaction of knowing they have a real impact, and they are positively changing the direction of the lives of young people.

 

SNR SERGEANT GREG PENN

In April 2004, PCYC lost one of its most respected Police Officers, when Snr Sgt Greg Penn lost his long battle with cancer. With the movement for about 10 years, Snr Sgt Penn began as the Inner Metro Zone Commander, served as Zone Commander for the Southern region and was acting State Co-ordinator when illness struck.
Despite his battle with cancer, Snr Sgt Penn dedicated himself to the progression of Police computer systems such as PASS (Programs And Services System).
The success of Targeted Programming and the PENN system were recognised by the Federal Government in the 2003 National Crime and Violence Prevention Awards.
After his passing, Snr Sgt Penn was honoured by the NSW Police for his work in the areas of computer software design and youth crime prevention, by being
awarded a Commissioner’s Commendation. The commendation recognised his outstanding commitment and dedication to duty throughout his career, particularly the vital role he played in the design and implementation of computer systems that have enabled enormous benefits to operational Police and the community. His wife Joanne gratefully accepted this award in his honour.
PCYC State Coordinator, Insp Paul Macmillan, said Snr Sgt Penn’s commitment in this most important area of policing merited acknowledgement at the highest level.
“His work has brought tangible benefits to the community and the NSW Police and is an example for others to follow in the best traditions of policing,” Insp
Macmillan said.
“Greg was extremely popular with a great sense of humour and warm personality. He will be enormously missed by his many friends in PCYC and the NSW Police.”
Sadly, Snr Sgt Penn leaves behind his wife Joanne, and two school aged daughters, Lauren and Alexandra.
PCYC hosted a benefit night for the Penn family at the Illawarra Master Builders Club which featured a performance by the NSW Police Swing Band, with
funds raised going towards his family.

https://www.pcycnsw.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/pub_ar2004.pdf

[divider_dotted]

 

 

 

 




Arthur Stephen McKENNA

 Arthur Stephen McKENNA

New South Wales Police Force

“possibly” Redfern Police Academy Class 82, 83 or 84

Regd. # 9677

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 30 May 1960

Constable 1st Class – appointed 30 May 1966

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 6 September 1975

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed ???

Stations?, Fairfield G.D’s

Service:  From  to  ? ( is in the 1979 Stud Book but not the 1988 )

AwardsNational Medal – possibly granted 15 September 1980

Born:  Thursday  12 December 1940 in Harden, NSW

Died on:  Monday  4 October 2004 in Tamworth Base Hospital, NSW

Cause:  Cancer

Age: 63 yrs  9 mths  22 days

Funeral date:  Thursday  7 October 2004

Funeral location??

Funeral Type:  Burial

Buried at:  Lincoln Grove Gardens, 1040 Gunnedah Rd, Tamworth, NSW

Grave Location:  FYP – 4 – A ( Family Plot )

GPS of Grave:  -31.075638   150.849480

 

ARTHUR is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance *NEED MORE INFO

 

 [divider_dotted]

 Funeral location:

[divider_dotted]

Arthur, back in the late 1970’s, was working the caged trucks of Fairfield and Cabramatta Police Stations ( both 34 Division ).

No further details are known of his death.

[divider_dotted]




Harold John FERRIS

Harold John FERRIS

New South Wales Police Force

Joined NSW Police Force via NSW Police Cadet system on 5 July 1937

Cadet # 147

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Superintendent 3rd Class

Stations:  Newcastle (1979)

Service:  From  5 July 1937  to  ?

Awards:    Queen’s Police Medal ( QPM ) – granted 31 December 1977

National Medal – granted 8 February 1979

Born:  18/07/1920

Died on:  02/09/2004

Cause?

Age:  84

Funeral date?

Funeral location:  Belmont, New South Wales.

Buried at:  Cremated and ashes spread over Belmont Bay, Lake MacQuarie.

Memorial plaque:  Belmont Cemetery, NSW

[alert_yellow]HAROLD is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

 

 [divider_dotted]

 

Canberra Times  Saturday  31 December 1977  p 13 of 22 Queen's Police Medal for Distinguished Service NSW Police Force Harold John Ferris, superintendent 3rd class
Canberra Times Saturday 31 December 1977 p 13 of 22
Queen’s Police Medal for Distinguished Service NSW Police Force
Harold John Ferris, superintendent 3rd class

Harold John FERRIS - memorial plaque
Harold John FERRIS – memorial plaque

[divider_dotted]

On 08/09/1979  a regular festival takes place in Newcastle called the Mattara Festival. On this day a rock concert was put on for the youth. It apparently got out of hand due to the number of youths in attendance, lack of private security, the volume of the music, the ‘inappropriate’ dress of the young females, and the consumption of alcohol. Supt Ferris said that “We could have filled our jails that day”

[divider_dotted]

Harold was the husband of Mabel Isabel “Mabs” FERRIS who died on Friday  22 May 2015, aged 93.

[divider_dotted]




Ronald Alexander CORCORAN

Ronald Alexander CORCORAN

( late of Fitzroy St, Cowra. Formerly of Punchbowl, Sydney )

New South Wales Police Force

Class # 3 – Penrith Police Academy

[alert_yellow]Regd. # 5030[/alert_yellow]

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 18 February 1946

Senior Constable – appointed 21 August 1961

Senior Constable – retirement

Stations:  Mounted Section ( 1946 – 1952 ), Regent Street Traffic ( 1952 – 1960 ), Camperdown GD’s ( 1960 – 1963 ), Glebe GD’s ( 1963 – 1968 )

Service:  From  pre 18 February 1946  to  7 October 1968 = 22+ years Service

Awards?

Born:  15 April 1925

Died on:  13 February 2004

Cause:  Dementia

Age:  78

Funeral date:  17 February 2004

Funeral location:  Cowra Anglican Church, Cowra

Buried atCowra Lawn Cemetery, Doncaster Dve – now laying with Olive

Husband to Olive, father to Graeme ( # 16712 ) & Darrell

[alert_blue]RONALD is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue]  *NOT WORK RELATED*

 

Ronald Alexander CORCORAN
RONALD ALEXANDER CORCORAN

 [divider_dotted]

 




Adam DUNNING

Adam DUNNING

Australian Protective Services Officer ( A.P.S. )

Australian Federal Police, 29 March 2003 – 22 December 2004

RAAF Reservist, 1995 –

Regd. # ?

Rank:  PSO1 (Protective Services Officer )

Stations:  Solomon Islands, 4 October 2004 – 22 December 2004

Service:  From  29 March 2003  to  22 December 2004 = 1+ year Service

[blockquote]

Unit:  RAMSI

Regiment:  ?

Enlisted:  ?

Service #  ?

Rank:  ?

Embarkation:  ?

Next of kin:  ?

Religion:  ?

Single / Married:  ?

Returned to Australia:  ?

[/blockquote]

Awards:  Meritorious Unit Citation for work in East Timor.

Commendation for efforts in disarming a male carrying a replica pistol in Honiara Court.

Born:  ?

Died on:  Wednesday  22 December 2004

Cause:  Shot – Murdered

whilst deployed on official duties at Honiara, Solomon Islands

Age: 26

Funeral date:  Thursday  30 December 2004

Funeral location:  ANZAC Memorial Chapel,

Royal Military College, Duntroon, ACT

Buried at:  Cremated

Memorial:  The main street of a new AFP training village in Canberra was named Adam Dunning Drive in his memory.

Adam DUNNING
Adam DUNNING

Adam IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance


Tears for the fallen as Adam comes home

By Craig Skehan and Aban Contractor
December 24, 2004

AFP officers farewell their mate Adam Dunning after loading his coffin into a RAAF jet at Honiara Domestic Airport.
AFP officers farewell their mate Adam Dunning after loading his coffin into a RAAF jet at Honiara Domestic Airport. Photo: Andy Zakeli

 

They had slow-marched their comrade’s casket to the plane that would take him home.

Their backs were straight, but the emotions were too much: tears tumbled down the cheeks of the Australian Federal Police pallbearers as they did Adam Dunning this last honour.

Then, once his body was stowed in the hold of the RAAF jet on the tarmac in Honiara, his mates made a last gesture of solidarity with the colleague they were farewelling forever – forming a circle, heads bowed, arms locked around each other’s shoulders.

Adam Dunning, the 26-year-old AFP protective service officer who was killed by a sniper in the early hours of Wednesday morning, was accompanied home by the Minister for Justice, Chris Ellison, and the Opposition’s home affairs spokesman, Robert McClelland, but at Fairbairn air base in Canberra, where the RAAF 737 touched down just before 6pm, it was Mr Dunning’s family and friends – his parents, Michael and Christine, his sisters, Sarah and Emma, and his girlfriend, Elise Wiscombe – who formed the guard of honour.

Standing in two straight lines, they faced the plane.

With the Australian Federal Police Commissioner, Mick Keelty, standing watch nearby, Mr Dunning’s parents held their heads high, and his sisters and Ms Wiscombe quietly sobbed as eight AFP pallbearers bore his flag-draped casket from the plane. His parents held hands and seemed to stand even straighter as their only son was placed in the hearse that would take him to the mortuary.

In the Solomons, police are questioning a taxi driver about several suspects in the murder. A Solomon Islands police source told the Herald that the taxi – seen near the murder scene with several passengers before the shooting – had been seized.

On a narrow, potholed road on the outskirts of the Solomons capital, Honiara, locals offered heartfelt apologies for the shooting.

“I am so very sorry,” said one young man. “He came here to help us.”

By the roadside at Zion Junction, investigating officers had cut the long grass to help search for clues to the identity of the person who, in darkness shortly after 3am on Wednesday, shot Mr Dunning while he was on patrol in a Toyota Land Cruiser.

Zion Junction does not have a particularly dangerous reputation. Rather, locals said, other settlements further along the same ridge were known for trouble, ranging from extortion to payback shootings.

Moffat Suiga, a community elder who was awakened by the shots that killed Mr Dunning, said he and others were at a loss to explain the murder.

A middle-aged businessman said the overwhelming majority of Solomon Islanders wanted to see those responsible put in jail. He said it would be a good thing if the Australian-led intervention force remained for the next 40 years.

At a commemoration service earlier in Honiara, Mr Keelty said Mr Dunning had “died for peace”.

The Solomon Islands Prime Minister, Sir Allan Kemakeza, said the young man had been helping the country overcome ethnic strife and crime. “We will not forget him,” he said.

A police funeral will be held for Mr Dunning on a day to be announced.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/World/Tears-for-the-fallen-as-Adam-comes-home/2004/12/23/1103391900411.html



adam-dunning-funeral


Offenders:  John Hen OME, 31 & James TATAU, 29


 

Location of Murder: 

 


 

Peacekeeper killed
ADG’s funeral brings Air Force and police together

By FLGOFF Fiona Peacock

The funeral of LAC Adam Dunning, a member of the PAF and Air Force Active Reserve.

The funeral of LAC Adam Dunning, a member of the PAF and Air Force Active Reserve.

LAC Adam Dunning.

LAC Adam Dunning.

LEADING Aircraftman Adam Dunning, an ADG with No. 28 (City of Canberra) Squadron and former member of No. 2 Air Field Defence Squadron, was killed in December last year while on operational duty with the Australian Federal Police as part of the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI).

In the early hours of December 22, LAC Dunning and an Australian Protective Service colleague were on a routine vehicle patrol in Honiara, protecting the Prime Minister’s and Governor General’s residences.

A concealed gunman shot at the vehicle, fatally wounding LAC Dunning, who was 26.

He deployed to the Solomons in October and, after only six weeks there, was awarded a commendation for disarming a man in front of the Magistrates Court.

At LAC Dunning’s funeral, members of 28SQN played a part in recognising his Air Force service. The squadron’s honorary air commodore, Air Commodore Justice Terence Higgins, represented 28SQN among the official party of Service chiefs.

Members of the Air Field Defence Wing provided the firing party and the guard of honour for receiving VIPs. The RAAF Ensign was carried by Pilot Officer Shane McGaughey and was escorted by Flight Sergeant John Forth.

Two close friends of LAC Dunning, Leading Aircraftmen Tim Gresham and David Pauli, were members of the bearer party. The President of 28SQN Association, Steve Williams, represented former 28SQN members. 28SQN members joined AFP personnel to form a guard of honour.

AFP Commissioner Mick Keelty praised No. 34 Squadron for the way it handled bringing LAC Dunning’s body back to Australia.

http://www.defence.gov.au/news/raafnews/editions/4701/topstories/story03.htm


 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2004-12-22/afp-officer-adam-dunning-was-murdered-while-on/606888


 

Family, friends, colleagues farewell peacekeeper

By Misha Schubert
Political correspondent
Canberra
December 31, 2004

They stood side by side. Two long lines of blue uniforms facing each other along the tree-lined road. Like a slow Mexican wave, each snapped to attention and saluted as the body of one of their own passed by.

Adam Dunning, murdered by a sniper while on patrol in the Solomons early last week, had begun the last leg of his journey home.

Earlier, these men and women of the Australian Federal Police and the Royal Australian Air Force had wept openly as Mr Dunning was farewelled with full police and military honours in the Duntroon chapel. “He was a great man,” said his federal police mate Pat Castle.

The nation’s military chiefs turned out to pay tribute, as did Prime Minister John Howard, Governor-General Michael Jeffery and senior cabinet ministers.

But this ritual belonged to those who knew and loved Adam Dunning.

His mother, Christine, read from a tribute that she and her husband, Mike, had written to their son in February. They had praised his courage, sensitivity and mettle.

His partner, Elise, who had brought red roses for the man she had loved, said he was her greatest friend. “He was my strength, my inspiration, my love.”

Peacekeeper Beau Tennant, who was with Mr Dunning the night before he died, broke down as he recalled his friend’s generosity.

“Before he left me, his last words were: ‘Are you right for money mate?’ That was the kind of bloke he was,” he said.

Federal Police Commissioner Mick Keelty said Mr Dunning would live on in the memories of grateful Solomon Islanders.

“Adam Dunning died for peace and law and order. His work and his death will always be remembered by his colleagues,” he told mourners.

The federal police hope to build a memorial to Mr Dunning at their new training centre for overseas police peacekeepers.

Mr Dunning also served with RAAF in Timor before joining the AFP.

Police believe his murder and another attack on police on October 21 were carried out by three former members of the Malaitan Eagle Force militia.

They have charged two men – John Ome and Philip Kwaimani – over the attacks and are hunting James Tatau, who Mr Keelty said was present at both events and had access to a cache of weapons.

Police believe the trio were working on their own, with no sign of any broader uprising against the peacekeeping effort.

It fell to Emma, who had adored her older brother, to claim his service medals and caps from the flag-shrouded coffin and hand them to her grieving parents.

As his police mates carried Mr Dunning’s coffin from the chapel into the sunlight, drummers and bagpipers ushered him on his way. A police motorcade led the cortege through Canberra’s streets to a private service and cremation.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/National/Family-friends-colleagues-farewell-peacekeeper/2004/12/30/1104344927723.html



Body of sniper victim arrives in Canberra

December 23, 2004 – 7:54PM

 

A plane carrying the body of murdered Australian peacekeeper Adam Dunning has landed in his home town of Canberra.

The 26-year-old Australian Protective Services officer was shot twice in the back by a sniper while serving as part of a peacekeeping mission in the Solomon Islands yesterday morning.

Members of Mr Dunning’s family, and his colleagues were on hand to formally receive his body.

Australian Federal Police Commissioner Mick Keelty returned from the Solomon Islands about half an hour before the plane bearing Officer Dunning’s body landed.

He was among those waiting for Justice Minister Chris Ellison and Labor’s homeland security spokesman Robert McClelland, who accompanied the body on the flight back to Canberra.

Commissioner Keelty, Senator Ellison, Mr McClelland and AFP officers formed a guard of honour before the coffin was removed from the plane.

Family members, including Officer Dunning’s parents Mike and Christine, and girlfriend Elise Wiscombe, stood arm in arm watching proceedings.

A guard of honour, carrying Officer Dunning’s hat, led the flag-draped coffin to the hearse.

Eight pall bearers stood tall under the weight, as Officer Dunning’s police colleagues watched on.

A cavalcade of AFP motorcycles is waiting to lead the hearse to Canberra’s mortuary.

A full police funeral will be held for Officer Dunning on a day to be announced.

Officer Dunning’s parents took the time to thank those who attended the short ceremony before the hearse headed for Kingston mortuary under police escort.

Senator Ellison later said the Solomons people were behind RAMSI and Australia’s efforts to bring law and order to the country.

He said some adjustments might be made to the conduct of night patrols but any final decision would depend on recommendations from the AFP.

He denied the Government had too quickly reduced the AFP’s military support in the Solomons.

“We’ve made fantastic progress in the Solomons and we never underestimated the danger that our people faced,” he told ABC television

http://www.smh.com.au/news/World/Body-of-sniper-victim-arrives-in-Canberra/2004/12/23/1103391888916.html


 

More troops sent in as peacekeeper slain

By Craig Skehan and Cynthia Banham
December 23, 2004

Australia is rushing 100 extra troops to the Solomon Islands in defiant reaction to the sniper murder of Adam Dunning, the nation’s first peacekeeper to be killed by hostile fire.

The murder highlights the perils of the new interventionist role in the Pacific islands, but the Prime Minister, John Howard, vowed the mission to the Solomons would go on “undeterred, unrestrained, unaffected by what’s happened”.

“We won’t be cowed by this,” the Foreign Minister, Alexander Downer, added.

Mr Dunning, a 26-year-old Australian Protective Service officer from Canberra who had dodged bullets while serving in East Timor, was shot twice in the back while on a patrol in a four-wheel drives Toyota Land Cruiser in the capital, Honiara, at 3.10am on Wednesday. The bullets were among six shots fired rapidly from a high-powered military rifle.

“It looks as though the person who fired it had training in the use of such firearms,” a Solomon Islands official said.

Members of former ethnic militias – who had formed gangs and reduced the country to anarchy – are now being questioned. Australian investigators say the involvement of former Solomon Islands police officers, or an individual officer, cannot be ruled out.

At his Canberra home, Mr Dunning’s father, Michael, was distraught as he spoke of his son’s honourable death.

“It is sad as he cared for the [Solomons] people so much and was doing something really good on their behalf,” Mr Dunning told the Herald. “He always has been a decent person, tough and soft-hearted at the same time. He was totally honourable and very stubborn – nobody could make him do anything that he did not think was right. He was a credit to us.”

Adam Dunning had been planning a future with his 22-year-old girlfriend, Elise Wiscombe, on his return home next month. “I’m very, very proud of what he’s done over there,” she said. “He’s one of the greatest people I’ve ever met.”

Mr Dunning was part of the regional intervention force which has been seeking to stem ethnic and criminal violence in the Solomons since July last year.

A rapid-response, 100-member infantry company from the First Royal Australian Regiment was to leave Townsville on Thursday for the Solomons, just a day after the murder. The Defence Minister, Robert Hill, said: “This is to send a clear message to the thugs … that we will not tolerate the murder of our police officers.”

A meeting of departmental secretaries in Canberra recommended extra forces to support the 160 defence force personnel already there. Those troops are backing the 147 Australian Federal Police members who are serving in the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) – about 95 of them from the Australian Protective Service, which comes under the federal police. The Justice Minister, Chris Ellison, and the Federal Police Commissioner, Mick Keelty, flew to Honiara on Wednesday night. Australian forensic experts also flew in.

Mr Keelty said: “Over 4000 arrests have been made and over 3700 weapons have been seized [since the intervention began]. Clearly this indicates that there are some in the community in the Solomon Islands who are not happy about RAMSI’s presence.”

He said the hot tropical climate – and the large number of weapons already recovered – were among the reasons body armour had not been used for regular patrols. However, this is now under review.

Mr Keelty called Mr Dunning “a brave and courageous young Australian” and said his killing emphasised “the danger that our people face”.

The Solomons Prime Minister, Sir Allan Kemakeza, described the killing as barbaric and cowardly.

Mr Dunning’s partner on patrol, who had been driving, tried to resuscitate him.

The murder scene, on the outskirts of Honiara, was close to two settlements which are known to be frequented by former ethnic militiaman who formed criminal gangs.

The Australian police contingent has been at the forefront of efforts to clean up local police and officers have been charged with offences from corruption to assault and robbery. A number of local politicians are either under investigation or already facing various charges.

Mr Keelty said the ammunition used indicated the murder weapon was an SLR or possibly an AK-47. This was consistent with some of the weapons used before the arrival of the intervention force. The looting of many SLRs and other military-style weapons from Solomons police armouries had fuelled the five years of unrest that prompted the intervention of the Australian-led force.

There was a major riot at the Central Prison in Honiara this year, when inmates threw rocks at Australian personnel and painted anti-Australian slogans. Two months ago, an intervention force vehicle patrol was fired on.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/World/More-troops-sent-in-as-peacekeeper-slain/2004/12/22/1103391841939.html


 

Protective Service Officers were deployed along with other Australian law enforcement officers in the Solomon Islands as part of RAMSI. The peacekeeping force suffered their first casualty on 22 December 2004 when PSO1 Adam Dunning was shot and killed while deployed on official duties in the Solomon Islands. Two former members of a local militia were charged but acquitted of Dunning’s murder.[5] Officer Dunning was buried with full police honours.

The main street of a new AFP training village in Canberra was named Adam Dunning Drive in his memory.[6] The $2.8 million training facility at Mount Majura just outside Canberra, has been designed to replicate situations in regional countries to which personnel might be assigned.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Protective_Service


 

Dunning remembered in training complex

June 23, 2005 – 4:04PM

The main street of a new training village for Australian Federal Police and other personnel being sent overseas has been named after murdered peacekeeper Adam Dunning.

The $2.8 million training facility at Majura, just outside Canberra, has been designed to replicate situations in regional countries to which personnel might be assigned.

Prime Minister John Howard officially opened the facility on Thursday in the presence of police chiefs from across the country as well as from several regional nations.

Australian Protective Service officer Mr Dunning, 26, was fatally shot twice in the back while on night patrol in the Solomon Islands capital of Honiara in December.

He was serving as part of the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomons.

His parents attended the opening of the village, through the centre of which runs a road now named Adam Dunning Drive.

“The loss of Adam Dunning signified that this is very dangerous work,” Justice Minister Senator Chris Ellison said.

 “That was the ultimate sacrifice paid in the course of his duties.”

Mr Howard said the new facility reflected the new security reality for Australia and its region.

“Events of the last five years have totally transformed both the demands and the expectations of the Australian community on the Australian Federal Police,” he told the gathering.

“In that five-year period we have seen the threatening arrival of international terrorism.

“We’ve (also) seen the emergence of an ongoing need on the part of this country, in cooperation with our friends in the Pacific region, to involve ourselves in the restoration of conditions of law and order and cooperation with police services and governments of those countries.”

The training village, to be used by a range of emergency services personnel as well as police, recreates the environment that police experience when on overseas missions.

Designed to reflect the streetscape of a small overseas township, it enables true-to-life scenario training which helps to prepare police for unknown and sometimes dangerous challenges.

It includes 18 buildings and structures including a corner store, a town hall, a police station, a school, a pub, a marketplace and even a cemetery, reflecting the fact that police are sometimes required to perform exhumations in the course of their work.

The spokesman said 124 personnel had already trained at the complex which was completed in March.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/National/Dunning-remembered-in-training-complex/2005/06/23/1119321840325.html


 

 

 




Ian Ross DENNIS

Ian Ross DENNIS

aka ‘ Spook ‘

New South Wales Police Force

NSW Goulburn Police Academy Class # 227

ProCst # 98375

Regd. # 23964

Rank: Commenced Training at Goulburn Academy on 1 April 1987 ( aged 30 years, 4 months, 8 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed 26 June 1987 ( aged 30 years, 7 months, 17 days )

Constable – appointed 26 June 1988

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations:  Bathurst, Redfern, Walgett, Lightning Ridge –

ServiceFrom 1 April 1987 to 3 August 2004 = 17 years, 4 months & 2 days Service

Awards:  No Find on Australian Honours

Born:  Friday  9 November 1956

Died:  Tuesday  3 August 2004

Cause:  Illness – possibly cancer???

Age:  47 years,  8 months, 25 days

Funeral date: ?

Buried at: Walgett in the R.C. section of Walgett Cemetery. plot 117K

Memorial:  Annual ‘E A’ Dennis Memorial cricket match

 


 

………Another police officer also was mourned today – Senior Constable Ian Ross Dennis, based in Walgett, north-west NSW, who died in hospital after a short battle with an illness, aged 47.

Mr Moroney paid tribute to both officers, saying they had been outstanding servants of the police force.

“It’s important on these occasions that we honour and acknowledge that service and that commitment,” he said.

“It’s a very sad day for the organisation to lose officers of this calibre who have selflessly served the people of this state to the very best of their skill and ability.

“And that’s all I could ever ask them to do.”

http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/08/03/1091476465269.html?from=storylhs


 

NSW Fallen Police FaceBook GROUP:  25 November 2014

Ian Borland Ian started out as a probationary constable at Bathurst where he worked for several years before he transferred. Prior to entering the Police he worked for the now defunct Evans Shire Council as s Grader driver. He was brought to Bathurst from Walgett to play rugby league for Bathurst St Patrick’s Club.
He was also an accomplished boxer. He fought for the Australian attire at Exhibition Hall, Brisbane where he was beaten on points and collapsed after the bout.
It was discovered he had glandular fever and blood poisoning yet he fought the full twelve rounds. After the bout he was not offered a rematch.
He and his wife Anne were tireless workers within the aboriginal community here in Bathurst.

Kevin Banister DENNIS Ian (Spook)

Death notice

03AUG2004

Death 47

late of Walgett, formerly of Bathurst

Western Advocate (Bathurst)

07AUG2004.

Born 09/11/1956.

Buried at Walgett in R.C. section.

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/486645958143410/?comment_id=489605637847442&ref=notif&notif_t=group_comment


 

Ian is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

Ian is NOT mentioned on the Retired Police Association Vale list


Grave location


 

Castlereagh’s Cricketing Comrades celebrate ten years of restoring community spirit

‘EA’ Dennis Memorial Shield

Castlereagh LAC Police and the Walgett Community took to the field on 26 October 2014 to commemorate the 10th Annual ‘E A’ Dennis Memorial cricket match.

The celebrated event was initiated in 2004 to honour the memory of the late Senior Constable Ian Dennis, an Aboriginal police officer formerly based at Walgett and Lightning Ridge.
As the temperature soared to 39.2 degrees, players from both sides demonstrated enthusiastic cricketing skills and a strong sense of community spirit. “The match is all about building better relationships between our police and our community. We all want the best for our community, and if we work together we have a better chance of reducing crime and re-offending”, said annual match organiser and Castlereagh LAC Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer (ACLO) Graham Ruttley.
In a close-fought battle reminiscent of Ashes tests from yesteryear, the 20/20 match resulted in a hotly contested draw.
The much-admired Senior Constable Dennis died in 2004. He is survived by his wife Ann Dennis, and their three children. Ann Dennis said Ian would be proud of the comradeship and encouragement displayed on the pitch.

“I can’t believe it is ten (10) years since Ian had died. Ian had overcome many obstacles and challenging adversity to fulfil his dream of becoming a Police Officer with the NSW Police Force. This cricket match provides the only opportunity in our community for Aboriginal people to engage in a different more positive way with local police officers,” said Ann Dennis.

“I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the Castlereagh LAC for their continued support. It is through the hard work, persistence and dedication of the Police ACLO Graham Ruttley, that this is an overwhelming success.
Castlereagh LAC Superintendent James Stewart believes that Ian’s legacy recognises the importance of Police being seen as part of their community. “Ian is often remembered by townspeople and police as being community minded, dedicated to his family and a good Police Officer. The EA Dennis Memorial Shield is a fitting way to recognise his contribution to the community of Walgett, and for Police to be seen as part of the community.”

The event is integral to improving communication and understanding between Castlereagh LAC police and the Walgett Aboriginal Community. It aligns with the Aboriginal Strategic Direction (ASD) 2012-2017, through the promotion of Aboriginal community ownership and involvement. It addresses all four of the priority areas as outlined in the ASD 2012-2017 document; particularly Priority 2 (Improve Communication and Understanding between police and Aboriginal People), by fostering the belief that police are an essential part of the community, and offering positive role models and connections for troubled youth and families.

The match is supported by an ASD Crime Prevention Grant as a key initiative to address the over-representation of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

The match is strongly tied to Goals 16 and 17 of the NSW 2021 (State Plan), through its focus on preventing and reducing crime, and decreasing juvenile and adult re-offending. “Sport is an essential part of our community. Through sport we can cross cultural and societal gaps, and encourage participation and integration. Events like the ‘EA’ Dennis cricket match can lead to better understanding, cooperation and partnerships within our local community,” said Castlereagh LAC Crime Coordinator, Sergeant Lisa Jones.

(7) Facebook


‘Admired’ cop dies in hospital

Senior Constable Ian Ross Dennis was admitted to Sydney’s Prince of Wales Hospital on Monday but died from a viral infection yesterday morning .

The 47-year-old father of three was born and raised in Walgett, and after joining the force he served in country communities including Dubbo and Lightning Ridge.

Mr Dennis started off his career as a panel beater in Walgett before he went to work in Bathurst as a plant operator for Evans Shire Council.

He stayed there for 13 years, until at the age of 30 he decided to become a police officer.

Mr Dennis proudly graduated from the NSW Police College in Goulburn in 1987.

“To lose an officer not only of Senior Constable Dennis’ calibre, but a man of his integrity, is a terrible loss,” NSW Police Commissioner Ken Moroney said.

Castlereagh Local Area Commander Superintendent Stan Single also paid tribute to a colleague and good mate.

“He was a wonderful character and was always happy, always there with a joke,” Superintendent Single said.

“Senior Constable Dennis was an excellent role model for the Aboriginal community.

When he first joined the force Mr Dennis was a general duties officer at Bathurst until December 1992.

In July 1997 Mr Dennis moved to Dubbo and was among our local ranks for three years until early 2000.

He then moved to Lightning Ridge for two years and eventually returned to Walgett police station, where he was serving until his death.

Mr Dennis is survived by his wife Anne, their sons Damian and Timothy, a daughter Geraldine and two grandchildren.

‘Admired’ cop dies in hospital | Daily Liberal | Dubbo, NSW


 

Policeman succumbs to illness

Tributes are being paid to a Walgett-based policeman who died in hospital in Sydney yesterday after a viral infection.

Senior Constable Ian Ross Dennis, 47, had been admitted to the Prince of Wales Hospital in July.

Senior Constable Dennis worked as a panel beater and plant operator in Bathurst before joining the police force where he served in Tamworth, Lightning Ridge, Dubbo and Walgett.

Castlereagh local area commander Superintendent Stan Single says Senior Constable Dennis was an excellent role model for the Aboriginal community.

He participated in the Walgett community, spending a lot of time with the town’s young people.

Senior Constable Dennis was married with three children.

 

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

Ian Ross DENNIS aka ' Spook '

 


 

 

 




David James GUFF

David James GUFF

aka  ‘ Guffy ‘

NSW Goulburn Police Academy  Class # 229

New South Wales Police Force

ProCst # 98810

Regd. # 24260

Rank:  Commenced training at Goulburn Academy on 29 June 1987 ( aged 24 years, 8 months, 4 days )

Probationary Constable – appointed 18 September 1987 ( aged 24 years, 11 months, 13 days )

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ?

 

Final Rank:  Senior Constable

Stations:  Petersham ( late 1980s ), Gladesville, Ryde, Zetland Police Rescue Squad, Pennant Hills GDs & Rescue Squad

Born: Friday  5 October 1962

Died:  Tuesday  17 August 2004

Cause: Illness – Suicide possibly due to departmental ‘ proceedings ‘

Age:  41 years, 10 months, 12 days

Funeral date:  25 August 2004

Buried in Vaughan Catholic Lawn Cemetery,

Grave location:  Row 1A, Grave 0084,

Freeman Ave, Macquarie Park, Nth Ryde.

 

David is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

 

David James GUFF - 2nd from left. Pennant Hills Rescue Squad.
David James GUFF2nd from left. Pennant Hills Rescue Squad.

 

David James GUFF
Dave working in with Polair

David James GUFF
Dave ( on right ) working in with Polair ( unknown operator )

It is believed that David was subject of a departmental ‘ proceeding ‘ and that he may have been on long term sick report.

It is understood that he committed suicide by hanging himself inside the family garage.

 

Pennant Hills Police Rescue Squad - around 2000
Pennant Hills Police Rescue Squad – around 2000

 

 

David James GUFF
as seen on 7 September 2020

David James GUFF

David James GUFF

David James GUFF

 

 

 

 

May he forever Rest In Peace

Ellen Marshall - daughter of David.
Ellen Marshall – daughter of David.

Ellen Marshall - daughter of David.
Ellen Marshall – daughter of David.


 

Grave location ( Row 1A )


 

 

 

 




Police Dog TITAN

Police Dog TITAN

New South Wales Police Force

Died  23 December 2004

Murdered – stabbed

 

Police Dog TITAN - stabbed to death during a siege at Seven Hills, NSW.
Police Dog TITAN – stabbed to death during a siege at Seven Hills, NSW.

Police Dog Titan. (Beychief Magic Return) Titan was tragically stabbed to death during a siege at Seven Hills, December 23rd, 2004.

His slaying caused new laws to be passed giving higher prison sentences for killing or injuring Police Service Animals. Titan‘s handler was Snr Const Sean McDowell.

http://www.beychief.com/in-memory-killed-in-the-l.asp

[divider_dotted]

 

 

Police Dog Memorial - Thamoor NSW
Police Dog Memorial – Thamoor NSW

 

Ode' to Police Dogs - Will we leave a pawprint ?
Ode’ to Police Dogs – Will we leave a pawprint ?