Jeanette WINTER

Jeanette WINTER

Wife of Kenneth Winter – Regd # 11147

Late of Gold Coast, Qld

New South Wales Police Force

Rank:  Police wife

Stations: ?

ServiceFrom  ? ? ?  to  ? ? ? = ? years Service

Awards?

Born? ? ?

Died on:  29 March 2010

Age:  78

Cause?

Event location:   ?

Event date:   ?

Funeral date? ? ?

Funeral location?

Buried at?

 Memorial located at?

 

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Nothing further can be found on this woman, her life or death.
Cal
6 August 2017
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Robert Jeffrey Joseph CROXFORD

Robert Jeffrey Joseph CROXFORD

aka  Bob

Late of Sunbury

1/  Commonwealth Police

2/  Victoria Police Force  Academy Squad 1/74

Regd. #  18267 ( VicPol )

Rank:  1/  Constable  21 August 1972 to 28 January 1974 ( ComPol )

2/  Probationary Constable – appointed 29 January 1974  ( VicPol )

Senior Constable – appointed 14 June 1979

Sergeant – appointed 30 December 1982

Senior Sergeant – appointed 26 March 1989

Stations: Russell St ( 17 June 1974 ),  Fitzroy ( 14 May 1975 ),  Detective at Russell St, then City West and then Homicide Squad.  CIB ( 14 March 1979 ), Broadmeadow, Avondale Hts ( 30 November 1983 ), City West ( 22 April 1987 – 1989 ), Altona North, Crime Courses Unit ( Detective Training School ) 20 February 1995 – Retirement

Service 1:  ( ComPol )  From  ? ? 1972  to  28 January 1974 = 1 year 161 days  years Service with ComPol

Service 2: ( VicPol ) From  29 January 1974  to  23 September 2000 = 26+ years Service

Total Policing Service:  28+ years Service

Awards: Nation Medal – granted 7 September 1990

Service Medal – 2nd Clasp – granted 1 September 1997

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 31 July 1999

Service Medal – 3rd Clasp – granted 1 September 1999

Victoria Police Star – granted 2006

  • 1.75 shot whilst on night shift. 2.20am when with Det S/C Kim West – laneway at rear of Cremorne St IRM – 3 shots fired at chest/head height. (Awarded the Victoria Police Star in 2006) . Sick leave 24.1.75 to 11.3.75. Clerical duties in Property Office from 12.3.75 to Retention on 1.4.75.

Born:  3 July 1950 at Euroa Bush Nursing hospital

Died on:  11 September 2010

Age:  60

Cause:  Suicide –

Event location:  Home

Event date:   11 September 2010

Funeral date18 September 2010

Funeral location:  Victoria Police Academy Chapel

Buried at:  Sunbury Lawn Cemetery, 80A Shields St, Sunbury, Victoria

Memorial:

Grave location:

-37.58941978049802    144.73147629682012

 Memorial located at?

[alert_yellow]BOB is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

IN LOVING MEMORY OF ROBERT JEFFREY CORXFORD 3.7.1950 - 11.9.2010 LOVED HUSBAND OF MAUREEN DEVOTED FATHER OF SIMON, DAVID, PAUL ALWAYS IN OUR HEARTS

IN LOVING MEMORY OF ROBERT JEFFREY CORXFORD 3.7.1950 - 11.9.2010 LOVED HUSBAND OF MAUREEN DEVOTED FATHER OF SIMON, DAVID, PAUL ALWAYS IN OUR HEARTS

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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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BOB CROXFORD – EULOGY – POLICE ACADEMY SATURDAY 18 SEP 2010

 

  1. Thanks to Bob’s family for giving me the opportunity to speak about Bob today – privilege to be asked. Also pleased to have Nigel up here with me to act as my ‘wingman’ which he’s done many times before.

 

  1. My aim is give you an overview of Bob’s professional life; his employment career. To do that I need to cover a 45 year period in the space of about 10/15 minutes. As a consequence I’ll be very brief but hopefully it will add to what you already know about his working life and perhaps fill some gaps.

 

  1. If any of you have been to a trivia night, you may have taken part in a game they call ‘sit down if’. The way it’s run is that everybody stands up and the host asks a question. If the answer applies to you, you keep standing. If it doesn’t, you sit down. It goes on until there’s only one person standing. For example if everybody stood up now I could say something like ‘sit down if…you’ve eaten  takeaway this week.  If you had, you’d sit down and I’d keep finding things to ask to get people to sit down.

 

If we used that approach here today, I’d ask you to sit down each time I told you something about Bob’s life that you didn’t know about. …and then see how many people were left standing.

 

The reason I thought about it was that I found that Bob had such a diverse and extensive life – and that’s just from the employment perspective.

 

Let’s set the scene.

 

 

  • Born at the Bush Nursing hospital in Euroa. July 3rd, 1950
  • Full name was Robert Jeffrey Joseph
  • He attended Euroa State and High Schools.
  • Left at age 15 (Form 4) (or Year 10) in July/August 1965

 

How many people would be left standing?

 

Bob had four major occupations during his working life.

 

 

First Employment – Butchery

 

  • His first job – almost the day after he left school (July/Aug 65) was with Smith and Ryan (Butchers in Euroa). (Left when widowed mum moved to Wangaratta).
  • When mum moved the family to Wangaratta in April 70 he went to work for L & M.Goodwin (Butchers) Rowan St Wangaratta.

 

It was during this time Bob decided to pursue another career – policing – and in Aug 71 he first applied for VicPol  – but fail to pass entrance exam. Education test – 65 errors (40 ‘general ability’.)

 

He decided instead to try for the Commonwealth Police and wrote on his application that he was leaving the butchery because he was “looking for a more interesting position”!

 

Second Employment – Commonwealth Police

 

  • He was successful and joined the Commonwealth Police in 1972 at the age of 22.
  • 4 week training course – came 10th of 28.
  • He served as a uniform Constable 21.8.72 to 28.1.74 (1 yr 161 days)
  • Obviously, however, it wasn’t much more of ….”an interesting position…” as while with CommPol – applied to join VicPol after only 15 months. (Nov 73).
  • I noted that in his entrance exam for VicPol, this time made only 43 errors (31 in general ability’)

 

 

 

How many of you would still be standing now?

 

 

 

Third and longest Employment – Victoria Police

 

  • Joined (Sworn in) 29.1.74
  • 5ft 8 ½ ins (174 cm) 11 stone 7 lb (73kg) – Jarrod Blair (77kg)
  • Blue Eyes; Brown Hair (!) – How many of you would be sitting down now?
  • Living in a flat in Brunswick Rd EBBR
  • Graduated 14.6.74 (Dux of 21 recruits – Squad 1/74)
    • 90%. Sqd avg 84.2%
  • Registered Number 18267
  • Russell Street6.74
  • (Married 74)
    • 1.75 shot whilst on night shift. 2.20am when with Det S/C Kim West – laneway at rear of Cremorne St IRM – 3 shots fired at chest/head height. (Awarded the Victoria Police Star in 2006) . Sick leave 24.1.75 to 11.3.75. Clerical duties in Property Office from 12.3.75 to Retention on 1.4.75.
    • 2 serious operations. Lengthy scar. Grandfather died while in hospital
    • Passed retention 30.4.75
  • Fitzroy uniform 14.5.75
  • It was then I first met Bob – I was at Collingwood which shared a boundary with Fitzroy – between us we covered 70 pubs and would often be ‘backing each other up at brawls’.
  • It was also then that I first formed a personal relationship with him during the annual football match between Collingwood and Fitzroy Police at Victoria Park or the Brunswick Street Oval called the ‘Crusader Cup’. I’m pretty sure the winner was the team that consumed the most stubbies – during the game!
  • It was also at that time that I left a lasting impression on Bob – a facial scar – when during a social cricket game I balled a pathetic ball to him which he tried to smash out of the ground only to miss hit it and end up bloodied and sore. (And, typically of Bob – never brought it up again.)
  • Bob was a great copper. In the 5 yrs at Fitzroy he was officially commended 4 times.

 

 

 

  • ……..for keen observation and zealous and intelligence follow-up action resulting in apprehension and conviction of an offender for motor vehicle theft and other offences. (12.1.76)
  • ………for alertness, keen observation, prompt action, and dedication to duty resulting in the single-hand arrest and successful prosecution of a violent and troublesome offender for a number of serious offences. (3.7.76)
  • ……….for observation, initiative and intelligent action which resulted in the detection of an active and dangerous criminal and the location of exhibits to support other criminal charges. (26.5.77)
  • ……….for observation and attention to duty which led to the apprehension and conviction of three offenders charged with the possession of a large amount of money which they admitted was obtained from the sale of illicit drugs.5.2.79)

 

  • His Fitzroy uniform days set the scene for a successful career – initially becoming a detective – first at Russell Street and then at City West and then to the highly sought-after Homicide Squad, seen as one of the elite areas of the Force.

 

  • Joined CIB 14.3.79
  • Promoted to Sen Constable 14.6.79
  • CIB ARS and ACW 79-80
  • Jan-March 1980 – DTS Course 115
  • Homicide 80-82

 

I was fortunate to work with Bob at Homicide for 2 of those years. It was clear that he was well suited to the role as he was as thorough and meticulous as any person I’d met.

 

More importantly, it was then that I learnt of one of his most respected characteristics, his empathy and ability to relate to people.  Bob was able to establish a rapport with people, a sincere rapport, better than anyone I’d seen. As Maureen could tell you, the family of homicide victims continued to stay in touch for many years, often sending Bob presents and birthday cards for a long time after he left the squad.

 

  • When he left Homicide two years later he took promotion to Sergeant in a Police Community Involvement program at Broadmeadows, then to Avondale Hts and back to a detective position at City West until he took promotion to Senior Sergeant at Altona North.

 

  • Promoted to Sgt 30.12.82 to Police Community Involvement Program VBC
  • Feb-April 1983 – Sub-Officers Course 101
  • Sgt at Avondale Hts 30.11.83
  • Oct-Nov 1986 – Advanced Detective training School No.27
  • CIB City West 22.4.87-89
  • Promoted to S/Sgt 26.3.89 as sub charge Altona Nth
  • NCA secondment (Sydney) 89
  • NCA Secondment (Melb) 89-91 – upgraded to Chief Inspector for lengthy periods. (NCA 25.7.88 to 7.4.91)

 

  • It was during these years that Bob was seconded to the National Crime Authority with secondments to Melbourne and to Sydney, and at one stage was upgraded to Chief Inspector – a major recognition of his ability, remembering he was a Senior Sergeant at that time.

 

  • S/Sgt O/C MAN 91-93
    • In 1991 Bob was appointed to the position of Senior Sergeant and in charge of the police station at Altona North. He quickly recognised the need to interact with the local community. In his file I found a letter from the Migrant Resource Centre for Westgate Region to CCP thanking Bob for presenting himself to elderly migrant groups and ..’managed through your simplistic approach to gain trust; and the elderly people are confident and feel comfortable with your presence. I thank you for this. I hope other police will adopt the same method and offer the same service as you have provided.

 

  • Royal NZ Police College – Inspectors Qualifying Course March – May 1993.

 

  • On Feb 20 1995 Bob transferred to his last potions – Detective Senior Sergeant at the Crime Courses Unit (Detective Training School) where he would remain until he retired from policing.

 

  • Bob relished the opportunity to lecture young investigators and to use his unique coaching and mentoring skills. In the 5 years at DTS he had a role in the development of 100’s of police members and representatives from various other organisations.

 

  • Again his ability was recognised through the promotion into an Acting Chief Inspector position. In (Aug 1999) a file note, his Supt said of Bob – “…adopts a common sense approach. He has demonstrated the mental courage to make hard decisions with appropriate consideration and balance for corporate, unit and individual needs. He is an extremely intelligent, responsible and dedicated member.”

 

  • DTS was a special part of Bob’s career and fitting place to close off his policing life. He was highly respected by the staff and I’m proud to use this moment to make an announcement. DTS hold four courses each year and one of the detectives on the course are selected as the Dux (for those unfamiliar with the term it’s spelt DUX!) and are presented with a special award. In addition, one of the four Dux of each year is selected to receive what you may call a Top Gun award…..the best of the best. I’m pleased to announce that from this year onwards, in commemoration of his life, The Dux of The Year award will be known as the Bob Croxford Award.

 

  • Bob retired 23.9. 2000 (soon after turning 50) as Detective Acting Chief Inspector after 26 yrs + 239 days service. (Sick leave credit of 384 days)

 

  • During that time he received numerous awards, including
    • The Victoria police Star
    • National medal 7.9.90
    • Service Medal Second Clasp 1.9.97
    • National Medal First Clasp 31.7.99
    • Service Medal 3rd Clasp 1.9.99

 

  • Last entry on his Record of Service described Bob as a loyal and dedicated member who gave consistent and reliable service to Victoria Police and the community.”

 

 

 

Australia Post

 

  • The fourth and final chapter in Bob’s career was with Australia Post. Someone had encouraged Bob to take a move and he started with Post as Victorian State Manager of the Corporate Security Group on September 25th 2000.
  • On November 1st  2004 both was promoted to a national Position in the group as the Manager of Security Operations. It was the last time I’d have the privilege of working with Bob.
  • In October 2008 he became the head of Corporate Security and was formally appointed to the position on 20 January 2010.
  • Bob applied his personality and character to people at post and quickly became respected and loved. He could relate to everyone from every part of the organisation and had the same respect for all, whether they were the CEO or the mail room assistant.

 

  • “Warmth, sense of humour and genuine care for others”
  • “A life most people would aspire to….”
  • “Good luck with your projects”
  • “a good friend and valued colleague”

 

  • When I asked people at Post what they thought of when they thought of Bob, this was some of their responses….
  • “Bloody Collingwood”
  • “Beautiful handwriting – a magnificent signature”
  • “Loved the Soprano’s” – (ironically, today being the birthday of James Gandolfini (who played Tony Soprano), someone whom I suspect Bob secretly aspired to be!
  • “Ice cream” – you could be in the flashest of restaurants yet Bob would order 3 scoops of vanilla ice-cream for dessert”.

 

 

Bob’s professional career was exemplary and will form the major basis for people’s memories of Bob.

 

 

It would be wrong though to forget his other work roles – those he did on a voluntary or honorary basis. Just as an example:

 

  • Merriwa Wangaratta Apex Club (early 70’s)
  • Sunbury Fire Brigade (Mgt Team – HR)
  • Kiwanis Club of Sunbury (Secretary 94/95)
  • Football League Umpires Assoc. VFL Reserves (69-77)
  • Vic Amateur Football Assoc. (78-80) Umpired GF 78 and 79
  • Apex Club Sunbury
  • Salesian College Team Mgr U16
  • Sunbury Fair Committee
  • Tribunal Member Sunbury Basketball Association
  • Riddell District Umpires Association (Boundary Umpire late 80’s/early 90’s and later as a goal umpire, Tribunal Convenor and Umpire Advisor)
  • Tennis Australia (Volunteer Driver at Aust. Open) 98-2000
  • Presenter at Australian institute of Public Safety.
  • Justice of the Peace

 

 

If we had played the Trivia Night ‘sit-down’ game, I’m confident none of us would still be standing.

 

Bob had lived a full life and along the way touched thousands of people, rewarding each of us with the experience of having known him.

 

Over his 60 year journey, I believe Bob had given a little of himself to every one he’d touched ……..and the well had now run dry.

 

 

Rest In Peace my friend.

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Daniel Arthur STILLER

Daniel Arthur STILLER

aka  Dan

Queensland Police Force

Regd. # ?

Rank:  Sergeant

StationsHendra Police Station before transferring to South Brisbane Traffic as a Senior Constable.

2007 Dan was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and transferred to the Oxley District Division Traffic Branch, working out of Mount Ommaney Police Station – HWP Cyclist

ServiceFrom  ? ? 2002  to  1 December 2010

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New South Wales Police Force

Regd. # 32276

” Possibly ” in PREP Class 272

Rank:  Constable

Stations?, Bankstown ( late 1990’s ),

ServiceFrom  ? ? 1997  to  14 July 2001 = 4 years Service with NSW Police force

Awards:  Queensland Police Service medal – posthumously

Queensland Police Service Award for Meritorious Service – posthumously

Born:  6 January 1977

Died on:  Wednesday  1 December 2010

Death location:  Bruce Hwy, approximately 15km south of Mt Larcom, Qld

Cause:  Motor cycle collision – rider -v- jacknifing semi trailer

Age:  33

Funeral date:  Thursday  9 December 2010 @ 10.30a,

Funeral location:  St Peter Chanel Catholic Church, Chaprowe Roadn  The Gap

Buried at:  Settlement Road, and on to a private interment

 Memorial at:  Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve, Heathwood, 4110. Stapylton, Johnson & Paradise Rd & Logan Motorway, Qld

Lat: -27.6425
Long: 152.986389
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.

Sergeant Dan Stiller died when his motorcycle was struck by a truck.
Sergeant Dan Stiller died when his motorcycle was struck by a truck.

 

Dan STILLER - QPOL - Killed 1 December 2005

 

[alert_green]DAN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

Details of Death:

On 30th November 2010 Sergeant Stiller departed Brisbane on escort duty with another officer, escorting an oversized load from Brisbane, destined for Rockhampton in central Queensland. Sergeant Stiller was riding a Qld Police Service motorcycle and the other officer was in a marked police sedan. That afternoon they rested at Miriam Vale over night and recommenced at 6am on 1st December 2010. In this escort, Sergeant Stiller was the lead escort, behind a pilot vehicle which was approximately 500 metres in front, and the police sedan was to the rear of Sergeant Stiller. Approximately 15 kilometres south of Mt Larcom on the Bruce Highway, in heavy rain, at 7am on 1st December 2010 three articulated vehicles were travelling south and were advised by the pilot of the load travelling north that there was an oversized load ahead, and to pull to the side of the road to make room. In doing so one of the articulated vehicles, whilst braking, lost control of the vehicle, causing it to ‘jack knife’, and travel onto the incorrect side of the road. The articulated vehicle collided head on with Sergeant Stiller, who was travelling in the centre of the northbound lane. Sergeant Stiller was killed instantly as a result of the impact. Sergeant Stiller has been posthumously awarded the Queensland Police Service Medal and the QPS Award for Meritorious Service.


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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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Police officer killed while escorting wide load

Date
Cameron Atfield
A police officer has been killed while escorting an oversized truck along the Bruce Highway in central Queensland.

Sergeant Dan Stiller, 33, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding was struck by a truck on the highway about 15 kilometres south of Mount Larcom at about 7am.

The crash closed the highway in both directions near Mount Larcom for more than five hours.

Deputy Commissioner Ross Barnett said it appeared the truck jack-knifed before it hit Sergeant Stiller, who was escorting a wide load and convoy along the Bruce Highway.

‘‘The tragic loss of a young promising officer of Sergeant Stiller’s calibre will be felt right throughout the organisation, particularly among those who were fortunate enough to work with him,’’ he said.

Mr Barnett said another police officer, in a police sedan, was also involved in the wide load escort but that officer was not injured.

Sergeant Stiller’s wife, also a police officer, was ‘‘naturally devastated’’ and was receiving the support of her colleagues and close friends, Mr Barnett said.

Premier Anna Bligh said Sergeant Stiller’s death was a ‘‘tragic reminder’’ that police put their lives on the line every day.

“Our thoughts, my thoughts, and think those of all Queenslanders are with his family. This is a very sad day for them,’’ she said.

“It’s also a very sad day for the police service. It’s been almost four years … since we’ve seen a Queensland police officer lose their life in the course of their duties.

Opposition leader John-Paul Langbroek also paid tribute to Sergeant Stiller.“This is a very sad day for our state’s police service and our greater Queensland community,” he said.

“I know each day that every one of Queensland’s 10,702 police officers go to work, they work in challenging and sometimes dangerous situations.’’

Police will prepare a report for the coroner.

The 33-year-old sergeant, originally from New South Wales, was an officer with the Oxley District Traffic Branch. Police are investigating the death of their colleague.

The investigating will be overviewed by the Ethical Standards Command.

11 comments so far

  • To my mate Dan,
    You were a great guy, an excellent policeman and will be truly missed.

    My condolences to your lovely wife Julie and your family.

    Commenter
    Ben G
    Location
    Sydney
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 2:06PM
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  • My deepest condolences to his family. I am very very sorry for your loss.

    Commenter
    Marie
    Location
    Brisbane
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 2:22PM
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  • My deepest sympathies go out to this young man’s family and friends. My respect and condolences go to all his brothers and sisters in the force.

    Commenter
    Roy
    Location
    Brisbane
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 2:56PM
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  • Dan. Incredibly sad to hear this news, you were a great guy and I will always remember your smile. Condolences to Julie and Dans family.

    Commenter
    Steven Cooper
    Location
    Melbourne
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 3:18PM
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  • Proud to have served with Dan in NSWPF, a friendly, lovely, smiling man taken from this world too soon. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. xoxo

    Commenter
    Kate Y
    Location
    Sydney
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 4:10PM
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  • My Deepest sympathies to those who have lost a loved one, while serving the community.
    Something must be done about the way these extra wide loads are allowed to travel at high speed along the highways. The escort system and rules are NOW Broken and Inadequate. Attitude seems to be anything goes as long as there is an escort. As a regular car driver on the Burnett and D’Aguilar highways, I have often seen very close calls several times as the escorts often do not give enough warning to oncoming vehicles for a heavy load that now often spreads across the two lanes , travelling at maximum legal speed. The loads seem to be getting wider and larger and more frequent with all the huge mining plant being shipped to and from Central Qld mines.
    I was almost unable to pull up recently travelling north at Collinton, almost running into the bridge as I tried to avoid a large load, with an escort barely 100m in front of it. If I had been in a semi, I or the escort most likely would not be here. The wide load was simply going too fast downhill to be safe.
    Most escorts do a fine job, but the loads are just getting too big and fast to be safely controlled, in all circumstances. Cars can pull up safely, but heavy vehicles coming in opposite direction must often have difficulty stopping and getting off the road.

    Commenter
    Vini Vidi
    Location
    Queensland
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 4:57PM
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  • Such a tragic loss of a great police officer and all round good bloke. Dan, I’m proud to have called you a colleague and friend. My thoughts and prayers are with your family and friends. You will live on in our hearts.

    Commenter
    Refidex
    Location
    Queensland
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 5:22PM
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  • The military and emergency services are two of few workplaces in this country where families and colleagues send their loved ones and mates out to the job with a greater fear that they will not return safely than most of us can understand. You have my profound thanks and my deepest respect.

    Commenter
    Les Hawken
    Location
    Melbourne
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 6:36PM
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  • a terrible loss that should have been avoided. why was a motorcycle doing this duty with the poor weather we have been experiencing lately. these wide load escorts are normally two pilot vehicles and three patrol cars. also in this weather the shoulder on most central queensland roads is far too soft to move a semi trailer off the bitumen onto grass where they get stuck as has happened on the beef road recently and had to get towed back onto the road by the prime mover pulling the wide load. not really an acceptable situation. who would have accepted responsibility if the the semi had tipped over in the mud.

    Commenter
    andrew
    Location
    brisbane
    Date and time
    December 01, 2010, 7:47PM
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  • The Police Force has lost another great Officer. Dan, you gave us plenty of laughs and you will be missed. NSW Police Force Class 272 – Delta (PREP of 1997) will always remember you. Our thoughts are with your wife, family, and friends. Rest easy now mate, your shift is done. We’ll take it from here.

    Commenter
    Rebecca C
    Location
    Wollongong NSW
    Date and time
    December 02, 2010, 8:53PM
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Rest in Peace my mate Sgt Dan Stiller. You will never ever be forgotten. A great Police Officer. A great Highway Patrol Officer. A true professional in every way. A loving husband that will be truly missed. My thoughts and prayers are with Julie, both families, your QPS mates and your NSWPF mates. I am shattered. Till we meet again.

Commenter
Dean L
Location
NSW
Date and time
December 03, 2010, 12:16AM

 

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/police-officer-killed-while-escorting-wide-load-20101201-18g9g.html

 

 

 

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This has been issued to all media on behalf of Sergeant Dan Stiller’s wife, Julie;

 A born and bred Brisbane-boy, Dan Stiller grew up knowing one day he would be able to combine his love of motorbikes with his job. In 2007, after 10 years as a police officer, he did just that when he was promoted to a Sergeant at the Oxley District Traffic branch.

On Wednesday December 1, Sergeant Dan Stiller paid the ultimate sacrifice doing what he loved.

 

Dan Stiller was born on January 6, 1977 in Brisbane to a large family. 

An exceptional swimmer, Dan still holds the swimming record at Nundah Primary School – something he continued to boast about even as an adult – and received a scholarship to Nudgee College because of his swimming talents.

Growing up, Dan knew he wanted to become a police officer, and in 1997 he was accepted by the New South Wales Police Force, where he served for four years before applying and being accepted to the Queensland Police Service.

On graduating into the QPS in 2002, Dan served at the Hendra Police Station before transferring to South Brisbane Traffic. In 2007 Dan was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and transferred to the Oxley District Division Traffic Branch, working out of Mount Ommaney Police Station.

I can still recall the first time we met, which was during orientation at the Hendra Police Station.  I saw him across the room and I was immediately attracted to him. 

It wasn’t long after that we were sharing our first motorbike together, and we have been inseparable since. We married on August 9 2008. Coming from a large family, Dan was ecstatic on hearing that he was going to be a dad. 

No words aptly describe Dan. He was a fun person, extremely loving and caring and had a fabulous sense of humour. 

His quirks and comments made me laugh. He was capable of making anyone laugh or feel better on a down day, and I learnt very early in our relationship that he was just as beautiful on the inside as he was  on the outside. 

 

Queensland Police Service Our apologies to those who commented on this previously. We’ve had a technical hitch, and had to repost it, which means your comments were lost.

Gary Anthony Hiles

Gary Anthony Hiles As a member of the Oxley District Traffic Branch, I am very proud to say that I knew Dan and can say that he was an outstanding Police Officer. He was professional, knowledgeable and helpful. He died doing what he loved and has left a hole in our office. You will never be forgotten. Rest in peace mate.

Orson Milligan
Di Mills
Nikki Bee

Nikki Bee What beautiful words! He was obviously loved! Condolences to his wife, family and the force!

Miche Maraea

Miche Maraea I have a large family myself, so I can acutely imagine their loss and how it is to be without one of your own, especially during this festive season! I wish his entire family peace and love!

Taleah Richters
Jason Saunders
Jason Saunders he may be gone but will never be forgotten.
my condolences to his family and fellow officers
Chloe Kavanagh

Chloe Kavanagh He looks so happy in that photo, what a great police officer.He will be missed by all.

Tia Paget

Tia Paget how sad its not fair

John Marks

John Marks I am a Police Officer too and will never forget that feeling when I knew what I was heading out to that morning. My sincerest heartfelt condolences go out to Dan’s family, friends & colleagues. RIP Sgt Dan STILLER.

Shane Drew

Shane Drew I’m so sorry to hear this. Condolances to his immediate family, and also his police family. Please take care…

John Marks
Jenelle Reghenzani

Jenelle Reghenzani So so sad what a fine young man to loose his life at such a young age…….RIP and my sincere condolences to his family. May god look over you and protect you in this sad time! I have so much respect for the QPS they have helped me over the years in some very hard times and I truly appreciate their dedication and hard work!

Roxy-lee Hodges

Roxy-lee Hodges goodbye so so sad just doing your job i really feel for your wife and family be a policeman in heaven now r.i.p

Barbara Ann Johnston

Barbara Ann Johnston My heartfelt sympathy to Dan Stillers family and loved ones and work mates. Carry on and live with the pride and happy memories of life shared with him…. as i am sure he would want you to do. Sometimes a loved one is taken from us way too early, but the love in our hearts and the happy memories, nothing or no one can ever take away. RIP young man…. another QPS HERO

David Wicks

David Wicks My thoughts are with his family. Yet another life lost doing a thankless motorcycle officers job. RIP. To the others still riding – be safe.

Desmond Goulding

Desmond Goulding May God Bless you and your family RIP

Vicki Lee

Vicki Lee the tears in your eyes can be wiped away but may the love in your hearts always stay…sincerest condolences to all Dan’s family, friends and colleagues, a special heartfelt one to his wife and unborn child. xo

Jack McRuff

Jack McRuff Vale Sgt. Stiller. You served, when others could not. May you live long in Heaven.

Lisa Richards

Lisa Richards Heart breaking for all involved. reading those beautiful words you can feel the love they shared for each other. im sure their child will bring joy and love to sgt stillers wife and their family. Taken way to soon. RIP SGT DAN STILLER

Tanya Cashin

Tanya Cashin My thoughts are with you Julie and Dan’s family. He truly was a lovely man who will be greatly missed. RIP Dan.x

Lisa Rosier

Lisa Rosier Heartfelt condolences to Dan’s wife and his family both personal and professional. Dan has crossed over to the other side where he watches over his loved ones and waits to guide them on their journey to the other side.

Cheryl Wk
Cheryl Wk it is always heart breaking when we lose one of our finest.
Julie, you will be able to tell your little one that their daddy was the best. Condolences to you and Sgt Stiller’s family,his friends and colleagues.

Lou Lou Black

Lou Lou Black RIP Baby Dan, thoughtts are with Julie and yr family xoxoxo

Barbara Stone

Barbara Stone Sgt Dan Stiller will always be remembered with pride and love. He was certainly taken too soon. My thoughts and prayers are with the Stiller family, their colleagues and friends at this very sad time.

Christopher Stokes
Rob Woodman

Rob Woodman Sgt STILLERs family can take pride from the fact he was”ä good bloke” and devoted family man. condolences to his family and friends.

Sam Harrison

Sam Harrison frown emoticon. Everything that can be said, has.

Catherine Shrimp
Sandy Duvall
Carrie Davidson

Carrie Davidson Julie…words cannot describe how sorry I am for your loss. My thoughts are with you and Dan’s family, friends and collegues. The Police service will not be the same without him.

Sharon Miller

Sharon Miller Very very sad. My thoughts and prayers are with his family.

Stephen Bottom

Stephen Bottom why dose it take something like this for us all to realize how much police do for us . Don’ t wait, If you see a cop , just say thanks.

Elle Oz

Elle Oz Dan – The Man!!!! Remember……..Oh I really couldn’t believe it when I turned on the TV that day, I still can’t believe it. You were always the life of the class with that smile that lighted up any room. I am so proud to have gone through the NSWPOL Academy with you it is yet another tragedy where a great Police Officer was once again taken from us. I will be thinking of you this Thursday as I attend the Remembreance Day Parade here in Townsville I will be thinking of you, Glen and Pete xo

Tim Rob

Tim Rob The Dan Stiller Reserve is a fitting monument to this man. If you don’t know where it is, Google it and visit it! If you love bird watching, 105 species have been seen there in the last year or so. No facilities and unfortunately the reserve is over-run by morons on trail bikes during the weekend, but it is one of the special places of Brisbane, wild yet accessible.

Tim Rob

Tim Rob Some complete moron(s) has/have destroyed the memorial. I dont have words – well polite ones anyway – to describe what I think about these idiots. This is a senseless act of vandalism that demonstrates just how moronic they are. If you destroyed the memorial and are reading this then please know that any reasonable person thinks that you are a complete f-wit.

Maria Markos

Maria Markos Thoughts are with his loved ones, mates and colleagues today. Lest We Forget.

Jillian Oliver
Jillian OliverI had the honour to work with Dan when he first started. He was a great officer and great person. It was a highlight to be working the truck with him. I valued his friendship and think of him often. My prayers and thoughts are with his family.
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Wildlife corridor to be named after fallen policeman Dan Stiller, killed by jack-knife truck on highway

A FALLEN policeman will have a wildlife corridor in Brisbane’s southwest named after him. Dan STILLER 7 - QPOL - Killed 1 December 2005

Sergeant Dan Stiller, 33, died on duty last Wednesday while leading a police escort along the Bruce Hwy in central Queensland.

He was killed when a semi-trailer jack-knifed and collided with him, becoming the first officer in over three years to die on the job.

Brisbane Lord Mayor Campbell Newman today bestowed on Stiller the rare honour.

“Sergeant Dan Stiller coordinated combined police and council enforcement operations against illegal trail biking while working at the Oxley Traffic Branch,” Cr Newman said.

“It is therefore fitting that we name the 122 hectares we’ve protected against illegal trail biking the Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve.

“It will be a place not just to remember Sergeant Stiller, but other members of the police force who have been killed on duty.”

The reserve lies at Larapinta, near Parkinson, and is bounded by the Logan Mwy, Johnson Rd and Paradise Rd.

Police Commissioner Bob Atkinson said Stiller’s wife Julie and the entire police service appreciated the honour.

“The QPS is very appreciative of this recognition by the Brisbane City Council,” Mr Atkinson said.

“It is a fine and fitting tribute to a very professional and dedicated officer and will help in terms of his colleagues dealing with his loss.

“Having discussed this with Dan’s wife Julie, I believe she is also very grateful for this initiative.”

Cr Newman said the bushland would be transformed into a valuable environmental and wildlife corridor and is currently being fenced and marked as bushland reserve.

The land was acquired by council over the past two years, primarily to protect it against illegal trail bikers.

The land grab was part of the Bushland Acquisition Program, which protects vital wildlife corridors in some of Brisbane’s most environmentally sensitive areas from future development.

Council expressed its sympathy to Stiller’s wife Julie, his family and to his colleagues in the police force, particularly the Oxley Traffic Branch.

The  funeral for Sgt Stiller will be marked by a motorcade and mounted police this Thursday.

His death sent shockwaves through the Queensland Police Service.

This Thursday’s funeral will be at St Peter Chanel Catholic Church, The Gap, at 10.30am.

“The cortege, including the QPS Pipes and Drums, the Mounted Police Unit and a procession of motorcycle police, will proceed from the church on Chaprowe Road to Settlement Road, and on to a private interment,” police said today.

The interment is for close friends and family only.

Sgt Stiller is survived by his wife Julie, also a police officer, who is pregnant with their first child.

Mr Atkinson has previously described Stiller as ” a dedicated traffic officer, committed to the safety and security of all Queenslanders”.

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Fallen officer ‘always wanted to be a policeman’

Date 

Dan Stiller was so determined to become a police officer that he didn’t let an initial knock-back extinguish his dreams, mourners in Brisbane have been told.

Hundreds of people, including his pregnant wife Julie, gathered today to farewell Sergeant Stiller, who died when a truck jackknifed and hit him as he escorted a wide load south of Rockhampton last week.

He was the first Queensland police officer killed on the job in more than three years.

Queensland Police Commissioner Bob Atkinson told mourners of the 33-year-old’s efforts to join the service.

‘‘His initial knock-back from the police service only hardened his resolve, and extra study saw his future guaranteed,’’ Mr Atkinson said.

‘‘In the words of his wife Julie: ‘As a boy, Dan always wanted to grow up and be a police officer. This, mixed with his ultimate love of motorcycles, made the traffic branch the place he was destined to be’.’’

Sgt Stiller met his future wife, a police detective, during a posting at Hendra police station in Brisbane’s inner north in 2002.

‘‘She remembers well the first motorcycle ride they shared soon after (meeting) and they were inseparable ever since,’’ Mr Atkinson said.

The couple married on August 9, 2008 and only recently announced they were expecting their first child.

Sgt Stiller was overjoyed about becoming a father and wasn’t shy about showing his love for his wife, Mr Atkinson said.

‘‘His love for Julie was complete and total,’’ he told mourners.

Mr Atkinson described Sgt Stiller as a dedicated, competent traffic officer whose work helped lower the road toll.

Sgt Stiller started his career with the NSW police service in 1997.

He moved back to his home state of Queensland in 2001 and joined the service as a recruit.

He was sworn in in early 2002 and two years later was transferred to the south Brisbane traffic branch where he was promoted to senior constable.

‘‘He achieved his destiny when he passed the police motorcycle course and became a full-time police motorcyclist in the traffic branch,’’ Mr Atkinson said.

‘‘His outstanding policing skills and leadership were rewarded in 2007 when he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and transferred to the Oxley District Traffic Branch.’’

www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/fallen-officer-always-wanted-to-be-a-policeman-20101209-18qj9.html

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Sgt Dan Stiller memorial unveiled

REMEBERED: A monument dedicated to Sergeant Dan Stiller, who died last December, was unveiled at a ceremony attended by his wife Julie Stiller last Wednesday. Sgt Stiller's family and friends also planted trees as a living memorial.
REMEMBERED: A monument dedicated to Sergeant Dan Stiller, who died last December, was unveiled at a ceremony attended by his wife Julie Stiller last Wednesday. Sgt Stiller’s family and friends also planted trees as a living memorial.

AN environmental corridor in Pallara has been named in honour of fallen policeman Sergeant Dan Stiller in a moving ceremony held last week.

Sgt Stiller’s wife Julie, along with his family, friends and colleagues gathered for the official naming of the 122 hectare Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve on Wednesday afternoon, which also included the unveiling of a memorial.

Sgt Stiller’s brother, John Stiller addressed the crowd and said his family were truly honoured by the mark of respect the memorial offered.

“If you knew Dan you’d know that whatever he put his mind to he committed to it 110 per cent,” he said.

“I am extremely proud of my brother, and this reserve will serve as a lasting tribute.

“It will also serve as a place for friends and family to visit and share quiet thoughts.”

The memorial was unveiled by Lord Mayor Campbell Newman and Parkinson Councillor Angela Owen-Taylor.

The Lord Mayor said Dan had been instrumental in working with council to deal with illegal trail biking while working at the Oxley Traffic Branch.

“Sergeant Dan Stiller co-ordinated combined police and council enforcement operations against illegal trail biking while working at the Oxley Traffic Branch,” he said.

“It is therefore fitting that the 122 hectares we’ve protected against illegal trail biking be named the Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve.

“It will now be a place not just to remember Sergeant Stiller, but also other members of the police force who have been killed on duty.”

Cr Owen-Taylor said she had worked closely with Sgt Stiller on road safety and illegal trail biking and she felt this was a fitting tribute.

“The dedication of this bushland to Sergeant Dan Stiller is significant as it is the place where Operation Trailblazer started in July 2008,” she said.

Sgt Stiller was killed on December 1, 2010, by a jack-knifing truck while escorting a wide load on the Bruce Highway near Mount Larcom.

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City police salute lost colleagues

The Police Remembrance Day march and ceremony held at Browns Park in North Ipswich on Thursday.
The Police Remembrance Day march and ceremony held at Browns Park in North Ipswich on Thursday.

IPSWICH police paid tribute to fallen detective Damian Leeding and Sergeant Daniel Stiller in a moving Police Remembrance Day ceremony yesterday.

A strong contingent of about 100 uniformed, plain-clothed and dog-squad officers gathered at the North Ipswich Reserve from about 9.45am, marching to the beat of the Salvation Army drummers along The Terrace, past Riverlink Shopping Centre, then up Downs St to Browns Park.

Ipswich’s Police Remembrance Day ceremony is held each year at the James Sangster Memorial, which was built in honour of the police officer who died in an attempt to rescue members of the Jackson family from floods in 1893.

There are now 139 names on the Queensland remembrance list – dating back to Laidley Constable Matthew Connolly in 1861 – all of whom died in the line of duty.

However, it was the two most recent additions to that list that drew special mention at the ceremony, led by Southern Region police chaplain Malcolm Twine.

The chaplain began with a prayer for all the men and women who have given their lives while serving the community.

Detective Senior Constable Damian Leeding was shot in the face with a shotgun after responding to an armed robbery at the Gold Coast suburb of Pacific Pines, on May 29 this year.

Family members turned off his life support three days later.

Sergeant Daniel Stiller was killed in a traffic crash while assisting in an oversized-vehicle escort near Rockhampton on December 1, 2010.

The 33-year-old’s wife was pregnant with their first child at the time. Superintendent Garth Pitman said the rain which persisted through the ceremony could not drown police pride.

“We’ll march in the rain if we have to,” he said while delivering the commissioner’s address.

Representatives of Ipswich City Council, the Ipswich RSL, Queensland Fire and Rescue Service and Neighbourhood Watch joined retired police and members of the community in laying wreathes next to the Sangster monument

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Policeman Dan Stiller memorial vandalised at Pallara

Sgt Dan Stiller, tragically killed on duty in a traffic accident, and his wife Julie.
Sgt Dan Stiller, tragically killed on duty in a traffic accident, and his wife Julie.

A MEMORIAL commemorating a police officer killed in the line of duty has been vandalised.

Oxley detectives are investigating after the memorial to Sergeant Dan Stiller, located in a reserve on Wadeville Rd, Pallara, was damaged late Tuesday.

Sergeant Stiller, 33, killed in 2010 at Mt Larcom when the wide load truck he was escorting crashed and hit his police motorcycle.

Police said the statue was damaged shortly after 5pm, when a thick glass panel covering a photograph of Sgt Stiller was smashed.

Investigators are now looking to identify three teenaged boys who were seen in the area at the time. Two of the boys were on scooters and the third on a skateboard.

They were last seen walking towards Lillypilly St, Heathwood.

In 2010, the park was renamed Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve in tribute to the well-respected traffic officer.

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 A memorial dedication and bushland reserve naming of 122 hectares bordered by Paradise Road, Johnson Road, Stapylton Road and Wadeville Street occurred on 9 March 2011 in honour of fallen Police Officer, Sergeant Dan Stiller.

   

A number of Dan's colleagues turned up in honour of the occasion
A number of Dan’s colleagues turned up in honour of the occasion

Lord Mayor Campbell Newman and I unveiled the memorial in Dan's honour.
Lord Mayor Campbell Newman and I unveiled the memorial in Dan’s honour.

 

 

 

Unveiling the Bushland Reserve Sign, named after Sgt Dan Stiller
Unveiling the Bushland Reserve Sign, named after Sgt Dan Stiller

The bushland reserve dedication and naming was commemorated with a planting
The bushland reserve dedication and naming was commemorated with a planting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.angelaowentaylor.com.au/PhotoGallery/tabid/65/AlbumID/430-133/Default.aspx

 

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SERGEANT DAN STILLER MEMORIAL UPDATE

A 17 year old male has been ordered to pay full restitution to restore the Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial at Heathwood.

The Brisbane City Council memorial in honour of Sergeant Dan Stiller was unveiled in March 2011.

It was an absolutely despicable act by vandals to destroy a public memorial, let alone a memorial dedicated to a Police officer who put his life on the line for our community each day he stepped out in uniform.

I worked closely with Sgt Dan Stiller to tackle illegal trail bike riding in Parkinson Ward and the Oxley Police District, and our community owes him for the service and care he provided us.

Residents have indicated to me they have supported the public appeal to assist Police.

Further to a thorough investigation by Queensland Police, the offender was brought to justice in the Richlands Magistrates Court on Tuesday 28 August, and ordered to pay full restitution.

I conveyed to Police the full cost of the damage and now the offender is being made to face the full consequences under law for his disgraceful behaviour.

I assure residents and Dan’s family, friends and work colleagues, we are working is to ensure restoration of the memorial occurs as quickly as possible and it will be as protected as much as possible.

Brisbane City Council dedicated the 122 hectares of bushland within the reserve in recognition of Sgt Dan Stiller’s commitment to the community in reducing illegal trail bike riding which was impacting severely on residents’ peaceful enjoyment of their own homes.

I met on site with Police Superintendent Maurice Poiner and stonemason Pete Macfarlane ahead of the photo of Sgt Dan Stiller being reinstalled into the memorial.

The Sergeant Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve is bordered by Wadeville Street, Paradise Road, Johnson Road and Stapylton Road.

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Coroner to examine police officer’s highway death

THE State Coroner has begun investigating a fatal crash involving a police officer escorting a wide load on the Bruce Highway at Mount Larcom.

Coroner Michael Barnes began hearing evidence in Brisbane on Wednesday into the adequacy of police investigations into the collision which killed Dan Arthur Stiller.

Sgt Stiller, who was escorting a wide load carrying a large piece of mining equipment, died when a prime mover jack-knifed about 7am on December 1, 2010, on the highway between Gladstone and Rockhampton.

Mr Barnes will examine the “adequacy and appropriateness” of regulations and guidelines surrounding wide-load transports within Queensland.

He will also investigate whether police motorcycles should be used as wide-load escorts.

John Edward Dodd, the truck driver involved in the crash, was found not guilty of careless driving by a Brisbane magistrate handed last month.

Magistrate Jacqueline Payne found Dodd had reacted as any reasonable and prudent driver would have.

The inquest is set down for three days.

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Coronor recommends wide-load changes after Stiller death

THE State Coroner has recommended a raft of reforms on how wide loads are escorted on busy Queensland roads following two fatal crashes within six months involving oversized escorts.

Queensland Police Sergeant Daniel Stiller was escorting a wide load on the Bruce Hwy at Mount Larcom when a prime mover jack knifed and crashed into his motorbike.

The 33-year-old died at the scene on December 1, 2010.

About six months later on May 17, 2011, Kenneth Roland Owens was travelling on a single lane section of the Bruce Hwy at Glenorchy, near Maryborough, with his wife and two friends.

A prime mover was travelling in the opposite direction and carrying a miner’s hut, which was so wide it protruded into the southbound lane.

Mr Owens hit the corner of the hut and was killed.

Following an inquest into the deaths, State Coroner Michael Barnes handed down his findings on Friday.

He was satisfied in Mr Owen’s case the driver transporting the wide load was safe and the oversized load satisfied guidelines.

Mr Barnes said while it was likely the lights and markers on the wide load could have distracted Mr Owens, there was no evidence to show why he did not avoid the corner of the miner’s hut.

But in Mr Stiller’s death, Mr Barnes found the blame for fatal accident could be partially contributed to how the wide load escort was carried out.

He found radio communications from the lead escort to other trucks approaching the wide load was confusing and trucks were not given clear instructions.

“Those escorting the wide load gave insufficient regard to the need for other vehicles to get completely off the road when the highway was only of two lanes and the difficulty this would pose for heavy vehicles,” Mr Barnes states.

Mr Barnes also found the driver behind the wheel of the truck which crashed into Sergeant Stiller did not slow sufficiently as he approached the wide load.

The State Coroner recommended wide load grants should not be issued if other transport is available, such as shipping to Gladstone and Mackay ports.

He has also recommended a review of placing police on motorcycles for wide escorts because of the increased risk of death or injury.

Mr Barnes also recommended a public awareness campaign about dealing with wide loads and more explicit signage.

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Dan Stiller Reserve, Parkinson Qld

6 posts / 0 new
Last post

 

timrob

timrob's picture
Dan Stiller Reserve, Parkinson Qld

A new section has been added to Dan Stiller Memorial Reserve in Parkinson to the south of Brisbane.  It is well worth a look as it has good tracks and an interesting lagoon in the north-eastern corner.  We recommend a weekend walk as there is quite high road noise from Logan Motorway in places.

“Dan” is a very interesting reserve that we have visited numerous times, and currently 152 bird species have been recorded there.  Interested people may like to download our (updated today) birders guide from:

http://www.vk4yeh.com/birding%20downloads.html

Photo of a female fairy wren taken at the lagoon yesterday.

 

Reflex

Reflex's picture

Thanks Tim. I’ll have a wander around one day.

Samford Valley Qld.

 

Devster

Devster's picture

Very informative information Thanks Tim

 

timrob

timrob's picture

My wife Marg and I will be leading a BQ walk to “Dan” on May 10th, and will be delighted to meet you.

Tim

Quote from BQ website

” This will be the fist BQ visit to Dan Stiller Reserve for 2015. Meet at 7 am at the gate near the end of Axis Place (UBD 239, E6). This section of the reserve is relatively new and until recently had no good tracks. BCC has made a loop track that includes a section with close proximity to a lagoon on a minor tributary of Oxley Creek. It is also possible, time permitting, to see a large ex-sandmining lake that apparently will become part of an expanded reserve in the future. The track is well made and an easy walk. Boots are recommended for safe access to the edge of the lagoon. There are no toilet facilities in this reserve.

We will meet for morning tea at the park on Lincoln Green Drive (UBD 238, H16) where toilets are available.”

 

Woko

Woko's picture

Great to learn of the extension to the reserve, Tim.

 

Reflex

Reflex's picture

Sounds good Tim.




Mark Derek HUDSON

Mark Derek HUDSON

aka Huddo

( late of Mt Annan )

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. # 19989[/alert_yellow]

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 4 December 1981

Constable 1st Class – appointed 4 December 1986

Senior Constable with many stints as relieving Sergeant between 1990 – 2008.

Retired ( Medical discharge – Chronic PTSD – HOD )

Stations:  No. ( Division ), Burwood, Five Dock, NSW Police Prosecutors, Highway Patrol No 9 Division, Highway Patrol Bankstown / Campsie Patrols, Crime Stoppers Unit, Police Media Unit, Highway Patrol – Mid West / Endeavour Regions ( including Five Dock & Petersham ), Traffic Camera Unit and Traffic Services.

Service:  From  14 September 1981  to  21 August 2008 = 26+ years Service

Awards:  22 November 1991 – COP Commendation for Courage:  Awarded Commissioner’s Commendation – Courageous resolution of a suicide attempt by an armed, disturbed man at Gladesville Hospital.

National Medal – granted 28 August 1997

NSW Police Medal & 2nd Clasp for NSW Police Medal – granted 30 June 2004

1st Clasp to the National Medal – granted 17 May 2007

3rd Clasp for NSW Police Medal – granted 11 February 2009 ( posthumously )

Assistant Commissioner Award ( Traffic ) for outstanding service to the people of NSW in contribution to the reduction of road toll and other Traffic Services as a NSW Highway Patrol Officer.

Born:  30 April 1957

Died on:  Saturday  3 July 2010

Cause: Cancer – Brain ( right side ) Grade 4 Glioblastoma Multiforme ( Diagnosed in October 2009 )

Age:  53

Funeral date:  Wednesday  7 July 2010 @ 10.30am

Funeral location:  St Paul’s Catholic Church,

cnr John & Mitchell St’s, Camden

Buried at:  Sydney Catholic Garden Cemetery, Western Rd, Kemps Creek


Mark Derek HUDSON

 

Grave location

Lawn Grave: St Andrew area:  R47:  # 5

GPS:  -33.89627130390685, 150.77976189912795

 

[alert_yellow]MARK is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

[alert_pink]MARK  IS mentioned on the Sydney Police Centre Memorial Wall[/alert_pink] * Added to Wall on Wednesday 26 September 2018

[blockquote]

Memorial:

HUDSON

Mark Derek

30.4.1957 – 3.7.2010

Beloved husband of Brigid

Loving dad of Jack

To the world he was but one

To us he was the world

[/blockquote]

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Anthony ‘ Tony ‘ Van GORP

Anthony ‘ Tony ‘ Van GORP

Victoria Police Force

Sergeant – Resigned March 2010

30 years service

Stationed at Healesville, Victoria

Suicide – Service Firearm

47 old

Died  22 March 2010

 

Sgt Anthony van GORP, VicPol
Sgt Anthony van GORP, VicPol

Tony van GORP - Facebook photo
Tony van GORP – Facebook photo

 

Location of Healesville Police Station:
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Policeman shot, killed by own gun at Healesville police station

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/policeman-shot-by-own-gun-at-healesville-police-station/story-e6frf7jo-1225844032667

UPDATE 5.36pm: A POLICEMAN found shot dead with his own gun at an outer Melbourne station was under investigation.

The officer-in-charge is believed to have been shot by his own gun at Healesville police station in Melbourne’s outer east about 9.30pm.

Victoria Police named him as Sergeant Anthony Vangorp.

Paramedics arrived to find the sergeant had suffered a gunshot wound to the head and had died at the scene.

A police gun was found nearby.

Emergency crews could not revive him.

The officer, who had more than 30 years’ experience in the force, had been under investigation and tendered his resignation on Friday after a probe into “disciplinary issues”.

The resignation took effect yesterday, and it is believed the officer took his own life after returning to collect his belongings last night.

Other officers at the station had left on an urgent job, leaving him at the station alone, before returning to make the shock discovery.

There are no suspicious circumstances, but Assistant Commissioner Ken Lay told Radio 3AW that investigators would examine how the former officer was able to get access to a police-issue firearm.

He said the death had come as a shock to his colleagues, and that he was well liked and respected.

It is understood the member leaves behind a female partner.

“This is pretty horrible for the local police, for the member’s family and for the broader community,” Mr Lay said.

“He was a well-known member up there. Overall, it’s a pretty sad event,”

He said the officer had spent much of his time in the eastern region in his “30-odd years” of service.

Mr Lay confirmed police management had been talking with the officer last week about “a number of issues”.

But he would not reveal details of the investigation “out of respect to the member, his family and the staff out there”, other than to confirm that it was not a corruption investigation.

He would not comment on suggestions that the officer was going to be sacked if he did not resign.

The homicide squad, ethical standards department and the Coroner are investigating, with police expected to prepare a report for the Coroner.

For more information on depression and to seek help on suicide prevention, please contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 http://www.lifeline.org.au, SANE Helpline on 1800 18 SANE (7263) http://www.sane.org and Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 http://www.beyondblue.org.au.

with Matthew Schulz

 

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Police officer found dead in station

Posted by: 3AW Radio | 23 March, 2010 – 9:48 AM

http://www.3aw.com.au/blogs/3aw-generic-blog/police-officer-found-dead-in-station/20100323-qrxj.html

THOMAS HUNTER: The police officer found dead at a station in Melbourne’s outer east last night has been named as Sergeant Anthony Vangorp.

The 47-year-old officer in charge had been under investigation for ‘‘serious discipline matters’’ in the week before his death, Victoria Police confirmed in a statement.

Two officers returning from divisional van duties found Sergeant Vangorp’s body at the Healesville police station about 9.30pm.

He had a gunshot wound to the head, believed to have been inflicted by a police gun, which was found at his side. His death is not being treated as suspicious.

Sergeant Vangorp, a 30-year veteran of the force, was alone in the three-member station at the time.

Deputy Commissioner Ken Lay said Sergeant Vangorp had tendered his resignation last week after being questioned by police management about “a number of issues’’, but not corruption.

He said the sergeant’s resignation became effective yesterday, and an investigation into his death would probe how he had access to a weapon.

‘‘He was actually there [at the police station] collecting his belongings,’’ Mr Lay told radio station 3AW.

‘‘He had spoken to a couple of members who were at the station while he was doing that. They had to sneak out and do a quick job. When they came back they, unfortunately, found what they found.

‘‘This is pretty horrible for the local police, for the member’s family and for the broader community. He was a well-known member up there.’’

It is understood Sergeant Vangorp had two adult children.

For help or information visit beyondblue.org.au, call Suicide Helpline Victoria on 1300 651 251, or Lifeline on 131 114.

 

Blog comments Your Say

  • This is just sad. Sad for his family, sad for his friends, his workmates, for the Police Force and anyone involved. This will seriously change many lives and leave very deep scars and pain for many years to come. My heart go out to his family, friends and to our members, just keep holding that thin blue line…
    Current Member Thursday 8 April, 2010 – 2:16 PM
  • This is just a complete tragedy for the family left behind, including the members. How dare force command act the way they have and wipe the blood from their hands without conscience. Unfortunately, this is not the only member to take his life due to the actions of the force in the last 6 months… so sad, condolences to the family.
    disillusioned tjf Friday 26 March, 2010 – 12:47 AM
  • This is a sad ingigdment on our community, police force and government. Although never a servicing officer I have over the years known many servicing officers and I refuse to use the term “members” as members belong to clubs! This is a true reflection of the political involvement into our once respected police force in Victoria and confirms the assumptions of many that our former and current Chief commiissioner and deputies are nothing more than puppets of the state. Mr. Overland is an appointed CC of the current state government as was his predecessor along with his deputies also, Mr, Lay although a well liked man is unfortunately a yes man that has risen to his current position by his inability to stand his ground on issues where he know’s wrong is being done. Yet he fully accepts his position and standing in the communmity regardless of the current situation within Victoria Police. It is a sad fact that we have so much violence on our streets, disrespect of community and police yet nothing is being proactively done to rectify the issues, just more spin.
    Police force or political representatives?

    Shane Thursday 25 March, 2010 – 9:56 PM
  • this is more politically correct rubbish from the higher up officials , Police officers are just Human and should be able to look at emails as long as they are Not outside the Law that applies to each and everyone of us , No wonder police are leaving faster than they can recruit them
    Wayne Harris Wednesday 24 March, 2010 – 5:47 PM
  • This is just another disgrace by Victoria Police. I was a member for 42 and a half years, I was pushed out the door. I suffered from Post traumatic disorder which came about after being involved in a number of serious incidents over the years including being shot at and other serious issues. I spoke to Christine NIXON prior to my departure about two issues that are close to me. the first being the treatment of our Indigenous Population by Victoria Police, and the second being the treatment of members and the lack of welfare support. Christine did not want to know about anything about it. My issues came to a head after I was forced by an Officer to Lock up a current serving member, who was also a mate of mine, after he found himself in a situation with serious mental health issues brought about by some tragic issues that he had been involved in as part of his work. Vale Tony VAN GORP, a mans man, and another senior member crunched by an unjust employer.
    Brian McCALLUM Wednesday 24 March, 2010 – 5:03 PM
  • This is a disgrace! The Vic Police force is leaving this poor mans family in a shadow of doubt. If all he did was misuse emails why on earth was he forced to resign?? Is this more of passed leaders culture surfacing here??
    alexas Wednesday 24 March, 2010 – 2:02 PM

I think police command have to come clean with this. I smell fish and they should be up front for the sake of the public and the family

  • Julie- Bayswater Wednesday 24 March, 2010 – 2:25 AM
  • My thoughts to the family and even more to the members on duty who are going to be disected and thrown out by ESD who will investigate this incident along with the homocide squad but for them 10 minutes. ESD is the biggest department in the Victoria police and you could easily put an extra 500 police on the street if you cut ESD by 1/3Seious misconduct can be a police officer getting a parking ticket or a speeding fine in his/her private vehicle susequently receiving 2 penalties civil and internal.Police management and ESD have no idea about staff management. ESD has and will always be seen as a path to promotion take down and discredit as many police as you can regardless of the parking ticket and you will fly through the ranks. Someone in ESD is now going to be the next chief commissioner for his tact on this.
    Martin – Chiangmai Wednesday 24 March, 2010 – 2:06 AM
  • So sad Tony. Condolences to your family and collegues. I just hope that your death is not in vain and that a full enquiry into the circumstances of your death are conducted in a proper manner. Those that are responsible for the “Witch-Hunt” that led to this tragedy should hang their heads in shame. ESD should not be investigating this matter. They were the ones who led the investigation into your ALLEGED misdemeanours and should not be allowed to be involved into what will ultimately be another cover-up. The comments by Mr LAY were extremely inappropriate, suggesting that you were under investigation for serious discipline matters. Let him explain what this means, as I believe the community has a different idea.
    Concerned Citizen Tuesday 23 March, 2010 – 8:43 PM

 

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Cop mourned

http://mountainviews.starcommunity.com.au/mail/2010-03-30/cop-mourned/

By Kath Gannaway
THE death of Sergeant Tony Van Gorp last week sent shockwaves through the Healesville community.
Tributes have flowed for the popular, community-minded policeman who as officer in charge at Healesville for the past 15 years, played an active role in many community organisations, particularly local schools.
Sgt Van Gorp, 47, was found dead on Monday night (22 March) by two colleagues when they returned to the Healesville police station at around 9.30pm.
Victoria Police confirmed his death just after midnight, stating that a gun was found at the scene and that there were no suspicious circumstances. It was soon also confirmed that he had had taken his own life.
The Melbourne media went into meltdown, and the rumour mill in Healesville followed suit, as it was revealed that Sgt Van Gorp was under investigation for misuse of the police email system.
Speculation was fuelled by the fact that Sgt Van Gorp had tendered his resignation on 18 March after receiving a Section 68 notice from Chief Commissioner Simon Overland.
The notice was one of only two issued by Mr Overland following investigations by the Ethical Standards Department for what were said to be “serious discipline matters”.
A close friend of Sgt Van Gorp has told the Mail he believed the letter was an ultimatum – resign or be sacked.
Much of the reporting on the police email crackdown last week revolved around other investigations being conducted by the ESD relating to racist and pornographic emails which Mr Overland said would shock the community.
He went on record on Thursday however as saying that the email for which he had delivered the section 68 to Sgt Van Gorp was neither racist, nor illegal.
Mr Overland has strongly rejected accusations that the Section 68 was a heavy-handed approach saying the email was sufficiently ‘serious’ to warrant the action.
He gave no indication as to the direction the ESD investigations into Sgt Van Gorp’s matter would now take, or if and when the exact nature of the email would be made known.
More stories on pages 8 and 9

 

 

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Anthony van GORP 2 - VicPol - Suicide 22 March 2010

 

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Police officer’s suicide may have been avoided over email scandal

Simon Overland

Simon Overland has been implicated in the investigation over a police officer’s suicide. Picture: Greg Scullin Source: Herald Sun

UPDATE 3pm: POLICE command says action taken to discipline an officer who later took his own life was “right and proper”.

The Office of Police Integrity is investigating claims that senior police – including Chief Commissioner Simon Overland – overlooked legal advice about how to discipline a police officer who later killed himself.

Healesville sergeant Tony Vangorp fatally shot himself after he was told to expect a Section 68 notice during Operation Barrott, an OPI-Ethical Standards Department probe into pornographic, racist and homophobic emails circulating among police.

The rarely used 68s are rubber-stamped by the Chief Commissioner and demand recipients show cause why they should not be sacked.

The Victorian Government Solicitor’s office is believed to have issued formal advice to senior police that 68s would be inappropriate in those cases. Internal police lawyers gave top brass similar legal advice.

The OPI has been told police may have misapplied their powers by issuing no-confidence notices during the email scandal that swept the force last year.

The officers implicated are Supt Lisa McMeeken, Assistant Commissioner Luke Cornelius and Mr Overland.

Police Association boss Greg Davies said he was amazed to hear of the allegations Mr Overland had disregarded advice.

“If that’s right and if those actions have contributed in any way, shape or form to the death of Tony Vangorp the Chief Commissioner surely cannot remain in office, then there’s only one person that’s made that decision in blatant disregard for internal and external legal advice that said don’t do it,’’ Snr-Sgt Davies said.

But in a statement released today, a Victoria Police spokesperson said police were confident they had followed proper procedure.

“Victoria Police is confident that the steps taken in relation to Sgt Tony Van Gorp in March last year were right and proper. These included, in recognition of the strong public interest in the matter from the outset, asking OPI to actively oversight our investigations,” the statement said.

“However we do not believe that the interests of the Van Gorp family are well served by further speculation and unseemly criticism in the media.

“The coronial process, in which we have confidence, must be allowed to run its course.”

The spokesperson said police would await the findings of the coronial inquest before making any further comment.

Mr Overland said today he did not ignore legal advice about issuing a disciplinary notice to Sgt Vangorp.

“If there is an OPI investgation into that, that’s fine and I welcome that,’’ he said.

“I have absolutely nothing to fear or hide in relation to that particular case.’’

Mr Overland said he was the only person who could issue the rarely used Section 68 notice, and legal advice surrounding them was often contradictory.

He said Sgt Vangorp resigned after the notice was issued.

Premier Ted Baillieu said today Mr Overland had his full support.

“I haven’t seen the issue in detail but the answer is yes (I have faith in Mr Overland),” he said.

The Herald Sun understands that another 68 issued under Barrott – to a senior detective in Geelong – has been withdrawn.

Senior police were advised that a Section 69 notice, which refers suspect officers to a disciplinary hearing, would be a more suitable way to deal with those caught up in Barrott.

Eight officers were sacked and about 13 others fined or demoted after they were found with vile emails on their computers last year. Several have lodged appeals.

An OPI spokesman last night said the office was “actively oversighting Operation Barrott and associated matters”.

Sgt Vangorp, a 30-year police veteran, shot himself at his police station last March. His death is before the Coroner’s Court.

Of the six 68s issued in Victoria, only one has not been overturned.

In advising against 68 notices, one government solicitor cited a precedent involving a fraud squad member disciplined with a 69 notice for having similarly offensive emails on his computer.

Anyone with personal problems can call Lifeline on 131 114; Victorian Statewide Suicide Helpline on 1300 651 251; or Mensline Australia on 1300 789 978.

crawfordc@heraldsun.com.au
– with Amelia Harris, Stephen McMahon

 

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Questions remain

By Kath Gannaway
Sgt van Gorp took his own life five days after receiving a rarely invoked Section 68 notice in relation to a probe into emails circulating among police.
The Section 68 notice demands that the recipient show cause why they should not be sacked.
Victoria Police issued a statement last week in response to claims made in the Herald Sun that the Office of Police Integrity was investigating whether senior police, including Chief Commissioner Simon Overland, had overlooked legal advice about the use of the Section 68.
Another option would have been a Section 69, which refers the recipient to a disciplinary hearing.
Sgt van Gorp’s brother, Fred van Gorp told the Mail he was pleased to hear the OPI was investigating the circumstances around the way his brother was disciplined.
“It is what we were hoping for from the start,” he said.
“The Section 68 is for criminals; police who have committed criminal activity, and what I am gathering from all this is that he should have got a Section 69 instead of the Section 68.”
Victoria Police however say they are confident the steps taken were “right and proper”.
“These included, in recognition of the strong public interest in the matter from the outset, asking OPI to actively oversight our investigations,” the statement said.
“The coronial process, in which we have confidence, must be allowed to run its course.”
Mr van Gorp however said he had not been advised as to whether the police report into his brother’s death had been handed over to the Coroner.
“I have been ringing the police for the last 17 months to find out and we’re still waiting,” he said.
A spokesperson for the Coroner’s Court told the Mail on Friday they could not do anything until the police had finished their part.
“We have not received anything from the police yet that has been logged as at Mid-March,” she said.
Detective Inspector John Potter of the Homicide Squad confirmed on Monday that the brief of evidence was finished, but said it was still under review.
He said that review was an internal police mechanism involving both the OPI and the Ethical Standards Department.
Det Insp Potter said the brief should be with the Coroner by early next month.

 

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Inquest

http://mountainviews.starcommunity.com.au/mail/2011-12-06/inquest/

By Kath Gannaway
Sgt van Gorp, 47, took his own life at the Healesville police station on 22 March 2010.
He had resigned from Victoria Police five days earlier, after he was issued with a Section 68 notice of no confidence by then Commissioner of Police Simon Overland.
Sgt van Gorp was under investigation at the time for misuse of the police email system.
Mr Olle told a packed court at a mention hearing on Wednesday 30 November that an inquest into Sgt van Gorp’s death “ … would appear to be the antithesis of what Sergeant van Gorp would have wanted in life”, but did not elaborate on the basis for that statement.
He said the hearing was to help determine whether it was necessary or appropriate to conduct an inquest.
He said the police investigation brief submitted to him was thorough, containing 64 statements and addressing, among other matters the circumstances in which Victoria Police made decisions to serve the Section 68 notice.
He noted that Victoria Police had subsequently made changes to the process involved in serving no-confidence notices.
Mr Olle allowed 14 days for submissions.
“Subject to submissions from interested parties in this matter urging a different view, it appears that the facts and circumstances are clear and that the conduct of an inquest would be beyond the scope of my statutory obligations,” he said.
Sgt Van Gorp’s partner Gayle Shelley and his brother Fred van Gorp were in the court, but declined to comment on the matter pending further submissions.
A further hearing will be held on 16 December.

 

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Van Gorp inquest call

By Kath Gannaway and Melissa Meehan
THE Police Association is pushing for an inquest into the apparent suicide of Healesville Sergeant Tony van Gorp.
Theo Cassamatis, representing both the Police Association and partner Gayle Shelley and brother Fred van Gorp, told the Melbourne Coroners Court on Friday that the court brief was just the beginning of the story.
He said without an inquest, the true circumstances of Sgt van Gorp’s death at Healesville Police Station in March last year and the reasons for the way he was treated would not be revealed.
“Unless that question is answered, as to why this man was targeted, whatever amendments are put in place that they are as susceptible to failure or error as those in place when Tony van Gorp was issued with the Section 68 notice,” Mr Cassamatis said.
“The answer why can only be achieved by interrogating those who have made statements.”
Mr Cassamatis dismissed what he called a misconception that an inquest is not what Sgt van Gorp wanted.
“The circumstances surrounding his death have already been aired,” Mr Cassamatis said.
“The people of Healesville know all too well why he ended his life.”
Dr Ian Freckleton SC, representing the Chief Commissioner made the point that some things may come out that could reflect badly on Sgt van Gorp but acknowledged that other than the email incident he had a flawless 32 year history in the force.
Coroner John Olle said he would take both arguments into consideration and come back with a decision in the new year.
Sgt van Gorp’s partner Gayle Shelley and his brother Fred were among family members at the hearing.

 

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Van Gorp inquest call

By Kath Gannaway and Melissa Meehan
THE Police Association is pushing for an inquest into the apparent suicide of Healesville Sergeant Tony van Gorp.
Theo Cassamatis, representing both the Police Association and partner Gayle Shelley and brother Fred van Gorp, told the Melbourne Coroners Court on Friday that the court brief was just the beginning of the story.
He said without an inquest, the true circumstances of Sgt van Gorp’s death at Healesville Police Station in March last year and the reasons for the way he was treated would not be revealed.
“Unless that question is answered, as to why this man was targeted, whatever amendments are put in place that they are as susceptible to failure or error as those in place when Tony van Gorp was issued with the Section 68 notice,” Mr Cassamatis said.
“The answer why can only be achieved by interrogating those who have made statements.”
Mr Cassamatis dismissed what he called a misconception that an inquest is not what Sgt van Gorp wanted.
“The circumstances surrounding his death have already been aired,” Mr Cassamatis said.
“The people of Healesville know all too well why he ended his life.”
Dr Ian Freckleton SC, representing the Chief Commissioner made the point that some things may come out that could reflect badly on Sgt van Gorp but acknowledged that other than the email incident he had a flawless 32 year history in the force.
Coroner John Olle said he would take both arguments into consideration and come back with a decision in the new year.
Sgt van Gorp’s partner Gayle Shelley and his brother Fred were among family members at the hearing.

 

 

 

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Tony’s truth unheard

http://mountainviews.starcommunity.com.au/mail/2012-02-21/tonys-truth-unheard/

By Kath Gannaway
THE two people closest to Tony van Gorp, his partner Gayle Shelley, and his brother Fred van Gorp, have maintained a dignified silence over the past two years.
Behind the scenes, they’ve grieved, fought for justice and the reputation of the Healesville police sergeant, and for changes to Victoria Police disciplinary processes to ensure what happened in Healesville on 22 March, 2010, never happens again.
The grieving is their own, but they had hoped that the inquest they and the Victorian Police Association were calling for would deliver the answers and changes they and other police wanted.
As they sat in the Coroner’s Court in Melbourne on Wednesday, 15 February Ms Shelley bowed her head several times as Coroner John Olle read out his decision. Fred van Gorp looked resigned; perhaps even defeated.
With his decision the Coroner put an end to any resolution on the question of accountability of the Chief Commissioner of Police at the time, Simon Overland, and the right or wrong of issuing the Section 68.
“He had 31 years’ experience, but it didn’t seem to account for anything in terms of what happened. Tony was just backed into a corner; he felt like he had nothing else,” Ms Shelley said.
“I was with him when he went to the (Police) Association. He lived on his public image, it was part of him, and when he got the notice, he realised he had let people down, and I suppose he let himself down,” she said.
“He knew there would be consequences … everybody makes mistakes but it (the Section 68) was designed for criminal (behaviour) and what Tony did certainly was not criminal,” she said, adding that she felt those issues have been brushed under the carpet.
Nonetheless, with their usual dignity, they say they have accepted the Coroner’s decision, but hope with the ongoing investigation the Coroner will at the very least address what they believe was a critical failure by Victoria Police – the lack of welfare provided to Sgt van Gorp after the delivery of the Section 68.
Admitting disappointment, he said however the Coroner’s response was a balanced one.
“Hopefully any future findings will ensure this never happens to another police officer again and that anyone put in that position gets adequate support and counselling,” Mr van Gorp said.
“We know now that we are not going to get an inquest, and perhaps we can move on a little bit from there,” he said.
In response to the Coroner’s comment that his findings would include Sgt van Gorp’s presence at the police station on the night of his death, both Ms Shelley and Mr van Gorp reflected with the benefit of hindsight, and say no-one could have known what was coming.
“Tony and Gayle had been planning on going on trips, and he was planning a fishing trip the next day … we didn’t expect it.
“It was a unique position (at Healesville police station) as officer in charge for 15 years, and while that’s probably something that needs to be addressed in the future, I don’t hold anyone (at Healesville) responsible for what happened on that night,” he said.
Ms Shelley said his colleagues had gone through great personal hardship over Sgt van Gorp’s death. “No-one is to blame there,” she said.
Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or SANE Helpline on 1800 18 SANE (7263).

 

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Inquest denied

By Kath Gannaway
THERE will be no inquest into the death two years ago of Healesville Police Sergeant Tony van Gorp.
Sgt van Gorp, 47, was found dead at Healesville Police Station on 22 March, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was under investigation in relation to misuse of the police email system and had been issued with a Section 68 (no-confidence) notice by the then Chief Commissioner of Police Simon Overland, five days before his death.
Sgt van Gorp’s partner Gayle Shelley and the Police Association had sought an inquest as part of Coroner John Olle’s ongoing investigation, partially to determine why Sgt van Gorp had been singled out by Commissioner Overland for what was seen as harsh and unusual treatment, and to restore his reputation.
Coroner John Olle ruled on Wednesday, 15 February, at the Coroner’s Court in Melbourne that the matters raised were beyond his jurisdiction in terms of an inquest and said he was satisfied that the cause and circumstances of Sgt van Gorp’s death could be established without one.
Coroner Olle said he had considered submissions from Ms Shelley and the Police Association (the applicants), as well as from the Chief Commissioner of Police in making his decision.
He said the basis for the applicants’ submission included a need to determine why the Chief Commissioner had considered dismissal as the appropriate action, to dispel claims that new procedures since introduced were appropriate and to bring about changes to legislation, including the removal of Section 68 notices.
While the submission made by the Chief Commissioner of Police neither argued for or against an inquest, it contended that an examination of the Chief Commissioner’s powers of dismissal were outside the scope of the coroner’s jurisdiction and that there was no evidence of systematic defects which needed to be explored as part of an inquest.
In relation to Sgt van Gorp’s reputation, he said the reputation of an individual was outside both the scope and legitimate purpose of an inquest, and outside the control of the coronial process.
“How matters are reported in the media cannot be controlled and have the potential to be very disturbing and intrusive to family members,” he said.
He said having examined the 963-page brief of evidence, he found no evidence to suggest that anyone who knew Sgt van Gorp thought less of him as a result of his behaviour.
While Ms Shelley said she was sceptical about the submissions put forward by the Commissioner of Police, and that she felt the issues around the Section 68 notice had been swept under the carpet, she said she accepted the decision.
Police Association secretary Greg Davies said the association was still vehemently opposed to the Section 68 process and had been in negotiations with the government in terms of a range of issues that needed to be addressed by the government, rather than by police. He said those negotiations were continuing.
He noted that the coroner had said his preliminary view was that the facts and circumstances of Sgt van Gorp’s death were clear and that an inquest was beyond his statutory obligations.On the matter of whether there was a systematic defect (in issuing the section 68) Mr Davies said the door was not closed on that question.
“He (the Coroner) is not saying there is no systematic defect, but that there is no systematic defect that requires an inquest. He may determine independently of an inquest that there is, or he may not,” he said.
He said the association accepted the coroner’s decision and would wait on the outcome of the investigation to see what end result would be. Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or SANE Helpline on 1800 18 SANE (7263).
>>> For more on Van Corp inquest issue see Page 3.

 

 

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Partner wins compensation over police sergeant’s suicide

The former de-facto wife of a respected 30-year policeman who shot himself at work has won a six-figure compensation payout from Victoria Police’s WorkCover insurer.

One of Sergeant Tony Van Gorp’s children will also receive compensation after police settled both claims before a contested County Court trial this week.

Sergeant Van Gorp died on March 22, 2010, at the Healesville Police Station five days after he was served with a notice of proposed dismissal for misconduct.

Then chief commissioner Simon Overland issued the notice after Sergeant Van Gorp, 47, was found to have received, stored and sent pornographic and inappropriate emails.

Gayle Shelley told Fairfax Media she was relieved the case was resolved, but was “extremely disappointed” that Mr Overland “elected to single Tony out so dramatically”.

“Tony was a dedicated member of the Victoria Police Force for 30 years and we now want to honour the work that he did and the person who he was,” she said.

A coroner later found that “everyone, including police colleagues, appeared to agree with (Sergeant Van Gorp) that the (notice) was ‘heavy handed’ for the behaviour he engaged in”.

In his findings last May, published today by The Age for the first time, the coroner John Olle said that in the days before his death he was very well supported by family, friends and colleagues.

Sergeant Van Gorp had regarded his behaviour as stupid but thought the notice was “heavy handed”, Mr Olle said.

He said it was clear he was “suffering” from the abrupt end of his career – his resignation was accepted and effective on March 27 – but no one, including a doctor and a psychologist, believed he was at risk of self harm.

He found that the “evidence suggests that Victoria Police were aware” the effect of the notice of Sergeant Van Gorp would be “shocking”.

Mr Olle further said that central to his actions on the night of his death was that he believed “people would think less of him “over the notice but that his perspective “on this matter was not supported by the evidence …”

Ms Shelley, who had been Sergeant Van Gorp’s partner since 2004, sued after Victoria Police’s insurer rejected her initial claim.

A major dispute between the parties centred on the appropriateness of the dismissal procedure, whether it caused or contributed to any mental injury and exposed Sergeant Van Gorp to the risk of harm.

Ms Shelley’s lawyer, Craig Sidebottom, of Slater & Gordon, told Fairfax Media that the “manner in which Victoria Police dealt with Tony was both unprecedented and heavy handed”.

“The power of dismissal that resided in s68 of the Police Regulation Act should have only be exercised by the Chief Commissioner very sparingly and ought be reserved for cases involving major corruption or criminal offence.

“Section 68 is a draconian provision. There were far better alternatives available to the Chief Commissioner when dealing with these issues.”

A police spokeswoman told Fairfax Media that ‘‘as Victoria Police is not a party to the proceedings, it is not for us to comment’’.

‘‘Tony Van Gorp’s death was a tragedy and Victoria Police extend our sympathy to his family and friends,’’ the spokeswoman added.

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Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/partner-wins-compensation-over-police-sergeants-suicide-20130409-2hjhz.html#ixzz3JPzfcVgA
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Partner wins compensation over police sergeant’s suicide

Date  

Steve Butcher

 EXLUSIVE

The former de-facto wife of a respected 30-year policeman who shot himself at work has won a six-figure compensation payout from Victoria Police’s WorkCover insurer.

One of Sergeant Tony Van Gorp’s children will also receive compensation after police settled both claims before a contested County Court trial this week.

Sergeant Van Gorp died on March 22, 2010, at the Healesville Police Station five days after he was served with a notice of proposed dismissal for misconduct.

Then chief commissioner Simon Overland issued the notice after Sergeant Van Gorp, 47, was found to have received, stored and sent pornographic and inappropriate emails.

Gayle Shelley told Fairfax Media she was relieved the case was resolved, but was “extremely disappointed” that Mr Overland “elected to single Tony out so dramatically”.

“Tony was a dedicated member of the Victoria Police Force for 30 years and we now want to honour the work that he did and the person who he was,” she said.

A coroner later found that “everyone, including police colleagues, appeared to agree with (Sergeant Van Gorp) that the (notice) was ‘heavy handed’ for the behaviour he engaged in”.

In his findings last May, published today by The Age for the first time, the coroner John Olle said that in the days before his death he was very well supported by family, friends and colleagues.

Sergeant Van Gorp had regarded his behaviour as stupid but thought the notice was “heavy handed”, Mr Olle said.

He said it was clear he was “suffering” from the abrupt end of his career – his resignation was accepted and effective on March 27 – but no one, including a doctor and a psychologist, believed he was at risk of self harm.

He found that the “evidence suggests that Victoria Police were aware” the effect of the notice of Sergeant Van Gorp would be “shocking”.

Mr Olle further said that central to his actions on the night of his death was that he believed “people would think less of him “over the notice but that his perspective “on this matter was not supported by the evidence …”

Ms Shelley, who had been Sergeant Van Gorp’s partner since 2004, sued after Victoria Police’s insurer rejected her initial claim.

A major dispute between the parties centred on the appropriateness of the dismissal procedure, whether it caused or contributed to any mental injury and exposed Sergeant Van Gorp to the risk of harm.

Ms Shelley’s lawyer, Craig Sidebottom, of Slater & Gordon, told Fairfax Media that the “manner in which Victoria Police dealt with Tony was both unprecedented and heavy handed”.

“The power of dismissal that resided in s68 of the Police Regulation Act should have only be exercised by the Chief Commissioner very sparingly and ought be reserved for cases involving major corruption or criminal offence.

“Section 68 is a draconian provision. There were far better alternatives available to the Chief Commissioner when dealing with these issues.”

A police spokeswoman told Fairfax Media that ‘‘as Victoria Police is not a party to the proceedings, it is not for us to comment’’.

‘‘Tony Van Gorp’s death was a tragedy and Victoria Police extend our sympathy to his family and friends,’’ the spokeswoman added.

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/partner-wins-compensation-over-police-sergeants-suicide-20130409-2hjhz.html

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Elwin ‘ Ned ‘ George WOOLASTON

Elwin ‘ Ned ‘ George WOOLASTON

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  6761[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 14 August 1950

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed 7 October 1977 – Retired

Stations: Mounted Unit, Fairfield & Cabramatta ( 34 Division )

Service:  From  pre August 1950  to  ? ? ? – Retirement

Awards:  National Medal – granted 8 June 1988

Born:  18 August 1929

Died:  17 September 2010

Cause?

Age:  80 years

Funeral date:  21 September 2010 –

Funeral location:  North Chapel, Forest Lawn Cemetery, Camden Valley Way, Leumeah

Buried at:  Cremated

[alert_blue]NED is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_blue]  * NOT JOB RELATED

2002-000100

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Senior Constable Greg Callander with Retired Sergeant 1st Class Ned Woolaston at the home of Ned & Sue in 2002. Ned was my Boss at Cabramatta Police Stn in 1980 – 1982. Ned Retired in 1988 and was a member of the NSW Police Mounted Unit in his early career.

Ned Woolaston - Funeral bookNed Woolaston – Funeral Service book.pdf

 Funeral photos:

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Thomas Gerald MOORE

Thomas Gerald MOORE

aka Tom

NSW Penrith Police Academy Class # ??

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. # 7641[/alert_yellow]

Rank: Probationary Constable – appointed 26 October 1953

Constable – appointed 26 October 1954

Constable 1st Class – appointed 26 October 1959

Senior Constable – appointed 26 October 1964

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 1 January 1969

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 25 January 1977

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed 9 December 1979

Inspector 3rd Class – appointed August 1984

Final Rank:  Inspector 3rd Class – retired

Stations:  Regent St GD’s – ( 2 Division ) 26 Nov. 1953 – 1 June 1954,

Ashfield? – Solo Motor Cyclist. ( 11 Division ) 2 June 1954 – 8 May 1955. 

He was going to Wagga Wagga but this transfer was cancelled.

Patrol Yard ( 4 Wheels – Transport Section – 20 Division ) 9 May 1955 – 13 June 1955.

Ashfield? – GD’s 14 June 1955 – 4 March 1956

Ashfield? – Outfit Cyclist – 5 March 1956 – 18 August 1957

Ashfield? – GD’s 19 August 1957 – 1 September 1957.

Police Training Centre ( Penrith ) Wireless Section 2 September 1957.

Communications Branch ( 20 Division ) 16 June 1967

Communications Branch ( 20 Division ) 31 January 1973 – Radio Communication Centre.

Liverpool ( 22 Division from 1 Aug 1973 until 28 Sept 1973 on a 2 month supernumerary position ), Merrylands? – GD’s from 1 May 1974 ( 26 Division ),

Wentworthville – O.I.C. from 8 December 1974 ),

Merrylands ( 26 Division ) from 20 March 1977 GD’s, 

S.T.S. – Communications Branch from 26 August 1979 – Operations Section, Communications Branch,

OIC of VKG2 ( Warilla ) – Retirement

ServiceFrom ? ? pre Oct 1953  to  1 April 1988 = 34+ years service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

but was Awarded the Police Long Service & Good Conduct Medal on 19 April 1976

Born:  8 August 1930

Died on:  29 May 2010

Cause?

Age:  79

Funeral date:  Thursday  3 June 2010 @ 11am

Funeral location:  Gerringong Catholic Church, Fern St, Gerringong, NSW

Buried at?

Tom Moore and his wife at his Send Off

Tom Moore and his wife at his Send OffTom Moore and his wife at the Send Off for Tom ( and others ) at the Illawarra Yacht Club

Tom Moore and his wife at the Send Off for Tom ( and others ) at the Illawarra Yacht Club

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Upon joining the NSWPF, Tom was described as:

5′ 9.5″ tall, 12 st 3 lb in weight, blue eyes, fair hair with Medium complexion and a Native of Goulburn, NSW.

He was single upon joining but married on the 21 May 1955.

He was previously employed as a Labourer for 2.5 months and a Fitter and Turner for 7 years.

He sat for the following examinations:

Constable 1st Class – Passed on 24 June 1958

Sergeant 3rd Class – Failed on 19 May 1966 but Passed on 19 May 1967

Sergeant 1st Class – Passed on 13 May 1975

Inspector – Failed on 16 May 1980 but Passed on 12 – 15 May 1981

He passed his Solo Motor Cycle course on 23 March 1954 and his 4WD Course on the 24 July 1973.

Tom ” Entered into a bond with Commissioner of Police to serve with Police Department for at least five years after completion of course at Marconi School of Wireless. Course completed 14 September 1958″

He successfully completed Stage 4 of Radio Trades Course at North Sydney Technical College in 1968.

He completed Army Technique of Instruction Course 17 on 21 April 1961

Completed Senior Sergeant’s Course # 11 conducted from 12 October to 4 December 1981.

Attended Australian Counter Disaster College Course # 886 – Counter Communications Planning – conducted between 28 February to 5 March 1982.

Completed the Australian Counter Disaster College Course # 900 ” Disaster Control ” from 11 to 16 July 1982.

August 1984: Former Liverpool Police Officer – Sergeant 1/c. Thomas. G.
Moore, attached to the Communications Branch at VKG Warilla was promoted to the rank of Inspector 3/c. It is believed that around 1988, he took optional retirement.  

  

May 2010: Former Liverpool Police Officer – Inspector Thomas. G. Moore passed away aged 79. Prior to retiring from the Communications Branch at Warilla, he and his wife moved down the south coast to the Gerringong area. Later Tom worked part-time for some years as the after hours mobile medical service driver. He would drive the “after hours Doctor” to visit needy patients around the south coast. His favourite location to rock fish was at ‘Black Point’ off Gerroa. He would often be seen swept into the ocean by huge waves while collecting green weed bait for black fish.      




Tracy Ann GRAY

Tracy Ann GRAY

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ?

Rank:  Leading Senior Constable

Stations: ?, Campbelltown L.A.C. ( 35 Division ) – death

ServiceFrom  ? ? 2000  to  2 June 2010 =10 years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born? ? ?

Died on:  2 June 2010

Cause:  Suicide

Age?

Funeral date?

Funeral location  ?

Buried at?

Memorial: NSW Police force Service Memorial Wall, Sydney Police Centre, Surry Hills, B6 ( right wall )

Leading SenCon Tracy Ann GRAY - 2 June 2010
Leading SenCon Tracy Ann GRAY – 2 June 2010

 

 [alert_red]Tracy is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_red]

REST IN PEACE
LEADING SENIOR CONSTABLE Tracy Ann GRAY
2 June 2010
NSW Police Force

”She was a tremendous officer. Tracy was exceptionally professional and polite – she was popular with other police officers.”

“She was a well respected and an extremely good trainer for young police and she always had a special care for victims of crime.” ~ Chief Inspector Bryan Doyle

Ms Gray joined the police force in 2000.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=415624578475467&set=a.540446609326596.1073741833.167692389935355&type=1&relevant_count=1

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Tracey had apparently “won a job” as a Sergeant 3rd Class but had not taken up that position at the time of her death.

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Absolutely no other information can be found on this woman – even 6 years later.  If someone see’s this memorial page and can offer further information – please contact Cal@AustralianPolice.com.au




Bryson Charles ANDERSON

Bryson Charles ANDERSON

Son of Rex

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  23020[/alert_yellow]

Academy Class:  222

Rank: Police Trainee – commenced 18 August 1986,

Probationary Constable – appointed 7 November 1986,

Constable 1st Class – appointed 1991,

Detective Constable 1st Class – appointed November 1993,

Sergeant – appointed 2004,

Detective Inspector – appointed 2009,

Duty Officer – from 19 December 2010

Detective Inspector

StationsGoulburn Academy, Parramatta G.D’s, Granville, Ermington, C.I. Duties – Granville, Castle Hill, Task Force Boyne, Ermington, Rosehill, Special Crime, Internal Affairs, Hawkesbury L.A.C.

Service:   From  18 August 1986   to  6 December 2012 = 26+ years Service

Awards:  National Medal – granted 22 July 1993

NSW Police Medal together with 1st & 2nd Clasps

Commissioner’s Unit Citation – 2003 for Highly professional investigations

1st Clasp to the National Medal – posthumously

3rd Clasp to the NSW Police Medal – posthumously

Valour Award – posthumously

Born:  16 January 1967

Died on:  6 December 2012

Cause:  Murdered – Oakville, NSW

Age:  45 old

 Funeral date:  Wednesday  12 December 2012

Funeral location?

Buried at?

Memorial location?

[alert_green]BRYSON IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

 

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The Commissioners Press conference.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-12-06/p … ck/4413626

Two people have been arrested after a senior police officer died after sustaining critical injuries in an axe attack in Sydney’s north-west.

Police say Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson was among a number of officers called to a dispute between neighbours at Scheyville Road in Oakville about 2pm (AEDT).

About two hours later, Detective Inspector Anderson was seriously injured in what is understood to have been an axe attack.

 Det Insp Bryson Anderson killed with an axe on Thu 061212

 

After treatment by paramedics he was rushed to Windsor Hospital in a critical condition but died a short time later.

Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said a 19-year-old man and a 42-year-old woman had been arrested at the scene and taken to Windsor Police Station where they were assisting investigators with their inquiries.

Mr Scipione said Detective Inspector Anderson was from a police family and had left a wife and three children.

“They are, as you imagine, distraught, but taking strong support from not only their immediate family, but the police family.

“We will console officers that were part of this particular operation.

“They, as you would also imagine, are traumatised and all support services have been put around them.

“I’ve got to say the strength and courage that is being shown inside (the hospital), not only by the police that are there, but also by the family, is incredible.”

 

Photo: Police say the officer was called to a dispute between neighbours in Oakville.

 Det Insp Bryson Anderson killed with an axe on Thu 061212  

 


 

Mr Scipione said he could not provide too many details of the events leading up to the attack given the investigation was in its early stages.

“I understand the (neighbourhood) dispute did involve the use of some weapons, but again having said that, we want to get to the bottom of this investigation before we start making too many statements,” he said.

“Suffice to say it was a violent neighbourhood incident that caused the police to attend and there were many police there.

“Some time after they first attended, there was an interaction which led to the death of Inspector Anderson.

“I understand they were trying to communicate with affected parties and were looking to resolve this peacefully.”

Mr Scipione said Detective Inspector Anderson had worked for him more than 10 years ago and paid tribute to his skills as an investigator.

“He was nothing short of a role model to those officers that come after him,” he said.

“Today is a stark reminder how dangerous this job is. These people do this in such a way they put their lives before the lives of others.

“You have an idea what the price is today.”

Anyone with information about the incident are being asked to call Crime Stoppers on  1800 333 000  or use the Crime Stoppers website.

 

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RIP  Bryson

A tribute from our Commissioner

Today ( Wednesday 12 December 2012) we honour a brave man. Bryson Anderson. A police officer, and so much more.

A man who was so deeply respected by the community in which he lived, worked and devoted much of his spare time.

A true man of the people. His service to the community was far greater than simply those days when he wore that blue uniform with such pride and distinction. And of course, Bryson was a loving husband, father and brother to his own family. To this family we owe so much. A debt of gratitude for the support you gave Bryson as he went about his duties. Police officers understand that each day they go to work, they put their lives on the line. This tragedy reminds us all of the sacrifice that goes with that understanding. Our community will always rely on men and women of courage who are willing to put up their hands to serve and protect. Bryson Anderson stood tall in their ranks. Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson, friend, you have left us with an enduring legacy, a standard to which we can all aspire and for which we are forever grateful. You will always be remembered.

Andrew Scipione

12 December 2012

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Valedictory for Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson

Date 

 

As delivered by NSW Police Force Commissioner Andrew Scipione APM

At 3.30pm on the 6th of December 2012, Detective Inspector Bryson Charles Anderson arrived at the scene of a neighbourhood dispute at Oakville near Windsor that had escalated beyond all reason.

He went to lend support to fellow officers who were seeking to bring matters to a peaceful resolution.

It was not to be.

The approach of police was resisted and Detective Inspector Anderson was fatally wounded.

Detective Inspector Anderson was rushed by ambulance to Hawkesbury Hospital but died as a result of his injuries.

Bryson Charles Anderson began his career as a trainee police officer on the 18th of August 1986 and attested on the 7th of November 1986.

His first general duties posting was here in Parramatta. That was followed by others to Granville and Ermington.

While at Granville in 1991, Constable First Class Anderson commenced criminal investigation duties, successfully gaining his designation as a Detective in November 1993.

Bryson’s designation was a defining moment in his policing career and he quickly displayed an aptitude and an enthusiasm for criminal investigation that was soon recognised by his commanding officers.

At Castle Hill, Task Force Boyne, Ermington, Rosehill and then within Special Crime and Internal Affairs, Bryson honed his detective skills. He was dedicated, analytical and meticulous.

A thoroughly good bloke. I worked with Bryson … and I can vouch for that.

In 2004, promoted to sergeant, Bryson returned to general duties. This time it was to Hawkesbury Local Area Command, where he was to spend three years as a supervisor.

In 2007 criminal investigation was again to beckon, Bryson seizing the opportunity to return to Special Crime and Internal Affairs … now known as Professional Standards … where he applied his skills to covert investigations. There he was promoted to the rank of Detective Inspector in 2009.

What was to prove Bryson’s final posting was back in Hawkesbury. He took up the role of Duty Officer in Hawkesbury Local Area Command on the 19th of December 2010, and served with distinction in that role until the moment of his passing.

Throughout his service Detective Inspector Anderson undertook extensive internal training in his chosen policing specialisation.

He was awarded the NSW Police Medal; the National Medal; as well as the first and second clasps to the NSW Police Medal.

In 2003 he received a Commissioner’s Unit Citation for highly professional investigations.

He will posthumously receive the first clasp to the National Medal and the third clasp to the NSW Police Medal.

Impressive as they are, the bare facts I have recounted do Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson little justice. Those who knew him … know that Bryson the man transcended … in achievements and in potential … any chronology of this type.

Those that know it best of all are Bryson’s wife, Donna, and his three children, Olivia, Darcy and Cain. It is with them that Bryson, devoted husband and father, was closest. And it is they who, tragically, must now manage without his love, strength and support.

Bryson’s father, Rex; mother, Shirley; and brothers Warwick and Damian also know the calibre of the man. Bryson’s is a profound loss, but be assured his life was just as profound a credit to you. I know for certain that he enriched the lives of all of us in the NSW Police Force who had the good fortune to know him.

What the record does not disclose is Bryson’s wholehearted embrace of community service.

Even when on holiday, Bryson was thinking of what he could do for others. On packing his bags last year for Vanuatu, in with the board shorts and sunscreen he found room for gifts and sporting equipment for the local village kids.

The demands of policing are great: more than enough for most of us, and often more than a full-time job. But not for Bryson. He was retained as a fire-fighter, serving for eight years between 1994 and 2002 at Number 81 Station, Windsor, rising to the rank of Deputy Captain.

And it didn’t stop there. Bryson coached a number of junior soccer teams for the Colo Soccer Club. And on the day before he died he took part in the final leg of the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics, held in Windsor, an event which five months earlier he volunteered to organise.

Bryson loved the Hawkesbury area, where he lived and worked most of his adult life.

And innumerable people, from the Hawkesbury and elsewhere, loved and admired Bryson in return. His personnel file is full to overflowing with complimentary remarks and letters of appreciation, many from the community and victims of crime, moved to write in gratitude for the care, dedication and professionalism with which he went about his work.

In Vanuatu, upon hearing of his passing, the villagers whose lives Bryson had so selflessly touched while on holiday held a service in his memory.

He was equally admired by his fellow police officers, myself among them. On the one hand, a tenacious and committed police officer, driven to pursue offenders for the darkest and most serious of crimes. Yet retaining the most extraordinary empathy, compassion and concern for the victims of those crimes.

He showed initiative and leadership; intelligence and perseverance; dedication and humility; and, memorably, a ready smile and an engaging way. Bryson drew people to him, without guile and without effort. The workplace was a better place for him being there.

The tributes from his fellow officers were immediate and many. They tell variously of a proud husband and father, a keen motor cyclist, an active participant in sporting clubs, and, invariably, of a superb police officer.

He made his vast store of policing wisdom available to young officers but never imposed it. More likely were those officers to hear from Bryson an encouraging “Just play your natural game, it’s first class” – one of his favourite sayings – to go with some tip or insight he’d somehow manage to convey.

Reflecting on her career, one officer … echoing the thoughts of many others I am sure, wrote: “Bryson you are an amazing officer and an even nicer gentleman. I formed this opinion 20 years ago as a naïve female probationary constable. I still hold the same opinion now. You will be truly missed”

There can be no doubt Bryson will be missed.

He lived for the community, died serving it and deserved much better.

His death reminds us that law and order are not givens. They come at a price and that price, on occasion, is a prohibitive one.

With Bryson’s death we realise, suddenly, even if belatedly, that ours is a society worth defending.

We realise that our hard won freedoms and protections are vulnerable and easily demolished.

We realise that not only is each individual’s life precious and fragile … but that so too is our way of life.

We meet Bryson’s death with grief and tears, but that can’t be allowed to suffice.

If he could lend us his voice, I’m sure Bryson would agree that now is not the time to be timid or defensive. It is not a time to be apologetic, nor a time for retreat.

The anger and regret we all feel – for Bryson’s sake and for the sake of all of the officers who have fallen before him – need to find constructive expression. As a society we need to rise up to repudiate violence, however and wherever we can, with all the energy we can muster.

For his wider police family … of which all police officers and their families are a part … Bryson’s death will neither be forgotten nor be in vain. Bryson’s courage and conviction inspire us now … and will into the future. We will continue to protect and serve the community as Bryson did. Of that he can be sure.

It is my honour today to posthumously confer two awards on Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson.

The National Police Service Medal: recognising Bryson’s ethical and diligent service in protecting the community.

And the Commissioner’s Valour Award for the conspicuous action and exceptional courage he displayed at the incident in Oakville where he lost his life. After being attacked with a knife and sustaining wounds that would prove fatal, Detective Inspector Anderson went to the aid of a fellow injured officer without hesitation.

In part the valour citation reads:

Conferred for conspicuous merit and exceptional bravery whilst under attack during the execution of his duties at Oakville on Thursday, 6 December 2012.

By his conspicuous actions and exceptional courage in a dangerous situation, Detective Inspector Anderson evinced the highest standards of the New South Wales Police Force and is so conferred with the Commissioner’s Valour Award.

I am deeply honoured, and indeed privileged, to be able to represent every member of the New South Wales Police Force here today to farewell a man who served his community with courage, honour, and distinction.

A loving husband and father.

A prized friend and colleague.

A police officer.

Our prayers are with you Bryson. May you rest in peace.

 

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/valedictory-for-detective-inspector-bryson-anderson-20121212-2b9e2.html

 

 

 

 

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 Insp Bryson Anderson - Murdered 061212 - 05Insp Bryson Anderson - Murdered 061212 - 04Insp Bryson Anderson - Murdered 061212 - 02

Insp Bryson Anderson - Murdered 061212 - 01

Insp Bryson Anderson - Murdered 061212 - 03

National Police Wall of Remembrance
National Police Wall of Remembrance

 

bryson-charles-anderson-nswpf-memorial-plaque

bryson-charles-anderson-nswpf-rotary-club-and-hawkesbury-lac

[alert_green]Bryson ANDERSON IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_green]

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Mitchell Barbieri and his mother Fiona plead guilty to their roles in killing of decorated officer Bryson Anderson

 

THE mother and son charged with killing decorated police officer Detective Inspector Bryson Anderson have pleaded guilty on the morning their trial was due to start.

Detective inspector Bryson Anderson, 45, who was killed when he attended a neighbourhood dispute in Oakville on December 6, 2012.
Detective inspector Bryson Anderson, 45, who was killed when he attended a neighbourhood dispute in Oakville on December 6, 2012.

Mitchell Barbieri pleaded guilty to murdering the 45 year old officer, while his mother, 47, pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty of the officer’s manslaughter.

The pleas came as the jury were about to be empanelled and begin to hear the opening address.

Bryson Anderson was killed on December 6, 2012, after being called to the pair’s Oakville home, in Sydney’s north west.

Fiona Barbieri’s plea to manslaughter is being accepted on the grounds of “substantial impairment”, the court heard.

It is expected a sentencing hearing will take place next year.

Mitchell Barbieri, 21, is facing a mandatory life sentence without parole for murdering a police officer.

The Supreme Court was packed with family, colleagues and friends of Det Insp Anderson, some of whom shed tears as the guilty pleas were announced.

Artist impression of Fiona Barbieri and her son Mitchell in the dock of Central Local Court last year. Artist impression by Bernd Heinrich
Artist impression of Fiona Barbieri and her son Mitchell in the dock of Central Local Court last year. Artist impression by Bernd Heinrich

Flanked by police officers, Det Insp Anderson’s brother Warwick Anderson thanked the investigating officers for their “support and strength” and the hard work of the DPP.

He said the family was very mindful of the officers who were with his brother on the day he died and who continued to suffer physical and psychological injuries.

“The thoughts, care and prayers of our family go out to them,” he told reporters outside court.

There was still a significant way to go for his family to come to terms with the “senseless and tragic loss of Bryson”, he said

Justice Robert Hulme adjourned the case until next Wednesday, when the Crown will begin calling evidence on sentence.

Defence counsel will give their submissions to court on November 24.

Family and friends of murdered Detective inspector Bryson Anderson and police head into the king st court complex. Picture: John Grainger
Family and friends of murdered Detective inspector Bryson Anderson and police head into the king st court complex. Picture: John Grainger

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Grave of Bryson Anderson
Grave of Bryson Anderson

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William Arthur George CREWS VA

William Arthur George CREWS  VA

New South Wales Police Force

Rank:  Detective Constable

Graduated Goulburn Academy in 2007

Regd. #

Age:  26 old

Stations:  Bathurst, Bankstown

Cause:  Accidentally Shot – friendly fire

Event location:  Bankstown

Died on:  9 September, 2010

Funeral:  16 September 2010 at St Andrew’s Cathedral, central Sydney

Constable Bill Crews - shot - 090910NSW Police Commissioner's Valour Award

The constable was accidentally shot during the execution of a search warrant in Bankstown on 9 September, 2010. He was posthumously awarded Commissioner’s Valour Award.

 

At the time of his death the constable was aged 26 years and had joined the New South Wales Police Force in 2007.

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http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/shot-officer-awarded-posthumous-promotion-and-valour-medal-20100916-15dib.html

Shot officer awarded posthumous promotion and valour medal

Date   

William Crews remembered at funeral

Tributes to William Crews from his brother and the NSW Police Commissioner at his funeral in Sydney.

NSW police officer William Crews, who died during a drug raid a week ago, has been posthumously awarded the Police Commissioner’s Valour Award and promoted to detective.

The 26-year-old trainee detective had been with the force for just three years when he was accidentally shot by a fellow police officer during the operation in Sydney’s southwest on September 9.

He loved his job and gave it everything that he could offer and I believe that this was why he was so successful in his chosen profession. He was a larrikin and loved to laugh but also knew when the job had to be done

About 5000 well-wishers, mostly made up of members of the NSW Police Force and including members of the emergency services, public and political leaders, gathered in and outside of St Andrew’s Cathedral in central Sydney to pay their respects at his funeral.

Officers carry the coffin into the cathedral.Officers carry the coffin into the cathedral. Photo: Peter Rae

 

After graduating from Goulburn Police Academy in 2007, the newly promoted Detective Constable Crews served at Campsie Local Area Command before he was rapidly promoted to the Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad earlier this year.

It was an extraordinary achievement, NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said at his funeral today.

“William was not in the NSW Police Force for long, but by anyone’s record, he was on a rapid upward path,” he said.

Fellow officers carry the coffin to the altar.Fellow officers carry the coffin to the altar. Photo: Peter Rae

 

Positions within the State Crime Command were highly sought after, Mr Scipione added.

“It is a place where our most-skilled detectives want to go,” he said.

“If you get there at all, it’s usually after a long apprenticeship.

 

William Crews.William Crews.

“If you get there quickly, it is because you have something that sets you apart.

“And William had that certain something.”

Along with the Valour Award, for “conspicuous merit and exceptional bravery” during the raid at Bankstown, Mr Scipione also posthumously promoted Constable Crews to the rank of detective.

The detective constable’s coffin, draped with the Australian flag and native flowers, was carried into the church by officers including his brother, Constable Ben Crews.

Moments earlier, a pianist played an uplifting version of the pop music ballad He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother.

Ben Crews described his younger brother as a larrikin who loved to laugh, loved his job and motor bikes, camping and farm life.

“He was man of great achievement, a man of integrity, a man of loyalty and a man of honour, a man of ethics and, lastly, a man who never gave up and kept fighting to the end,” Ben Crews said.

“I will never forget you and miss you with all that I have.

“I know you will be looking down upon us today with that smile which touched and enriched the lives of so many, thinking how lucky you were to be loved so much by so many people.

“Rest in peace mate.”

Senior Constable Ben Kemp from Det Const Crews’ home town of Glen Innes, where it is believed he will be buried, told police mourners the fallen officer was a reason for them to keep getting up each day to go to work.

“His legacy is our legacy …” he said.

“He is 15,000 of us …

“He made a difference.”

The Anglican Archbishop of Sydney Dr Peter Jensen said the family had set an example for the community on how to grieve.

They had met with the officer who accidentally shot Det Const Crews to assure him they did not hold him responsible for his death.

“In particular, we want to thank you for showing us how to forgive,” Archbishop Jensen said.

“Like it or not, some people in your position may have responded with anger and even cries for vengeance.”

After the service, police officers formed a guard of honour down George Street.

The funeral procession included mounted police, a police band and colleagues from Campsie Local Area Command and the Middle East Crime Squad.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/shot-officer-awarded-posthumous-promotion-and-valour-medal-20100916-15dib.html#ixzz2Jwkg2V7V

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/shot-officer-awarded-posthumous-promotion-and-valour-medal-20100916-15dib.html#ixzz2JwkU56iw

 

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http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/a-courageous-larrikin-who-gave-his-life/story-e6frg6nf-1225925057994

A courageous larrikin who gave his life

TO his brother he was Bill; to his uni mates he was Will; to his police colleagues he was Crewsy.

To the thousands of strangers who yesterday attended the funeral of the slain constable despite never having met him, William Arthur George Crews was a hero who represented everything that is good about the force.

More than 5000 people, including 2300 uniformed police officers, looked on at Sydney’s St Andrew’s Cathedral as Constable Crews was remembered as a loyal and honest man who died just as he was beginning to realise his potential.

The 26-year-old trainee detective was accidentally shot dead by fellow police officer Dave Roberts during a drug raid in Sydney last week.

Sergeant Roberts was among the mourners yesterday, having been publicly reassured by the Crews family earlier this week that he was not to blame for the tragedy.

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione described Constable Crews as a brave young officer whose career was on “a rapid, upward path”.

“William Crews didn’t lose his life on the 9th of September; he gave his life,” Mr Scipione said. “And he gave it in the very way that he lived — in the service of others.”

Constable Crews had only recently been deployed to the Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad, which was a reflection of his abilities, the Police Commissioner said.

“If you get there at all, it’s usually after a long apprenticeship,” Mr Scipione said. “If you get there quickly, it is because you have something that sets you apart. And William had that certain something.”

Mr Scipione said Constable Crews, who grew up in Glen Innes in northern NSW, would be honoured with a posthumous designation of detective constable. He also posthumously received the Commissioner’s Valour Award for “exceptional courage” shown during the fatal drug raid.

Constable Crews’s older brother, Ben, who is also a policeman, said his younger sibling was a “larrikin” who always looked out for others.

“He was man of great achievement, a man of integrity, a man of loyalty and a man of honour, a man of ethics and, lastly, a man who never gave up and kept fighting to the end,” Constable Ben Crews said. “I know you will be looking down upon us today with that smile which touched and enriched the lives of so many, thinking how lucky you were to be loved so much by so many people.

“Rest in peace, mate.”

 

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http://www.sydneycathedral.com/sermons/major-funerals/detective-william-arthur-george-crews

Detective William Arthur George Crews

Date:

16/09/2010

Speaker:

Archbishop Peter Jensen

Sermon download:
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http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/hansart.nsf/V3Key/LA20100921011

Tribute to Constable William Crews

About this Item
Speakers Stewart Mr Tony
Business Private Members Statements, PRIV
TRIBUTE TO CONSTABLE WILLIAM CREWS
Page: 25739

Mr TONY STEWART (Bankstown—Parliamentary Secretary) [1.46 p.m.]: Yesterday I travelled to Glen Innes where I attended the funeral of Detective Constable William Arthur George Crews, known by his family, his friends and the police community as Bill or Crewsy. Also in attendance at the funeral were the Premier of New South Wales, Kristina Keneally; the Minister for Police, Michael Daley; the Speaker of the House, Richard Torbay; the New South Wales Commissioner of Police; police commissioners from other States; high-ranking police officers throughout New South Wales; and more than 500 general duties police officers. Also present were family, friends and community members; people lined the street. It is tragic to attend the funeral of a person who has passed away at 26 years of age. It is even more tragic when the courageous person—a member of our New South Wales Police Force from my electorate of Bankstown—was killed in action. The Bankstown community is really hurting. I have received many condolences, more than 1,000 at this stage, from friends and constituents of Bankstown who want to say one simple thing to the family: Sorry.

Yesterday the funeral was presided over by Reverend Chris Brennan, Vicar of the Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Glen Innes; Reverend Alex Thomas, Police Chaplain of Bankstown Local Area Command; and Reverend Alan Lowe, Senior State Police Chaplain. It was a beautiful service. In addition, friends of Bill Crews gave a wonderful rendition of aspects of his life, and the opportunities that he afforded to them and to others in the Glen Innes community. It was one big family coming together to celebrate this great man’s life. At 26 years of age this man had lived three lives in terms of his contributions and achievements. This funeral and the State funeral, which was held last week at St Andrew’s Cathedral in Sydney, have had a profound impact on me and my understanding of the Police Force.

Last Thursday, following the State funeral, more than 400 police came to Bankstown to attend the wake, which was held with minimal notice at Bankstown Sports Club. I pay tribute to Bankstown Sports Club for providing the facilities, services, food and beverages. It was an opportunity to bring the brothers and sisters of the New South Wales Police Force together as a family to recognise not only the achievements of Constable Bill Crews, posthumously Detective Constable Bill Crews, but also the work of our police officers. I will read to the House a poem recited by Constable Kemp at last week’s funeral. It is important for us as members of Parliament to note the words. The poem reads:

Ben
Stay strong brother.Nothing we say can change what’s happened.
Your brother, our brother, died for what’s right.
He gave his all for what we believe in. He did what you would do.
He is the reason why we get up each and every day and go to work to keep our streets as safe as we can.
He is you. You are him. We are him. He gives us hope.
He is the reason why we will continue to get up and go to work.
Stay strong brother.He is gone but we will always remember his courage and strength in the face of grave danger.
You will survive and grow stronger, we will grow stronger with you.
Stay strong brother.The ultimate sacrifice was paid by one of New South Wales’ finest.
He lays peaceful, knowing he has done all for our cause, his cause.
Stay strong brother.His legacy is our legacy. He is us. 15000 of us.
We will continue to stand and fight, fight with all our heart for what we believe is right.
To protect our families, to protect the weak, to protect the helpless, to protect our way of life as Australians.
He did not leave us in vain, none of us will.
Stay strong brother.Fight or flight is a word we learn early on.
And fight your brother did, and to that end he makes us all proud, because that is what is expected of a New South Wales police officer, and that, my brother, is what he delivered.
Stay strong brother.Not many people live in your world, his world, our world.
Our society takes for granted what he did for us, what you do for us, what we do for them.
It is an unforgiving, terrible, gutless world sometimes, most times.
But every now and then someone makes a difference, he made a difference—a big difference.
Stay strong brother.

He is their hero, our hero, my hero.
He is Will Crews. May he rest in peace.

STAY STRONG BROTHER

Those words commemorate a great man.

 

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http://www.news.com.au/national-news/nsw-act/prosecutors-to-appeal-seven-year-sentence-given-to-philip-nguyens-who-was-responsible-for-the-death-of-william-crews/story-fndo4bst-1226608221814

Prosecutors to appeal seven year sentence given to Philip Nguyen’s who was responsible for the death of William Crews

Amy Dale

PROSECUTORS will appeal the seven year sentence given to Philip Nguyen, the man responsible for the death of trainee detective William Crews. NSW Attorney General Greg Smith released a statement this morning saying he has been informed by the DPP Lloyd Babb SC that they “have decided to appeal against the sentence handed down to Philip Nguyen.”

The 57-year-old was sentenced to at least seven years behind bars, but with time already in custody he will be eligible for release in September 2017.

He pleaded guilty to the manslaughter of Constable Crews, who was killed from a bullet to the neck while on a raid of a Bankstown garage in September 2010.

The gunshot which killed the promising 26-year-old officer came from his colleague’s gun, but the court found Nguyen had been responsible for the death by starting a shoot-out with police.

In sentencing him to a maximum of nine years and six months in prison, Justice Elizabeth Fullerton said “although he didn’t fire the shot which killed him, he caused his death.”

Mr Smith and Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said on the day of Nguyen’s sentence earlier this month they hoped the DPP would appeal.

Constable Crews’ father Kel said outside the courtroom following the sentence “it doesn’t seem to us to be appropriate for our family, for the police and for the community.”

“He has given his life in the line of duty, we have been sentenced to life- the sentence that has been given down has been nothing to what we have been sentenced to,” Mr Crews said.

The matter will be mentioned in the Court of Criminal Appeal later this year.

 

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http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/first-interview-policeman-who-shot-constable-bill-crews-talks-about-the-pain-of-the-dark-day-that-claimed-his-mate8217s-life/story-fni0cx12-1226694791012?sv=21594397341dde5ed0034d1b90af49ac#.UgcRY52gDmI.facebook

First interview: Policeman who shot Constable Bill Crews talks about the pain of the dark day that claimed his mate’s life

police colleague

THE incident lasted just 2.8 seconds – from the time police shouted “search warrant” to the last of five bullets being fired. For three years Detective Senior Constable Dave Roberts, 42, has been struggling to understand how a routine warrant ended with his mate killed from a bullet he fired.”For a long time I couldn’t think clearly about the matter,” Roberts said.

My hell after a shot my mate dead

In 2010, his team from the Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad were in the carpark of a Bankstown unit block to search drug supplier Philip Nguyen, 55.

It was considered so low-risk that detectives walked into the garage without guns drawn.

Constable Crews, 26, had just joined the squad as a highly recommended recruit. He was carrying a folder under his arm.

Extensive intelligence checks would tell police Nguyen was not armed.

Then they spotted him.

Roberts remembers an incredibly cramped space, Nguyen walking quickly out of his garage, the muzzle of his gun flashing as it fired, and Crews promptly returning fire three times.

“I’ve dropped what I was holding, drew my gun and fired once,” he said. “All that took less than three seconds.”

His words slow as he recalls regrouping with his colleagues behind a brick wall when the shooting stopped. They realised Bill was missing.

“We were looking down the garage … we saw Bill lying motionless.”

He exhales deeply before continuing.

“I was expecting to see Nguyen on the ground as well. I was hoping like crazy my round had struck him.

“About 10 seconds after it dawned on me that my round may have struck Bill.” Roberts’ world fell apart after that night – his colleagues’ too. The commanding officer who approved the warrant later quit the force and to this day blames himself for the whole incident.

Another detective who saw the tragedy unfold self-medicates with alcohol and medication. He is a mess.

Roberts suffered the most. He has held his silence since but agreed to share his story in the hope it might assist others suffering extreme trauma.

His path has been a lonely one. It is the only friendly fire case in NSW Police Force history where a policeman has died in the line of duty.

After the incident he was taken to hospital and treated for injuries caused during a grief-stricken rage. His knuckles still bear the scars from that night as he tried to punch holes through brick walls inside the garage.

He woke to discover Nguyen was in custody and uninjured, ending any hope his bullet struck its intended target.

A carload of senior police would arrive on his doorstep later that evening to break the news his bullet struck Crews.

“That was one of the worst days of my life.”

At his lowest point Roberts was gambling heavily and dependent on Xanax to regulate his moods. He also began experiencing debilitating panic attacks. He had previously never gone near a poker machine now he was addicted. His marriage of 18 years nearly collapsed.

“I lost thousands over a 12-month period. Initially I played low amounts _ $10 at a time _ but on occasions I would put in $500. It was an escape … a very expensive way to numb the mind.”

With the help of sessions at a post-traumatic stress clinic he managed to walk away from gambling in April last year but there would be other struggles.

 Police officers carry the coffin of Constable Bill Crews into St Andrews Cathedral in Sydney. Picture: Chris Pavlich

Crews’ desk had been left untouched when he returned to work a month after the incident. Little reminders of him were everywhere. They exchanged two emails just before heading off that night.

“I’ve only just deleted them,” Roberts said. “I kept them for two years.

“When I hit send on those emails everything was good. Bill was still alive. They’re a painful reminder.” Compounding his grief were reports suggesting the search was “botched”, implying he was clumsy or ill-prepared.

“It hits hard,” he said. “I knew the word `botched’ wasn’t a nice word. I looked it up and the definition is everything I’m not.”

Nguyen’s solicitor would later assert in court that Roberts, a stickler for safety precaution, was the only officer wearing a ballistic vest that night. Incorrect. Another detective, Tom Howes, was wearing body armour – and for good reason. Howes was with Roberts the night of December 27, 2007, when a Comanchero bikie pointed a gun in their direction during a traffic stop, prompting two shots to be fired.

Both officers, ever since, insist on body armour.

Until just a few months ago, Roberts said he could not forgive himself. Nagging questions were dogging his mind. What if he had aimed better? What if the bullet had been two centimetres to the right? What if the gun was angled higher?

He would return to the Bankstown garage several months after the shooting with two police colleagues – one a tactical weapons expert, the other a detective – to reconstruct the incident and seek their impartial advice.

Statistically it was impossible to replicate the circumstances of the shooting. The whole thing was a tragic, freakish one-in-a-million, they said.

“I beat myself up for a long time over this,” Roberts said, citing family, close friends, police colleagues and the police chaplain, Frank, as those who brought him back from his living hell. “I don’t `what if’ so much anymore. I don’t blame myself anymore.”

Nguyen has been sentenced to seven years jail over the death of Crews that night. Prosecutors have appealed, saying the punishment was “manifestly inadequate”.

Roberts is still in the force, but in a different command. He has several important reasons for staying – he wants to set a positive example for people and show life can go on after even the worst tragedies. The job, he says, is an extremely noble profession. But a major factor that is close to his heart is Crews’ mother. “I made a promise to Sharon … She said if we left the cops it would compound her grief.”

On September 8, the anniversary of Crews’ death, Roberts will visit the memorial. Every year he goes by himself, looks at Crews’ name, and remembers that night and his colleague in private.

“There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t think about what happened and not a day goes by where I don’t think about Bill. And there hasn’t been for the past three years.

“I think about Bill only being a young man and he had everything ahead of him.

“I know he was well-loved by his family, by his friends.

“I know there isn’t a day that goes by (that) they wouldn’t miss him either.”

 

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National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra. TOUCH PLATE DETECTIVE CONSTABLE WILLIAM ARTHUR GEORGE CREWS
National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.
TOUCH PLATE
DETECTIVE CONSTABLE WILLIAM ARTHUR GEORGE CREWS

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Officer’s death hits local police hard

By BRENDAN ARROW

ANOTHER LIFE LOST: Chifley Local Area Command Acting Inspector Lionel White said police in Bathurst have been personally affected by the death of Constable William Crews in Sydney on Wednesday night. Photo: BRENDAN ARROW 091010
ANOTHER LIFE LOST: Chifley Local Area Command Acting Inspector Lionel White said police in Bathurst have been personally affected by the death of Constable William Crews in Sydney on Wednesday night. Photo: BRENDAN ARROW 091010

POLICE in the Chifley Local Area Command have been personally affected by the death of trainee detective William Crews.

The 26-year-old died in a Sydney hospital after he was shot while carrying out a drug operation on Wednesday night with seven other officers from the Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad in Bankstown, in Sydney’s south-west.

The officers were fired upon outside the targeted property in Cairds Avenue about 9pm. Constable Crews was hit in the head and neck.

Philip Nguyen, 55, has since been charged with shooting with intent to murder and discharging a firearm with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.

Geehad Ghazi, 27, has been charged with possession of an unauthorised firearm.

Yesterday, Acting Inspector Lionel White said the tragic situation in Sydney had personally impacted on a number of officers who knew Constable Crews.

“It is a very shocking situation, a couple of the officers here at the Bathurst Police Station knew him and have been left very upset by the situation,” he said.

“Some of the officers worked with him and trained with him before he became a detective.

“For those officers, we are offering them support and counselling during this tough time.”
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Reminding people of those officers who lost their lives in the Bathurst area in the line of duty is a memorial board naming the 13 policemen who have died in the line of duty.

Since Trooper Robert Lovell McDougall died in 1853 near Sofala, 12 officers have fallen in the line of duty in Bathurst area with Sergeant Paul Mitchell Quinn the last, on the March 30, 1986.

Acting Inspector White said the latest death in Sydney brought to the forefront the difficult circumstances that police can find themselves in daily.

“On top of the very mundane things we do every day this is a stark reminder of the dangers police officers can face while in the front line,” he said. “This very much reminded us of the risk officers sometimes have to take while in the line of duty.

“It is a great tragedy.”

http://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/911623/officers-death-hits-local-police-hard/

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Bill Crews inquest: Errors in planning, execution of drug raid contributed to police officer’s death

Updated

An inquest into the shooting death of a Sydney police officer in a botched drugs raid five years ago has found errors in the planning and execution of a search warrant, stemming from “inadequate training” and “ineffective supervision”.

Constable William ‘Bill’ Crews was unintentionally shot by a colleague in returning fire from a drug dealer, in the underground car park of an apartment block at Bankstown in Sydney’s south west in September 2010.

He later died in hospital.

In handing down his findings, New South Wales Coroner Michael Barnes said Crews was killed as a result of “cascading, compounding errors“.

“Sadly, it seems likely that had these errors not occurred Bill Crews may not have died,” Mr Barnes said.

Outside the Glebe Coroners Court, Crew’s father Kelvin Crews said he was emotional.

“Our family has tragically been affected for the rest of our lives,” he said.

“It’s a tragic incident that’s occurred and we never want it to happen again.”

Young and ‘relatively junior’

Crews was “a good bloke and a good cop” committed to learning his new role as a detective in the Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad.

On September 8, 2010, the 26-year-old was one of several “relatively junior detectives”, who thought they were attending a routine search after being tipped off about a man dealing cocaine and heroin from a garage to Middle Eastern crime families, including the Hamze and Kalache families.

None of them had advanced weapons training and none were prepared for what unfolded, according to the coroner.

William Crews' father Kelvin speaks to the media outside the inquest into his son's death.
William Crews’ father Kelvin speaks to the media outside the inquest into his son’s death.

When the group, led by Crews, entered the basement, they headed towards the wrong garage.

Affected by drugs and with little English, 58-year-old Philip Nguyen fired on the seven undercover officers who were not displaying identification, thinking they were robbers.

Detective Senior Constable Dave Roberts returned fired whilst trying to get cover.

The coroner said Detective Senior Constable Roberts did not know exactly where Crews was at the time and his movement meant he could not control where his gun was pointing when it fired.

This is contrary to police procedures and training.

Risk assessment ‘critically compromised’

Police expected a drug deal would occur at Nguyen’s garage that night involving Middle Eastern crime families; however, the operation was deemed low-risk.

The NSW coroner was highly critical of the risk assessment and its approval by more senior ranking officers.

The court heard Detective Inspector Michael Ryan sought to downplay the risks by suggesting Nguyen, an Asian male, was less likely to possess weapons or attack police because “Asians tend to be businessmen”.

Inspector Ryan also asserted the Kalache family was “a spent force”.

Mr Barnes said the risk assessment was also informed by inadequate intelligence gathering and reconnaissance, which could have prevented the officers attending the wrong garage that night.

“To merely drive by the premises and stop outside briefly when two inhabitants of the unit block were able to facilitate access was unwise and unnecessarily scant,” Mr Barnes said.

The coroner noted NSW Police had made improvements in the way risk assessments were now conducted and in training and oversight.

Whilst body armour would not have saved Crews, the coroner also noted NSW Police was planning to introduce soft body armour vests that would clearly identify the wearer as a police officer.

“I am satisfied NSW Police has rigorously engaged with each of the inadequacies highlighted by the circumstances in which Detective Bill Crews died,” Mr Barnes said.

Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione has refused to say if he would consider disciplinary action against the officers involved, saying he would need to first read the coroner’s report.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-21/bill-crews-shooting-inquest-finds-errors-in-plan-execution/6791412

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