David Charles SANDERSON

David Charles SANDERSON

AKA  CHARLIE
Late of  ?

NSW Redfern Police Academy Class #  126

New South Wales Police Force

[alert_yellow]Regd. #  14494[/alert_yellow]

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 5 April 1971

Constable 1st Class – appointed 5 April 1976

Sergeant – appointed 2 May 1986

Inspector – appointed ? ? ?

Chief Inspector – appointed ? ? ?

Superintendent – appointed ? ? ?

Final Rank = Superintendent

Stations?, Liverpool ( ‘A’ List – early 1970’s ), Campbelltown ( 35 Division Detective ), Bankstown ( 19 Division – Detective ), Instructor – Detectives Training Course 2/77 & 3/77, Deniliquin ( Det Sgt – late 1980’s ), Lismore ( Commander ), Tweed Heads, District Officer – Albury, Thredbo Landslide Commander ( 1997 ), Queanbeyan ( Commander ) – Retirement

ServiceFrom  ? ? pre April 1971?  to  19 July 2002 =  31+ years Service

Awards:   National Medal – granted 8 June 1988 ( Det Sgt )

1st Clasp to National Medal – granted 8 March 1997 ( C/ Insp )

Commissioners Commendation for the Emergency Response Management of Thredbo Landslide in July 1997. Award received in 2000

Born:   Tuesday  29 April 1947

Died on:  Sunday  28 April 2019 ( ONE day before his 72 birthday )

Age:  71

Cause:   Melanoma & Brain Cancer

Event location:  Home

Event date:  Sunday  28 April 2019 during the morning – surrounded by family

Funeral date:   Thursday  2 May 2019 @ 1.30pm

Funeral location:   Saint Raphael’s Catholic Church, 47 Lowe St, Queanbeyan, NSW

there will be NO formal Police involvement at the funeral although family and friends are invited to attend.

Wake location:  ?TBA

Funeral Parlour:  William Cole Funerals, Canberra  6253 3655

Buried at:   Queanbeyan Lawn Cemetery,  Lanyon Dr, Jerrabomberra, NSW

 Memorial located at:   ?

 

David Charles SANDERSON

 

[alert_yellow] CHARLIE is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance[/alert_yellow]  *NEED MORE INFO

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 Funeral location


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FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

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May they forever Rest In Peace

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Charlie was a former school teacher & quite academically gifted together with being an all round nice guy.
He was also the Forward Commander at the Thredbo Landslide and the ‘face of’ the Police during that event and a legend as the Commander.
We give our deepest condolences to Sue and his 7 kids.

SANDERSON David Charles ( CHARLIE )

29 April 1947- 28 April 2019

Beloved husband of Sue.

Father of Matt, Joe, Sarah, Paul, Annie, Pete and Christina.

Passed away peacefully the morning of Sunday, 28 April surrounded by his family.

Charlie will be remembered as a loving father, a dedicated Police Officer and a great mate to all who knew him.

The funeral service for Charlie will be held at St Raphael’s Catholic Church, Lowe Street, Queanbeyan on Thursday 2 May 2019, commencing at 1:30 pm.

Burial will follow at Queanbeyan Lawn Cemetery.

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Published in The Canberra Times on Apr. 30, 2019

 

May 4, 2019
Dear Sue and family, we were both saddened and shocked to read of Charlie’s passing in our church bulletin at Mass tonight. We have fond memories of family connections in Queanbeyan and beyond. Charlie will be remembered as a true gentleman, wonderful family man and exemplary policeman. I hope we can make contact in the near future. You are in our thoughts and prayers and we send you our love.
The de Jongh family.
May 2, 2019
To Sue and family. I arrived in Canberra yesterday 1 May, as part of the Salvation Army Australia Red Shield Ride from Sydney to Melbourne. I hoped to catch up with Charlie while here, so to find he has just passed away is terrible news. We leave to ride south to Cooma today so will not be able to attend his funeral and pay my respects to the family.
I valued the friendship of Charlie and Sue during our time on Mornington Island and since, and still remember how easily he made friends during our time together on the Great Vic Bike Ride.
Rest in peace Charlie. You left a wonderful legacy in your family and your industry and we are the better for knowing you.
From Robert Cooper and Sharon Donald.

 

 

May 1, 2019
Charlie SANDERSON
May 1, 2019
You were a bloody good bloke Charlie.

May you forever Rest In Peace.

https://www.australianpolice.com.au/david-charles-sanderson/

April 30, 2019
To Sue and family, after knowing Charlie through work in the New England area and with him at Lismore he was a great man, leader and friend. His family was his number one priority and he will be surely missed by everyone that has known him. Irene and I are not able to share in your grief first hand but we will from a distance. Irene and Les Bulluss.
April 30, 2019
Dear Sue and family, sending you love and strength at time. Melissa, Sarah and Genevieve – Rise Above – Capital Region Cancer Relief
May 1, 2019
To Sue and family. Sorry to hear of Charlie’s passing. Sad for all. RIP
April 30, 2019
To Sue and family, after knowing Charlie through work in the New England area and with him at Lismore he was a great man, leader and friend. His family was his number one priority and he will be surely missed by everyone that has known him.
Irene and I are not able to share in your grief first hand but we will from a distance.
Irene and Les Bulluss.
April 30, 2019
Dear Sue and family, sending you love and strength at time.
Melissa, Sarah and Genevieve – Rise Above – Capital Region Cancer Relief
http://tributes.canberratimes.com.au/obituaries/canberratimes-au/obituary.aspx?n=david-charles-sanderson&pid=192735540

David Aspland‎ New South Wales Policing History ForumSeptember 7, 2017 · I trotted along to Retired Police Day 2017 in Queanbeyan today and had a great time catching up with a few old reprobates and listening to some very interesting presentations by current police of the issues of today. Here is me catching up with Retired Superintendent Charlie Sanderson (LEFT) and Retired Sergeant Scott Ide (RIGHT).
David Aspland‎ New South Wales Policing History Forum   September 7, 2017 · I trotted along to Retired Police Day 2017 in Queanbeyan today and had a great time catching up with a few old reprobates and listening to some very interesting presentations by current police of the issues of today. Here is me catching up with Retired Superintendent Charlie Sanderson (LEFT) and Retired Sergeant Scott Ide (RIGHT).

These photos appeared in the Deniliquin Pastoral Times, February last year ( 2018 ). The first one was taken at Charlie’s sendoff from Deniliquin around 1990…they recreated the shot at the Deni Police Re-union in February last year ( 2018 ). We did indeed have fun with Charlie…may he rest in peace. The two guys to the right who did not make the reunion are Paul Hansen (glasses) and Cameron Wendt. So proud to have worked with all these fellows. Pat Seccull
These photos appeared in the Deniliquin Pastoral Times, February last year ( 2018 ). The first one was taken at Charlie’s sendoff from Deniliquin around 1990…they recreated the shot at the Deni Police Re-union in February last year ( 2018 ). We did indeed have fun with Charlie…may he rest in peace. The two guys to the right who did not make the reunion are Paul Hansen (glasses) and Cameron Wendt. So proud to have worked with all these fellows.    Pat SeccullThese photos appeared in the Deniliquin Pastoral Times, February last year ( 2018 ). The first one was taken at Charlie’s sendoff from Deniliquin around 1990…they recreated the shot at the Deni Police Re-union in February last year ( 2018 ). We did indeed have fun with Charlie…may he rest in peace. The two guys to the right who did not make the reunion are Paul Hansen (glasses) and Cameron Wendt. So proud to have worked with all these fellows. Pat Seccull

Survivor found in resort rubble


We talked about community service and community policing. I told him of the success of Sgt Neville Plush in Nimbin and how much love and support he gets and how different that was to the corrupt crew who occupied the Nimbin Police Station before Inspector Charlie Sanderson took over as Lismore Area Commander. “Community is the eyes and ears of policing,” said Callum. Later Callum came by again because he was interested in the progress of the cardboard jail.

Liverpool Police History
Liverpool ( NSW ) Police Time Line ( 1788 – 2016 )
June 1973:  Police Serving in the Citizens Military Forces (C.M.F.)
March/April, 1973, the 1/19th Battalion, Royal NSW Regiment, CMF, completed the last of its 3 day camps, which had been designed for the training of National Service personnel, and the first camp in which the Unit was entirely composed of volunteers.
The unit was often referred to as the ‘1/19 th Police Battalion ’, due to the number of Police who served in the Unit.
Members of the NSW Police Force in camp were :-
Captain R. R. Lidden, a Senior Constable at Scarborough Police Station; Lieutenant D. C. Sanderson, a Constable at Liverpool Police Station; Warrant Officer Class II K. W. Jones, a Constable 1/c at Bega Police Station; Sergeant P. Delamont, a Constable at the S.T.P North Sydney ; Corporal R. N. Deards, a Constable 1/c at Lake Cargelligo Police Station; Corporal J. Gibbs, a Constable at the S.T.P. North Sydney; and Private P.E. Graham, a Constable 1/c at Orange Police Station.
 Liverpool Police History page 239, David Charles SANDERSON
Liverpool Police History page 239

Interesting story about a defining moment in Emergency Rescue in Australia, the Thredbo Landslide. I was transferred to Monaro LAC a couple of months after it happened as the A/Crime Manager (I still wonder about that title, but Crime Coordinator sounds even worse ). The Commander, Supt Charlie Sanderson was still working on the Coroners Brief. It was one of the most amazing documents I have ever read in policing. Charlie was a great detective.

Training for a nightmare: How first responders prepare for the worst

Updated

Charlie SANDERSON, Thredbo Landslide - 1997
Part of the Thredbo Landslide of 1997

As rescuers scanned for life in sub-zero temperatures after the Thredbo landslide, the dangerously unstable site and freezing conditions stalled search efforts and caused equipment to seize.

One of Australia’s most popular holiday spots became the site of one of our greatest tragedies when 18 people died in the landslide in 1997.

It marked a turning point in the way authorities responded to natural disasters in Australia.

“We’ve gone really from a system that was ad hoc and everyone was doing the best they can to a system that’s well-maintained and regulated,” Fire & Rescue New South Wales Chief Superintendent Paul Bailey said.

In 1997, Fire & Rescue NSW had about 30 urban search and rescue trained staff — now the figure is almost 10 times that.

Training and technology have both vastly improved in the past 20 years.

Australia now has two internationally accredited urban search and rescue teams, meaning they can deploy anywhere in the world at a moment’s notice.

Six hours to get in the air

The NSW team is one of two in Australia to hold classifications with United Nations International Search and Rescue Advisory Group.

“When we’re told there’s an incident we need to be up and out of the here in six hours,” Chief Superintendent Bailey said.

“So that means getting a team of 72 people, all our equipment, which is over 36 tonnes of equipment, all together onto a cargo plane and anywhere in the world within six hours.”

Responding quickly is crucial — search and rescue crews say after around 100 hours life expectancy falls significantly.

They’ve been tested too. Firefighters say in 2011, Australian crews got to the Christchurch earthquake before some teams from Auckland.

The NSW team was deployed to the Japan earthquake and tsunami and also Tropical Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu in 2015.

To remain permanently prepared, the search and rescue teams train in gruelling and realistic scenarios.

“What we do is simulate a pancake collapse — so that’s when building floors topple on top of one another,” Fire & Rescue’s Manager of Specialised Operations Darryl Dunbar said.

“Then our crews have to make entry through those floors to gain an entry underground to access that tunnel network.”

Once teams arrive on the scene, they use an array of gadgets to search for life — including vibration sensors that can detect the slightest bit of scraping or tapping on metal or concrete.

“[Vibrations] can actually travel more than 50 metres through a structure depending on how a building has collapsed,” station officer Daniel O’Dea said.

“These crews, that’s their job to identify that sound, work out what it is exactly if it’s in fact a distress call from someone.”

“We’ve got cameras that can snake down into a void, a tiny gap that was a wide as your finger and go down through that gap to manoeuvre that to locate any signs of life.”

First responders’ training facility revealed

When the ABC visited the Ingleburn training facility, search and rescue teams were running a refresher course for firefighters.

The idea is to get as many firefighters as possible around the state trained because they are likely to be the first responders.

It begins with the basics — cutting through tonnes of concrete and then using timber as a lever to create access.

One of the firefighters on the training course was Scott Featherstone, son of Paul, the paramedic who helped Stuart Diver for 12 hours until he was freed from the concrete after the Thredbo landslide.

He said his dad’s efforts in part inspired him to become a firefighter.

“I always wanted to do something where I could [help people],” he said.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-23/how-thredbo-landslide-changed-disaster-preparation-in-australia/8732152?fbclid=IwAR1fYs2_DruP-tSm9XNcr045Nsxz18J49wvrUtlEnhnQvsDKGrAH3-af0-s

 


 

 

 

 

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I knew David Charles Sanderson from ingleburn primary days he was a good teacher and his wife was a good person we all grieve at this point in time Lloyd Wilson