Frederick James McLAUGHLAN

Frederick James McLAUCHLAN *

Late of Campsie

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  ‘ Q ‘ 9623

For the purposes of this website ‘Q‘ represents those Police joining between 1862 ( commencement of NSWPF ) – 23 February 1915 ( Commencement of NSWPF current numbering system )

Rank:  Probationary Constable – appointed 11 March 1913

Final Rank = Constable 1st Class

Stations: ?, Balgownie – from mid 1922 ( Cst & Cst 1/c ), Pt Kembla ( Cst 1/c ) – Death

Service: From ? ? pre March 1913? to Discharged Medically unfit  November 1930 = 18 years Service

Awards:  No find on It’s An Honour

Born: 28 August 1890 in Cust, Canterbury, New Zealand

Died on:  Saturday 3 December 1938 in Canterbury, NSW

Age: 47

Cause:  Arrest injuries

Event location: Port Kembla

Event date:   Friday  6 January 1922

Funeral date: Monday  5 December 1938

Funeral location: Rookwood Cemetery, Rookwood, NSW

Wake location:

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at:   Cremated – Ashes scattered at Rookwood.  No Memorial at Rookwood

Memorial located at: Oak Flats Police Station – main entrance wall and also inside security hall

Frederick James McLAUCHLAN

Frederick James McLAUGHLAN

 

THURSDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 2014<br /> Located on the front wall to Oak Flats Police Station. NSW Police Force Constable 1st Class Frederick James McLAUGHLAN. Died as a result of injuries sustained in the line of duty, Port Kembla, NSW. 3 December 1938.

THURSDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 2014
Located on the front wall to Oak Flats Police Station.

Frederick James McLAUGHLAN

THURSDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 2014
RETIRED POLICE DAY HELD AT LAKE ILLAWARRA POLICE STATION, OAK FLATS.
Memorial Plaque hanging inside the Secure foyer of Oak Flats Police Station, NSW.

 

FREDERICK IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

May they forever Rest In Peace

On 6 January, 1922 Constable McLaughlan attended a disturbance at Port Kembla. While he was attempting to arrest a man who had been involved in a fight, another man tried to hit the constable with a bottle of beer. The constable consequently punched the man in the mouth and in so doing received a deep cut to his right hand.

After suffering some discomfort with the injury, the constable sought medical attention. Complications with his health developed over the next few years and it was eventually determined that he was suffering from an aortic aneurism, the result of an infection from the injury sustained when he punched the offender in 1922. He was discharged medically unfit in November, 1930 and passed away on 3 December, 1938.

 

The constable was born in 1890 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 11 March, 1913. At the time of his injury he was stationed at Port Kembla.

BeyondCourage

 

Surname Given Names Notice Type Date Event Age Other Details Publication Published
McLAUGHLAN Frederick James Death notice 03DEC1938 Death late of Campsie Sydney Morning Herald 05DEC1938
McLAUGHLAN Frederick James Funeral notice 05DEC1938 Cremation Sydney Morning Herald 05DEC1938

 

 

 

BDM New Zealand

BIRTH:  Reg. #  1890/16913.  Frederick James McLAUCHLAN

MOTHER:  Elizabeth

FATHER:  James

NO FIND FOR A DEATH

NO FIND FOR A MARRIAGE – up to 1930

NO FIND UNDER McLAUGHLAN

https://www.bdmhistoricalrecords.dia.govt.nz/Search/

BDM NSW

BIRTH:  No find for McLAUCHLAN or McLAUGHLAN  in NSW between 1880 – 1920

MARRIAGE:  Reg. # 5225/1914 Frederick J McLAUCHLAN.  BRIDE:  Vera Alma BEST   in Sydney (B: 1891 – D: 1 Sept 1954 )

DEATHS:  Reg. # 22586/1938    Frederick James McLAUGHLAN   Father:  James   Mother:  Elizabeth     Canterbury District.  The parents in this Death have the same Christian names as the person born in N.Z.

In N.Z. his surname is spelt with the ‘C‘ but in NSW, his surname is spelt with the ‘G‘.

https://familyhistory.bdm.nsw.gov.au/lifelink/familyhistory/search/

 

*

Whilst updating this Memorial page on 16 September 2018, I found that this person is recorded in the NSW State Archives & Records under Registers of Police as having the surname spelt McLAUCHLAN & not McLAUGHLAN.

Numerous local newspaper articles also have him as McLAUCHLIN.

 

Cal

160918

 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), Saturday 19 December 1942, page 16


MARRIAGES

BRUSSEL – McLAUCHLAN – November 23 at St John’s Church, Campsie, by the Rev. C. C. Short, Pamela, younger daughter of the late Mr Frederick James McLauchlan, and of Mrs Vera McLauchlan, to Hendrikus Brussel (M. N.), younger son of Mr and Mrs P Brussel of Leiden, Holland.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/17807170#

 

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 5 February 1926, page 16


NORTH ILLAWARRA COUNCIL.

At the meeting on Wednesday night, all the aldermen were present.

From Constable McLauchlan intimating that his transfer not having been yet arranged for definitely he was prepared to continue inspection of slaughter premises. — Agreed to.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142467870

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 15 January 1926, page 19


WOLLONGONG COURT.

MONDAY.

Drink. — Walker Chaulker pleaded guilty to charges of drunkenness and of offensive words at Balgownie.

Constable McLauchlan stated that Chaulker was behaving in a violent manner with a paling in his hand, and when spoken to by himself addressed the language to him.

Fined £2 for language and for drunkenness 10/-.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142468904

 

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 27 February 1925, page 21


QUARTER SESSIONS

Assault.

William Pollack (18) pleaded not guilty to a charge of indecently assaulting Muriel Hughes at Tarrawanna. There was a second account of common assault.

Mr. Clancy, instructed by Mr. Morgan for defence. Accused exhausted his right of challenging jury.

Muriel Hughes deposed on the night of the 24th November, when she was on her way home from the Pictures at Corrimal to Tarrawanna, accused accosted her and threw her down. She screamed and he went off.

Witness had three years before had had an illegitimate child.

Br. Mr. Clancy witness was asked about habits of being out late at night; she went to dances.

Constable McLauchlan gave evidence of arrest of accused at Mount Pleasant Colliery, and produced a statement signed by accused.

Accused in a statement from the dock said he had merely put his arm round the girl’s waist; she struggled and they both fell; if he hurt her, he was sorry.

Alexander Drain deposed that on the day following the alleged assault, he had heard Muriel Hughes speak of it laughingly. Acquitted.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142845554

 

 

Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 – 2001), Friday 20 Nov. 1925 (No.111), page 5044


[7918]      Department of Lands,

Sydney, 20th November, 1925.

AUTHORITIES FOR PROSECUTION OF TRESPASSERS ON CROWN LANDS.

IT is hereby notified, for general information, that the undermentioned members of the Police Force and other persons are authorised and empowered to prefer informations in writing, under and in pursuance of the provisions of the Crown Lands Acts, against any person or persons in unlawful occupation or use of Crown Lands, or lands granted, reserved, or dedicated for public purposes, or found cutting or removing timber, or stripping or removing bark, or digging for or removing stone, soil, or other material therefrom, without holding a license.

They are further authorised to sue for and recover such penalty or penalties as any such person or persons shall have incurred for and in respect of such unlawful occupation, use, or proceedings.

[ Leases 1925-18,180]

P. F. LOUGHLIN,

Minister for Lands.

 

Friday  20 Nov. 1925       Government Gazette of NSW        Page 5044

Station.                Name of Person authorised                       Rank

Balgownie           McLaughlan, Frederick James             Constable 1st Class

 

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/223016587

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 4 July 1924, page 16


NORTH ILLAWARRA COUNCIL.

At the meeting on Wednesday night | all the aldermen were present.

Correspondence.

Meat Inspector and Impounder

There were four applications in reply to advts. ( adverts ) for the above office. In the course of discussion, the Mayor said the finances would not admit of the appointment of the proposed officer. He recommended appointing a combined maintenance Workman and impounder and asking department’s permits for Constable. McLauchlan ( who had applied to be appointed for meat inspection ). This was agreed to, former position to be advertised. It was proposed to allow £1 a week for forage, but an amendment reduced this to 10/.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142457922

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 8 August 1924, page 15


NORTH ILLAWARRA COUNCIL.

At the meeting on Wednesday evening there were present all the aldermen.

Correspondence

From Inspector-General Mitchell, ; stating there would be no objection to Constable McLauchlan acting as Inspector of slaughter premise.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142459398

 

 

Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 – 1950), Friday 2 March 1923, page 3


POLICE COURT.

Wollongong — Friday, February 23rd. ( Before Mr. M. T. McMahon, S.M.)

Alleged Shooting with Intent.

Reginald Davidson, 21, was charged that on 20th February he did, at Fairy Meadow, shoot at Stanley Robinson with intent to do him grievous bodily harm. Mr. Morgan appeared for defendant.

Constable McLauchlan, stationed at Balgownie, deposed that at 10.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 20th inst., he went to Mr. Elliott‘s house at Fairy Meadow. He knocked at the door, which was opened by Mr. Elliott.

In the kitchen he saw defendant and said, ‘I want that revolver you were shooting with tonight,’ and he ‘replied, ‘I have no revolver, and did not shoot at anybody.’

He called Robert Robinson and pointing to defendant said, ‘Do you know this man?’ He replied, ‘Yes, that is the man who shot at us tonight.’

He then called Stanley Robinson and he said, ‘That’s the man who fired the revolver off at me.’

Witness questioned Davidson, who replied, ‘I did not mean to shoot them. I had a few drinks, and I will tell you all about it.’ I was with Jack Elliott at Wollongong this afternoon, We met Mrs. Robinson and a young lady with a baby. They told me her name was Mrs. Taylor. We all got pretty drunk and went home to Elliott‘s in a motor car. We had more drink at Elliotts.

At 9 o ‘clock someone knocked at the door, and I heard a man ask for Mrs. Taylor. They had an argument, as she wouldn’t go home with him. The man walked inside and took the baby. He ( defendant ) struggled with the man on the verandah and fired off a revolver to frighten him.

Defendant was then arrested. Defendant subsequently told witness that he had thrown the revolver into the dam, and which witness recovered loaded in four chambers, and with one empty shell.

Witness asked Davidson who the revolver belonged to and he replied Jack Elliott. About three months ago he had a row with his wife, and I told him I would throw the revolver into the dam, but I hung it up, behind a picture.’

Witness recovered the revolver in a dam about 200 yards away from Elliott‘s place. Defendant boards at Elliott‘s.

There were several bottles nearly empty on the premises when defendant was arrested.

Stanley Robinson, living at Fairy Meadow, deposed that he went to Elliott‘s place on the evening of the 20th to bring home his sister, whose name is Mrs. Taylor. His brother and brother-in-law were with him. While his brother was talking to his sister a man came out of the door and made a punch at him ( witness ). The blow missed and they closed, and they rolled from the verandah on to the ground, where witness was on top.

Defendant was the man who wrestled with witness. Defendant stepped back about four paces and pulled a revolver from his hip pocket and fired at him. He ( witness ) saw the flash, but the bullet missed.

When defendant fired witness went to run, but fell over the fence, and defendant said ‘I’ve got the ____.’

Witness had never seen defendant to speak to before.

Robert Robinson gave corroborative evidence.

Leonard William Taylor, hairdresser, Keira Street, Wollongong, deposed that. he went to Elliott‘s place on the night in question. Saw accused there, and saw him make a hit at Stanley Robinson, after which there was a scuffle and they both fell. The accused then fired the revolver at Stanley Robinson, and the two Robinsons ran away.

The accused reserved his defence and was committed for trial.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/133020348

 

Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 – 1950), Friday 9 February 1923, page 9


DETECTIVES WAITING.

SENSATIONAL ARRESTS.

A sensational arrest was made at Balgownie Co-operative Store at 2 a.m. on Tuesday, when Detective Sergeants Barclay and Thornley, Plain Clothes Constables Morgan and Cameron, and Constable McLauchlan found Sydney Hill, 58, and Albert (Duck) Clarke, 45, on the premises with a kit of house-breaking tools. Both men were brought to Wollongong lockup, and charged with breaking and entering.

The defendants were brought before the Court on Tuesday, and charged. Evidence, however, was not entered on, and the cases were remanded till Monday next, 12th instant. Bail was allowed — self in £80 or two sureties of £40. In Clarke’s case alone was bail forthcoming.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/133019136

 

Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 – 2001), Friday 21 July 1922 (No.111), page 3943


[7918]      Department of Lands,

Sydney, 14th July, 1922.

AUTHORITIES FOR PROSECUTION OF TRESPASSERS ON CROWN LANDS.

IT is hereby notified, for general information, that the undermentioned members of the Police Force and other persons are authorised and empowered to prefer informations in writing, under and in pursuance of the provisions of the Crown Lands Acts, against any person or persons in unlawful occupation or use of Crown Lands, or lands granted, reserved, or dedicated for public purposes, or found cutting or removing timber, or stripping or removing bark, or digging for or removing stone, soil, or other material therefrom, without holding a license.

They are further authorised to sue for and recover such penalty or penalties as any such person or persons shall have incurred for and in respect of such unlawful occupation, use, or proceedings.

[ Occ. 1922-4,267]

W. E. WEARNE,

Minister for Lands.

 

Friday  21 July 1922       Government Gazette of NSW        Page 3943

Station.                Name of Person authorised                       Rank

Balgownie           McLaughlan, Frederick James             Constable

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/222083225

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 16 June 1922, page 4


WOLLONGONG COURT.

MONDAY. Fencing Posts for Firewood.

Godfrey Williamson pleaded guilty to a charge of larceny of posts, property of the Towrodgi ( Towradgi ) Park Trust.

Constable McLauchlan deposed that he visited a house at Balgownie, and found the missing posts there in a load of firewood.

Then spoke to accused who admitted having sold the posts in a load of fire wood.

G. W. Payne, chairman of the trust, deposed that a considerable part of the boundary fence had been taken away ; there had been much destruction done at the park ; about a dozen seats had been torn up and taken and a shed damaged.

Defendant, a returned soldier, said he had been off work and under the doctor for six weeks; he took the posts at the fence, seeing the state it was in and supposing these would not be required.

Mr. Payne said the trustees only wanted a caution administered.

Fined 20/ costs 8/, witnesses 32/.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142241992

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 2 June 1922, page 9


BALGOWNIE

(Correspondent.)

On Friday evening, 19th, the local School of Arts was the scene of a very happy gathering of adults and young folks who had assembled to express feelings of goodwill and appreciation, and also farewell greetings to ConstableFrewin, Mrs. Frewin and family, who have been, recently transferred to Watson’s Bay.

The function also included a formal welcome to his successor, Constable McLauchlan; and Mrs. McLauchlan.

The early part of the programme was mainly vocal, and was shown much appreciation of Mr. P. Meizer presided, acting for Mr. Alridge, who had been called away to another urgent meeting.

The chairman directed the attention of those assembled to the aim of their presence there that evening— to do honor and show their appreciation both verbally and materially, to the guests of the evening. Mr. W. Madden spoke of the Frewin family, both in private and social life in terms of esteem.

Mr. S. W. Sproule, on behalf of the public, presented to the guests a very fine silver tea and coffee service, also personal gifts to Constable Frewin of a fountain pen, and to Mrs. Frewin a beautifully bound volume of Tennyson’s poems. Speaking, he said, from having known Constable and Mrs. Frewin, he spoke words of praise, congratulating the constable on his promotion to such a comfortable retreat as Watson’s Bay. He also welcomed Constable McLauchlan.

After Constable Frewin‘s acknowledgements, the remainder of the time was spent socially and in dancing.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142241590

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 25 November 1921, page 17


WOLLONGONG COURT.

MONDAY.

Thomas J. Williams and Arthur Floyd for drunkenness in Main road, Corrimal, were each fined 5/ and 8/ costs.

Thomas A. Ryan and James Stewart were charged with being on hotel premises in prohibited hours. — Constable McLaughlan deposed to having seen the defendants at 10.30 p.m. in the Great Eastern Hotel, Port Kembla ; Stewart said he was seeking a bed. Each fined 10/ and 8/ costs.

Richard M?????a pleaded not guilty to a charge of being in the Great Eastern Hotel, he being a prohibited person.

Constable McLauchlan deposed that on the 12th instant he saw defendant go into the bar of the Great Eastern ; witness asked the licensee if he knew that man, he replied he did not know his name; the licensee also, in reply, said he had served him several drinks during the day; just then, he called for five drinks, but as he did not pay for them he (licensee) told him to get out. — In reply to Mr. Morgan ( for the defence ) witness said defendant had been a source of annoyance to the police ever since the order had been made against him. — Defendant denied having been inside, he merely looked in to see if his brother was there. — Mrs. Brunning deposed she had given defendant, who was her uncle, a letter to give to her father, who lived at the hotel.

By Sergt. McAuley : Defendant had had some drink that day.

Constable McLauchlan, recalled, deposed he saw defendant with his brother before he went into the hotel. —

Fined 20/, 8/ costs.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142235104

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 20 December 1918, page 12


MONDAY.

Constable McLauchlan, Port Kembla, deposed that Alfred Cummins drank to excess and caused much trouble. — Prohibition order for 12 months.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142704783

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 27 July 1917, page 22


WOLLONGONG COURT

TUESDAY.

Patrick Kennedy was charged with indecent language at Port Kembla, and with no lawful visible means.

Constable McLauchlan deposed that defendant had been discharged from the penitentiary on the 26th February; he had been at Port Kembla for five months, and had done about three weeks work. He had been about hotels a nuisance in the bars; if people would not shout, he wanted to fight them. He had earned £2 8s the last week and had 14s coming to him.

The D.S.M. said that when arrested he was not without lawful means, having been earning money. Information dismissed. A number of previous convictions were read by Sergt Toohey.

For indecent indecent language fined £5 or 2 months.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/141641155

 

South Coast Times and Wollongong Argus (NSW : 1900 – 1954), Friday 2 June 1916, page 8


WOLLONGONG COURT

WEDNESDAY.

Thomas Osborne, thirty-three, was charged with drunkenness in Wollongong, fined half a crown. For insulting words to Constable McLauchlan, fined twenty shillings or seven days. Fines paid.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/141651250