George Henry BLAKE

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George Henry BLAKE

AKA 

Late of Banora Point, NSW  

 

NSW Police Training College – Penrith  Class #  035

 

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  6567

 

Service:  From Monday 5 December 1949   to   ? ? 1986? ? years Service ? ? ?

 

Rank:  Commenced Training at Penrith Police Training College on Monday  5 December 1949 ( aged 21 years, 6 months, 6 days )

Probationary Constable- appointed Monday  16 January 1950 ( aged 21 years, 7 months, 18 days )

Constable – appointed ? ? ?

Constable 1st Class – appointed ? ? ? 

Detective – appointed ? ? ?

Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? 

Leading Senior Constable – appointed ? ? ? ( N/A )

Sergeant 3rd Class – appointed 20 February 1967  ( South District )

Sergeant 2nd Class – appointed 10 March 1974

Sergeant 1st Class – appointed 22 January 1980  ( appears in 1985 Stud Book )

Does NOT appear in 1988 Stud Book

Inspector – appointed ? ? ? 

Chief Inspector – appointed ? ? ? 

Superintendent – appointed ? ? ? 

Chief Superintendent – appointed ? ? ?

 

Final Rank?

 

Stations?, Central Police Station Cells ( 1 Division )( Cst )( May 1954 ), ?, Gilgandra? ( early 1960s ), South District ( Sgt 3/c )( 1967 ), ?, Menindee ( Sgt 3/c )( Mar 1972, Apr 1972 ), Wilcannia ( Sgt 3/c )( Aug 1972, Sept 1972 ), Mitchell ( Sgt 3/c )( Sept 1972 ), Broken Hill ( Sgt 2/c )( 1983 )( lived in the old South Broken Hill Police Station ), “possibly” Casino then Pennant Hills,Tweed Heads – Retirement

 

Retirement / Leaving age: = ?

Time in Retirement from Police: ?

 

Awards:  National Medal – granted 8 June 1988 ( Former SenSgt )

 

 Born:  Tuesday 29 May 1928 

Died on:  Saturday 27 February 2021 

Age:  92 years, 8 months, 29 days 

 

Cause?

Event location:   ?

Event date ?

 

Funeral date? ? ? TBA

Funeral location?TBA 

( click here to see Cornona19 Virus Pandemic rules – this will be a limited numbers Funeral )

any Future Wake location??? TBA 

any Future Wake date??? TBA

( Due to current Govt. restrictions on ‘Gatherings’ due to Corona19 Virus Pandemic, some families may wish to have a Memorial Service / Wake with friends and family at a later date )

Funeral Parlour: ?

Buried at: ?

 

Memorial / Plaque / Monument located at: ?

Dedication date of Memorial / Plaque / Monument: Nil – at this time ( March 2021 )

 

 

 GEORGE is NOT mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance  *NEED MORE INFO


 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal


 

May they forever Rest In Peace

https://www.facebook.com/groups/AustralianPolice.com.au/ 

https://www.facebook.com/NSWFallenPolice/ 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NSWFallenPolice/ 

Australian Police YouTube Channel 


 

Condolences to Mary and your daughter – Amy.

 

Photograph of Senior Sergeant George Blake (Tweed Heads) taken at Terranora Country Club skeet shooting facility in 1985-86. George joined us for a BBQ and refreshments after training.
Photograph of Senior Sergeant George Blake (Tweed Heads) taken at Terranora Country Club skeet shooting facility in 1985-86. George joined us for a BBQ and refreshments after training.

 


 

It was only two weeks ago ( 10 February 2021 ) that people were talking about George, and others, on FaceBook when he was out at Gilgandra, NSW, in the 1960s..

Nigel McReaddie who grew up in Gil stated,
Sgt George Blake, legendary ‘hard arse’ copper, got us kids into boxing at the old horse stables in the sixties, at the back of the Golden West Hotel (I was 14 and didn’t last long at boxing, we also had some rough old mats for a bit of ‘judo throwing’ as I recall! I went to school with his daughters and knew the Blake family personally!
Noel Howell (Sgt was also big on sport and youth development (encouraging organised sport and avoiding crime) like George Blake, a typical hard arse country copper and from memory, one of my (and many others) footy coaches in the seventies, he took over as lock up Sgt replacing George Blake (I think)
Lindsay Wilson was a painter and lived just down the road from us, I went to school with his oldest daughter Kay, I am still in touch with her, she is a retired nurse mother and grand mother and lives in SA! An absolutely wonderful women!
Her Dad Lindsay was a very respected man and did a lot of community work too, including being one of the work horses in developing the ‘ new’ Youth Club.
I recall it from 14 years of age up, I can add without doubt though that all three gentlemen mentioned and their families were held in high regard by myself, my family and most of the other families in Gilgandra, for their services and involvement within the community“.

New South Wales Police Historical Society FB Group

 

Bradley Howell<br /> NSW Police Historical Society FB Group<br /> Bradley Howell<br /> 10 Feb 2021 @ 5.11pm<br /> As we know police officers quite often become involved with their community in local projects.<br /> These photos are from the early 1960’s in Gilgandra, NSW.<br /> My father, Arthur Noel Howell ( # 5001 ), known as Noel Howell, with George Blake ( # 6567 ) and Mr. Lindsay Wilson - local painter, during the construction of the Gilgandra Youth Club.
Bradley Howell
NSW Police Historical Society FB Group
Bradley Howell
10 Feb 2021 @ 5.11pm
As we know police officers quite often become involved with their community in local projects.
These photos are from the early 1960’s in Gilgandra, NSW.
My father, Arthur Noel Howell ( # 5001 )( in middle ), known as Noel Howell, with George Blake ( # 6567 )( on right ) and Mr. Lindsay Wilson ( on left ) – local painter, during the construction of the Gilgandra Youth Club.
Gilgandra Police Boys Club - 1960s
during the construction of the Gilgandra Youth Club ( 1960s ).
Bradley Howell<br /> NSW Police Historical Society FB Group<br /> Bradley Howell<br /> 10 Feb 2021 @ 5.11pm<br /> As we know police officers quite often become involved with their community in local projects.<br /> These photos are from the early 1960’s in Gilgandra, NSW.<br /> My father, Arthur Noel Howell ( # 5001 ), known as Noel Howell, with George Blake ( # 6567 ) and Lindsay Wilson ( # 10242? ) during the construction of the Gilgandra Youth Club.
Bradley Howell
NSW Police Historical Society FB Group
Bradley Howell
10 Feb 2021 @ 5.11pm
As we know police officers quite often become involved with their community in local projects.
These photos are from the early 1960’s in Gilgandra, NSW.
My father, Arthur Noel Howell ( # 5001 )( Sgt 3/c on right ), known as Noel Howell, with George Blake ( # 6567 )( SenCon on left ) during the construction of the Gilgandra Youth Club.

 


 

Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954),

Friday 28 May 1954, page 5

Mr. Justice Dovey

Says Evidence

” A Lot of Poppycock ”

Royal Commissioner Mr. Justice Dovey yesterday described evidence by David Edward Studley-Ruxton on the alleged pawning of a stolen overcoat as ” a lot of poppycock. ”

His Honor warned Studley-Ruxton that if he did not behave himself he would spend the night ” in less comfortable quarters than Marton Hall. ”

Yesterday was the 39th day of the inquiry by the Royal Commission into allegations by David Edward Studley-Ruxton, 32, that he had been assaulted by police officers at Darlinghurst, police station on the night of February 25.

When the hearing resumed yesterday Mr. Justice Dovey said he had considered questions asked of Studley-Ruxton late on Wednesday. Studley-Ruxton had indicated that he had not sought protection.

His Honor said: ” It seems to me that, by his answers Studley-Ruxton has indicated that he is not willing to answer the questions.

” The answers given by him should not be admissible against him in subsequent proceedings. ”

” An Ill-Advised Attitude! “

Mr. J. W. Shand, Q.C., for

Inspector J. H. Aldridge, said it was clear that Studley-Ruxton had adopted an ” advised attitude. ”

His Honor: It is an ill advised attitude!

Mr. Shand: He adopted the

same attitude when he had counsel appearing for him. His answers have been given voluntarily, although nothing said here can bind another tribunal.

His Honor: He has been asked certain questions which if answered in a particular way, may amount to a voluntary confession of his guilt of a serious criminal offence. I should indicate that, in my view, by his demeanour and his answers, Studley-Ruxton is unwilling to answer questions.

To his Honor, Studley-Ruxton said, “I wish to answer these questions.”

His Honor: Are you adopting this attitude as a result of advice from somebody else?

Studley-Ruxton: No. It is what I have done all along.

His Honor: But you were represented earlier by counsel. Have you, at present, any solicitor or counsel advising you?

Studley-Ruxton: No. I see Mr. J. Poole and Mr. A. Larkins (barrister) occasionally but they do not advise me.

Mr. Shand: You were asked to consider why you could forget forging and uttering a cheque?

” Cannot Recall The Cheque At All “

Studley-Ruxton: I have thought about it. I cannot recall the cheque at all.

His Honor: Do you think you could have done it when you were drinking heavily?

Studley-Ruxton: It could be so. I can’t remember it.

Mr. Justice Dovey: How could you forget that you had wrongfully and illegally taken possession of a cheque which was not yours – signed it and cashed it?

Studley-Ruxton: If I had done that, I would remember it.

Do you deny that you did it? – I really do not think I did it.

Mr. Shand: Did you take a letter, containing the cheque from the letter rack at the Tiranna guest house?

Studley-Ruxton: I have no recollection of it.

You were hard up then?

Yes.

Did you pawn anything in February this year? – No.

On February 15 this year, will you deny that you pawned an article in William Street? – I don’t know if I did.

His Honor: I don’t believe you! Did you or didn’t you?

Studley-Ruxton: I will swear I did not.

Mr. Justice Dovey: A witness may adopt such an attitude which would compel the Tribunal to conclude that he is deliberately refusing to answer questions. If I draw that inference, and I am reluctant to do so, I will have to take action.

” If Did Wrong Will Admit It “

Studley-Ruxton: If I have done anything I will face up to it. If I did anything wrong I will admit it. I don’t know if I did or not.

His Honor: We want the truth.

Studley-Ruxton: I don’t know whether I did it or not.

His Honor: I don’t believe you are telling the truth when you say that you don’t know whether you pawned an article or not. You must remember.

Studley-Ruxton: I don’t think I pawned anything. I might have done; I don’t remember.

Mr. Shand: You received £2 for the article you pawned?

Studley-Ruxton: No, I don’t think so. I don’t remember pawning anything.

Showing Studley-Ruxton an overcoat, Mr. Shand asked: “Will you swear that you did not pawn this coat in February this year?”

Studley-Ruxton: I would not pawn that; I would keep it.

His Honor: Is that a serious answer?

Studley-Ruxton: I did not pawn it.

His Honor: Could you have forgotten it?

Studley-Ruxton: I could have.

His Honor: Nonsense!

Studley-Ruxton: I might have done it and forgotten it.

Mr. Shand: What about pawning the stolen overcoat?

Studley-Ruxton: If it was stolen and I pawned it, well, I pawned it.

” Formed Opinion You Are Lying “

His Honor: Do you really, in your fondest dreams, think that anybody could believe such a lot of poppycock! I have formed the opinion that you are lying when you say that you did not know whether you pawned an article or not.

Studley-Ruxton: It is not poppycock, your Honor.

Mr. Shand: Will you admit that you did it?

Studley-Ruxton: If it will make you content, Mr. Shand I will admit it.

Mr. Shand: Don’t worry about my contentment. Did you do it?

Studley-Ruxton: I cannot remember.

Will you admit it?- I can’t remember. If I did it, I did it; that is all.

Will you deny that you had this overcoat in your possession? I cannot recollect.

His Honor: Is it your coat? Studley-Ruxton: It is not my coat.

Mr. Shand: Will you admit that you got £2 from Henry Davidson at a pawn shop in William Street on February 15?

Studley-Ruxton: I might have.

Police ” Said They Would Get Me “

His Honor: From that answer I take it that, very reluctantly, you are admitting that you did?

Not reluctantly. The way I was in February I could have done it.

Does that mean that you might have committed any form of crime and not remember it?- Yes.

Studley-Ruxton added: “This is just what the police said they would do. They said they would get me. I will admit anything at all.”

Mr. Shand: Will you admit that you pawned the coat?

Studley-Ruxton: Yes.

Where did you get the coat?

– I don’t know.

His Honor: I don’t believe you.

Mr. Shand: Where did you get it?

Studley-Ruxton: I don’t know. It is your story you are making up, Mr. Shand not mine.

His Honor: If you do not behave yourself, witness, you will find yourself in less comfortable quarters to-night than in Marton Hall!

[ Evidence was given earlier that Studley-Ruxton was staying in a flat in Marton Hall. ]

Mr. Shand: Will you agree that you got £2 for the coat? Studley-Ruxton: No.

His Honor: But you admit that you pawned it?

Studley-Ruxton: I admit it because Mr. Shand kept at it.

Was it a truthful answer? – If I pawned it, yes.

His Honor: I am getting sick and tired of the way you are humbugging these proceedings. I will not put up with it much longer.

Studley-Ruxton: I think the story fits in very well with what the police said they would do. They told me that if I hit back at them they would get witnesses to make any story stick. They have certainly gone to a lot of trouble.

Mr. Shand: You know that the overcoat and the piece of material came from a stolen car?

” Other Charges ” Mentioned

Studley-Ruxton: Yes.

Early this year you were engaged in every kind of dishonesty you could lay your hands to?- I must have been very busy.

That is what I am suggesting? – Well, I was on the scoot.

His Honor: You have denied that you feared other charges might be preferred against you by the police. That is the only reason this evidence has been allowed.

Studley-Ruxton: If I go to prison I don’t mind. This Commission’s inquiry is entirely different from what Mr. Shand is putting. If I committed crime I must pay for it.

Mr. Shand: There is no doubt that will be attended to !

Coat Identified By Witness

Charles Phillip Coventry, in evidence, identified an overcoat before the Commission as his property which was in his car, stolen in February.

Henry Davidson, pawn-broker, of William Street, East Sydney, said he lent £2 to a David Edwards, of Springwood Avenue, Potts Point. Edwards was a well dressed, well-spoken, gentlemanly person similar to Studley-Ruxton.

Lancelot Roy Conn, of the Ezi-way Laundry, King’s Cross, said Studley-Ruxton offered him a taxation rebate cheque in the name of another person. He cashed the cheque because he assumed it was in order.

Maxwell John Jarvis, hotel broker, of Castlereagh Street, Sydney, identified Studley-Ruxton as the man who asked him, on February 17, if he wanted to buy a car which was “hot.”

Mr. Justice Dovey, to Studley-Ruxton: Do you still say that on February 25 when you were arrested you had no belief or suspicion that you had committed other offences which might be brought home to you?

Studley-Ruxton: Yes, your Honor.

Constable George Henry Blake, attached to Central police station cells, said he was on duty on February 27 when a man named Gilbert came to see Studley-Ruxton in the cells about bail. Gilbert did not ask Studley-Ruxton anything about his injuries.

As they left the cell after seeing Studley-Ruxton Gilbert said to him, “I don’t know whether I should go bail for him or not. He is not a bad chap. He used to work for me, but I don’t know whether I can trust him.”

The hearing will be resumed at 10.15 a.m. on Monday.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/27516794


 

 

Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 – 1954),

Wednesday 27 May 1953, page 12

YESTERDAY’S COURTS

“COLORED” EVIDENCE

Judge Nield in Quarter Sessions Appeals yesterday called police evidence in a drunken driving charge ” highly colored. ”

He rebuked three policemen for smiling as they left the court when the case ended.

Judge Nield upheld an appeal by Ronald Charles Hobson, 36, engineer, of Minnebah Road, Northbridge, against his conviction and fine on a change of having driven under the influence of liquor.

He set aside the conviction and fine.

Mr. H . Harris, S.M., convicted Hobson on April 2 in Central Court and fined him £50.

Sergeant William Claude Gidders, Sergeant Raymond William McLean, and Constable George Henry Blake gave evidence, in the appeal.

Missing witness

Sergeant Gidders said that on November 24 last Hobson’s car struck a rockery in Strathallen Avenue, Northbridge, careered across the road, and demolished a telephone booth.

When police went to Hobson’s home soon afterwards, Hobson came to the door, leaned against the wall, and munched a raw onion, said Gidders.

Police accused him of eating the onion to disguise his breath, the sergeant added.

Judge Nield said the practice was to put all available evidence before the tribunal, but if for some reason the Crown did not propose to call a witness who might be able to give material evidence, it should place the defence in the position of being able to do so.

He said that in the present case the police had obtained from a person a statement which might have been material in assisting the tribunal reach a decision. The police had not produced the statement, called the person as a witness, or made his name and address available to the defence. “That, to my mind, clouds the whole case with suspicion,” he said.

“The case for the prosecution presented for the magistrate and repeated here is so highly colored that the suspicion is not removed.”

Judge Nield added that two witnesses who gave the starting and finishing point of Hobson’s driving on November 24 — which he said gave the complete answer to the charge — had not been cross-examined about the “highly colored evidence” by the three police that Hobson had been drunk at the time.

[ Yesterday Hobson said that on November 24 he had driven from Alexandria to Northbridge, through the city, during peak-hour traffic. ]

As the police were leaving the court, Judge Nield said: “Would you police refrain from those smiles and comport yourselves properly and decently?”

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/248694031


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nothing further, than what is recorded above, is known about this person at the time of publication and further information and photos would be appreciated.

 

Cal
 

 

 

 

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