In Remembrance of those Police Officers who gave their life

FARRALLEY, Michael
Constable
13 July, 1863

The Constable was drowned whilst attempting to cross Salisbury Creek, near Newcastle. Further details of the event are unknown.The Constable was born in 1839 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 3 November, 1862

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QUINLIVAN, Michael
Constable
3 September, 1863

On the morning of 3 September, 1863, the Constable was drowned whilst attempting to cross the Turon River at Sofala, north of Bathurst. He had been assisting Sergeant Hardy in pursuit of offenders who had earlier committed an armed holdup on Smith’s Public House. The two Police succeeded in capturing one of the offenders and recovering some stolen property.
The Constable was born in 1837 and joined the New south Wales Police Force on 18 August, 1862, At the time of his death, he was stationed at Mudgee.Return to Honour Roll

 

RUCKER, Henry
Constable
19 October, 1863

The Constable was drowned whilst attempting to cross a tributary of Lake Macquarie. He was one of a group of Police searching for a number of offenders who had earlier robbed James William’s Jewellery Store in Hunter Street, Newcastle. Whilst endeavouring to cross the creek, the Constable’s horse rolled over, throwing him into the water where he drowned.
The Constable was born in 1832 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 4 March, 1863. At the time of his death, he was probably stationed at Newcastle.Return to Honour Roll

 

ROBINSON, Robert
Sergeant
22 January, 1864

The Sergeant was among a party of Police who intervened in a dispute between two parties of Chinese people at Muckerawa on the Macquarie River (near Stuart Town). The Sergeant disarmed one of the people involved, taking a rifle from him. The Sergeant then took hold of the weapon by the muzzle and smashed it over a log. As he did so, the rifle discharged, killing him instantly.
The Sergeant was born in 1815 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 1 April, 1852.Return to Honour Roll

 

KINSELLA, Michael
Constable
8 April, 1864.

Whilst attempting to cross the Boothingbee Creek, near Berry, in a canoe, the Constable was drowned. Further details of the incident are unknown.
The Constable was born in 1835 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 26 October, 1863. At the time of his death, he was stationed in the South-Western District.Return to Honour Roll

 

JOHNSTON, James
Senior Constable
8 May, 1864.

A mounted Constable stationed at the Police Depot in Sydney, James Johnston was killed when he was thrown from his horse. Further details of the incident are unknown.
The Senior Constable was born in 1836 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 1 March, 1862. At the time of his death, he was stationed at the Police Depot.Return to Honour Roll

 

McLERIE, John Aitcheson
Superintendent
25 November, 1864

Son of then Inspector General of Police, Captain John McLerie, the Superintendent died as a result of too many cold, wet nights spent in the bush carrying out Police duties. His cause of death is listed as “rheumatism caused by the effects of exposure”.
At the time of his death, he was stationed in the Southern District.Return to Honour Roll

 

NELSON, Samuel
Constable
26 January, 1865

Shortly before 6pm on 26 January, 1865 bushrangers Hall, Dunn and Gilbert attacked Kimberley’s Inn at Collector. The local Police at the time were out searching the area for the bushrangers, and the only man on duty in town was the Lockup keeper, Constable Nelson. When news of the attack reached the Constable he remarked to his wife that he would simply “have to do his best” against the bushrangers. Approaching the hotel armed only with a Police carbine with bayonet attached, the Constable was shot by Dunn who had hidden behind a fence post. Nelson was initially hit in the chest by a shotgun blast, and as he staggered, Dunn fired again, hitting him in the face. He died almost instantly. The bushrangers then robbed the Constable’s body of his personal belongings and the carbine, and escaped into the bush. The entire incident had been witnessed by one of the Constable’s nine children, young Frederick Nelson, who was also fired upon by Dunn.
The Constable was born in 1823 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 5 August, 1857. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Collector.Return to Honour Roll

 

WARD, John
Senior Constable
3 February, 1865

On the morning of 3 February, 1865 the Senior Constable was returning to Coonabarabran from a prisoner escort to Mudgee. Near the locality known as Barney’s Reef he was informed that a Chinese man had been robbing passing travellers in the vicinity, and was nearby in the scrub. Following a short search, Senior Constable Ward located the offender’s camp and approached him. When the offender saw the constable he pointed a shotgun at him. The Constable drew his service revolver and told the offender to put down the shotgun. The offender than fired, the shot striking the Constable in the side of his body. Although the Constable fired at the offender, he managed to escape. The murderer, later identified as the Chinese bushranger Sam Poo, was later captured and hanged.
The Senior Constable was born in 1829 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 1 February, 1858. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Coonabarabran. Return to Honour Roll

 

POTTINGER, Sir Frederick William
Inspector
9 April, 1865

Baronet Sir Frederick William Pottinger was the Officer in Charge of the Lachlan district when he came under official scrutiny for the departmental offence of “riding in a public horse race” on 5 January, 1865. The Inspector was suspended from duty and subsequently dismissed, despite many letters and petitions from the public to the government. On 5 March, 1865 he set out by coach to travel to Sydney to seek reinstatement. En route, the coach stopped at Wascoe’s Inn in the Blue Mountains (where the present town of Blaxland is situated), and Pottinger left the coach for a short time. When he was climbing aboard the coach to resume the journey, a pocket pistol the Inspector was carrying in his waistcoat accidentally discharged. The shot entered his body just below the rib cage. Following treatment the Inspector appeared to be progressing well and was eventually conveyed to Sydney to recuperate, however his condition took a turn for the worse and he died on 9 April, 1865. The Inspector had gained a reputation as a most fearless and tireless Police Officer at a time when the bushranging plague was at its peak.
The Inspector joined the New South Wales Police Force about 1857. Prior to his dismissal he was stationed at Forbes. Return to Honour Roll

 

HERBERT, John R
Senior Constable
13 April, 1865.

In April, 1865 Senior Constable Herbert, along with Constables Cook and Ambrose and Tracker Pete, were searching for the Hall Gang of bushrangers in the bush between Forbes and Canowindra. The bushrangers had earlier robbed a store at Forbes and information had been obtained indicating that they were headed for Canowindra. The Police party made camp in the bush near Molong, and Senior Constable Herbert announced that he and Constable Ambrose would be leaving the camp to keep watch on a hut where they suspected the gang might be hiding. It was arranged that should either he or Constable Ambrose return during the night he would whistle to alert the camp of their approach. Unfortunately, Herbert and Ambrose decided to return during the night, but after losing their way in the darkness, they approached the Police camp from a different direction than expected. Being closer than they believed to the camp, they also did not whistle to signal their arrival. Believing the approaching riders to be bushrangers, Constable Cook issued a challenge on two occasions without receiving a reply. On the second occasion, his challenge unanswered, both he and Peter fired at the sounds in the darkness. As a result, Constable Herbert was shot in the groin, neck and shoulder. He died about a week later.
The Senior Constable was born in 1837 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 1 September, 1859. At the time of his death, he was stationed in the Western District. Return to Honour Roll

 

WALSH, John
Sergeant
29 March, 1865.

Died as a result of injuries sustained when he was thrown from his horse at Araluen. Further details are unknown.
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