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William EIFFE

Late of Singleton

New South Wales Police Force

Regd. #  P 1154

For the purposes of this website ‘P‘ = represents those Police joining Pre 1862 when NSWPF “Officially” commenced

Rank:  Constable

Stations?, Singleton

ServiceFrom  11 August 1857  to  24 January 1867 = 9+ years Service

Awards:   ?

Born:   ? ? 1833 – 1834

Died on:   Thursday  24 January 1867

Age:  33 – 34

Cause:   Shot – accidental

Event location:  between Bendemeer & Tamworth, NSW

Event date:  16 January 1867

Funeral date:   Friday  25 January 1857

Funeral location:   Old Bendemeer Cemetery

Funeral Parlour:  ?

Buried at:   Old Bendemeer Cemetery ( private property and unmarked )

 Memorial located at:   Bendemeer Cemetery, NSW

 

 


WILLIAM IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance – but under an incorrect surname of EFFE which they won’t correct

 

 

FURTHER INFORMATION IS NEEDED ABOUT THIS PERSON, THEIR LIFE, THEIR CAREER AND THEIR DEATH.

PLEASE SEND PHOTOS AND INFORMATION TO Cal

May they forever Rest In Peace

On 16 January 1867 Constable Fyffe was performing gold escort duty on a coach travelling between Bendemeer and Tamworth.
It is thought that the shaking of the coach caused a rifle to accidentally discharge shooting the Constable.
The wounded Constable was left in a shepherd’s hut while the coach continued to Tamworth to obtain medical assistance.
Dr Scott of Tamworth provided assistance for Constable Fyffe however the wound was to prove fatal and he died the following Thursday.
The Constable was born in 1834 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 11 August 1857.

Constable William Eiffe memorial unveiled by Oxley police at Bendemeer Cemetery

A PERMANENT memorial to recognise a fallen officer has been unveiled near Tamworth on the 150th anniversary of his death.

Constable William Eiffe died from a gunshot wound to the thigh on January 24, 1867, and is buried in an unmarked grave in the Bendemeer cemetery.

Oxley police together with Tamworth Regional Council – who helped to construct the memorial – commemorated his career in the force in a service on Tuesday morning.

”It’s a great part of the local history to have this recorded and I think it brings some interest in the local cemetery and the history of Bendemeer,” Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd said.

“And, hopefully for centuries to come, people will be able to come here and look at this and remember what has happened in our past.”

The Singleton-based officer was on a police escort on the night before his death when he was accidentally shot in the leg.

“On the evening of Wednesday the 23rd of January, 1867, there was a gold escort moving through the Moonbi Ranges, approximately seven miles from Bendemeer,” Oxley Sergeant Josh McKenzie said.

“A rain show had caused members of the escort to retreat into the carriage, another member of the escort had handed his rifle to Constable Eiffe, he rested the rifle across his thighs with the butt resting against the side of the coach.

“It is thought that the shaking and bouncing of the carriage has caused the rifle to accidentally discharge, shooting Constable Eiffe in the thigh.”

Constable Eiffe was left at Shepherds Hut nearby and the coach returned to Tamworth.

Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth<br /> Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.<br />

Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth
Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.

 

Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth<br /> Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.<br />

Memorial service: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd lays a wreath at the unveiling of the plaque at the Bendemeer cemetery. Photos: Breanna Chillingworth
Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Sergeant Josh McKenzie in Bendemeer.

 

Paying tribute: Senior Oxley police, along with officers from Kootingal, Walcha, Nowendoc and Tamworth, pictured with Tamworth councillor Phil Betts.<br />

Paying tribute: Senior Oxley police, along with officers from Kootingal, Walcha, Nowendoc and Tamworth, pictured with Tamworth councillor Phil Betts.

Paying tribute: Senior Oxley police, along with officers from Kootingal, Walcha, Nowendoc and Tamworth, pictured with Tamworth councillor Phil Betts.<br />

Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Leading Senior Constable Ron Stoltenberg and Cr Phil Betts.<br />

Memorial unveiled: Oxley Acting Superintendent Jeff Budd with Leading Senior Constable Ron Stoltenberg and Cr Phil Betts.

 

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial
William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

William EIFFE Memorial<br /> William is actually buried in an unmarked grave.

“Dr Scott of Tamworth was taken to the hut but unfortunately Constable William EIFFE died from the effects of the gunshot wound at noon on the 24th of January, 1867.”

Acting Superintendent Budd said the service was a reminder of how far the force had come in 150 years.

It is thought that the shaking and bouncing of the carriage has caused the rifle to accidentally discharge.

Sergeant Josh McKenzie

“One of the things that would be a tragedy today is for this to occur and his family to not be supported,” he said. “In the days of Constable William Eiffe, his wife and four children would have been destitute without the support we have today and we should be grateful for that.”

Of Note:  Searching NSW State Archives & Records on 14 May 2018:
There are NO surnames of FYFFE
There are NO surnames of EFFE
There are NO surnames of EIFFE
There were no Williams born in 1834
There is no Registered number 1154 on that website.  There is 1153 ( Beatty ) and 1155 ( Moloney ) but no 1154
A wildcard search on ‘FFE‘ didn’t reveal any similar names or anyone born in 1834 on THAT website.
Danny Webster notes on 24 January 2017:
He is sometimes referred to as “Fyffe” and “Effe”, however the Registers of Police Employment 1847–1885 provides the spelling as “Eiffe”, his registered number as 1154, the fact that he was married at the time of appointment and that he was a former soldier.
The New South Wales Police Gazettes of 5 March, 1862, 3 April, 1867 (£100 gratuity awarded to his wife), and 3 July, 1867 indicate “Eiffe”.
His death was registered at Armidale as “Eiffe”.
He is incorrectly listed in the official New South Wales Police Honour Roll as William “Effe”.
This was originally recorded as:

Constable William FYFFE

Accidentally Shot

Tamworth

24 January, 1867

 

On 16 January, 1867 Constable Fyffe was performing gold escort duty on a coach travelling between Bendemeer and Tamworth. It is thought that the shaking of the coach caused a rifle to accidentally discharge, shooting the constable. The wounded constable was left in a shepherd’s hut while the coach continued to Tamworth to obtain medical assistance. Dr Scott of Tamworth provided assistance for the constable, however the wound was to prove fatal and he died the following Thursday. He is sometimes referred to as William Effe.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald dated 25 January, 1867 reported that news from Tamworth had been received that ” Last evening, Constable Fyffe, on gold escort duty, was accidentally shot in the thigh whilst riding in the coach on Moonby Ranges, seven miles from Bendemere. His rifle accidentally discharged, it is supposed, by the shaking of the coach. He was left at a shepherd’s hut. The escort proceeded to Tamworth, and on its arrival there Dr. Scott was immediately started off. Fyffe died from the effects of the wound at noon today. He has left a wife and large family at Singleton.

 

The constable was born in 1834 and joined the police force on 11 August, 1857. In 1862 he became a member of the newly-formed New South Wales Police Force. At the time of his death he was stationed at Singleton.