Constable 1st Class William JUSTIN

New South Wales Police Force

Horse Accident

Thuddungra

8 March, 1905

 

On the day of his death Constable Justin was patrolling about ten miles from Thuddungra (Young district) when his horse became skittish and began to buck. The constable was driven into a wire fence by the animal, where he sustained severe injuries to his face and hands. He was found some three hours after the incident by some girls going home from school, and was quickly taken to the home of a Mr Webb. He was taken to Young Hospital the next day however he unfortunately passed away.

 

The constable was born in 1859 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 19 November, 1881. At the time of his death he was stationed at Young.

 

Today, Missy and I paid a visit to William JUSTIN at Young.
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As you can see from these and previous photos of this grave, there is a bloody huge gum tree growing right on top of him. There is a remembrance day ribbon pinned to the tree and the flowers and trinkets have obviously been placed in recent years.
The GPS co-ordinated are 34 19 37S/148 17 17E.
Page 84 in Beyond Courage.
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Eucser Haze added 3 new photos.
14 hrs ·  8 March 2017

Please take the time to read a little about NSWPF history, or at least just have a look at the state of a grave that belongs to an officer killed in the line of duty, Cst 1/c William Justin. Yes- that is a large tree growing through the centre of the grave.

I’m at a loss to understand how the grave of a Police officer, who died in the service of this state, can be allowed to reach this condition. I seriously wonder what his family and colleagues would think of us.

Remembered…

Constable 1st Class William JUSTIN
Young Police
Horse Accident – 8 March, 1905
Resting Place – Young General Cemetery, Young

In early March, 1905 Constable Justin was patrolling about ten miles from Thuddungra (Young district) when his horse became skittish and began to buck. The constable was driven into a wire fence by the animal, where he sustained severe injuries to his face and hands. He was found some three hours after the incident by some girls going home from school, and was quickly taken to the home of a Mr Webb. He was taken to Young Hospital the next day however he unfortunately passed away. The Shoalhaven Telegraph dated 29 March, 1905 reported the following some weeks later.

“DEMISE OF FIRST-CLASS CONSTABLE JUSTIN.
[Written by Daniel McMillan, an old and sympathetic Friend.]
A great gloom was cast over this neighbourhood and surrounding district on Monday week last, when the sad news became known that First-class Constable Justin had succumbed to injuries which he received through being thrown from his horse whilst on duty the Wednesday previous, some 20 miles from Young, at which place he has been stationed for a considerable time. It would appear from the evidence adduced that while Mr Justin was in the act of shutting a gate, which was a complicated one, his horse, being a spirited animal, started to buck, and ran away, causing the rider to lose his balance and fall to the ground. The unfortunate man, being dragged a considerable distance by the stirrup, was brought into contact with a barb-wire fence, thence with a tree. It is also surmised that the horse kicked him on the head. He was found in an unconscious state some hours, it is supposed, after the accident occurred. At the time of the accident Constable Justin was over 20 miles away from his home. He was found by a Mr Webb, a farmer residing some distance away from the scene of the untoward incident, who took him to his home, and did all that he could to relieve the sufferer until medical aid was obtained, From the first but little hope was entertained of his recovery. He only regained consciousness for a few minutes before his death, which sad event took place on the Saturday evening following, at 8 o’clock. Mr Justin, who was, it may be said, in the prime of life, being only 45 years of age at the time of his death, was the eldest son of the late Mr W. Justin, so long and favourably known in connection with the Harbors and Rivers Department; he was born in Sydney, and whilst only a child removed with his parents to Shoalhaven, where his aged mother still re sides, with several other members of the family. The deceased, at the early age of 21, joined the police force, with which he had been associated ever since, and during his 24 years’ service he had been stationed at many places in New South Wales, including Goulburn, Braidwood, Myrna, Queanbeyan, Frogmore, Young, and other stations. In referring to the deceased gentleman, an up-country paper says: ‘He was the popular constable, who was loved and respected by all, and will be greatly missed.’ The same can be said by everybody at every place where he has been. Besides a wife and 5 children, the deceased leaves a mother, 2 brothers, and 4 sisters, together with a large circle of friends and acquaintances, to mourn their loss. The funeral, which took place at Young on Sunday week, was largely attended…”

The constable was born in 1859 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 19 November, 1881. At the time of his death he was stationed at Young. He is listed in the official New South Wales Police Honour Roll.

 

https://www.australianpolice.com.au/william-justin/

https://www.australianpolice.com.au/william-justin/

https://www.australianpolice.com.au/william-justin/

 

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