Allan Wayne McQUEEN SC, VA

New South Wales Police

Academy Class 227

Regd. #  ?

Rank:   Constable

Stations:  Sydney District Anti Theft Squad

Service:   From 27 June 1987  to  5 May 1989 = 1+ years Service

Awards:  Star of Courage ( SC ) ( Posthumously )

Commissioners Valour Award ( VA ) ( Posthumously )

Born? ? 1962

Died On:  5 May 1989

Event:  Shot – wounded

Event location:  Woolloomooloo

Event Date:  24 April 1989

Died:  5 May 1989 ( 9 days after event )

Cause:  Murdered – shot twice

Age:  26

Funeral date:  9 May 1989

Funeral locationSt Mary’s Anglican Church

Buried at:  Cremated.  East Ballina Cemetery, McQueen Family Wall, Sec: Niche, Lot # 2

GPS: 28*51’47″S / 153*35’26″E

Memorial: 1/ Yurong Parkway, Phillip Park , Sydney, 2000

GPS:  Lat: -33.872583 / Long: 151.213778

2/ Sydney Police Centre, McQueen Room, 151 – 241 Goulburn Street, Surry Hills.

3/  Police Launch McQueen???.

Allan's touch plate was polished today, this 27th anniversary, 5 May 2016, by a mate, Craig Coleman, at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

Allan’s touch plate was polished today, this 27th anniversary, 5 May 2016, by a mate, Craig Coleman, at the National Police Wall of Remembrance, Canberra.

 

ALLAN IS mentioned on the Police Wall of Remembrance

On the morning of 24 April, 1989 Constable McQueen, Constable 1st Class Ross Judd and Probationary Constable Jason Donnelly were patrolling the Woolloomooloo area. All were members of the District Anti-Theft Squad. About 11.35am they saw the offender Porter, apparently attempting to break into a motor vehicle. While Constable Judd parked the police vehicle, Constables McQueen and Donnelly went to speak to the offender. As he was being detained, the offender produced a concealed weapon and shot Constable McQueen twice in the chest and Constable Donnelly in the abdomen. Both constables then chased the offender, who continued firing at them, until both collapsed from their wounds. Constable Ross Judd also pursued and fired at the offender before returning to assist his colleagues. He then carried both wounded constables to the police car and drove them to the Sydney Hospital.

Constable Donnelly was to recover from his wounds however Constable McQueen had sustained extensive internal injuries and died on 5 May, 1989. The offender was later arrested by Queensland Police.

The Canberra Times of 12 July, 1990 reported on the result of the trial of the offender.

CONVICTION IN POLICE DEATH
SYDNEY:John Albert Edward Porter has been found guilty of the murder last year of Sydney police constable Allan McQueen. A Supreme Court jury deliberated for nearly 10 hours before finding Porter, 28, guilty of shooting the policeman on April 24 last year. Porter was remanded in custody for sentencing on August 3. The jury also found Porter guilty on one count of shooting with intent to cause grievous bodily harm and three counts of shooting to avoid arrest. He was found not guilty on a sixth charge of attempting to murder Constable Jason Donnelly.

Justice Badgery-Parker had directed the jury to find Porter not guilty on the charge of attempting to murder Constable Donnelly. Porter had pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Friends and relatives of Constable McQueen sat comforting each other in the public gallery as the verdict was returned. Constable McQueen, 26, died in St Vincent’s Hospital nine days after the April 24 shooting.

The constable was born in 1962 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 27 June, 1987. At the time of his death he was attached to the Sydney District Anti-Theft Squad. He was posthumously awarded the Commissioner’s Medal for Valour and the Star of Courage.

 

 

 

The Age 25 April 1989 p1 of 42

The Age      25 April 1989      p1 of 42

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 25 April 1989 p1 of 54

The Sydney Morning Herald      25 April 1989      p1 of 54

 

 The Sydney Morning Herald 26 April 1989 p5 of 62

The Sydney Morning Herald       26 April 1989      p5 of 62

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 April 1989 p2 of 119

The Sydney Morning Herald   27 April 1989   p2 of 119

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 30 April 1989 p2 of 109

The Sydney Morning Herald           30 April 1989       p2 of 109

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19890430&id=4DRWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0ecDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4933,9248506&hl=en

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 1 May 1989 p6 of 76

The Sydney Morning Herald      1 May 1989       p6 of 76

 

 

The Age 1 May 1989 p5 of 36

The Age      1 May 1989      p5 of 36

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 1 May 1989 p3 of 76

The Sydney Morning Herald     1 May 1989    p3 of 76

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 4 May 1989 p1 of 118

The Sydney Morning Herald    4 May 1989     p1 of 118

 

 

The Age 4 May 1989 p1 of 61

The Age       4 May 1989          p1 of 61

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 5 May 1989 p1 of 76

The Sydney Morning Herald     5 May 1989     p1 of 76

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 5 May 1989 p4 of 76

The Sydney Morning Herald      5 May 1989      p4 of 76

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 7 May 1989 p25 of 99

The Sydney Morning Herald     7 May 1989     p25 of 99

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 12 May 1989 p2 of 74                        The Sydney Morning Herald        12 May 1989     p2 of 74

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19890512&id=rDJWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=nOcDAAAAIBAJ&pg=2205,1063653&hl=en

The Age 12 May 1989 p10 of 52

The Age            12 May 1989       p10 of 52

The Age 27 June 1989 P15 of 54

The Age               27 June 1989              P15 of 54

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 June 1989 p2 of 54

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 June 1989 p2 of 54

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 27 June 1989 p3 of 54

The Sydney Morning Herald                 27 June 1989                p3 of 54

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald 19 July 1989 p6 of 72

The Sydney Morning Herald    19 July 1989    p6 of 72

 

NSW Police Academy, Goulburn HERO'S WALK

NSW Police Academy, Goulburn HERO’S WALK

Date: 24 August 1989. Memorial unveiled on corner of Haig Ave & Boomerang St, sydney.

Date: 24 August 1989. Memorial unveiled on corner of Haig Ave & Boomerang St, sydney.

 

November 2013

Constable Allan Wayne McQueen

Constable Allan Wayne McQueen : November 2013
Photographs supplied by Peter F Williams

Memorial erected in memory of Constable Allan James McQueen who was shot in the line of duty and died from his injuries on the 5th May 1989.

On the morning of 24 April 1989, Constable McQueen, Constable 1st Class Ross Judd (MV, BM ), and Probationary Constable Jason Donnelly (MV, BM ) were patrolling the Woolloomooloo area. All were members of the District Anti-Theft Squad. About 11.35am they saw the offender Porter apparently attempting to break into a motor vehicle. While Constable Judd parked the Police vehicle Constables McQueen and Donnelly went to speak to the offender. As he was being detained the offender produced a concealed weapon and shot Constable McQueen twice in the chest and Constable Donnelly in the abdomen. Both Constables then chased the offender who continued firing at them until both collapsed from their wounds. Constable Ross Judd also pursued and fired at the offender before returning to assist his colleagues. He then carried both wounded Constables to the Police car and drove them to the Sydney Hospital. Constable Donnelly was to recover from his wounds however Constable McQueen had sustained extensive internal injuries and died on 5 May 1989. The offender was later arrested by Queensland Police.

Front Inscription

IN MEMORY OF
CONSTABLE
ALLAN WAYNE McQUEEN S.C.,V.A.
AGED 26 YEARS

DIED 5TH MAY 1989 FROM
GUNSHOT WOUNDS RECEIVED
IN THE EXECUTION OF HIS
DUTY AT THIS LOCATION
ON THE 24TH APRIL 1989

Location

Address: Yurong Parkway, Phillip Park , Sydney, 2000
State: NSW
Area: AUS
GPS Coordinates: Lat: -33.872583
Long: 151.213778
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.

http://monumentaustralia.org.au/themes/people/crime/display/100949-constable-allan-wayne-mcqueen

 

 

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald Wednesday, May 10, 1989

Moving tributes for police nice guy ‘Big Al”

By LINDSAY SIMPSON ” Chief Police Reporter As one of “Big Al’s” best mates read a moving eulogy, burly police officers, hats in hands, bowed their heads and cried. Big Al was Constable Allan Wayne McQueen, the well-mannered policeman from Kyogle who died in the line of duty, shot trying to apprehend a suspected car thief in Sydney.

Constable McQueen, who had been in the force two years, had been picked to work with the Anti-theft Squad a training ground for young officers on their way to becoming detectives. Big Al, who spent three years trying to become a police officer, was known by that name “not so much because of his height but because of his heart”, said Cheryl Coleman, whose husband had shared a house with Constable McQueen in Coffs Harbour.

As Senior Constable Steve Tedder, who gave one of the eulogies said, “Big Al had the basic love and desire to become a police officer”. In 1986, while running his own cleaning business in Coffs Harbour, he built his own house and several local police officers became his flatmates. At that stage he had five jobs and was studying at night for his HSC English in an attempt to become a police officer. About this time, before he was even in the force, he saved a man’s life. The man had quarrelled with his girlfriend outside a local night club and had head-butted a pane of glass. The glass had cut his throat and Al tore his shirt off and stemmed the flow of blood while waiting for the ambulance.

Big Al. who trained as a boxer and played Rugby League, was not always the muscle builder he was at the time he joined the force. His former Rugby League coach at Kyogle High School, Mr Stan McBride, said that in the 14-year-old competition he had been the second smallest kid in the group.

Ballina townspeople also came to the funeral service. One local, Mrs Val Studdert, said she had never met Allan McQueen but had come out of respect for what he had done. “If we don’t have law and order, we have nothing,” she said.

The pallbearers wore pistols. Perhaps that’s the way it has to be these days, but they touched the pretty white wooden church in the green countryside with vulgarity. They were big, strong young men and their bulky police uniforms made them bigger, so that when they came to the narrow church door carrying their mate’s coffin, they could barely squeeze through. In any case, the coffin seemed too narrow for a young man as big as Allan McQueen.

Nearly 300 police went to his funeral in Ballina yesterday along with his mother and father, Mr John and Mrs Shirley McQueen, and 300 family and friends. They spilled out of St Mary’s Anglican Church into a church hall, where the service was shown on video, and out of the hall on to the grass, where they listened through loudspeakers.

If we are to still violence, we must cherish life. Yesterday, 26-year-old Allan McQueen’s life was cherished. Today, others will cherish the life of 32-year-old David Gundy, the unarmed man killed in a police raid following Constable McQueen’s mortal wounding. Spring had sung in both men for only a while before life escaped them in violence. Senior Constable Graham White told the mourners that Allan McQueen had been a man of honour, love and integrity and a man whose word could be relied upon. He did not search for riches but for life itself, said Constable White. “Today he would be saying, ‘Let’s get on with it. Let’s not have all this fuss and bother’.”

Detective Senior Constable Steve Tedder said that the day McQueen received the letter of his acceptance into the force, “his face lit up as if Manhattan had lit up”.’ Constable Tedder lived with Constable McQueen in Manly and called his mate “Big Al”. “What a joy he was to live with,” he said. Constable McQueen had made more friends in 18 months in Manly than Constable Tedder had in 28 years.

Colleagues of slain policeman Allan McQueen weep as he is laid to rest in Ballina yesterday. One of his favourite expressions was: “Not a problem“. Another was: “I’m here for a good time, not a long time.” Constable Tedder said it was somehow appropriate that Allan McQueen began his long battle for life on April 24, the day before Anzac Day. That was the day Allan McQueen became a hero. Police Commissioner John Avery said Constable McQueen had exhibited the qualities of a police leader of the future. “His father said it was a waste of a fine young life, and I agree,” said the Commissioner. “His was an unforgettable example of courageous service that will enshrine his name in the annals of the history of NSW.” Mr Avery quoted Virgil: “Blessings on your young courage, boy, for that is the way to the stars.”

Outside the church, a senior policeman said: “There’s a finality to heroism.” Mr Athol McQueen, a cousin and the boxer who knocked down champion Joe Frazier in the 1964 Olympic Games, said: “I hope there are more young blokes around like him.”

” The police band played a funeral march for their colleague, past Sunnyhaven Flats. The open-faced country folk let the tears run down their cheeks. As the cortege passed a place called Camelot, on the way to the Lismore Crematorium and another place called Goonellabah, an old woman stood at the roadside and said : “Poor little fellow.” At the crematorium flowers spelled out the letters NSWP -New South Wales Police on the hillside.

A young policeman picked up a rose and handed it to a young woman. , ‘ Mr John McQueen wipes away a tear as he stands with his wife Shirley at their son’s funeral.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/123586879/

 

NSW Police Service Annual report 1989 / 1990

NSW Police Service Annual report 1989 / 1990

https://www.opengov.nsw.gov.au/viewer/e97f9949de7fce571e09f3baa392f1a4.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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