In Remembrance of those Police Officers who gave their life

LEES, Henry Stanley
Constable
22 August, 1941

Constable Lees was the Officer in Charge of Jerry’s Plains Police Station. On the day of his death he had been patrolling the district on horseback, calling in at local properties. Later in the day the Constable’s rider less horse was found by a farmer near Hobden’s Hill. He searched the area and eventually located the body of the Constable lying in a roadside ditch. It appeared that the roadway had collapsed underneath Constable Lee’s horse, causing the animal to stumble and fall into the ditch, crushing the rider.
The Constable was born in 1914 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 11 January, 1937. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Jerry’s Plaines.

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MARSH, John Lindsay
Constable 1st Class
9 November, 1942.

On 9 November, 1942 Constable Marsh was riding a Police motor cycle outfit in Church Street, Gloucester. The cycle collided with a post, overturned and threw the Constable to the roadway. As a result Constable Marsh suffered a fractured skull and despite being taken to hospital died the same day.
The Constable was born in 1909 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 8 January, 1930. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Gloucester.

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MATTHEWS, George William
Constable
31 July, 1943.

Shortly after 6pm on 16 May, 1943, Constable Matthews and Constable Emslie were on duty in Campbell Street, Sydney. They intervened in a brawl outside the Capitol Theatre where they had seen two men kicking a man on the ground. When the two Constables arrested the assailants, the crowd turned on them and both Constables were assaulted. Constable Matthews received injuries to his nose and left eye, and as a result, reported off duty on sick report. Unfortunately his condition deteriorated and he was admitted to the Sydney Hospital where he passed away on 31 July, 1943.
The Constable was born in 1917 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 3 July, 1939. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Central Police Station.

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BAILEY, Eric George
Sergeant 3rd Class
12 January, 1945.

Shortly after 8pm on 12 January, 1945, Constable Bailey spoke to a man dressed in an American Naval Uniform outside the Exchange Hotel, Blayney. The Constable told the man that he intended to search him and his belongings regarding his alleged possession of a revolver. The man suddenly produced the revolver and shot Constable Bailey in the stomach. Constable Bailey then took hold of the offender, and during the ensuing struggle two more shots were fired and the offender was wounded in the wrist. Three railway employees quickly came to the Constable’s aid and the offender was handcuffed and detained until extra Police arrived. The wound suffered by Constable Bailey unfortunately proved to be severe and he died on admission to the Orange Base Hospital. He had achieved a rare feat in that he had arrested his own murderer.
(Allegations were later made suggesting that the offender was a contract killer sent to murder another local Constable, Stan Grady, who had been enthusiastically investigating sly grog sellers and SP bookies in the area. The offender was said to have inadvertently shot Constable Bailey , whom he mistook for Grady, who was off duty at the time. When shot, Constable Bailey was in Mounted Police uniform, and until that day Stan Grady had been the only Mounted Constable in Blayney, thus the offender’s error. The offender, well-known Sydney Criminal Cyril Norman – alias Thomas Couldrey – was convicted and sentenced to death).

Sergeant Bailey was born in 1906 and joined the New South Wales Police Force in 1927. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Blayney. He was posthumously promoted to Sergeant 3rd Class and awarded the George Cross and the George Lewis Trophy.

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HENWOOD, Alfred George
Constable 1st Class
23 June, 1945.

On 2 June, 1945 Constable Henwood was riding his Police motor cycle outfit from Delungra to Inverell. Light rain was falling at the time, and as the Constable was not wearing goggles, his visibility was obscured by both rain and sand being thrown up by the front cycle wheel. Unfortunately he collided with a stationary truck, receiving extensive injuries. He died in the Inverell Hospital three weeks later.
The Constable was born in 1907 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 23 May, 1928. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Inverell.

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EISENHUTH, Alan Bernard
Sergeant 1st Class
12 July, 1945.

On 12 July, 1945 Sergeant Eisenhuth, the Officer in Charge of the Murwillumbah Police Station, attended a local hotel to assist one of his Constables who was having difficulty arresting a large and troublesome offender. When the Sergeant arrived the offender was subdued and both Police then conveyed him to the Police Station, despite his resisting and struggling all the way. Upon their arrival the Sergeant went to his office to get the cell keys, collapsed and died. He was found to have suffered a coronary occlusion, caused by exertion during the arrest.
The Sergeant was born in 1892 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 28 February, 1914. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Murwillumbah.

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NEWELL, Lawrence Benjamin Armitage
Sergeant 3rd Class
13 September, 1945.

On the night of 13 September, 1945, Sergeant Newell left the Liverpool Police Station to attend a brawl in Macquarie Street, Liverpool. Upon his arrival the Sergeant attempted to arrest a British navel rating. A struggle ensued, during which the Sergeant suffered a heart attack. He was conveyed to the Liverpool Hospital, however died soon after being admitted.
The Sergeant was born in 1898 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 30 March, 1921. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Liverpool.

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WILLIAMS, Reginald Ambrose
Constable 1st Class
20 July, 1946.

On 9 August, 1943 Constable Williams was working at the Mona Vale Police Station, and whilst attempting to kick-start a Police motor cycle, became ill. He walked to his residence at the Station, and soon lost consciousness. After being treated at his residence he was admitted to the Manly District Hospital the following day where it was determined that he had suffered a heart attack. Upon recovery, the Constable resumed light duties at Manly Police Station, however in October, 1945 he suffered another attack. Although he again recovered and resumed light duties, he suffered a third attack and fatal on 20 July, 1946.
The Constable was born in 1908 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 5 December, 1928. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Mona Vale.

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AHEARN, Victor Donald
Detective Constable 1st Class
11 August, 1946.
On 11 August, 1946, Detective Constable Ahearn and Detective Constable Bowie waited at Long Bay Gaol to arrest two suspects wanted for break and enter and motor vehicle theft offences. When the two men arrived to visit two female prisoners at the gaol, as expected, the Detectives arrested them. They then set out to convey the prisoners to Daceyville Police Station, with Constable Bowie driving, and Constable Ahearn seated in the rear of the police vehicle between the prisoners. Shortly after leaving the gaol, one of the prisoners produced a firearm and shot Constable Ahearn twice in the side. Constable Bowie quickly stopped the vehicle, and when trying to assist his colleague now struggling with the offenders, he was also attacked. After assaulting Constable Bowie, the offenders escaped, though were later arrested. Unfortunately, Detective Constable Ahearn died of his wounds before medical assistance arrived at the scene.
The Constable was born in 1906 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 8 January, 1930.

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PORTER, Noel Ainsworth McCarthy
Sergeant 3rd Class
19 September, 1946.
The Sergeant was the Officer in Charge of the Hillston Police Station, and on 14 June, 1946, was required to recover a decomposing body from the Lachlan River. A few days earlier, he had been cutting wood, and had sustained a cut to the back of his left thumb. It is though that whilst handling the body, the Sergeant had contracted an infection through the cut. A few days after the incident, Sergeant Porter sought medical attention for severe pains in his hand. When his condition continued to deteriorate, he was sent to the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and following treatment, resumed duty in July. The Sergeant soon developed a sceptic throat condition, and died on 19 September, 1946. The cause of death was found to have been heart failure which had eventually resulted from the original infection contracted on 14 June, 1946.
The Sergeant was born in 1900 and joined the New South Wales Police Force on 13 February, 1922. At the time of his death, he was stationed at Hillston.

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